Clinical and Ethical Indications for Cognitive Impairment Screening in Primary Care

Originally presented on January 19, 2017

Guest:
David Hoffman, M.Ed., C.C.E.
Director, Bureau of Community Integration and Alzheimer’s Disease, Division of Long Term Care, Office of Health Insurance Programs
New York State Department of Health

Current evidence indicates that the general public is hesitant to share concerns about memory loss with their physician. Likewise, physicians are often unlikely to disclose a diagnosis of cognitive impairment or dementia, citing lack of knowledge, too little time, or difficulty discussing such a sensitive topic. The general public and many members of the medical community also continue to believe that an early diagnosis for a disease with no cure provides little benefit.

In this webcast, Department of Health Bureau Director David Hoffman offers three alternative perspectives to challenge current norms. First, Hoffman proposes that knowing information about cognitive impairment or related diagnoses helps the patient and their family in multiple ways. Secondly, he discusses the wide array of tools that are shown to be both sensitive and specific for screening, and importantly, are quick to implement. Using principles of bioethics, Hoffman makes the argument that cognitive screening and disclosure is ethically the right thing to do.

Learning Objectives
After watching this webcast participants will be able to:

  • Describe the benefits of early cognitive screening;
  • Describe cognitive screening tools shown to be both sensitive and specific;
  • Discuss the Medicare Annual Wellness visit as a vehicle for changing dementia diagnostic practices at a population level; and
  • Identify ethical justifications for cognitive screening and early diagnosis.

The planners, moderator, and presenters do not have any financial arrangements or affiliations with any commercial entities whose products, research or services may be discussed in this activity.

No commercial funding has been accepted for this activity.


Continuing Medical Education Credits

The School of Public Health, University at Albany is accredited by the Medical Society of the State of New York (MSSNY) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The School of Public Health, University at Albany designates this enduring material for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 

Continuing Medical Education Credits are offered until January 31, 2020.


Continuing Nurse Education Contact Hours

The University at Albany School of Public Health is an Approved Provider of continuing nurse education by the Northeast Multi-State Division, an accredited approver by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

This offering is approved for 1 nursing contact hour(s).

Nursing Contact Hours are offered until February 28, 2019.


Certified Health Education Specialist Contact Hours

Sponsored by the School of Public Health, University and Albany, SUNY, a designated provider of continuing education contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designated for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.0 total Category I contact education contact hours. Maximum advanced-level continuing education contact hours available are 0.

Continuing Education Contact Hours are offered until January 31, 2020. 


Social Work

University at Albany, School of Social Welfare, Social Work Continuing Education Program is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board of Social Workers as an approved provider of continuing education for Licensed Social Workers - #0011

This offering is approved for 1 social work self-study continuing education hour.

Social Work continuing education hours are offered until December 31, 2017.