Dayna M. Maniccia

 

Clinical Assistant Professor
Health Policy, Management, & Behavior

Department of Health Policy, Management, and Behavior 
University at Albany, School of Public Health                
One University Place, Room 175                
Rensselaer, NY       12144-3456
Email:  dmaniccia@albany.edu

Education:

DrPH Social Behavior and Community Health University at Albany, School of Public Health 2010
MS Health Policy and Management University at Albany, School of Public Health 2000

Courses Frequently Taught:

SPH341 Healthy People and Communities
SPH342 How U.S. Health Care Works:  Myths and Realities

Research Interests:

Influences on behavior, specifically physical activity and nutrition behaviors; health information technology adoption by providers; evidence based decision making in public health; local public health workforce

Selected Publications:

Abramson EL, McGinnis S, Edwards A, Maniccia DM, Moore J, Kaushal R with the HITEC investigators. (2011) Electronic health record adoption and health information exchange among hospitals in New York State. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2753.2011.01755.x    

Maniccia DM, Davison KK, Marshall SJ, Manganello JM, Dennison BA. (2011) A meta-analysis of interventions that target children’s screen time reduction. Pediatrics 128(1):e193-210.

“Ban fast food ads on TV: U.S. doctors” By Frederik Joelving.  Jun 27 2011 (http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/06/27/us-fastfood-ads-idUSTRE75Q0K820110627)

 “Interventions Can Cut Kids' TV Screen Time - Less Screen Time May Result in Lower Rates of Childhood Obesity, Researchers Say” By Denise Mann. June 27, 2011  (http://www.webmd.com/parenting/news/20110627/interventions-can-cut-kids-tv-screen-time

Waltz EC, Maniccia DM, Bryde RL, Murphy K, Harris BR, Waldenmaier MN. (2010) Training the public health workforce from Albany to Zambia: Technology lessons learned along the way. Public Health Reports  125(Suppl. 5):61-69.  

Jurkowski JM, Maniccia DM, Spicer DA, Dennison BD. (2010) Multimedia Campaign Increases Intention to Call 9-1-1 for Stroke Symptoms Preventing Chronic Disease  7(2): available at www.pcd/issues/2010/mar/09_0087.htm.   

Jurkowski JM, Maniccia DM, Dennison BD, Samuels SJ, Spicer DA. (2008) Factors contributing to awareness of the necessity to call 9-1-1 for stroke symptoms in Upstate, New York. Preventing Chronic Disease 5(2): available at www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2008/apr/07_0108.htm