News and Events 2003



Public Health Law Related to Terrorism

Thursday, December 04, 2003

Lawrence O. Gostin, JD, LLD (Hon.) is an internationally recognized scholar in law and public health. He is Professor of Law at Georgetown University; Professor of Public Health at the Johns Hopkins University; and Director of the Center for Law and the Public's Health at Georgetown and Johns Hopkins Universities (CDC Collaborating Center "Promoting Public Health Through Law": http://www.publichealthlaw.net). He is also the Co-Director of the Georgetown/Johns Hopkins Program on Law and Public Health; Faculty Affiliate for the Kennedy Institute of Ethics; and on the Steering and Executive Committees of the Institute for Health Care Research and Policy of Georgetown. He is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, Oxford University.

This program will discuss how the converging threats of biological weapons and emerging infectious diseases place public health systems under pressure to balance the public's health and individual liberties.

At the conclusion of the presentation, the participants will be able to:
Describe changes in the late 20th and early 21st centuries that have made us examine legal issues in public health.
Support public health law training programs and assemble effective material for public health audiences.
Identify legal issues and analysis in targeted areas relevant to public health law.

These projects are supported under a cooperative agreement from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Grant number U90/CCU224249-02. The contents of this program do not necessarily represent the official views of the CDC.


Coordinating Community Response: Public Health, Hospitals, Law Enforcement and Emergency Management Services

Thursday, November 06, 2003

Dr. Joel Ackelsburg, MD, MPH, Medical Director of Emergency Readiness & Response at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

He will address the roles and responsibilities of various agencies that are necessary for the coordination of a community-wide response to an act of terrorism.

At the conclusion of the presentation, the participants will be able to:
Outline steps or establishing a regional approach to managing public health emergencies.
Discuss the critical elements pertaining to multi-agency collaboration and preparedness.
Describe new and non-traditional pubic health approaches to collaborate multiple agency efforts.

These projects are supported under a cooperative agreement from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Grant number U90/CCU224249-02. The contents of this program do not necessarily represent the official views of the CDC.


Addressing the Threat of Food and Agricultural Terrorism

Thursday, October 02, 2003

Mr. Akey currently serves as Assistant Director of Animal Industry and Assistant State Veterinarian. He will discuss various aspects of his role as Emergency Programs director, including animal disease surveillance/monitoring systems, zoonotic diseases, bioterrorism and informatics.


Terrorism Preparedness: Effecting Local Response from a National Plan

Monday, March 24, 2003

Dr. Smithson directs the Henry L. Stimson Center Chemical and Biological Weapons Nonproliferation Project. She launched this project in January 1993 to serve as an information clearinghouse, watchdog, and problem-solver regarding chemical and biological weapons issues. Under its auspices, Dr. Smithson has conducted analytical research across the spectrum of complex topics associated with the control and elimination of chemical and biological weapons. Her research bridges the technical and policy communities to create problem-solving recommendations that both communities can feasibly execute. She is author of two recent books, Ataxia and Toxic Archipelago, has published widely in journals, testified before Congress, and is frequently consulted by the media, including NPR, the New York Times, the Washington Post, CNN, NBC Nightly News, and the BBC, to name a few.  In this program, Dr. Smithson will discuss national preparedness planning in light of last year's and on-going events.


The Public Health Response to Smallpox

Thursday, January 30, 2003

At the conclusion of the presentation, the participants will be able to:

Identify smallpox and its many variants.
Describe the distinguishing features of both variola (smallpox) and varicella (chicken pox).
Identify potential complications associated with smallpox vaccination and high-risk populations.
Describe the local public health community response to a smallpox vacccination program.
Identify the role of public health if a smallpox outbreak were to occur.

This program co-sponsored by the New York State Department of Health, NYS Association of County Health Officials, University at Albany Center for Public Health Preparedness.