Teaching


"Blindly believing in books is worse than no books."
(Mencius (372 BC-289 BC), Jin Xin II)
A somewhat similar (but not exactly the same) saying in English (source uncertain):
"The letter kills, but the spirit gives life."
And here is a line coined by me:
"Blindly believing in the teacher is worse than no teacher."

 

GOG529/BIO534 Spatial Statistics (Spring) (Syllabus)

This course provides an introduction to spatial statistics for spatially referenced data. Spatial point patterns, geostatistical data, and areal (regional/lattice) are studied using the viewpoint that these are realizations from random processes. Major topics to be covered include spatial stochastic process, exploratory spatial data analysis, intensity function, K function, cluster statistics, spatial interpolation, spatial covariance functions, variograms, kriging, spatial autoregressive models. Computer exercises with R programming language (http://www.r-project.org) are designed to help students gain hands-on experience on the topics presented in lectures. Students are required to present and discuss assigned readings and develop an individual research project that applies spatial statistical methods in problem solving. Please refer to the syllabus for the detailed course schedule.

 

GOG518/BIO518/INF508 Ecological Modelling (Fall) (Syllabus)

This course introduces the basic principles of ecological modelling including model conceptualization,construction, and analysis. Participants will develop knowledge and skill in: (1) constructing models for their own research, and (2) critical reading of models in the literature. Computer exercises with R programming language (www.r-project.org) are designed to help students gain hands-on experience on the topics presented in lectures. Students are required to present and discuss assigned readings and develop an individual research project in the topic of their interest.

 

GOG101 Introduction to Physical Environment (Spring and Fall)

Introduction to the three main fields of physical geography (climatology, biogeography, and geomorphology) from an integrated earth systems viewpoint. The major world climate, vegetation, soil and landform regions are treated as process-response systems whose physical patterns and interrelationships, causes, and significance are examined. Includes assessments of the role of human impacts for global and regional change.

Required Textbook (available from campus bookstore, amazon.com, etc.)
[H] Darrel Hess. 2014. McKnight's Physical Geography: A Landscape Appreciation, 11/E, Pearson.

Recommended Readings
[H] Darrel Hess. 2014. Laboratory Manual for McKnight's Physical Geography: A Landscape Appreciation, 11/E, Pearson.

 

GOG525 Remote Sensing Applications (2015 Fall) (Syllabus) (Flyer)

Recent developments in remote sensing technology have greatly improved our ability to extract scientific information about the Earth's environment. This course focuses on state-of-the-art techniques and methods for estimating terrestrial information from remote sensing observations.

The specific topics cover a wide range of advanced remote sensing algorithms for:

     (i)   Estimation of land surface radiation budget components
    (ii)   Estimation of biophysical and biochemical variables
   (iii)   Estimation of water cycle components

Each topic follows the same template:

     (i)   Introduction to basic concepts and fundamental principles
    (ii)   Review of practical algorithms with a comprehensive list of references
   (iii)   Detailed descriptions of representative algorithms and case studies
   (iv)   Surveys of current products, spatiotemporal variations of the variable
    (v)   Identification of future research directions

Hands-on tutorials on IDL ENVI programming will covered in the lab session for practical problems.

 

GOG422/522 GIS for Social Sciences (2015 Spring, 2016 Fall) (Syllabus)

The objective of this course is to apply GIS techniques on social sciences. Specific goals are: (1) to provide students with an understanding of how GIS can be applied in social sciences; (2) to familiarize students with advanced GIS and modeling techniques; (3) to provide students with hands-on experience in working with various data sources through a project related to their own research interest. Applications spread from typical themes in urban and regional analysis (e.g., trade area analysis, regional growth patterns, urban land use and transportation) to issues related to crime and health analyses. It also covers common tasks (e.g., distance and travel time estimation, spatial smoothing and interpolation, accessibility measures) and major issues (e.g., modifiable areal unit problem, rate estimate of rare events in small population, spatial autocorrelation) that are encountered in spatial analysis. Computer exercises with ArcGIS are designed to help students gain hands-on experience on the topics presented in lectures. Students are required to present and discuss assigned readings and develop an individual research project that applies geospatial methods in geographical problem solving.