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Public Administration Undergraduate
Courses & Syllabi (Spring 2015)

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RPAD 140/RPOS 140 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC POLICY L. Zamboni
If you look around you there are policies everywhere, from taxes to welfare; from border control to space exploration. Governmental institutions, at every level of government, affect all aspects of your daily life. RPOS/RPAD 140 - Introduction to Public Policy - exposes you to the nuts and bolts of policy making and the policy analysis process by discussing their complexity, the role policy analysts have in interacting with government, and the vast number of actors and factors affecting our society's rules and institutions. In this course we will ask questions such as: Where do ideas for policies come from? How do these ideas turn into governmental programs or legislation? What does it take to get a policy formulated, enacted, and successfully implemented? What is the role of different governmental actors (e.g. executive, legislature, courts) and how do they interact with other actors in the policy process (e.g.. interest groups, business, the media)? By the end of this course you will be able to: Discuss in an informed and professional manner how policies are formulated and work. Identify the nuances of public problems' definition. Debate with technical ground different alternatives and solutions to social problems. Understand the United States' governmental institutions and main policy actors. The course is a requirement for students in Rockefeller College's Public Policy program, and is also considered a Social Science course under the General Education requirements. 

RPAD 204 COMPUTER MODEL DECISION J. Mayo
Making tough decisions – can computers help? Students will learn to use Internet technologies as well as techniques in computer modeling for critical thinking, policy analysis, and decision support. Topics include a review of quantitative methods for strategic analysis, tools for helping make tough decisions, and a survey of formal modeling techniques.

RPAD 236 INSTITUTIONS & POLICY IN BUSINESS REGULATIONS D. McCaffrey
This course examines the public regulation of business, surveying the field in general but with special attention to regulatory controls in financial markets. Its subjects include the justifications and critiques of government regulation, ethical considerations in regulatory decisions, international dimensions of regulatory policy and management, and how political, legal, and technological processes shape regulation.

RPAD 302 UNDERSTANDING PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS E. Fazekas
The major objective of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to explore basic ideas about how people work in large (work) organizations, and the processes and structures that operate day to day in such organizations. The course examines how people act and interact within organizations and attempt to change those organizations, and how organizations react to the individuals who comprise the organization. The course uses multiple perspectives or frames as a way of understanding of individual and organizational behavior in work organizations. Only one version of R PAD 302 may be taken for credit. ** Note this class meets on downtown campus.

RPAD 303 PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION & MANAGEMENT A. Davis-Alteri
This course is designed to provide students an introduction to the field of public administration, including its practice, themes and values, and contemporary challenges. Public administration is government in action, as broadly defined by Woodrow Wilson in 1887. Public administration includes activities taken directly by government, or indirectly by its partners, to meet the democratically expressed needs of the public. These activities include policy design, implementation, evaluation of outcomes, and re-design or re-direction. By the end of the course, students should have a basic understanding of 1) the relationship and tensions between politics and administration, 2) various means for assuring administrative accountability and responsiveness, and 3) the challenges associated with implementing public programs. It is intended that students will leave the course with a substantive, applied understanding of the values and practice of public administration. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing. ** Note this class meets on downtown campus.

RPAD 316/RPOS316 METHODOLOGICAL TOOLS FOR PUBLIC POLICY S. Umar
Introduction to research design, statistics, and computer usage in public policy with an emphasis on the interpretation of results. Students examine experimental, quasi-experimental and nonexperimental research designs, summarize and present univariate distributions, perform bivariate and multivariate analyses including simple cross-tabulations and multiple regression analysis, and learn to use a computer to perform statistical and data management operations. Required for public affairs majors. Only one version of R PAD 316 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite: RPAD 204. ** Note this class meets on downtown campus.

RPAD 321/RPOS 321 STATE & LOCAL GOVERNMENT F. Mauro
This course focuses upon intergovernmental relations; the interdependent roles of governors, legislatures, and courts in policy-making and implementation; the organization, functions, and jurisdiction of local governments; interaction of political parties and interest groups with formal institutions and processes; and problems in selected functional areas. Emphasis will be placed upon socio-economic trends leading to change in state and local governments, consequent issues raised, and proposals made in response to such issues.

RPAD 328/RPOS 328 LAW AND POLICY D. Jones
Examination of the role of the of the courts in the public policy process and in substantive policy fields; integrates the literature of law and policy and applies it to such areas as mental health care, corrections, human resources, education, and housing policy. Only one version of R POS 328 may be taken for credit.

RPAD 329Z/RPOS 329Z BUREAUCRATIC POLITICS D. Liebschutz
Examination of political behavior within and among administrative agencies, focusing on the sources of power in the bureaucracy, and the ways in which agencies use their political resources to shape public policy. Only one version of RPAD 329Z/RPOS 329 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): RPOS 101 and 102, or junior or senior standing.

RPAD 399/RPOS 399 INTRODUCTION TO NOT-FOR-PROFIT MANAGEMENT B. Slater
This course connects theory and practice by examining a variety of management strategies utilized in running nonprofit organizations. Course readings and discussions will include writing and fulfilling mission statements, facilitating governance, designing effective fundraising tactics, evaluating programs, managing government contracts, and engaging in advocacy or lobbying. We will cover the formation of the nonprofit sector and its differences from public and for-profit sectors. Students will grapple with difficult issues currently facing nonprofit managers.

RPOS/RPAD 399 PUBLIC SPENDING & FISCAL POLICY Z. Barta
This course focuses on the politics of public finances. It explores the social conflicts surrounding taxation, public spending, and public debt; the role played by different political actors and institutions in fiscal policy choices; and the influence of non-governmental and supra-national organizations (like rating agencies or the International Monetary Fund) on national public finance. It seeks to answer questions like 'Why do different countries spend and tax so differently?' 'Why do some countries get dangerously indebted?' 'How do others keep their budgets in balance?' 'What are the pitfalls and advantages of sharing decision making across the state and federal levels?' The first half of the course relies on lectures and class discussions, while the second half involves work on team-projects analyzing the significant difficulties of different countries in the wake of the global economic and financial crisis.

RPAD 436 TECHNOLOGY IN FINANCIAL MARKET REGULATION D. McCaffrey
The development, operation, and regulation of technological systems shape modern financial markets. These systems are developed and overseen by market centers, clearing organizations, and other market infrastructure organizations, as well as sell-side financial firms, institutional investors and other buy-side participants, corporations, technology providers, and public and private regulators. Market controls, technological development, and regulation shape this system individually and interactively. This course examines the central features of technology in financial markets and how market and regulatory controls and social and behavioral conditions produce and interact with them. Prerequisite(s): prior coursework in study of regulation and/or finance highly recommended.

RRPAD 498/RPOS 390 APPLIED PUBLIC AFFAIRS CAPSTONE J. Richardson
This capstone course includes the competition of an internship and a linked classroom experience. This course offers students the opportunity to integrate theoretical concepts related to politics, public administration, and organizations with practical experience in political, public sector and administrative institutions. This course seeks both to enhance the education value of the internship and to make it a springboard for a successful career. The course has four major components: skill development, career options, employment strategies, and school to work connection. Students enrolled in this class must obtain an internship during the same semester as the course, and it is the student's responsibility to find their own internship. Students must have an overall minimum GPA of a 2.50. Students should contact the Undergraduate Internship Coordinator to discuss internship opportunities, how to obtain an internship and to obtain a permission number for the course. May not be taken by students with credit for RPAD 498/RPOS 390. Prerequisite(s): RPAD 140, RPAD 316, AECO 110, RPOS 101, RPAD 302, and a cumulative grade point average of 2.0.

RPAD 499 SENIOR SEMINAR IN PUBLIC AFFAIRS M. Christakis
This course serves as Public Policy major's "cap stone" experience during which students will be asked to integrate the various theories, concepts and issues raised throughout their academic work in the field of public policy. This course seeks to deepen students' understanding of public policy and the various contexts through which public policy issues are framed in contemporary America. The course will afford students the opportunity to reflect upon their curricular and co-curricular experiences as public policy majors that have contributed and informed their understanding of public policy.