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Public Administration Undergraduate
Courses & Syllabi (Fall 2015)

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RPAD/RPOS 140 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC POLICY A. Fox
This course introduces students to the process of public policy making. This course analyzes public policy making as the outcome of a number of political actors and processes. As a student in this course, you will gain a greater appreciation for the complexity of policymaking, the vast number of actors involved in policy making, and the factors that make policies more or less successful. Through the course, we will ask questions such as: Where do ideas for policies come from in the first place? Why do some ideas get attention while other problems are ignored? What does it take to get a policy formulated, enacted, and successfully implemented? What are the roles of the executive, legislature, courts, interest groups, business, the news media, and other actors in the policy process? Why do some policies, even after extensive research and analysis, seem so irrational and haphazard? The course also introduces students to a number of substantive policy areas including health policy, education policy, environmental and energy policy, economic and social welfare policy, foreign policy as well as drawing on current events that change each semester to highlight the art and science of policy making in both a domestic and global context. There are no prerequisites for this course. Gen. Ed: Social Science. Only one version of RPAD/RPOS 140 may be taken for credit.

RPAD 204 COMPUTER MODEL DECISION J. Mayo
Making tough decisions – can computers help? Students will learn to use Internet technologies as well as techniques in computer modeling for critical thinking, policy analysis, and decision support. Topics include a review of quantitative methods for strategic analysis, tools for helping make tough decisions, and a survey of formal modeling techniques.

RPAD 302 UNDERSTANDING PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS S. Kim
The major objective of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to explore basic ideas about how people work in large (work) organizations, and the processes and structures that operate day to day in such organizations. The course examines how people act and interact within organizations and attempt to change those organizations, and how organizations react to the individuals who comprise the organization. The course uses multiple perspectives or frames as a way of understanding of individual and organizational behavior in work organizations. Only one version of R PAD 302 may be taken for credit.

RPAD 305 PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES M. Ku
This course introduces the ways that information technologies affect governmental functions, democratic processes, and public programs. It introduces students to understand the interaction of policy, management, data, and technology in the design, operation, and evaluation of information technology initiatives in the public sector. It also provides an overview of topics related to the use of information technologies in public administration, including websites, social media, and mobile applications, among others. It covers topics such as e-government, e-democracy, e-governance, leadership, e-procurement, and information security and privacy.

RPAD/RPOS 316 METHODOLOGICAL TOOLS FOR PUBLIC POLICY H. Khalid
Introduction to research design, statistics, and computer usage in public policy with an emphasis on the interpretation of results. Students examine experimental, quasi-experimental and non-experimental research designs, summarize and present univariate distributions, perform bivariate and multivariate analyses including simple cross-tabulations and multiple regression analysis, and learn to use a computer to perform statistical and data management operations. Required for public affairs majors. Only one version of RPAD/RPOS 316 may be taken for credit.

RPAD/RPOS 329: BUREAUCRATIC POLITICS M. Christakis
This class examines the sources and varieties of political behavior within and among organizations. The readings cover the organizational context of politics and the nature of power and politics in organizations, including how we might manage these dynamics in our careers.

RPAD/RPOS 328 LAW AND POLICY D. Jones
How are courts involved in policy-making? Are courts counter-majoritarian when they shape policy? Do we want courts to be making policy? How do societal demands shape our legal system and in turn, how does the law shape us? In this course we explore those questions by viewing the legal system in a political and social context. Our material will be a variety of legal, political, and sociolegal scholarship that touches on issues such as race, class, torts, and bureaucracy. The course is broken into four units: Unit 1: Why Courts? A primer on the structure and function of courts; Unit 2: Decision-making, how courts make decisions; Unit 3: Transforming Us, how courts transform the way we think about rights and ourselves; and Unit 4: The Big Debate, do courts even matter in creating social change? **Only one version of RPAD/RPOS 328 may be taken for credit. Same course offered at 2 different times.

RPAD 329Z/RPOS 329 BUREAUCRATIC POLITICS M. Christakis
Examination of political behavior within and among administrative agencies, focusing on the sources of power in the bureaucracy, and the ways in which agencies use their political resources to shape public policy. Only one version of RPAD 329Z/RPOS 329 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): RPOS 101 and 102, or junior or senior standing. ***Please Note – This course will be taught on the Downtown Campus.***

RPAD 344 - EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS R. Mathews
Emergency Preparedness provides a study of applicable policies, protocols, and laws that impact the practice of emergency preparedness at the federal, state, and local levels of government. The study includes a brief review of the history of emergency management setting the stage for an examination of “best practices” and philosophies. These drive the nation’s preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation efforts of various levels of emergencies and disasters which in turn helps facilitate a community’s resilience in the face of disasters. The methodology used in this course includes classroom discussions and activities, studies of applicable case studies, and individual exploration resulting in a well crated paper. Where applicable, simulation activities provide opportunities for the student to “experience” realistic situations similar to real-world emergencies and disaster operations.

RPAD/RPOS 399 PUBLIC SPENDING & FISCAL POLICY Z. Barta
From the 1960s, governments in developed countries progressively widened the scope of their involvement in the life of citizens. The state assumed responsibility for the welfare people not only through public pensions, health care, education, unemployment benefits and the like, but also through interventions in the economy to smooth out business cycles, stimulate growth and mitigate unemployment. By the 1980s, the tide turned and many countries attempted to retreat from the path of the ever-growing welfare state. The order of the day became retrenchment, privatization and market principles. This course studies both processes, with special attention to the cross-national differences within the general patterns. It seeks to explain the driving forces behind the expansion of the welfare state from the 1960s and the differential success of countries in reversing that trend since the 1980s.

RPAD/RPOS 399 HOMELAND SECURITY RISK MANAGEMENT B. Nussbaum
Homeland security is a burgeoning and fast-changing field, and one with major consequences both for public safety as well as for governance and public administration. The United States has spent billions of dollars on the homeland security enterprise since 2001 - across federal, state, local governments as well as the private and non-profit sectors - and the creation of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was the largest reorganization of the federal government since the 1947 National Security Act. This course will examine the various components of homeland security risk, including the threat, vulnerability and consequence drivers public safety officials have to contend with. Students will examine thesecomponents of risk, how they are measured and assessed, and how policy emerges from the interaction of these risks with institutions, stakeholders, public opinion and politics.

RPAD 435 LAW IN FINANCIAL MARKET REGULATION D. McCaffrey
The development, operation, and regulation of technological systems shape modern financial markets. These systems are developed and overseen by market centers, clearing organizations, and other market infrastructure organizations, as well as sell-side financial firms, institutional investors and other buy-side participants, corporations, technology providers, and public and private regulators. Market controls, technological development, and regulation shape this system individually and interactively. This course examines the central features of technology in financial markets and how market and regulatory controls and social and behavioral conditions produce and interact with them. Prerequisite(s): prior coursework in study of regulation and/or finance highly recommended.

RPAD 445 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF CYBER SECURITY B. Haynes
Our world is more connected today than it has ever been in our history. Tomorrow we will be more connected than we are at this very moment. While each connection we make in the virtual world is intended to make our lives easier, we must ask ourselves, “What if someone pulled the plug? How do we respond? Should we have been able to prevent it?” Since the creation of electronic devices that transmit information there have been criminals, terrorists, and nation states that seek to exploit them for financial, social, or political/ideological gain. This threat has become one of the top national security priorities, requiring a cyber force that includes the training of people who don’t even work as cyber professionals. Maybe you have seen the signs in your current work places, “Security is everyone’s responsibility.” A simple statement has never been truer.

RPAD 555 Disaster, Crisis, and Emergency Management and Policy B. Matthews
The short but significant history of the creation of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) will serve as the starting point for this course which provides a comprehensive and functional approach to understanding this department and its role. Time will be spent in developing an understanding of the nation's effort, led by DHS to develop preparedness capabilities to prevent, protect from, respond to, recover from, and mitigate high consequence events caused by acts of terrorism, natural disasters, and accidents. The course will rely heavily upon primary sources and case studies to guide the student through the DHS maze and the nation's preparedness efforts at the federal, state, and local levels.

RPAD 469 Cyber Threats and Intelligence Wright
Over the past two decades cyber crime has undergone a series of radical shifts, from being the purview of computer nerds to any crime involving computers, to the current definition which often focuses on computer network intrusions. Cyber crime currently involves a range tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTP) from the introduction of malware into networks through varying delivery mechanisms, to distributed denial of service (DDoS) and Structured Query Language (SQL) injection (SQLi) attacks. Motivations run the gamut from financial gain to notoriety, social activism, espionage, and revenge.

RPAD 571/471 Understanding the organization, capabilities and employment of military forces in support of civil authorities in the Homeland Security Enterprise. F. Sheppard
This on-line course provides a comprehensive strategic level examination of the Homeland Security Enterprise and the methodology for integrating Federal and State military forces in support of civil authorities during the planning, training and response phases of emergency operations. Federal, State and Local civilian authorities are responsible for preparing for and responding to natural and man-made emergency incidents and disasters. Emergency managers often include military forces in their emergency management planning and training programs as necessary to support potentially overwhelmed civilian first-responders during an incident.

RPAD 472 Disaster and Crisis Management in the Public, Private and Nonprofit Sectors T. Hastings
Natural disasters, acts of terrorism, and industrial accidents are just few of the types of threats and hazards organizations have to contend with. This course will explore how and why public, private and nonprofit organizations prepare for, and respond to, disasters and other crisis situations.

RPAD 498/RPOS 390 APPLIED PUBLIC AFFAIRS CAPSTONE P. Gunty
This capstone course includes the competition of an internship and a linked classroom experience. This course offers students the opportunity to integrate theoretical concepts related to politics, public administration, and organizations with practical experience in political, public sector and administrative institutions. This course seeks both to enhance the education value of the internship and to make it a springboard for a successful career. The course has four major components: skill development, career options, employment strategies, and school to work connection. Students enrolled in this class must obtain an internship during the same semester as the course, and it is the student’s responsibility to find their own internship. Students must have an overall minimum GPA of a 2.50. Students should contact the Undergraduate Internship Coordinator/Rockefeller College’s Office of Career Development to discuss internship opportunities, how to obtain an internship and to obtain a permission number for the course. May not be taken by students with credit for RPAD 498/RPOS 390.

RPAD 499 POLICY CAPSTONE S. Bushway
This course builds on the analytical tools and theoretical concepts developed in the Public Policy and Management core to explore the field of policy analysis, rationales for policy intervention, and a range of policy tools. This course will then apply these tools to criminal justice policy problems such as marijuana legalization and criminal sentencing policy. An emphasis will be placed on effectively communicating these complex ideas in writing. May not be taken by students with credit for RPOS/RPAD 340. Prerequisite(s): RPAD 140, RPAD 316, AECO 110, AECO 111.