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Public Administration Graduate
Courses & Syllabi (Spring 2016)

Click on the blue course title for a copy of the syllabi.
 

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PAD 500 Introduction to Foundations of Public Administration (4)
This course focuses on tensions and trade-offs between important values in public administration and the institutional foundations of the public service in political, bureaucratic, and legal settings. Major topics include dimensions of the public sector, characteristics of institutional settings, history of the field, environmental context, and functions, roles, behaviors, and structures.
 
PAD 501 Public and Nonprofit Financial Management (4)
This course focuses on teaching students how to use financial information to make decisions in public and not-for-profit organizations.  The first half of the course focuses on developing, implementing and controlling agency financial plans.  The course covers an introduction to financial management, the development of operating budgets, tools for short-term decision-making, capital-budgeting decisions, and the analysis of long-term financial options.  The second half of the course focuses on summarizing, reporting on and analyzing an organization's financial position, and the results of its operations.
 
PAD 503 (PUB 503) Principles of Public Economics (4)

How do markets allocate resources in an economy?  How do firms operate in both the sort run and the long run?  What effect do taxes have on markets?  What are the key rationales for governments to intervene in the economy?  This class surveys microeconomic theory, with particular emphasis on principles most relevant for government and applications to policy or management.  Prerequisites: PAD 501 and familiarity with algebra.

PAD 504 (PUB 504) Data, Models, and Decisions I (4)
Introduction to computer-based tools for planning, policy analysis, and decision making. Topics include administrative and policy models in spreadsheets, dynamic models in difference equations and spreadsheets, making decisions with multiple criteria, resource allocation, probability and decision trees, data bases and information management, and telecommunications in local networks and the Internet. Prerequisites: Familiarity with word processing on either IBM or Macintosh platforms.
 
PAD 505 (POS 505) Data, Models, and Decisions II (4)
Basic introduction to statistical methods and tests. Specific course topics include measurement, probability, distribution, tables and graphs, estimation and hypothesis testing, and linear models. Emphasis is placed on interpreting and presenting statistical outputs, including reports generated by computer programs. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

PAD 506 Foundations of Public Management (4)
An introduction to the theory and practice of public management. Topics include individual, group level, and organizational issues such as creating productive work environments, working within human resource systems, developing a learning organization, facilitating innovation, and managing across organizational boundaries. Cases and exercises will focus on practical applications of concepts covered. Prerequisite: Institutional Foundations of Public Administration.

PAD 508 Professional Applications II (2)
This Module normally is taken during the later half of a student's core curriculum. It continues the focus on skill development introduced in Professional Applications I and synthesizes material presented throughout the core. Using simulations and other exercises, it requires students to address a significant, multifaceted managerial or policy problem. Prerequisite: PAD 507 Professional Applications I.

PAD 509 Public Service Intern Seminar (1)
Capstone Requirement. Students registered in this course are required to assemble and obtain approval for their capstone portfolio. This class will normally be taken during a student's last semester of enrollment prior to graduation.

PAD 526 (POS 513) Field Seminar in Public Policy (4)
A survey of the substantive, methodological, and normative concerns found in the study of public policy. Offered jointly by the faculty in public policy.

PAD 536 (ACC 536) Regulation of Securities Markets (3)
This course examines the history, organization, and central issues of securities market regulation in the United States. The course discusses the roles of federal and state regulation, self-regulatory organizations, and firms within the regulatory system. Topics include, but are not limited to, the history and main principles of federal securities statutes; examinations and supervision by different levels of the regulatory system; and the relationships among change in financial markets such as financial innovations and regulatory structure and practice. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

PAD 540 Public Policy Analysis (4)
This course is a survey of public policy analysis.  It builds on the statistical and analytic skills that have been developed in students' prior microeconomics and data analysis courses.  The principal objective of this course is to strengthen problem solving, analytic, and professional writing skills that will enhance students' understanding of the policy process, and increase students' ability to identify problems, enumerate solutions, evaluate alternative policies, and communicate results to clients.  Prerequisites:  RPAD 503, RPAD 504 and RPAD 505; or equivalent courses that cover introductory microeconomics, introductory statistics, and Excel proficiency; or permission of the instructor.

PAD 549 Cyber Security: Long Term Planning and Risk Management
No matter how well an economy appears to be there never seems to be enough money to go
around. That is what makes budget season the most difficult for any organization, public or
private. One area that has seen considerable growth in recent years even despite many other
budget areas being cut is Cyber Security. Will this trend continue? Likely yes, but like all hot
areas it will cool. Which means the principles and methods taught in this course will become
even more prevalent.

PAD 550 (PUB 550) Foundations of Government
Information Strategy and Management (4)

Introduces the interaction of policy, management, and information technology in the design, operation, and evaluation of government operations and public services. Relies heavily on case studies to illustrate how these domains play out in multiple settings and across sectors-public, private, and not-for-profit. Prerequisites: PAD 500 and PAD 506, and Permission of Instructor.

PAD 554 (POS 554) Political Violence, Insurgency and Terrorism (4)
This course examines the relationships among, and differences between the following activities in the international political system: political violence, insurgency, and terrorism.  The course will include a consideration of the causes of these activities, their effects on national and international politics, and an evaluation of governmental responses to them.

PAD 556 Homeland Security Intelligence (4)
This course examines Homeland Security Intelligence at the Federal, State, and local levels.  We begin with an overview of the US foreign intelligence community, its mission, history, structure, and capabilities.  We examine how this community's composition and structure have changed as its mission was fundamentally altered twice, first with the end of the Cold War and then with the rise if terrorism.  Next, we look at the capabilities of new producers of terrorism related intelligence at federal law enforcement agencies and at the Department of Homeland Security.  The main thrust of the course is intelligence at the State and local levels. The federal government has worked with the states to create significant intelligence capabilities outside the beltway since the events of 9/11/2001.  This course identifies and discusses the State and local customers for homeland security intelligence and examines the degree to which these intelligence requirements are being met.

PAD 557 (PUB 557) Intelligence Analysis for Homeland Security (4)
This course provides instruction in conducting intelligence analysis, with emphasis on homeland security issues at the State and local levels.  After an overview of the history and structure of the US foreign intelligence community, we review the fundamentals of intelligence analysis tradecraft as practiced within the CIA and other federal intelligence agencies.  Extensive time is devoted to learning and using structured analytic techniques through student-led analytic exercises on terrorism and major crimes.

PAD 559 Homeland Security: Building Preparedness Capabilities (4)
The short but significant history of the creation of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) will serve as the starting point for this course which will provide a comprehensive and functional approach to understanding this department and its role.  The preponderance of time will be spent in developing an understanding of the nation's effort, led by DHS to develop preparedness capabilities to prevent, protect from, respond to, and recover from high consequence events caused by acts of terrorism, natural disasters, and accidents.  The course will rely heavily upon scenario-based activities and case studies to guide the student through the DHS maze and the nation's preparedness efforts at the federal, state, and local levels.

RINT 512/RPAD 568/RPOS 568 Human Rights
This course examines the legal, political, and social dimensions of the modern human rights movement, its relationship to International Criminal Law, International Humanitarian Law and International Law as a whole and its implications for international affairs. It provides both an introduction to basic human rights philosophy, principles, instruments, and institutions, and an overview of several current issues and debates in the field. The course also seeks to analyze the ways in which allegations of human rights violations are dealt with and to expose some of the limitations in the architecture of the international system. Case studies will be used to illustrate contemporary debates regarding hierarchy among rights, conflicts between individual rights and societal priorities, human rights in single-party states, rights and transitions to democracy, amnesty for human rights violations, and the linkage between human rights and other national interests.

RPAD 604 Inequality and Public Policy
This course addresses the formulation and implementation of public policies that seek to end diverse inequities. Specifically, this course will explore alternative definitions of equality and their implications for public policy; the role of issue definition and agenda-setting in policy making; the troublesome challenge of measuring equality for purposes of developing or assessing policy; the causes and politics of inequality, and the dynamics of governing institutions that produce, exacerbate or ameliorate inequalities. The course will equip students with a variety of policy analytic tools to help them analyze inequalities and the various public policies used to address them.

PAD 607 Non-Profit Governance (4)
This course examines the governance environment where boards and the leadership volunteers that serve on them operate, including what boards and volunteers do and how they do it to maximize nonprofit organization effectiveness.  The aspect of the course that covers the "what" is the formal roles and responsibilities of boards whereas the "how" refers to the non-formal approach taken to carry out their roles vis a vis the organization's management.  The course utilizes a series of written reflections and Academic Service Learning (ASL) to explore the concept of board effectiveness in a real world context (e.g. students are matched to local boards to assess governance effectiveness).  ASL, which is an intellectual process (academic) and product (service) of learning, is an ideal pedagogy for the theme of the course – exploring ways nonprofit boards and the volunteers that sit on them add positive value to nonprofit organizations.

PAD 637 Social and Organizational Networks in Public Policy, Management, and Service Delivery: Theory, Methods, and Analysis (4)
The concept of "network" has become central to many discussions of public policy, management, and service delivery but is rarely studied systematically. This course is designed to explore the theoretical underpinnings of network analysis, introduce basic network analytic methods, and examine and compare insights gained through network analysis with other forms of analysis. Prerequisites: Completion of required statistical courses for the Master's or Ph.D. program; permission of instructor.

PAD 647 Capital Markets, Risk and Governments (4)
This course will examine related concepts of risk and return, the impact of diversification on risk, and the fundamental concepts that underlie derivative products in both equity and debt markets.  It will explore these concepts in the context of regulation, government borrowing, hedging and pension investment activities.  It will include an examination of topics such as: risk premiums, the impact of diversification on portfolio risk, the pricing and expected return on equity investments, the role of derivatives in investments, the pricing of both debt and equity derivatives and the relationship between these concepts and capital requirements.  The course will also examine the basic structure of taxable and tax-exempt debt, the various kinds of issuers (including public authorities), and the pricing of debt in primary and secondary markets.  Prerequisites: Strong spreadsheet modeling skills and PAD 501, PAD 504 and PAD 505.

PAD 652 Seminar on Information Strategy and Management (1-4)
Leaders from government agencies, nonprofit organizations, private companies, and research organizations discuss their perspectives on the field of information strategy and management. Seminar is intended to be taken in conjunction with PAD 550 or 650. Prerequisites: PAD 500, PAD 522, or permission of instructor.

PAD 654 Your Money or Your Life: Economics of Health Policy (4)
Why is health care so expensive?  Why do health care markets tend to be inefficient and unjust?  What are major psychological biases in health care behavior?  What incentives does the American health care system create for the different actors in the system?  How can we evaluate health care outcomes?  This course examines major topics in the economics of health care policy, including selection, moral hazard, bargaining power, adoption of new technologies, valuing health, consumer behavior, provider behavior, and psychological health economies.  Prerequisites: PAD 503 and 505, or equivalent exposure to microeconomics and statistics.

PAD 659 Managing Public Service Organization Finances (4)
This course focuses on the tools and techniques of managing government and non-profit budgets and financial decision-making within public service organizations.  Topics include payroll projection and management, purchasing and procurement, contracting for services, budget analysis and planning, budget management and reporting, fund and revenue management, and the importance of internal controls and financial control systems.  Prerequisite: PAD 501.

PAD 661 Comparative and International Public Management
Do public administrators do the same things all over the world? Are public servants in Singapore, Canada and Brazil motivated by the same incentives? Is organizational performance measured differently in Kenya compared to Cambodia? Does the idea of "global governance" make sense? These rhetorical questions give a flavor of the conceptual and practical issues that are the subject of public management and its reform around the world. The purpose of this course is not to make you a virtual globetrotter or a superficial expert on several vastly different administrative systems. Rather, students will gain a deeper appreciation of the concepts and tools of public administration in countries with different cultures, histories and political regimes.

PAD 675 Topics in Public Policy Advocacy (4)
This course examines an array of public policy advocacy strategies, including organizing, public education, and lobbying. Depending on the semester, applications will be to various policy sectors, e.g. issues of concern to women, children, and families, or health care. In addition to covering material on legal, structural, and strategic issues involved in advocacy, the course will examine conceptual underpinnings to understand advocacy as it impacts nonprofit organizations, government, and society as a whole.

PAD 704 Research Design (4)
This course prepares doctoral students to design and conduct research studies using quantitative and qualitative approaches. Topics include: different research orientations; how to articulate research questions and testable hypotheses; steps in the research process; basic features of various methodologies including surveys, interviews, experiments, and using secondary data; strengths and limitations of different research methods; and how to develop research proposals. Prerequisite: PAD 705 or equivalent graduate-level course on applied statistics.

PAD 724 Simulation for Policy Analysis and Design (3-6)
Continued development of topics treated in PAD 624, Simulating Dynamic Systems, stressing advanced concepts in the formulation of feedback simulations of social systems. Organized around a single paper that requires students to formulate and construct a dynamic model for a public policy problem.

PAD 725 Applied Quantitative Methods
This course covers advanced quantitative methods for applied policy analysis, including linear regression, nonlinear estimation, censored data, panel data methods, and simulation-based approaches. Considerable emphasis is placed on actual practice. Accordingly, students will work with a real US government dataset, will use STATA to prepare and analyze the data, and will write the results of their analyses in a manner suitable for publication.

PAD 750 Seminar on Social Perspectives to Information Technology in Public and Private Organizations
This course reviews social sciences perspectives to information technologies in public and private organizations.1 It starts with readings about the research assumptions underlying studies in technology and organizations as well as readings that discuss the similarities and differences between public and private organizations. The course then turns to readings that discuss a variety of theoretical frameworks developed to study technology in organizational settings. Finally, the course highlights empirical studies into particular phenomena associated with information technology in public and private organizations.

PAD 882 Seminar in Doctoral Research and Professional Development (1)
Second term of a two-year-long seminar for first and second year Ph.D. students in Public Administration and Policy that introduces them to doctoral research and the academic profession.

PAD 884 Seminar in Doctoral Research and Professional Development (1)
Fourth term of a two-year-long seminar for first and second year Ph.D. students in Public Administration and Policy that introduces them to doctoral research and the academic profession.