rock_images/random_pagetops/78_rotation/78r_1.jpg; rock_images/random_pagetops/78_rotation/78r_2.jpg; rock_images/random_pagetops/78_rotation/78r_3.jpg; rock_images/random_pagetops/78_rotation/78r_4.jpg; rock_images/random_pagetops/78_rotation/78r_5.jpg; rock_images/random_pagetops/78_rotation/78r_6.jpg; rock_images/random_pagetops/78_rotation/78r_7.jpg; rock_images/random_pagetops/78_rotation/78r_8.jpg; rock_images/random_pagetops/78_rotation/78r_9.jpg; rock_images/random_pagetops/78_rotation/78r_10.jpg; rock_images/random_pagetops/78_rotation/78r_11.jpg; rock_images/random_pagetops/78_rotation/78r_12.jpg; rock_images/random_pagetops/78_rotation/78r_13.jpg; rock_images/random_pagetops/78_rotation/78r_14.jpg; rock_images/random_pagetops/78_rotation/78r_15.jpg; rock_images/random_pagetops/78_rotation/78r_16.jpg; rock_images/random_pagetops/78_rotation/78r_17.jpg; rock_images/random_pagetops/78_rotation/78r_18.jpg; rock_images/random_pagetops/78_rotation/78r_19.jpg; rock_images/random_pagetops/78_rotation/78r_20.jpg; rock_images/random_pagetops/78_rotation/78r_21.jpg;
 

Public Administration Graduate
Courses & Syllabi (Fall 2012)

Click on the blue course title for a copy of the syllabi.
 

Sort by semester: Fall 2011 | Spring 2012 | Fall 2012 | Spring 2013 | Fall 2013
Spring 2014
 
PAD 540 Public Policy Analysis (4)

This course is a survey of public policy analysis.  It builds on the statistical and analytic skills that have been developed in students' prior microeconomics and data analysis courses.  The principal objective of this course is to strengthen problem solving, analytic, and professional writing skills that will enhance students' understanding of the policy process, and increase students' ability to identify problems, enumerate solutions, evaluate alternative policies, and communicate results to clients.  Prerequisites:  RPAD 503, RPAD 504 and RPAD 505; or equivalent courses that cover introductory microeconomics, introductory statistics, and Excel proficiency; or permission of the instructor.
 
PAD 554 (POS 554) Political Violence, Insurgency and Terrorism (4)

This course examines the relationships among, and differences between the following activities in the international political system: political violence, insurgency, and terrorism.  The course will include a consideration of the causes of these activities, their effects on national and international politics, and an evaluation of governmental responses to them.
 
PAD 556 Homeland Security Intelligence (4)

This course examines Homeland Security Intelligence at the Federal, State, and local levels.  We begin with an overview of the US foreign intelligence community, its mission, history, structure, and capabilities.  We examine how this community's composition and structure have changed as its mission was fundamentally altered twice, first with the end of the Cold War and then with the rise if terrorism.  Next, we look at the capabilities of new producers of terrorism related intelligence at federal law enforcement agencies and at the Department of Homeland Security.  The main thrust of the course is intelligence at the State and local levels. The federal government has worked with the states to create significant intelligence capabilities outside the beltway since the events of 9/11/2001.  This course identifies and discusses the State and local customers for homeland security intelligence and examines the degree to which these intelligence requirements are being met.
 
PAD 557 (PUB 557) Intelligence Analysis for Homeland Security (4)

This course provides instruction in conducting intelligence analysis, with emphasis on homeland security issues at the State and local levels.  After an overview of the history and structure of the US foreign intelligence community, we review the fundamentals of intelligence analysis tradecraft as practiced within the CIA and other federal intelligence agencies.  Extensive time is devoted to learning and using structured analytic techniques through student-led analytic exercises on terrorism and major crimes.
 
PAD 607 Non-Profit Governance (4)
This course examines the governance environment where boards and the leadership volunteers that serve on them operate, including what boards and volunteers do and how they do it to maximize nonprofit organization effectiveness.  The aspect of the course that covers the "what" is the formal roles and responsibilities of boards whereas the "how" refers to the non-formal approach taken to carry out their roles vis a vis the organization's management.  The course utilizes a series of written reflections and Academic Service Learning (ASL) to explore the concept of board effectiveness in a real world context (e.g. students are matched to local boards to assess governance effectiveness).  ASL, which is an intellectual process (academic) and product (service) of learning, is an ideal pedagogy for the theme of the course – exploring ways nonprofit boards and the volunteers that sit on them add positive value to nonprofit organizations.

PAD 610 Organizational Theory and Behavior (4)
This course uses social science theories and methods to understand human behavior in organizations.  It explores such important areas as decision-making, perception, communication, group dynamics, and such managerial issues as organizational politics, organizational culture, and organizational change.  Students employ case studies and exercises to develop skills in organizational analysis.
 
PAD 613 Issues in Not-for-Profit Management (4)
Examination of a broad range of management issues relevant to not-for-profit organizations. Topics include: differences between public, private, and not-for-profit management; governance and boards of directors; strategic planning and human resource issues in not-for-profits; resource development; sector convergence and competition; and the government/voluntary sector relationship.
 
PAD 616 Operational Planning and Control (4)
Course covers theories, issues, and techniques of management control. Topics cover management control theory and the role of controls in strategic management, work measurement, statistical and non-statistical sampling methods, performance auditing, selected cost accounting techniques, operational budgeting, statistical process control, and project management systems, such as PERT and CPM. Prerequisites: PAD 504 and PAD 505.
 
PAD 626 Evaluation of Public Sector Programs (4)
The practice of program evaluation in the public sector is the focus of this course. Topics covered include both quantitative and qualitative evaluation methods, data collection, conduct of evaluation in an organizational setting, and utilization of evaluation results. Prerequisite(s): PAD 504 and PAD 505 or permission of instructor.
 
PAD 631 Cost Management for Government and Nonprofit Organizations (4)
This course will focus on issues of management-control systems, cost measurement for reporting and cost analysis for decision making. Topics will include the elements of management-control structures, cost definitions, product costing, cost allocation, standard costing, activity-based management, economic value added, the use of statistical and operations research models in financial management and other current issues in managerial finance and resource management. Prerequisite: PAD 501.

PAD 641 Basic Governmental Accounting (4)
Survey of governmental accounting principles and procedures for persons without prior formal instruction in accounting. Included are such topics as account classification, cash and accrual accounting, appropriation and program accounts, cost estimation from accounts, development and analysis of financial statements, and the uses of accounting information for managerial decision making. Prerequisite: PAD 501 or permission of instructor.
 
PAD 644 (HPM 648) Health Care Finance (4)
Examines major policy and implementation issues in the financing of health care, particularly the poor. Among the topics addressed are health cost containment, Medicaid, long term care, AIDS, and the provision of care to the uninsured. Prerequisites: PAD 503 and PAD 505 (or equivalent).
 
PAD 645 Psychological Economics and Policy (4)

Economic analyses are usually rooted in assumptions of perfect rationality, perfect selfishness, and perfect self-control.  Real human beings do not meet these assumptions.  How do real people respond to economic policies?  How can traditional analyses be adapted to use more psychologically realistic assumptions?  How can policy makers use experiments to help design and evaluate programs?  In the past few decades, economists in the fields of Behavioral Economics and Experimental Economics have explored how to draw on the methods and insights of psychologists.  That work has become increasingly relevant in policy circles.  This class surveys the theories, methods, and evidence of these fields and discusses their relevance for designing and implementing public programs.  Readings will consist primarily of professional journal articles.  Prerequisites: PAD 503, PAD 505.
 
PAD 648 Economics of Government Revenues (4)
How do governments collect revenues, and what are the effects on the economy?  Who bears the costs of taxation?  Why do many countries have several layers of government (federal, state/province, local) and why do different layers collect different types of taxes and perform different types of services?  What are the effects of welfare programs like TANF and the EITC?  This class surveys the economics of taxation (especially in the U.S.), tax evasion, poverty relief programs, fiscal federalism, local public finance.  The class looks at both theory and empirical research.  Emphasis is placed on reading professional academic sources.  Prerequisites: PAD 503 (or equivalent familiarity with microeconomics) and PAD 505 (or equivalent familiarity with statistical regressions).

PAD 688 Statistical Programming Workshop (1)

This workshop introduces students to statistical computer programming skills useful for doctoral research, with special emphasis on how to write code that is automated, easily modified, and readable.  Time permitting, the class may also discuss other programs useful for research, such as EndNote.
 
PAD 697 Guided Research (1-4)
Close individual guidance by a faculty member in the application of verbal and numerical research methods for the purpose of answering an administrative question, Students design a plan of research and gather, evaluate, organize, and report information on a substantive problem of interest to themselves and the faculty member. The resulting research is expected to be as nearly of professional quality in form and content as possible given the resources available and the background preparation of the student. In general, the research is reported in a colloquium open to all students and faculty. This course may be repeated. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
 
PAD 705 Research Methods II (4)
Intermediate course in specific research techniques and tools of analysis; qualitative and quantitative techniques of analysis addressed. Prerequisite: PAD 704.
 
PAD 708 Organizational Behavior and Theory (4)
A survey of the major issues and theoretical perspectives in organization theory. Examination of evolution of the field of organization theory, and discussion of the contemporary research on behavior and structure within organizations, and on environmental factors in organization behavior.
 
PAD 737 Contemporary Organization Theory and Management (4)
This seminar deals with contemporary issues in organization theory.  Students are exposed to the dominant schools of thought through the discussion, analysis, and comparison of representative work.  Among the areas covered are power, conflict, culture, organization/environment relations, and economic theories of organization.  Students will learn to identify the strengths and weaknesses of each of these diverse schools of thought and to compare their underlying assumptions.  Prerequisites: PAD 708 or another Ph.D. level course in organizational theory.