Bryan Early, Political Science Department, Awarded U.S. Department of State Grants

Bryan Early
Political Science

Sponsor: U.S. Department of State
Dates: September 27, 2013 – September 27, 2014
Amount: $34,994

Seminar on Strategic Trade Controls for Western Balkan Countries

The Western Balkan region poses a substantial proliferation risk due to its location along major commercial trade and smuggling routes, transnational and organized crime, indigenous arms manufacturing and trade, and burgeoning dual-use industry sectors. The Western Balkan states are at varying degrees of STC development, ranging from relatively new and unimplemented laws in some to advanced systems based on EU standards in others, but deficiencies nonetheless persist in all of these systems. Gaps in laws and regulations and weaknesses in the implementation of licensing restrictions, customs and border controls, and industry outreach diminish the efficacy of nonproliferation efforts in the region, especially at the borders.

It is important that STC officials in each of these governments’ agencies have the necessary fundamental understanding of the U.S., EU, and international norms, standards, and best practices for STC laws, regulations, licensing systems, enforcement, and industry outreach. This is particularly the case with officials who have just assumed their responsibilities but have little knowledge of or experience with strategic trade control. These individuals require sufficient knowledge so that they can administer their duties effectively and take the necessary steps to address and close remaining gaps in their governments’ systems.

CPR therefore proposes to provide a comprehensive introductory overview of strategic trade controls for appropriate government representatives from the Western Balkans (Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Montenegro, and Serbia) during a one-week seminar in Budva, Montenegro. The seminar will provide participants with a basic understanding of the fundamental principles of strategic trade controls and an appreciation for the role that effective STC systems play in global security. The seminar also will discuss how a complete and effective system can help to strengthen border security and mitigate the risk of unauthorized border incursions and smuggling.

Bryan Early
Political Science

Sponsor: U.S. Department of State
Dates: September 25, 2013 – March 29, 2015
Amount: $174,945

Strategic Trade Control Legislation Development & Licensing Assistance - Iraq

First, CPR associates will conduct a thorough review of Iraq’s existing legal authorities to determine all existing legal-regulatory gaps. Prior to the first consultation, the CPR Team will review Iraqi legal instruments, such as the Nonproliferation Act 2012, the Instructions of Implementation [of] Nonproliferation Treaties and Conventions 2009, Law No. 99/1980 on Preventing Harmful Radiation, and the Law on Weapons (as amended), and identify specific areas where these legal authorities can be amended or augmented, at the executive level, in order to enable more effective and comprehensive regulation of trade in dual-use and munitions-related goods and technologies in Iraq.

The Project Team will conduct three face to face consultations with five (5) GOI officials in Amman, Jordan.

The Project Team will formulate a plan to facilitate regular contact with the GOI officials throughout the period of performance. CPR associates will contact GOI officials periodically, in accordance with GOR and Post protocols, to check in and oversee the status of their efforts.

Bryan Early
Political Science

Sponsor: U.S. Department of State
Dates: May 15, 2013 – May 14, 2014
Amount: $99,744

Strategic Trade Control Workshops for Brokers and Freight Forwarders-Kazakhstan

There is a pressing need for the GOK and Kazakh industry to recognize the importance of government-industry cooperation, information sharing, and industry compliance with national and international nonproliferation obligations and to begin the process of forging a sustainable partnership. Kazakh freight forwarding companies, brokers, trade facilitators, etc. would benefit significantly from instructional and interactive exercises that provide insight into their role and place within the nonproliferation context, the export control responsibilities of transportation businesses, the “red-flags” which should trigger suspicion, and the international best practices for trade facilitation service providers.

CPR proposes conducting the two one-day trainings in the transit hub of Almaty, Kazakhstan. Having two events set apart in time will allow the largest audience participation amongst relevant industry. In the alternative the CPR Team would be able to conduct one of the seminars in Astana to allow for more GOK participation, or in any other city in Kazakhstan that ISN/ECC feels is appropriate. During each visit, the CPR Project Team will conduct a one-day seminar in Almaty on trade facilitation and nonproliferation concepts and best practices for selected GOK officials (Ministry of Transport and Customs) and a broad swath of representatives from major Kazakh transportation companies and industry associations (to include: brokers, freight forwarders, customs brokers, the Kazakhstan Transportation and Logistics Association (KAZLOGISTICS), and the Kazakhstan Freight Forwarders Association). GOK officials can use the event as an opportunity to share information and government perspectives and forge ongoing relationships with a valued industry sector. The inclusion of GOK representatives will enable dialogue between government and industry and allow GOK officials to highlight public and private initiatives that are designed to enhance the country’s role as a transit hub in Central Asia and discuss how these initiatives could directly impact the trade facilitation industry. Conversely, industry officials can offer their perspective on the types of outreach institutions the GOK should consider developing and the obstacles they foresee encountering while implementing strategic trade control. The events will provide an ideal forum for government and industry partnerships and could help to secure early industry buy-in, should the GOK eventually decide to enact transshipment and brokering controls on strategic commodities.