Program Goals and Attributes

All students we graduate: (1) demonstrate pedagogical content knowledge. They use research, theory, and practice to guide instructional decision-making; and (2) demonstrate effective teaching skills in their area of specialization.


MS Literacy Program Goals (B-6, 5-12, B-12)
For students admitted into the program before Summer 2013

Pedagogical Content Knowledge--Within their chosen level of instruction, our graduates will have a firm, research-based and theoretically-grounded understanding of:
  • Language and Literacy Development
  • Methods and Materials
  • Task Difficulty
  • Teacher Learning Communities
  • Technology
  • NYSED Standards and Core Curriculum
  • Individual and Cultural Differences
  • Literacy, Society, and Families
  • Assessment of Literacy
  • Prevention and Solution of Literacy Difficulties
  • Organization of Instruction
  • Self-Extended Learning

Teaching Skills--We expect graduates from our program to be proficient in the following:
  • Teaching Routines
  • Teaching Reading and Writing
  • Children's Literacy Development
  • Creating Literacy Contexts
  • Instructional Decisions
  • Learning Communities for Teachers
  • Learning Communities for Students
  • Organizing Instructional Contexts
  • Communication


MS Early Childhood and Childhood Education Program Goals
For students admitted into the program before Summer 2013

 

Pedagogical Content Knowledge--Within their chosen level of instruction, our graduates will have a firm, research-based and theoretically-grounded understanding of:
  • Language and Content Knowledge Development
  • Methods and Materials
  • NYSED Standards and Core Curriculum
  • Prevention and Solution of Content Knowledge Difficulties
  • Literacy in Society
  • Individual and Cultural Differences
  • Task Difficulty
  • Assessment
  • Technology
  • Self-Extended Learning

 

New Program Attributes
For students admitted into all programs Summer 2013 and later

 

Attribute

Pedagogical Content Knowledge Teaching and Leadership Practices

 

1. Literacy as Social Practice

Graduates understand literacy as meaningful social practice.

Graduates recognize and build on students' cultural resources and diverse life experiences.

Graduates teach literacy as meaningful social practice.

Graduates teach to/through students' cultural resources and diverse life experiences.

2. Generate Productive Learning Communities

Graduates collaborate and communicate with colleagues, other specialists, families, administrators, and the public on literacy issues showing care and sensitivity to different perspectives and different languages.

Graduates learn to create productive learning communities for students. In these learning communities students learn with and from one another as well as from the teacher.

Graduates collaborate and communicate with colleagues, other specialists, families, administrators, and the public on literacy issues showing care and sensitivity to different perspectives and different languages.

Graduates also generate productive learning communities for students. Graduates engage with families in responsive and respectful ways.

3. Engagement and Independence

Graduates know how to teach for independence and resilience through engagement and meaningful activities.

Graduates teach for independence and resilience through engagement and meaningful activities.

Graduates engage students in literate acitvites that allow students to demonstrate competence, and turn students' attention to the productive strategies they use independently and with support, even in unsuccessful attempts.

4. Reciprocal Relationships Across Modes of Communication

Graduates understand the recpirocal relationships among reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and representing.

Graduates know how to use multitmodal texts to create opportunities for students to draw on multimodalities strategically to create meaning, depending on purpose and audience.

Graduates learn to engage with students as authors and readers.

Graduates teach in a way that capitalizes on the reciprocal relationships among reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and representing.

Graduates teach with multimodal texts and create opportunities for students to draw on mulitmodalities strategically to create meaning, depending on purpose and audience.

Graduates engage with students as authors and readers.

5. Self-Extending Learning

Graduates know how to teach for strategic actions and self-extending learning, including developing: specific reading and writing competenices such as comprehension, critical reading, vocabulary knoweldge, word knowledge (phonological insight, spelling, and analysis), composing, revising, and editing.

Graduates teach for strategic actions and self-extending learning, including developing: specific reading and writing competenices such as comprehension, critical reading, vocabulary knoweldge, word knowledge (phonological insight, spelling, and analysis), composing, revising, and editing.

6. Knowledge of Literacies and Their Development

Graduates understand the nature, complexities, and patterns of literacy development.

Graduates understand how to assess students in specific literacy areas (e.g., Fluency, phonemic awareness) and make subsequent decisions about appropriate instruction.

Graduates understand multiple formal and informal assessments to inform future, responsive instruction, and how to be systematic and strategic in their assessment practices through careful observation to inform assessment and instructional decisions.

Graduates use their knowledge of the nature, complexities, and patterns of literacy development to inform their assessment and instruction.

Graduates use assessments to inform future, responsive instruction, and are systematic and strategic in their assessment practices.

Through careful observation and analysis, graduates document growth wtih and without formal assessments.

7. Research-Based Professional Learning

Graduates use research studies and professional learning communities to analyze and improve their practices.

Graduates assume first and foremost that learning problems lie in instruction, rather than in the learner, and seek solutions accordingly.

Graduates use research studies and learning communities to analyze and improve their practices.

Graduates assume first and foremost that learning problems lie in instruction, rather than in the learner, and seek and enact solutions accordingly.

8.  Respectful Representation of Students, Families, and Communities

When graduates represent students, their language reflects the full extent of student competencies and progress, and the nature of learning contexts.

Graduates know how to interact with families and communities in caring ways that build respectful, positive relationships that support students.

Graduate students represent student strengths and progress, and the nature of learning contexts.

Graduates interact with families and communities in caring ways that build respectful, positive relationships that support students.

9. Critical Literacies

Graduates engage critically with the world through literacies and arrange for their students to do the same.

Graduates choose texts and resources that enable students to engage in inquiry and critical converations into issues related to the human condition.

Graduates critically consume and produce media texts.

Graduates know how to support students to use literacies to engage as active and critical participants in local and global communities.

Graduates engage critically with the world through literacies and arrange for their students to do the same.

Graduates choose texts and resources that enable students to engage in inquiry and critical converations into issues related to the human condition.

Graduates critically consume and produce media texts.

Graduates support students to use literacies to engage as active and critical participants in local and global communities.

10.  Disciplinary Literacies/Knowledge Building

Graduates understand the nature of disciplinary literacy practices, including the discipline of teaching.

Graduates use their knowledge of disciplinary literacy practices in their teaching.

11. Data Based Decision Making 

Graduates understand how to select, gather, analyze and use the most useful screening, formative and summative data for problem finding, problem solving and decision-making.

Graduates have a critical understanding of what conclusions can be drawn from data in research studies and how to link research and practice.

Graduates understand the value and limitations of observational, standardized, and norm-referenced data.

Graduates understand how literacy policies are made at all levels, and how to participate in all levels of policy making.

Graduates critically analyze claims of commercial publishers and websites regarding the value of products (materials, procedures, tests).

Graduates select, gather and analyze data for problem finding, problem solving and decision-making.
 12.  Technologies and Digital Media

Graduates understand the nature and implications of technologies and digital media in literacy practices.

Graduates understand the acquisition of digital literacies.

Graduates choose and use relevant technologies and digital media for teaching and assessment.

 Graduates use appropriate technologies and digital media, understanding the nature and implications of their choices.

Graduates choose and use relevant technologies and digital media for teaching and assessment.

 13.  Materials and Resources

Graduates choose a range of instructional materials and resources appropriate for learners.

Graduates critique and evaluate instructional materials drawing on research.

 Graduates use a range of instructional materials and resources appropriate for learners.

Graduates critique and evaluate instructional materials drawing on research.

14.

Prevention and Intervention

Graduates understand the importance of, and optimal approaches toward, preventing difficulties with literacy acquisition, particularly how to ensure good first instruction.

Graduates understand and identify successful practice in key literacy areas (e.g., comprehension, alphabetic knowledge, vocabulary).

Graduates understand how to manage resources to optimize compensatory tiers of instruction.

Graduates implement optimal approaches toward preventing difficulties with literacy acquisition by ensuring optimal instruction.
 15. Standards Graduates understand and draw on standards related to disciplines and teaching e.g., CCSS, IRA Teaching Standards, NYS Standards for each discipline, National Board Standards. Graduates show evidence of using the standards in their teaching e.g., CCSS, IRA Teaching Standards, NYS Standards for each discipline, National Board Standards