Monica L. Rodriguez

Social/Personality Program Area

Monica Rodriguez

 

Monica L. Rodriguez
Associate Professor of Psychology

Office: Social Sciences 317
Phone: (518) 442-4820
Fax: (518) 442-4867
email: mlrodriguez@albany.edu

Research Lab: Social-Personality Development
Curriculum Vitae (pdf)

Areas of Interest:

My research focuses on the nature and development of self-regulatory processes involving the delay of immediate rewards for the sake of more desired long-term outcomes. Much of this research has sought to identify relevant individual and contextual factors influencing self-regulation, from toddlerhood to adolescence, and its role in preventing social maladjustment in children at clinical and demographic risk. We have examined prospectively the role of self-regulation in forecasting socio-emotional outcomes and academic competencies in different populations from elementary school years to early adolescence. Likewise, my colleagues and I have investigated relevant maternal, individual, and contextual factors involved in the early development of self-regulatory skills (from infancy to preschool age), as well as the socio-emotional mechanisms that enable older youth to pursue long-term goals and to respond adaptively to challenge and adversity. Currently we are conducting a large-scale project on prevention of child maltreatment in collaboration with the Office for Children and Family Services in New York State and the Human Services Center at the School of Social Welfare at SUNY Albany. In this multi-level, longitudinal study, we are evaluating the effects of a home visitation program (a randomized-trial) at a broad level, on the incidence of maternal child maltreatment, as well as at a microanalytic level, focusing on maternal behaviors and self-regulatory processes in mother-child interaction in a population of mothers at risk for child maltreatment during pregnancy. Specific areas of interest follow.

  • Early Social and Personality Development
  • Self-Regulatory Processes
  • Field Studies in Populations at Risk