University at Albany
 
Art and Culture Talks
2011 Marjorie L. and Ronald E. Brandon Art and Culture Talks

ACT programs will be held at the museum.
For more information, call (518) 442-4035.

All programs are free and open to the public.
Parking will be provided in Visitor Lot #1A courtesy of the Provost’s Office. The museum will be open one hour prior to the program.

 

ACT (Art & Culture Talks) brings together artists, critics, writers, poets, and scholars to address key issues in contemporary art and culture through rigorous and provocative talks, conversations, debates, seminars, screenings, and readings in an informal setting.

As an integral part of the University Art Museum’s outreach effort, ACT strives to bring the University community and the people of the Capital Region into closer engagement with each other and with the important cultural issues of our time.


 

  • Monday, November 7
    7:00 pm
    Lecture by Ken Johnson, author of Are You Experienced?: How Psychedelic Consciousness Transformed Modern Art (2011)

  •  

    Ken Johnson, MA '78 is a freelance critic, who writes regularly for the New York Times. He has been writing art criticism professionally for more than 20 years. He graduated from Brown University in 1976 with a degree in art, followed in 1978 by a master's degree in studio art with a concentration in painting from UAlbany. In 1983, he started writing art reviews for the Albany Times Union and other capital region publications. In 1987 he began writing articles on contemporary artists for Arts Magazine, and a year later he moved on to Art in America, where he wrote reviews and articles regularly for the next nine years. Since 1997, he has been writing art criticism for the New York Times, where he reviews six to eight current exhibitions each week. He is the author of the recently released book, Are You Experienced? Art and the Psychedelic Revolution, published by Prestel Books.


     

  • Wednesday, September 7
    7:00 pm
    Lecture by artist Wolfgang Staehle
    University Art Museum

  •  

    Wolfgang Staehle is widely recognized as one of the pioneers of Internet art. Born in Stuttgart, Germany in 1950, he has been living in New York since 1976. In 1991 he founded THE THING, an independent media project that began as a bulletin board system (BBS) and became one of the seminal on- and offline forums for Net art. His works have been shown at Fondation Cartier in Paris, Gagosian Gallery in New York, Transmediale 02 in Berlin, Wood Street Galleries in Pittsburgh, Centro Cultural Banco do Brasil in Rio de Janeiro, the Tate Modern in London, and the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C.


     

  • Tuesday, March 29
    7:00 pm
    Reading and talk by science fiction and fantasy author John Crowley
    University Art Museum

  •  

    John Crowley, acclaimed author of science fiction, fantasy, and historical fiction, received the Lifetime Achievement Award of the World Fantasy Convention in 2006, and the Award in Literature from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters in 1992. His works include the novels Four Freedoms (2009), Lord Byron’s Novel: The Evening Land (2005), four volumes of the highly praised fantasy series AEgypt (1987–2007), and Little, Big (1981), which received the World Fantasy Award for Best Novel. Since 1993 he has taught creative writing at Yale University.


     

  • Monday, March 21
    7:00 pm
    Lecture by artist Pepon Osorio
    University Art Museum

  •  

    Pepón Osorio was born in Santurce, Puerto Rico in 1955 and lives and works in Philadelphia. Osorio is best known for his large-scale installations, which are influenced by his experience as a social worker in The Bronx. His pieces usually evolve from interaction with the neighborhoods and people he works among. Recent solo exhibitions include NeoHooDoo: Art for a Forgotten Faith at the Menil Collection, Houston (2008); How We Live Together at the 27th São Paulo Bienal in Brazil (2007); and Trials and Turbulence at Ronald Feldman Fine Arts in New York (2005). His work has also been shown at the Whitney Museum of American Art and el Museo del Barrio in New York, the Smithsonian Museum of American Art in Washington, D.C., and el Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico and el Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Puerto Rico.


     

  • Monday, February 28
    7:00 pm
    Lecture, "The Artist as Writer as Artist" by Daniel Kunitz, art critic and executive editor of Modern Painters
    University Art Museum

  •  

    Daniel Kunitz will address contemporary artists who present their own writings––be they discursive essays, stories, or poems––as visual art.
    He is currently executive editor of Modern Painters and contributing editor of the Paris Review. Formerly he was managing editor of the Paris Review, U.S. editor of ArtReview, and an art critic for Village Voice. His essays, reviews, and articles have appeared in Harper's, Vanity Fair, TLS, LA Times, and many other publications. He is a faculty member in the Art Practice Department at the School of Visual Arts in New York. Kunitz received a DEUG, Université de Paris-Sorbonne; a B.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison; and an M.F.A. from Columbia University.


     

  • Tuesday, February 15
    7:00 pm
    Lecture and book signing for Phyllis Galembo: Maske by photographer Phyllis Galembo and art historian and essayist Chika Okeke-Agulu
    University Art Museum

  •  

    Phyllis Galembo began photographing the characters and costumes of African masquerade in Nigeria in 1985, developing her theme throughout Africa and the Caribbean over the next twenty-five years. She has exhibited worldwide, including the recent exhibitions Call and Response: Africa to America. The Art of Nick Cave and Phyllis Galembo at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston, South Carolina(2010); Phyllis Galembo: Masquerade, a Decade at Reflex Art Gallery in Amsterdam, The Netherlands (2009); West African Masquerade: Photographs by Phyllis Galembo atThe Frances Young Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, New York (2007); Dressed for Thrills: Halloween and Masquerade Costumes at F.I.T. Museum in New York (2003); and Manifestations of the Spirit atthe Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. (2001). Her books include Dressed for Thrills, 100 Years of Halloween Costumes and Masquerade (2003) and Vodou: Visions and Voices of Haiti (1998). Galembo received an M.F.A. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and is currently a professor of photography at the University at Albany.

    Chika Okeke-Agulu specializes in classical, modern, and contemporary African and African diaspora art history and theory. He edited the first-ever issue of African Arts (2006) dedicated to African modernism, and has published articles and reviews in African Arts; Meridians: Feminism, Race, Transnationalism; Nka: Journal of Contemporary African Art; Art South Africa; and Glendora Review.  He has organized several exhibitions and written catalogue essays for them, including the Nigerian Pavilion at the first Johannesburg Biennale (1995), and was an academic consultant for Documenta 11 in Kassel, Germany (2002). As an artist, Okeke-Agulu has had more than thirty-five one-man and group exhibitions of his work in Nigeria, South Africa, Senegal, Britain, Germany, South Korea, Switzerland, Sweden, and the United States. He has received numerous academic and professional awards, including Woodrow Wilson Fellow (2010–11) and Clark Fellow at the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute (2008). He received a Ph.D. in art history from Emory University, Atlanta and currently teaches art history at Princeton University.


     

     

    All programs are free and open to the public. The
    museum will be open at 6 pm prior to the programs. For more information, call (518) 442-4035.