Picturing the Antropocene Upcoming Events

Monday, November 16, 7 pm
Picturing the Anthropocene: A Conversation
Boor Sculpture Studio

Closest parking: Visitor Lot #2.
Free and open to the public

This events launches a campus wide conversation regarding the “Anthropocene,” a contested term that some have used to define a geological era of human-driven destruction. It will feature four brief presentations and perspectives from scholars in the environmental sciences, arts, and humanities. Questions and conversation are welcome.

Presenters: Danny Goodwin, Associate Professor, Department of Art and Art History; Christopher Pastore, Assistant Professor, Department of History; Mary Valentis, Associate Professor, Department of English and Director, Center for Humanities, Arts and TechnoScience (CHATS); Mathias Vuille, Associate Professor, Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences.

Picturing the Anthropocene is a multi-disciplinary program organized by the University Art Museum and the Department of Art and Art History that will include a major contemporary art exhibition and related public programs exploring the subject of climate change in its broadest implications. Supported by a grant from the 2015 Presidential Initiatives Fund for Research and Scholarship.



Monday, November 23, 4:30 pm
Lecture by painter Alexander Ross
Boor Sculpture Studio

Closest parking: Visitor Lot #2.
Free and open to the public

Alexander Ross was born in 1960 in Denver and lives and works in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. His work will be included in a major exhibition that will take place July-December 2016 at the University Art Museum exploring the de-stabilizing impact of global climate change and our conflicted relationship to the natural world. Ross has exhibited at Stephen Friedman Gallery in London, Gallerie ussenotHhHussenot in Paris, Nolan Judin Berlin in Berlin, Wetterling Gallery in Stockholm and Marianne Boesky Gallery, Paul Kasmin Gallery, Mary Boone Gallery, Derek Eller Gallery and Feature Inc., all in New York City. Group exhibitions include Our Grotesque, curated by Robert Storr, at Site Santa Fe and Remote Viewing at The Whitney Museum of American Art. He is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Louis Comfort Tiffany Award, an Art Production Fund Fellowship and Residency at the Musée Claude Monet in Giverny, and an Artist Fellowship Grant from the Tesuque Foundation.

Picturing the Anthropocene is a multi-disciplinary program organized by the University Art Museum and the Department of Art and Art History that will include a major contemporary art exhibition and related public programs exploring the subject of climate change in its broadest implications. Supported by a grant from the 2015 Presidential Initiatives Fund for Research and Scholarship.