More Information on Environmental Health Sciences

Student Learning Objectives Environmental Health Sciences

Master of Science

Core Competencies

  • Epidemiology MPH core competencies.
  • Biostatistics MPH core competencies.
  • Acquire basic and advanced knowledge in selected concentrations.
  • Gain advanced technical experience in the use of sophisticated and state-of-the-art instrumentation in the chosen field.
  • Read, critically evaluate, and present scientific literature, including justifying the choice of methods applied to problems and the interpretation of results obtained.
  • Prepare a written thesis and describe the principles and procedures for techniques involved, quality assurance for data acquisition, and statistical analysis.
  • Present and orally defend knowledge gained in a public seminar.
  • Describe issues related to the proper conduct of scientific research, including policies of federal and state agencies, and the university regarding scientific misconduct.

Track-Specific Competencies

 

Toxicology

  • Acquire broad knowledge of the field of toxicology including the basic principles, target organ toxicity, and the toxicity of a select group of compounds.   Know the basic building blocks of toxicology, and be able to build a more detailed knowledge of those particular aspects of toxicology that interest them.
  • Understand the molecular foundations of biological processes, including major current concepts in biochemistry and molecular biology, and have familiarity with the research literature in the molecular biosciences and techniques and applications of modern molecular toxicology.
  • Perform basic statistical analysis of data generated from lab experiments or field studies.

Environmental Chemistry

  • Acquire broad knowledge of the field of Environmental Chemistry including development of methods for ultra-trace analysis of pollutants in air, water, soil and biological matrices; understanding of sources, chemodynamics and fate of environmental pollutants in ecosystems.
  • Understand the methods used to assess human and environmental exposure pathways of environmental pollutants and quantitative analysis of exposure levels; environmental processes that affect the dynamics and fate pollutants; multimedia monitoring and modeling, biomonitoring and bioaccumulation of toxic chemicals.
  • Be familiar with the research literature, analytical techniques, and applications of those techniques in Environmental Chemistry.  Interpret and critically analyze the data on environmental chemical analysis; conduct research independently and be able to perform basic statistical analysis of data generated from laboratory or field studies.

Environmental and Occupational Health

  • Have a broad knowledge of the field of environmental health including an understanding of the interaction of principles contained in fundamental environmental chemistry, biology, toxicology, epidemiology and general environmental health.  Using this fundamental knowledge the students will then develop a refined knowledge related to their particular field of study within environmental or occupational health.
  • Have the skills, obtained during their course of instruction, to apply technical knowledge to both field and laboratory investigations.   This will include recognizing the elements needed for a successful investigations, acquisition and integration of the information to meet study objectives and investigation resolution.
  • Assess risks from either environmental or occupational exposures and identify measures to mitigate the risks.
  • Manage data acquired during field and laboratory investigations.  This includes the basic knowledge of statistics including hypothesis development, hypothesis testing and fundamental concepts involving data manipulation using parametric and non-parametric analyses.

Master of Public Health (MPH)

MPH Core Competencies – for all MPH concentrations

BIOSTATISTICS

  • Describe the roles biostatistics serves in the discipline of public health.
  • Describe basic concepts of probability, random variation and commonly used statistical probability distributions.
  • Describe preferred methodological alternatives to commonly used statistical methods when assumptions are not met.
  • Distinguish among the different measurement scales and the implications for selection of statistical methods to be used based on these distinctions.
  • Apply descriptive techniques commonly used to summarize public health data.
  • Apply common statistical methods for inference.
  • Apply descriptive and inferential methodologies according to the type of study design for answering a particular research question.
  • Apply basic informatics techniques with vital statistics and public health records in the description of public health characteristics and in public health research and evaluation.
  • Interpret results of statistical analyses found in public health studies.
  • Develop written and oral presentations based on statistical analyses for both public health professionals and educated lay audiences.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES

  • Describe the direct and indirect human, ecological and safety effects of major environmental and occupational agents
  • Describe genetic, physiologic and psychosocial factors that affect susceptibility to adverse health outcomes following exposure to environmental hazards.
  • Describe federal and state regulatory programs, guidelines and authorities that control environmental health issues.
  • Specify current environmental risk assessment methods.
  • Specify approaches for assessing, preventing and controlling environmental hazards that pose risks to human health and safety.
  • Explain the general mechanisms of toxicity in eliciting a toxic response to various environmental exposures.
  • Discuss various risk management and risk communication approaches in relation to issues of environmental justice and equity.
  • Develop a testable model of environmental insult.

EPIDEMIOLOGY

  • Identify key sources of data for epidemiologic purposes.
  • Identify the principles and limitations of public health screening programs.
  • Describe a public health problem in terms of magnitude, person, time and place.
  • Explain the importance of epidemiology for informing scientific, ethical, economic and political discussion of health issues.
  • Comprehend basic ethical and legal principles pertaining to the collection, maintenance, use and dissemination of epidemiologic data.
  • Apply the basic terminology and definitions of epidemiology.
  • Calculate basic epidemiology measures.
  • Communicate epidemiologic information to lay and professional audiences.
  • Draw appropriate inferences from epidemiologic data.
  • Evaluate the strengths and limitations of epidemiologic reports.

HEALTH POLICY & MANAGEMENT

  • Identify the main components and issues of the organization, financing and delivery of health services and public health systems in the US.
  • Describe the legal and ethical bases for public health and health services.
  • Explain methods of ensuring community health safety and preparedness.
  • Discuss the policy process for improving the health status of populations.
  • Apply the principles of program planning, development, budgeting, management and evaluation in organizational and community initiatives.
  • Apply principles of strategic planning and marketing to public health.
  • Apply quality and performance improvement concepts to address organizational performance issues.
  • Apply "systems thinking" for resolving organizational problems.
  • Communicate health policy and management issues using appropriate channels and technologies.
  • Demonstrate leadership skills for building partnerships.

SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES

  • Identify basic theories, concepts and models from a range of social and behavioral disciplines that are used in public health research and practice.
  • Identify the causes of social and behavioral factors that affect health of individuals and populations.
  • Identify individual, organizational and community concerns, assets, resources and deficits for social and behavioral science interventions.
  • Identify critical stakeholders for the planning, implementation and evaluation of public health programs, policies and interventions.
  • Describe steps and procedures for the planning, implementation and evaluation of public health programs, policies and interventions.
  • Describe the role of social and community factors in both the onset and solution of public health problems.
  • Describe the merits of social and behavioral science interventions and policies.
  • Apply evidence-based approaches in the development and evaluation of social and behavioral science interventions.
  • Apply ethical principles to public health program planning, implementation and evaluation.
  • Specify multiple targets and levels of intervention for social and behavioral science programs and/or policies.

PUBLIC HEALTH BIOLOGY

  • Specify the role of the immune system in population health.
  • Describe how behavior alters human biology.
  • Identify the ethical, social and legal issues implied by public health biology.
  • Explain the biological and molecular basis of public health.
  • Explain the role of biology in the ecological model of population-based health.
  • Explain how genetics and genomics affect disease processes and public health policy and practice.
  • Articulate how biological, chemical and physical agents affect human health.
  • Apply biological principles to development and implementation of disease prevention, control, or management programs.
  • Apply evidence-based biological and molecular concepts to inform public health laws, policies, and regulations.
  • Integrate general biological and molecular concepts into public health.

    Environmental Health Sciences Concentration Competencies

  • Acquire basic knowledge in the area of environmental health, including two of the three sciences relevant to environmental health: chemistry, toxicology, and radiation sciences.
  • Acquire skills in collecting and analyzing environmental data, dose-response assessment and risk assessment.
  • Understand the strengths and limitations of various laboratory methodologies to make value use of scientific data and their application to environmental health problems.
  • Become part of a public health team, using scientific knowledge and communication skills to solve public health problems.

Doctor of Public Health (DrPH)

DrPH Core Competencies – for all DrPH concentrations

ADVOCACY

  • Present positions on health issues, law and policy.
  • Influence health policy and program decision-making based on scientific evidence, stakeholder input, and public opinion data.
  • Utilize consensus-building, negotiation, and conflict avoidance and resolution techniques.
  • Analyze the impact of legislation, judicial opinions, regulations, and policies on population health.
  • Establish goals, timelines, funding alternatives, and strategies for influencing policy initiatives.
  • Design action plans for building public and political support for programs and policies.
  • Develop evidence-based strategies for changing health law and policy.

 

COMMUNICATION

  • Discuss the inter-relationships between health communication and marketing.
  • Explain communication program proposals and evaluations to lay, professional, and policy audiences.
  • Employ evidence-based communication program models for disseminating research and evaluation outcomes.
  • Guide an organization in setting communication goals, objectives, and priorities.
  • Create informational and persuasive communications.
  • Integrate health literacy concepts in all communication and marketing initiatives.
  • Develop formative and outcome evaluation plans for communication and marketing efforts.
  • Prepare dissemination plans for communication programs and evaluations.
  • Propose recommendations for improving communication processes.

 

COMMUNITY/CULTURAL ORIENTATION

  • Develop collaborative partnerships with communities, policy makers, and other relevant groups.
  • Engage communities in creating evidence-based, culturally competent programs.
  • Conduct community-based participatory intervention and research projects.
  • Design action plans for enhancing community and population-based health.
  • Assess cultural, environmental, and social justice influences on the health of communities.
  • Implement culturally and linguistically appropriate programs, services, and research.

 

CRITICAL ANALYSIS

  • Apply theoretical and evidence-based perspectives from multiple disciplines in the design and implementation of programs, policies, and systems.
  • Interpret quantitative and qualitative data following current scientific standards.
  • Design needs and resource assessments for communities and populations.
  • Develop health surveillance systems to monitor population health, health equity, and public health services.
  • Synthesize information from multiple sources for research and practice.
  • Evaluate the performance and impact of health programs, policies, and systems.
  • Weigh risks, benefits, and unintended consequences of research and practice.

 

LEADERSHIP

  • Communicate an organization’s mission, shared vision, and values to stakeholders.
  • Develop teams for implementing health initiatives.
  • Collaborate with diverse groups.
  • Influence others to achieve high standards of performance and accountability.
  • Guide organizational decision-making and planning based on internal and external environmental research.
  • Prepare professional plans incorporating lifelong learning, mentoring, and continued career progressions strategies.
  • Create a shared vision.
  • Develop capacity-building strategies at the individual, organizational, and community level.
  • Demonstrate a commitment to personal and professional values.

 

MANAGEMENT

  • Implement strategic planning processes.
  • Apply principles of human resource management.
  • Use informatics principles in the design and implementation of information systems.
  • Align policies and procedures with regulatory and statutory requirements.
  • Deploy quality improvements methods.
  • Organize the work environment with defined lines of responsibility, authority, communication, and governance.
  • Develop financial and business plans for health programs and services.
  • Establish a network of relationships, including internal and external collaborators.
  • Evaluate organizational performance in relation to strategic and defined goals.

 

PROFESSIONALISM AND ETHICS

  • Manage potential conflicts of interest encountered by practitioners, researchers, and organizations.
  • Differentiate among the administrative, legal, ethical, and quality assurance dimensions of research and practice.
  • Design strategies for resolving ethical concerns in research, law, and regulations.
  • Develop tools that protect the privacy of individuals and communities involved in health programs, policies, and research.
  • Prepare criteria for which the protection of the public welfare may transcend the right to individual autonomy.
  • Assess ethical considerations in developing communications and promotional initiatives.
  • Demonstrate cultural sensitivity in ethical discourse and analysis.

 

DrPH – Environmental Health Sciences Concentration Competencies

  • Acquire skills in the application of epidemiologic methods to environmental health problems.
  • Acquire advanced knowledge in environmental health, including two areas from: chemistry. Toxicology, epidemiology, radiation science and policy.

Ph.D.

Core Competencies

  • Epidemiology MPH core competencies
  • Biostatistics MPH core competencies
  • Acquire basic and advanced knowledge in selected concentrations.
  • Gain advanced technical experience in the use of sophisticated and state-of-the-art instrumentation in the chosen field.
  • Read, critically evaluate, and present scientific literature, including justifying the choice of methods applied to problems and the interpretation of results obtained.
  • Prepare a written thesis and describe the principles and procedures for techniques involved, quality assurance for data acquisition, and statistical analysis.
  • Present and orally defend knowledge gained in a public seminar.
  • Describe issues related to the proper conduct of scientific research, including policies of federal and state agencies, and the university regarding scientific misconduct.
  • Acquire advanced knowledge in the chosen field.
  • Acquire analytical, field, and laboratory skills through rotations and specialty courses that provide training in the use and interpretation of results from sophisticated instrumentation.
  • Read, critically evaluate, and present scientific literature, including justifying the choice of methods applied to problems and the interpretation of results obtained.
  • Demonstrate a command of the fundamentals and current state of the discipline sufficient to prepare a written proposal.
  • Develop problem solving skills through application of knowledge to a research problem in the chosen track.

 

Track-Specific Competencies

 

Toxicology

  • Acquire broad knowledge of the field of toxicology including the basic principles, target organ toxicity, and the toxicity of a select group of compounds.   Know the basic building blocks of toxicology, and be able to build a more detailed knowledge of those particular aspects of toxicology that interest them.
  • Understand the molecular foundations of biological processes, including major current concepts in biochemistry and molecular biology, and have familiarity with the research literature in the molecular biosciences and techniques and applications of modern molecular toxicology.
  • Perform basic statistical analysis of data generated from lab experiments or field studies.

 

Environmental Chemistry

  • Acquire broad knowledge of the field of Environmental Chemistry including development of methods for ultra-trace analysis of pollutants in air, water, soil and biological matrices; understanding of sources, chemodynamics and fate of environmental pollutants in ecosystems.
  • Understand the methods used to assess human and environmental exposure pathways of environmental pollutants and quantitative analysis of exposure levels; environmental processes that affect the dynamics and fate pollutants; multimedia monitoring and modeling, biomonitoring and bioaccumulation of toxic chemicals.
  • Be familiar with the research literature, analytical techniques, and applications of those techniques in Environmental Chemistry.  Interpret and critically analyze the data on environmental chemical analysis; conduct research independently and be able to perform basic statistical analysis of data generated from laboratory or field studies.

 

Environmental and Occupational Health

  • Have a broad knowledge of the field of environmental health including an understanding of the interaction of principles contained in fundamental environmental chemistry, biology, toxicology, epidemiology and general environmental health.  Using this fundamental knowledge the students will then develop a refined knowledge related to their particular field of study within environmental or occupational health.
  • Have the skills, obtained during their course of instruction, to apply technical knowledge to both field and laboratory investigations.   This will include recognizing the elements needed for a successful investigations, acquisition and integration of the information to meet study objectives and investigation resolution.
  • Assess risks from either environmental or occupational exposures and identify measures to mitigate the risks.
  • Manage data acquired during field and laboratory investigations.  This includes the basic knowledge of statistics including hypothesis development, hypothesis testing and fundamental concepts involving data manipulation using parametric and non-parametric analyses.