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Undergraduate Courses

All undergraduate students in the Interdisciplinary Major in Financial Market Regulation take the following courses or appropriate substitutes approved by the Academic Program Advisor, in consultation with the participating academic units.

Business and Finance

B Acc 211 Financial Accounting (3)
Basic principles of accounting theory and practice, nature of assets and equity; income measurement and statement preparation. Not open to freshmen.

B Fin 300 Financial Management (3)
Introductory course that covers the basic concepts essential to a comprehensive understanding of financial management. Topics to be covered include valuation models, financial statement analysis, operating and financial leverage, capital budgeting, cost of capital, and working capital management. Prerequisite(s): B Acc 211.

B Fin 333 Investment Management (3)
Development of the fundamental approach to the valuation of equity securities. Examines the institutional environment in which investment decisions are made. Reviews the concept of portfolio theory, and contrasting theories of the behavior of equity securities prices. Develops various models for the pricing of common stock and equity derivative instruments. Term project requiring written and oral presentation of a securities analysis. Extensive computer spreadsheet assignments. Prerequisite(s): B Fin 300.

B Fin 375 Money and Capital Markets (3)
Rigorous examination of the U.S. financial system, stressing the importance of financial markets, financial securities, and market participants. Emphasizes the factors that influence the level and structure of interest rates, including monetary policy actions of the Federal Reserve System and financial regulation. Develops models for the pricing and analysis of bonds and various fixed income derivative instruments. Extensive computer spreadsheet assignments. Prerequisite(s): B Fin 300.

Public Policy and Law

R Pad 236 Institutions and Policy in Business Regulation (3)
This course examines the public regulation of business, surveying the field in general but with special attention to regulatory controls in financial markets.  Its subjects include the justifications and critiques of government regulation, ethical considerations in regulatory decisions, international dimensions of regulatory policy and management, and how political, legal, and technological processes shape regulation.

R Pad 435 Fundamentals of Securities Law (3)
This course examines the history, rationales, and structures of securities laws in the United States, focusing mainly on the federal level but touching on issues pertaining to the states.  Topics include public requirements governing the issuance of securities; mandatory public disclosures; legal requirements governing corporate mergers and acquisitions; primary and secondary markets for securities; exemptions from full coverage of laws, the reasons for exemptions, and how technology and market changes have affected these exemptions over time; and the basic structure of securities market regulation.

R Pad 436 Regulation of Securities Markets (3)
This course examines the history, organization, and central issues of securities market regulation in the United States.  The course discusses the roles of federal and state regulation, self-regulatory organizations, and firms within the regulatory system. Topics include, but are not limited to, the history and main principles of federal securities statutes; examinations and supervision by different levels of the regulatory system; and the relationships among change in financial markets such as financial innovations and regulatory structure and practice.

Information Management and Analysis

Choice of I Csi 105 or I Csi201

I Csi 105 Computing and Information (3)
A broad introduction to computer and information sciences and related disciplines. All of these fields study various aspects of information and the modern digital computer. Among the central topics of this course, students will learn basic computer programming because understanding how computers work is a key to understanding their use across all of the disciplines in Computing and Information. The topics include what we can and cannot known through computing, interactions between technology and humans, and a series of contemporary applications of the disciplines. The course includes critical readings, multiple perspectives, formulation and defense of opinions, common themes among diverse topics, and skills and practice of teamwork.

I Csi 201 Introduction to Computer Science (4)
Computer algorithms and their representation. The principle of information hiding and its relation to program block structure. File structure and access methods. The efficient use of computational resources. Program development and style.

I Inf 201 Introduction to Information Technology (3)
A technique-oriented introduction to client-based Web design and development technologies, including HTML/XHTML, CSS, JavaScript, digital imaging, file formats, etc.; also the elements of UNIX and networks necessary to understand and implement basic information management and transfer. Prerequisite(s): I INF 100X or I IST 100X, and permission of instructor; not open to students who are taking or have completed I IST 361.

B Itm 330 Business Information Systems & Technologies(3)
This course offers an introduction to the fundamentals of information systems and information technology in business. It focuses on models for modern business processes, integration of business functions, and the tasks and techniques for developing computer-based information systems. Topics such as project planning, time, risk, and resource management in various business applications will be supported by software tools, such as Microsoft Project. Elements of database management, information systems building and prototyping will be introduced using popular end-user software packages such as Access and Excel. Prerequisite(s): A Mat 106 and B Msi 215 or their software equivalents; B Msi 220 or A Mat 108 or A Eco 320. Offered fall and spring. NOTE: I Csi 201 and I Inf 201 will be accepted as substitutes for prerequisites for B Itm 330.

B Itm 331 Business Application Development (3)
This hands-on course includes creating and using relational database software (ACCESS), elements of database theory and modeling, information systems analysis and design. Experience with system building is gained through individual and group projects with integrate database technology with prototyping methodology. Prerequisite(s): BITM 215 or its equivalent, and BITM 330. Offered spring and summer (may not be offered every summer).

Choose One from the Following Two Courses:

B Itm 416 Communication, Networking, and Security (3)
This course provides an introduction to integrative business strategy, practice, and enabling technologies. Topics include telecommunication (concepts, protocols, and hardware), computer networks (client-server, LAN, and OSI), computer security (Security Threats and Vulnerabilities, Network Security, Cryptography, and Privacy), and related emerging technologies.

I Ist 423 Networking Essentials (3)
Covers the fundamentals of computer networking concepts and implementation and the client and server operating systems that run on networked PCs. Special emphasis is placed on network protocols and how they operate at all layers of the networking model. Emphasis also is placed on the interoperability of networks that run on multiple protocols, platforms, and operating systems.

Courses for the Interdisciplinary Minor in Financial Market Regulation

All undergraduate students in the Interdisciplinary Minor in Financial Market Regulation take the following courses or appropriate substitutes approved by the Academic Program Advisor, in consultation with the participating academic units.

Business and Finance

B Acc 211 Financial Accounting (3)
Basic principles of accounting theory and practice, nature of assets and equity; income measurement and statement preparation. Not open to freshmen.

B Fin 300 Financial Management (3)
Introductory course that covers the basic concepts essential to a comprehensive understanding of financial management. Topics to be covered include valuation models, financial statement analysis, operating and financial leverage, capital budgeting, cost of capital, and working capital management. Prerequisite(s): B Acc 211.

B Fin 333 Investment Management (3)
Development of the fundamental approach to the valuation of equity securities. Examines the institutional environment in which investment decisions are made. Reviews the concept of portfolio theory, and contrasting theories of the behavior of equity securities prices. Develops various models for the pricing of common stock and equity derivative instruments. Term project requiring written and oral presentation of a securities analysis. Extensive computer spreadsheet assignments. Prerequisite(s): B Fin 300.

B Fin 375 Money and Capital Markets (3)
Rigorous examination of the U.S. financial system, stressing the importance of financial markets, financial securities, and market participants. Emphasizes the factors that influence the level and structure of interest rates, including monetary policy actions of the Federal Reserve System and financial regulation. Develops models for the pricing and analysis of bonds and various fixed income derivative instruments. Extensive computer spreadsheet assignments. Prerequisite(s): B Fin 300.

Public Policy and Law

R Pad 236 Institutions and Policy in Business Regulation (3)
This course examines the public regulation of business, surveying the field in general but with special attention to regulatory controls in financial markets.  Its subjects include the justifications and critiques of government regulation, ethical considerations in regulatory decisions, international dimensions of regulatory policy and management, and how political, legal, and technological processes shape regulation.

R Pad 435 Fundamentals of Securities Law (3)
This course examines the history, rationales, and structures of securities laws in the United States, focusing mainly on the federal level but touching on issues pertaining to the states.  Topics include public requirements governing the issuance of securities; mandatory public disclosures; legal requirements governing corporate mergers and acquisitions; primary and secondary markets for securities; exemptions from full coverage of laws, the reasons for exemptions, and how technology and market changes have affected these exemptions over time; and the basic structure of securities market regulation.

Information Management and Data Analysis

I Csi 105 Computing and Information (3)
A broad introduction to computer and information sciences and related disciplines. All of these fields study various aspects of information and the modern digital computer. Among the central topics of this course, students will learn basic computer programming because understanding how computers work is a key to understanding their use across all of the disciplines in Computing and Information. The topics include what we can and cannot known through computing, interactions between technology and humans, and a series of contemporary applications of the disciplines. The course includes critical readings, multiple perspectives, formulation and defense of opinions, common themes among diverse topics, and skills and practice of teamwork.

I Csi 201 Introduction to Computer Science (4)
Computer algorithms and their representation. The principle of information hiding and its relation to program block structure. File structure and access methods. The efficient use of computational resources. Program development and style.