Honors Courses: 2013/14 Academic Year

The following honors courses are scheduled to be offered during the 2013/14 academic year. Courses without numbers are in the process of being approved as new honors courses. The course numbers will be posted once the new courses are approved. Courses that read "Pending" under the General Education section and are in parentheses are awaiting approval for that particular general education requirement.

Fall Semester

Department: Anthropology
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: George Broadwell
Course: The Design of Language (TANT 125)

Description: The human species has a biologically based potential for particular types of communication. By expressing air from the lungs and wiggling the tongue, for example, I can convey my displeasure with the television choices available to me. Or if I am deaf, I can convey the same idea my moving my fingers and hands in certain specified ways. It appears to be impossible to teach the full human system to any non-human species, though limited language learning by other species occurs. Because we are the only sentient species with a full language capacity, it is difficult for us to distinguish those features of human language that would be necessary components of any intelligent communication system from those that are mere accidents of human biology.

Yet in science fiction and fantasy, we often find examples of constructed languages that have been designed for communication between intelligent non-human species. Elvish, for example, is a language spoken by immortal elves in "The Lord of the Rings" and Klingon is spoken by humanoid aliens from another planet in "Star Trek." Both languages attempt to imagine what the communication system of another intelligent species might be. But, in order to construct a credible fictional language, we have to think carefully about the nature of human language. Can we imagine other ways to construct intelligent communication systems? What are the biological and conceptual constraints on a system of this type? Each student in this course will construct an artificial language which reflects the biology, history, and environment of the creatures who speak it. In the process of creating plausible alien languages, we will read both contemporary linguistics and contemporary science fiction that bear on the nature of human – and non-human – language.

General Education: None

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Department: Anthropology/Latin American and Caribbean Studies
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Marylin Masson
Course: Aztecs, Incas, & Mayans (TANT 233/TLCS 233)

Description:  This course is an survey of the archaeology and ethnohistory of the three best-known indigenous civilizations of the New World. Each is presented in terms of prehistoric background and evolution, social organization, politics and economics, religion, and art. Consideration is given to the Spanish conquest of these three groups and to their modern legacies. 

General Education: International Perspectives

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Department: Art

College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Sarah Cohen
Course: Art of the Enlightenment (TARH 252)

Description: This course examines art produced in Europe during the eighteenth century, a period of rich cultural and intellectual exchange known as the “Enlightenment.” We explore the original context, use, and significance of the art, as well as the association between artmaking and other forms of cultural inquiry and expression during this era of profound societal change. The art that we examine includes painting, sculpture, graphics, and decorative arts, and we explore a number of key trends that developed in France and England through a process of influence, exchange and rivalry between these two European powers. These trends include the playful, sensual style known as the Rococo; complex treatments of gender; the fascination with nature and science; and encounters both economic and cultural with people of other parts of the world, notably China, Japan, and Africa.

General Education:  Arts; International Perspectives

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Department: Chemistry
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Priyantha Sugathapala
Course: Advanced General Chemistry I (TCHM 130)

Description: Energy, enthalpy, thermochemistry, quantum mechanics and atomic theory, general concepts of bonding, covalent bonding and orbitals, gases, liquids, and solids. Only one of ACHM 120 and TCHM 130 may be taken for credit.

Prerequisites: One year of high school chemistry; having taken AP chemistry in high school will be helpful, but is not required.

General Education: Natural Science

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Department: Educational and Counseling Psychology
College/School: School of Education
Instructor: Jeffrey Haugaard
Course: Honors Education: History, Theory, & Practice (TCPY 110)

Description:  This course is intended for all first-semester students in The Honors College.  All first-semester students are encouraged to enroll, although enrollment is not required.  It is an introduction to university education.  One focus of the course will be on using the University Library effectively, since there is so much more to the library at a research university than other libraries that honors students are likely to have encountered.  Another focus will be on searching for and evaluating primary and secondary resources for writing college papers - a skill that all honors students will need.  We will also explore the organization of UAlbany (e.g., who is the Provost and what does she do) and explore the multiple issues involved in academic integrity.

Prerequisites: Open to first-semester students in The Honors College and second-year students in The Honors College with instructor's permission.

General Education: None

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Department: Educational and Counseling Psychology
College/School: School of Education
Instructor: Jeffrey Haugaard
Course: Exploration of Pathways: Careers and Families (TCPY 112)

Description: A course for second-year honors students that completes a three-course sequence that began during the first year. Through a series of talks by professionals from several fields, students will gain an understanding of the professional and personal pathways taken by those in various professions.  Of particular interest will the the meandering pathway that many of the speakers' lives have taken.

Prerequisites: Open to second-year students in The Honors College and third-year students in The Honors College with instructor's permission.

General Education: None

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Department: English
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Jeffrey Berman
Course: Writing About Love and Loss (TENG 226)

Description: In this course we will focus on how writers use language to convey love and loss and the ways in which they seek consolation and hope through religion, nature, art, deeds, or memory.We will explore different kinds of love--love of God, family or friends, romantic partner, or self; we will also explore different kinds of loss--loss of religious faith, family or friends, romantic partner, health, or self-respect. The minimum writing requirement is forty pages, typed, double-spaced. In addition, students will write a weekly diary entry exploring their feelings about the course.The only required text in the course is my book "Death Education in the Writing Classroom." I will not grade students on the content of their essays or on the degree of self-disclosure but only on the quality of their writing. I’ll run the course as a writing workshop: each student will be expected to bring 26 copies of his or her essay about once every three weeks.

General Education: Humanities

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Department: English
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Eric Keenaghan
Course: The Art of War (TENG 226)

Description: This course takes a multidisciplinary and cultural-studies approach to the question of the relationship between art and war during the present century and the previous one. How has the U.S. state and American society conceived of the roles of artists in times of war? How have activists and political dissidents conceived of art’s ability to resist wartime politics and to be critical of cultural and social trends during periods of war? How have public intellectuals and philosophers intervened in articulations of that relationship? How have American artists themselves conveyed ideas of art as having political bearing, either as forms of direct action or as entities semi-detached from state politics?

We will study aesthetic and cultural texts from a variety of genres—film, visual arts (painting and photography), theater and opera, music (avant-garde and popular), journalism, literature (fiction and poetry, including soldiers’ and activists’ writings), even comic books—produced as responses to three major U.S. wars: World War II, the Vietnam War, and the current so-called “War on Terror” (including the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan). We will examine these works in light of commentary drawn from a variety of discourses (history, sociology, governmental publications, philosophy). The politics of the studied literary and artistic figures will range from the conservative to the radical, the militant to the pacifist, including even the apolitical or ambivalently political. Special emphasis will be placed on how artists and their work challenge our assumptions about the relationship between art and war.

General Education: Humanities

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Department: Finance
College/School: School of Business
Instructor: Rita Biswas
Course: Global Business (TFIN 200)

Description: This interdisciplinary business course will introduce students to today’s global business environment with special emphasis on globalization of markets and globalization of production. It will first explore the phenomenon of globalization and its main drivers. It will then cover the national differences in political economy, in cultures and in ethics. Next, it will look at recent geopolitical and economic events around the world and how they relate to globalization. Finally, the course will examine the impact of globalization on businesses while looking at international trade, global marketing and global human resources management at a broad level. Students will learn about various world-wide institutions and their respective roles, such as the World Trade Organization, the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the United Nations and its auxiliary organizations.

General Education: None

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Department: Latin American and Caribbean Studies
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Johana Londono
Course: Race, Ethnicity, and the Contemporary US City (TLCS 288)

Description: This course examines the historical and contemporary ethnic and racial transformation of American cities. We begin with early 20th century Latino, Asian, and Black migrations to NYC and southern California, move onto the rise of ethnic urban politics in the 1960s and 70s, new urban transnational ties in a late 20th century global era, and end with the exponential rise and geographic expansion of ethnic and racial minority populations in various urban and suburban cities across the US. A study of these shifts in cities is of particular relevance today as professionals in creative, policy, and academic fields grapple with an increasingly multicultural US city.

The course draws from texts in anthropology, sociology, history, cultural studies, and geography, all of which are augmented with various films. By reading multidisciplinary texts that cover various cities and ethnic and racial groups across the United States, students in this course will gain a rich theoretical and analytical background on the pressing issues, individuals, and communities that have shaped and continue to shape multicultural urban America.

General Education: 21st Century; US History; Humanities

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Department: Mathematics & Statistics
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Steven Plotnick
Course: Honors Calculus II (TMAT 119)

Description: Honors version of second-semester calculus: Techniques of integration, applications of the definite integral, conics, polar coordinates, improper integrals, infinite series.  These are the same topics as AMAT 113, but topics are covered in greater depth.  TMAT 119 substitutes for AMAT 113 toward the prerequisite in any course. Only one of AMAT 113 and T MAT 119 may be taken for credit.

Prerequisites: A grade of A in A MAT 112, a grade of A in a high-school AP calculus course, or permission of the instructor.

General Education: None

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Department: Mathematics & Statistics
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Marco Varisco
Course: Honors Calculus II (TMAT 222)

Honors version of linear algebra. Same topics as A MAT 220, but topics are covered in more depth, with more emphasis on theory. This course is for students with more than average ability and more than average interest in mathematics. T MAT 222 substitutes for A MAT 220 towards the prerequisites in any course.  Only one of A MAT 222, T MAT 222, and A MAT 220 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): grade of A in A MAT 113 or A MAT 214, and permission of the instructor, or a grade of B+ in A MAT 119 , T MAT 119, A MAT 218, or T MAT 218.

General Education: None

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Department: Philosophy
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: PD Magnus
Course: Scientific Revolutions (TPHI 219)

Description:  Thomas Kuhn introduced the notion of a "paradigm shift" in science, something that has become part of our general vocabulary.  His 1962 book, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, marked a shift in the way that people think about science. This course begins with the state of science studies before Kuhn: the way that historians, sociologists, and philosophers thought about science. Then it takes a close look at Kuhn's landmark book. Finally, it explores some of the reactions and consequences that Kuhn's work has for science studies.

General Education: (Pending: Humanities)

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Department: Physics
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Vivek Jain
Course: Honors Physics I: Mechanics (TPHY 141)

Description: An introduction to the fundamentals of physics: Classical Mechanics. Topics include the concepts of force, energy and work applied to the kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies and an introduction to special relativity.  Course content will be similar to APHY 140, however, topics will be covered in more depth and at a more advanced level.  Only one of APHY 140 and TPHY 141 may be taken for credit.

Prerequisites: A college calculus course or an AP calculus course (these courses may be taken concurrently with TPHY 141).

General Education: Natural Science

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Department: Political Science
College/School: Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy
Instructor: Victor Asal
Course: Violent Political Conflict (TPOS 260)

Description: This course is designed to introduce students to the study of violent political conflict. We will examine the how, why and when of violent political conflict both domestic and international. What are the key empirical and normative questions raised by violent political conflict and what answers to these questions does the literature offer? What other strategies, like nonviolence and negotiation are available to actors instead of political violence? In this course, in addition to studying the theories that have been developed to explain the politics and history of violent political conflict, students will have an opportunity to participate in simulation exercises designed to sharpen their analytic skills in the subject area. Students will take on the roles of policy makers in several simulations. In addition students will have the opportunity to participate in ongoing research and see how different kinds of political conflict are studied in the social sciences.

General Education: Social Science

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Department: Psychology
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Robert Rosellini
Course: Advanced Introduction to Psychology (TPSY 102)

Description: The course explores in greater detail than in APSY 101 the basic methods and points of view in the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include biological bases of behavior, personality organization, intelligence, motivation, emotions, learning, and social relations. This course is intended for students who have more than average interest in psychology and who are considering becoming psychology majors or minors. Only one of APSY 101 or TPSY 102 may be taken for credit.  **Students who are receiving credit for AP psychology get credit for APSY 101.  Consequently, these students should not enroll in TPSY 102, as they will not be given credit for it.

General Education: Social Science

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Department: Social Welfare
College/School: School of Social Welfare
Instructor: Blanca Ramos
Course: Multiculturalism in a Global Society (TSSW 299)

Description: This course examines multiculturalism in the United States within a global context. Students critically analyze earlier and current global forces underlying the ethnic diversity and pluralism of today’s U.S. society. These include the cultural, economic, social, political, and technological impacts of globalization, transnational migration, and the history, diversity and distinct experiences of ethnic groups. Special attention is given to the intersection of race, gender, social class, religion, and sexual orientation with ethnic group membership. Students also evaluate theoretical stances and controversial issues related to the multicultural debate. Ecological and social justice perspectives are used as primary tools for understanding.

This course offers students an opportunity to heighten awareness of their own ethnic heritage and cultural values and beliefs that shape their world view and who they are today. It strives to enhance students' knowledge and appreciation of different ethnic groups within and outside of the U.S., and develop a deeper sensitivity to the experiences of social injustice encountered by members of some of these ethnic groups. The course material is designed to encourage students’ thought and exploration through lectures, active discussions, students’ oral presentations, guest speakers, multi-media, and a community service-learning project. The ultimate goals of this course are to encourage students to become engaged global citizens, agents of social change, and more fully prepared to function effectively in today’s multicultural global society.

General Education: 21st Century

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Department: Sociology
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Richard Lachman
Course: US Foreign Policy in Comparative Perspective (TSOC 274)

Description: Why do nations fight wars? How do governments get the human and financial resources to fight wars? We will answer these questions first by briefly looking at the historical development of nation states and trace their growing abilities to force men into armies and to tax citizens. We will then turn to three recent U.S. military confrontations: the Cuban missile crisis, the Vietnam War and the ongoing “war on terrorism.” We will look at how and why the U.S. government made the decisions it did in each circumstance, and examine the extent to which public opinion affects foreign policy.

General Education: Social Science


Spring Semester

Department: Anthropology
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Sean Rafferty
Course: Critical Thinking and Skepticism (TANT 201)

Description: How many people believe almost everything they are told, or everything that they read? How can we tell the difference between statements that are based on fact, and those based only on opinion, ideology, error, or falsehood? Why should we care in the first place? This class will help you answer these questions, and hopefully raise many more. We will cover the ways in which your own brain and senses can trick you. We will cover the common mistakes made in reasoning, “logical fallacies,” that can lead even the most critical of thinkers to false conclusions. We will cover several of the most common types of false information that people encounter today, such as psychics, astrology, or complementary and alternative medicine, and will explore why these are problematic. Our focus throughout will be on identifying current, real-world examples of “uncritical thinking” in popular and news media. Hopefully, at the end of the course we will all be better consumers of knowledge.

General Education:21st Century

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Department: Atmospheric & Environmental Science

College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: John Delano
Course: The Search for Life Beyond Earth (TGEO 110)

Description: As the Associate Director of a NASA-funded Astrobiology Institute (headquartered at RPI), this course explores the multidisciplinary field of Astrobiology that seeks answers to questions bearing on the origin and distribution of life in the galaxy. This course develops the concepts that biologists, chemists, physicists, and planetary scientists are using to address some of the most enduring questions in human history (e.g., Are we alone in the Universe?). With the support of NASA, scientists are now able to investigate natural processes that may have led to the origin of life on Earth (and possibly elsewhere), and to detect planets orbiting other stars (i.e., exoplanets). Of the more than 3,000 exoplanets that are currently known, some are Earth-sized and a subset of those may be habitable by life-as-we-know-it.

General Education: Natural Sciences

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Department: Biology
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Richard Zitomer
Course: Genomics and Biotechnology (TBIO 176)

Description: The sequencing of the genomes of a large number of organisms, from bacteria to human, has provided enormous insights into a wide range of human endeavors. Almost no aspect of human knowledge has been untouched by the information being compiled. The information gathered has also driven the development of new technologies designed to explore and exploit the information gathered. The goal of this course will be to familiarize students with the nature of the information that can be gathered from genomics and the benefits derived from the new biotechnologies. Also, simple research problems will be assigned to introduce students to the web based resources and programs used to analyze genomic data. Open to Honors College students only.

General Education: Natural Science; 21st Century

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Department: Chemistry
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Priyantha Sugathapala
Course: Advanced General Chemistry II (TCHM 131)

Description: Chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, spontaneity, entropy, free energy, electrochemistry, transition metals, coordination chemistry, organic and biochemical molecules. Only one of ACHM 121 and ACHM 131H may be taken for credit.

Prerequisites: TCHM 130 or permission of the instructor.

General Education: Natural Science

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Department: Educational and Counseling Psychology
College/School: School of Education
Instructor: Jeffrey Haugaard
Course: Introduction to Honors Research (TCPY 111)

Description:A course for all second-semester honors students and all second-year honors students admitted during their first year. Students will be introduced to undergraduate honors research through presentations of their honors theses by senior honors students and by presentations by the instructor about research ethics.  Information about how to find a research advisor will be presented and students will explore which professors might be appropriate advisors for the senior thesis that they will be writing in three years.

Prerequisites: Open to first-year students in The Honors College and second-year students in The Honors College with instructor's permission.

General Education: None

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Department: Criminal Justice
College/School: School of Criminal Justice
Instructor: Alissa Wordern
Course: Introduction to Criminal Justice (TCRJ 201)

Description: The purpose of this course is to introduce students to a social science approach to learning about American criminal justice policy and administration. We will examine how the American criminal justice system operates, and with what consequences, studying the principal institutions of the system, the actors within the system, the goals of criminal justice administration, and the objectives and implementation of criminal justice policy at national, state, and community levels. Throughout the course, we will learn to recognize the limits of what we know about social and legal responses to crime, the ways we develop knowledge, and the importance of objectivity and reflection in the discussion of what are often controversial and politicized issues.

General Education: None

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Department: East Asian Studies
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Anthony DeBlasi
Course: China's Confucian Tradition (TEAS 250)

Description: This course will address central philosophical and ethical issues in the Confucian tradition, a main source of East Asian cultural values. The emphasis will be on reading and discussing translations of primary sources, including the Analects of Confucius, the Mencius, excerpts from the other Confucian Classics, as well as Confucianism’s key interpreters in later centuries. Topics addressed will include human nature, the foundations of political life, ethical decision-making, and the Confucian vision of learning. Upon completion of the course, students will have an appreciation of both the richness of the tradition and the challenges it faces in adapting to the modern world.

General Education: Humanities; International Perspectives

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Department: English
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Jennifer Greinman
Course: Upstate America: New York and the Literary Imagination (TENG 270)

Description: This course will offer a broad survey of American literature through the very focused prism of upstate New York, to argue that part of the particularity and even peculiarity of this region is its significance to the settlement, development, and the very idea of the American nation. Beginning with records of the creation of the Iroquois confederacy and concluding with Susan Choi’s novel of a Chinese-American student radical, hiding from the FBI in the Catskills, we will explore the ways in which this region has functioned for centuries as a crucible for the concepts and crises around which a ‘national’ American literary tradition developed: frontier violence, nationalism, political emancipation, spiritual awakening, poverty, immigration, and emigration. Students will thus be introduced to key questions and debates of literary scholars, who are engaged with issues of canon formation, canon expansion, and literary nationalism.

Some of the readings for this course will be deeply rooted in the upstate region – such as those by James Fenimore Cooper, Herman Melville, and William Kennedy – while others merely pass through on their way somewhere else – such as those by Harriet Jacobs, and Henry James – but taken together, all of them suggest that upstate New York occupies a strange position in the literary imagination of America. Partly, this is because upstate New York has always been a region of strange imaginings, from the ghost stories of Ichabod Crane to the spiritual revelations of Joseph Smith and “Mother” Ann Lee. Partly, though, this is also because upstate New York has always been a region of contested borders, as texts from Cooper’s Leatherstocking novels to the 2008 film Frozen River all make abundantly clear.

General Education: 21st Century

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Department: English
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Randall Craig
Course: Law and Literature (TENG 226)

Description:
The course title “Law and Literature” refers, first, to representations law in the literature of four periods: Ancient Greece, Renaissance England, Victorian Britain, and Twentieth-Century America. Special attention will be paid to recurring themes such as divine versus human law, the power of the state versus the rights of the individual, and the demands of law versus the principles of justice. Second, the title signifies an exploration of the function of literature in the legal world. What role do elements typically thought of as literary—such as story telling, drama/performance, and rhetoric—have in the law? The study of the primary texts will be accompanied by readings in legal theory, cultural studies, and narratology.

General Education: Humanities

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Department: Health Policy, Management, and Behavior
College/School: Public Health
Instructor: Christine Bozlak
Course: Maternal and Child Health (THPM 250)

Description: The goal of the course is to introduce students to the maternal and child health (MCH) field. This course will give students a beginning knowledge base of MCH within a public health context, focusing on the major life course issues addressed in MCH, both domestically and globally, as well as public health approaches to address these issues. This course will also introduce students to some of the professional, educational, and  career opportunities within MCH. Guest lecturers with expertise in specific MCH topics will be invited to participate in the course.

General Education: (Pending: Social Science)

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Department: Mathematics and Statistics
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Steven Plotnick
Course: Honors Calculus III (TMAT 218)

Description: Curves and vectors in the plane, geometry of three-dimensional space, vector functions in three-space, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line and surface integrals.

Prerequisites: TMAT 119 or permission of the instructor.

General Education: Mathematics

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Department: Philosophy
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Rachel Cohon
Course: Introduction to Ethical Theory (TPHI 212)

Description: What is the basis of our moral judgments and attitudes? What do right actions have in common that makes them right, and what do wrong actions have in common that makes them wrong? (Is it that they are commanded by a divine being? Required by existing social rules? Are actions right or wrong because of their consequences for human happiness? Their conformity to a rule of reason?) What sort of person is it best to be? What is valuable in life?

We will examine answers to these classic philosophical questions about ethics in the works of historical and contemporary philosophers. These answers take the form of ethical theories. We will study a selection drawn from these theories: the divine command theory, cultural ethical relativism, the moral sentiment theory, utilitarianism, Kantian ethics, virtue ethics, and the immoralism of Nietzsche. We will look closely at the justifications offered for these theories, and subject the theories to critical analysis. In order to think and write clearly and reason well about these issues, we will begin with an introduction to logical arguments and we will work on the special skills required for writing philosophy.

General Education: Humanities

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Department: Physics
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Vivek Jain
Course: Honors Physics II: Electromagnetism (TPHY 151)

Description:  An introduction to the fundamentals of physics: electrostatics and magnetism, including the concepts of the electric and magnetic fields, electric potential and basic circuits; the laws of Gauss, Ampere and Raraday; Maxwell's equations; geometrical optics. Course content will follow APHY 150. However, topics will be covered in more depth and at a more advanced level. Only one of A PHY 150, APHY 151, or TPHY 151 may be taken for credit.

Prerequisites: TPHY 141 or permission of instructor; AMAT 113 or TMAT 119 (may be taken concurrently with TPHY 151).

General Education: Natural Science

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Department: Political Science/Public Health
College/School: Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy/School of Public Health
Instructor: Kamiar Alaei
Course: Health and Human Rights: An Interdisciplinary Approach (TPOS 272/TSHP 272)

Description: This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to health and human rights and the contemporary challenges and solutions associated with them. The course will be taught by physicians and human rights champions Kamiar Alaei and Arash Alaei, with guest lectures from experts in public health, philosophy, social welfare, law, gender studies, public administration, and the United Nations, among others. Through lectures, discussion, and case studies, students will develop a broad theoretical understanding of health as a human right, become familiar with legal and policy frameworks to support public health, and acquire skills in the application of these concepts and the implementation and evaluation of solutions to our modern health challenges.

General Education: 21st Century

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Department: Psychology
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Ewan McNay
Course: Honors Introduction to Behavioral Neuroscience (TPSY 214)

Description:   The goals of this course are two-fold; One, to provide an in-depth understanding of several selected topics in the field of Behavioral Neuroscience; Two, to provide an opportunity to critically evaluate research in the area of Behavioral Neuroscience.  We’ll be discussing - and you’ll need to think and work - at several levels, from the cognitive/ behavioral down to the details of neurochemistry and molecular biology.  There’s no other way to sensibly do neuroscience, and in any case it’s helpful to be exposed to how molecular-level events influence and cause macro-level behavior.

General Education: Natural Science; Social Science.