Curriculum 2008 - 2009

Fall 2008

Department: Anthropology
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor:   Jennifer Burrell
Course: Human Rights & Wrongs: Anthropological Explorations (T ANT 141)

Anthropology College of Arts & Sciences   Jennifer Burrell Human Rights & Wrongs: Anthropological Explorations (T ANT 141)

Description: This course is designed to provide an overview of human rights and anthropology from theoretical and historical points of view and from the vantage point of engagement and practice.  Using a critical approach, we will move away from the notion of a set category or monolithic legal structure toward an understanding of a flexible and elastic set of conceptual frameworks used to accomplish transitions, make claims and gain access to resources.  In doing so, we will consider the increasing transnationalization of rights discourse and the growing terrain in which claims, legal and otherwise, are made through it. A series of international and national case studies will be examined.

Throughout the course, we will consider human rights practice, broadly understood, in various forms.  We shall do so with the premise that differential access to rights exists in the everyday lives of people and this is frequently addressed in ways that may not fit into our existing definitions of human rights.  These nevertheless constitute the defense of a right that has been abused due to legal, political or structural violence.

More specifically, course objects include the following:

    * How anthropology’s colonialist heritage has led to a particular conception of rights
    * How anthropological concepts and theories contribute to contemporary human rights debates, and the underlying assumption of these theories
    * How anthropologists grapple with ethical and activist dilemmas involved in human rights advocacy work and contribute to policy making

As an Honors course, this class offers the opportunity for in-depth consideration of and debate about moral, ethical, and disciplinary dilemmas involved in human rights theory, practice and advocacy through lectures, films, guest lecturers, focus groups, and presentations. The course includes a semester long writing project requiring students to become human rights 'experts' using concepts from the course.
Meeting Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 11:45 - 1:05
General Education: Social Science

 

Department: Biology
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor:  Richard Zitomer
Course: Genomics & Biotech: Broad-ranging Impact on Mankind (T BIO 176)

Description: The sequencing of the genomes of a large number of organisms, from bacteria to human, has provided enormous insights into a wide range of human endeavors.  Almost no aspect of human knowledge has been untouched by the information being compiled including both the obvious, such as medicine, agriculture, psychology, anthropology, and environment sciences, to the less obvious, such as history, sociology, language and communication, and ethics.  The ongoing sequencing of the genomes from a large number of individual humans has led to the design of individualized medical treatments for people with the same diseases, changes in biologists understanding of race, and a clearer picture of the evolution of the human species.  Genome sequencing has also driven new technologies designed to explore further the use of the information gathered.

The goal of this course will be to familiarize students with the nature of the information that can be gathered from genomics, and where the field will be going in the future.  Examples will be used to emphasize the broad range of fields impacted by the new technology.  Also, given the high information content of genomes, 12 billion bits for the human genome, data analyses has required the development of specific computer programs and web resources.  Students will be introduced to these freely available tools, and with appropriate access to sufficient computers, will be assigned simple research problems for the students to learn how to use the web resources and programs.
Meeting Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 2:45 - 4:05
General Education:  Application has been made to the SUNY system for this course to meet the natural sciences requirement.  It is expected to be approved, but that approval has not yet occurred as of 7/20/08.

 

Department: Chemistry
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Lawrence Snyder
Course: Chemical Principles I: Advanced General Chemistry I (T CHM 130)

Description: Energy, enthalpy, thermochemistry, quantum mechanics and atomic theory, general concepts of bonding, covalent bonding and orbitals, gases, liquids, and solids. Only one of A CHM 120 and A CHM 130H may be taken for credit.

Prerequisite(s): One year of high school chemistry and one year of high school physics or concurrent enrollment in college physics. Students will also be required to pass a test to assess their knowledge of chemistry fundamentals on the first day of classes. Those not passing the test will be advised to enroll in A CHM 120.
Meeting Time (first course): Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9:20-10:15
Meeting Time (second course): Monday, Wednesday, Friday 10:25-11:20
General Education: Natural Science

 

Department: Communications
College/Schools: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Annis Golden
Course: Interacting with Organizations (T COM 250Z)

Description: Some communication scholars claim that we live in an “organizational age” with many – if not almost all – of our daily activities embedded within organizations. Most of us earn our livings within organizations and obtain the services we need for daily life from organizations. In fact, many of us derive much of our sense of who we are from our organizational memberships. The central concern of this course is examining how individuals negotiate their relationships with organizations. The course focuses primarily on the dynamics of employee-employer relationships, but it also looks at how individuals interact with organizations as consumers of their services in the context of healthcare organizations.
Meeting Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 8:45 - 10:05
General Education: Writing intensive

 

Department: Criminal Justice
College/School: School of Criminal Justice
Instructor: Alissa Pollitz Worden
Course: Introduction to Criminal Justice (T CRJ 201)

Description: The purpose of this course is to introduce students to a social science approach to learning about U.S. criminal justice policy and administration. We will examine how this society’s criminal justice systems and apparatus operate, and with what consequences, studying the principal institutions of the system, the actors within the system, the goals of criminal justice administration, and the objectives and implementation of criminal justice policy at national, state, and community levels.  Throughout the course, we will learn to recognize the limits of what we know about social and legal responses to crime, the ways we develop knowledge, and the importance of objectivity and reflection in the discussion of what are often controversial and politicized issues.   Our approach to studying criminal justice will be based on social science theories (about individuals, organizations, and political bodies), and on empirical evidence.  The study of criminal justice is genuinely interdisciplinary, and we shall draw upon history, political science, sociology, policy, law, and economics to answer these questions.

Substantive knowledge objectives include the following:

    * What is a crime?  What is not? Who gets to decide?
      What is justice? How have our notions of justice evolved over time?
    * The “law on the books” isn’t always the same as the “law in practice.”  What accounts for the distinction?
      Society expects criminal justice systems to reduce crime.  Is that a reasonable expectation?
    * How well do we understand the social consequences of criminal justice policies?
    * Classes will be based on both lecture and discussion formats.  In addition to discussing common readings, students will develop individual research projects based on policy issues that they shall select.

Meeting Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 8:45 - 10:05
General Education:  Application has been made to the SUNY system for this course to meet the social sciences requirement.  It is expected to be approved, but that approval has not yet occurred as of 7/20/08.

 

Department: Computer Science
College/School: College of Computing & Information
Instructor: George Berg
Course: Introduction to Computer Science (T CSI 201)

Description: Students will learn how computers and computer software work.  In contrast to most other introductory computer science courses, that use abstract examples to show how computer software works and should be written, this introductory course will use small personal robots.  Students will learn how they can write programs to control the robots.  To get the robot, with increasing sophistication, to sense its environment and to move about, explore and change this environment.  As we get the robots to do more and more, we learn more about the computer hardware and software that underlies them.
Using the robots, students will learn three important things.  First, they will learn the first semester’s lessons in developing and writing computer software.  Second and third, through the class exercises and team projects, the students will learn group communication and teamwork skills.  Based upon feedback from employers and potential employers of UA graduates, these are the basis of skills they are looking for in the technically savvy graduates they wish to hire. Specifically, the programming they learn will form the nucleus of skills they need to take the follow-on course (CSI310, Data Structures), and that they will build on throughout the CS curriculum.
Meeting Time: Mondays & Wednesdays 2:45 - 4:05

 

Department: Education & Counseling Psychology
Collge/School:   School of Education
Instructor: Joan Newman
Course: Current Issues in Child Development (T EPS 220X)

Description: This course will introduce major themes and current issues in the study of child development. Students will be introduced to the importance of research based knowledge to analyze and investigate these issues. Students will complete weekly readings and regular assignments, and will be required to undertake observational research and present their findings at a poster session at the end of the course.
Meeting Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 11:45-1:05
General Education: Information Literacy

 

Department: English
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Don Byrd
Course: Introduction to English Studies: Reading Through the Information Glut (T ENG 210)

Description: It has been estimated that if all human communications before the appearance of digital technology were transcribed and digitized, it would amount to a total of about 5 exabytes of data (an exabyte being a billion gigabytes).  Now more than 3 exabytes of new data are being created each year. Thus, every three or four years, more information is being produced than in the entire previous human history up to—let’s say—1970, and this production now increases exponentially.  In the face of this explosion of information, the amount of information that an individual can sample is insignificant. What is a novel or the life’s work of a poet in the face of these quantities?

In the course, we will read one very large novel, Thomas Pynchon’s Gravity’s Rainbow, and related materials.  A book that always appears on lists of the greatest books of the twentieth century, Gravity’s Rainbow is about the questions of information, information management, and the paranoia and conspiracies theories that are generated by the information glut. It touches on many of the most perplexing realities and theoretical questions of the twentieth-century, and, to the extent time allows, all will be explored. The goal will be understand what literature is in a society in which literate communication is no longer the primary means of information exchange. Students will be introduced to the fundamental methods of literary study and the basic theories of literary criticism. The course will be combination of seminar and workshop.  Students will be expected to prepare materials to contribute to the problem posed by each session. Reading will include critical essays and other relevant texts, especially history, theoretical texts dealing with the information technologies, and texts that inform the novel.
Meeting Time: Mondays & Wednesdays 2:45 - 4:05

 

Department: English (Journalism Program)
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Thomas Bass
Course: Visual Culture (T JRL 220)

Description: “Visual Culture” explores the increasing dominance of visual media in contemporary life. The course examines how traditional narrative forms of storytelling are being replaced by visual forms of storytelling in journalism, film, television, the internet, video games, anime, graphic novels, advertising, and public relations. Particular attention will be paid to the global flow of visual culture and the digital technologies that facilitate these cultural exchanges. This is an introductory course in a fundamental area of interdisciplinary studies. It is designed to introduce students to critical thinking, visual analysis, and the skills involved in writing accomplished, thoughtful prose.
Meeting Time: Wednesdays 2:45 - 5:35
General Education: Arts

 

Department: History (Documentary Studies Program)
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Gerald Zahavi
Course: Introduction to Documentary Studies (T HIS 251Z)

Description: Nonfiction, research-based films, radio programs, hypermedia presentations, photographs, and long-form analytical narratives shed light on our world. They portray real people, events, and situations--but with an aesthetic sensibility that transforms these depictions into compelling and emotive statements about our social, cultural, political, and economic lives. As John Grierson, a pioneer of the documentary form, noted, “Documentary is the creative treatment of actuality.” It is that special combination of fealty to the real and authentic and attention to artistry and personal vision that defines this distinctive genre and that invites such a broad variety of humanists and technophiles into its fold. This is a gateway course for all students majoring in Documentary Studies and is also an excellent opportunity for majors and non-majors alike to gain an understanding of the myriad forms of past and present documentary work.

Students will obtain a general introduction to the theoretical and practical approaches to documentary work in radio/audio, video/film, hypermedia/multimedia, photography, and long-form nonfiction writing. The course will cover both the history and some of the rudimentary skills involved in the production of each documentary mode, placing a strong emphasis on linking the research methods of the social sciences and the humanistic concerns of the arts. Among the subjects covered in Doc 251/His 251 are: media archives and archival research, ethical and legal issues associated with documentary research and production, the history and theory of documentary photography, film, radio, long-form non-fiction prose and documentary editing—as well as the newest documentary genre, hypermedia.
Meeting Time: Tuesdays 2:45 - 5:35
General Education: Writing Intensive

 

Department: History
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Susan Gauss
Course: The World in the 20th Century (T HIS 158)

Description: The goal of this course is to examine the principal political, economic, cultural, and intellectual developments in world history in the twentieth century.  By examining critical moments of contact and exchange, we will analyze how the movement of people, ideas, militaries, commodities, disease, and religion has contributed to increasing interdependence between world regions.  While we will look at globalization as a process of worldwide integration, we will also seek to understand how integrative processes have fostered cultural conflict.  By looking at local worlds within the context of globalizing shifts, we will analyze how recent historical changes have fueled integration, for example around concepts of modernity or western values, alongside the continuation of cultural diversity and local differences.
A primary objective includes fostering an appreciation among students of the distinct understandings of world history generated in different areas of the world, and how those divergent perspectives shape global interaction.  A second objective is to teach students about how history is practiced by historians, including how they identify and analyze sources (ranging from documents, letters, and diaries to media and art) in order to create a synthetic and balanced understanding of our past. The course will balance lectures with student participation (via discussions and presentations) and diverse media.
Meeting Time: Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays 1:40 - 2:35
General Education: Global & Cross Cultural Perspectives

 

Department: Languages, Literatures, & Cultures (French Studies)
College/Schools   College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Mary Beth Winn
Course: Women in Medieval France (T FRE 201)

Description: A study of women in France from the 5th through the 15th centuries, as viewed in literature, history, and the arts.  The course will examine the many roles and occupations of women in society against the background of the prevailing ideas about the nature of woman. Object of desire as well as incarnation of evil, daughter of Eve or of the Virgin, woman was at once worshipped and maligned.  If the ideal woman was “chaste, silent, and obedient,” others were warriors, writers, and saints.
Learning objectives of the course include: knowledge of the place and condition of women in medieval society, of their roles and powers, and of the nature of “woman” as represented in multiple texts (literary, historical, religious, musical, artistic), familiarity with works by significant woman writers, ability to analyze, discuss, and compare texts of various genres, to conduct a research project on some aspect of the course subject, and to present it (orally and in writing), and consideration of the continuing appeal of medieval heroines such as Joan of Arc in literature for children and adults. These objectives will be sought through discussion, oral reports, lectures, and trips to area museums and libraries.
Meeting Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 10:15 - 11:35
General Education: Humanities; Europe

 

Department: Mathematics and Statistics
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Alexandre Tchernev
Course: Honors Calculus I (T MAT 118)

Description: Honors version of first-semester calculus. Same topics as A MAT 112, but topics are covered in greater depth. This course is for students with more than average ability and more than average interest in mathematics. Students with a strong interest in mathematics or the physical sciences should consider taking T MAT 118 instead of A MAT 112. T MAT 118 substitutes for A MAT 112 toward the prerequisite in any course. Only one of A MAT 112 & T MAT 118 may be taken for credit.

Prerequisite(s): Three years of secondary school mathematics or permission of the instructor.
Meeting Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 1:35-2:25 & Tuesday 11:45-12:40
General Education: Math

 

Department: Mathematics and Statistics
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Antun Milas
Course: Honors Calculus II (T MAT 119)

Description: Honors version of second-semester calculus. Same topics as A MAT 113, but topics are covered in greater depth. For students with more than average ability and more than average interest in mathematics. Students with a strong interest in mathematics or the physical sciences should consider taking T MAT 119 instead of A MAT 113. T MAT 119 substitutes for A MAT 113 toward the prerequisite in any course. Only one of A MAT 113 & T MAT 119 may be taken for credit.

Prerequisite(s): T MAT 118, a grade of A in A MAT 112, or permission of the instructor.
Meeting Time: Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays 11:30-12:25 & Monday 1:40-2:35

 

Department: Mathematics and Statistics
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: William Hammond
Course: Honors Calculus of Several Variables (T MAT 214)

Description: Curves and vectors in the plane, geometry of three-dimensional space, vector functions in three-space, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line and surface integrals.

Prerequisite(s): A MAT 113 or T MAT 119.
Meeting Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 10:15-11:35 & Wednesday 10:25-11:20
General Education: Math

 

Department: Music
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Robert Gluck
Course: Modern Jazz: Bebop to Free Jazz and Beyond (T MUS 223)

Description: Modern Jazz arose in response to the World War II swing era, broadening forms of musical expression throughout music, and the emerging civil rights movement. This course will explore the major composer / performers of this improvisatory art form, with an emphasis on Charlie Yarbird Parker and his influence on the post-bop, modal and impressionistic forms that followed with Miles Davis, John Coltrane and Ornette Coleman. It will survey special topics including singers, Latin Jazz, Jazz Fusion, the creative avant-garde movements from Chicago and current trends.

Course learning objectives include:

Gain an understanding of the musical forms and aesthetic ideas of jazz after World War II
Understand the evolving nature and multiplicity of forms of jazz expression, from more traditional-leaning to avant-garde
Become familiar with the core repertory of that musical period
Explore the socio-political context for the evolution of Modern jazz
These course objectives will be achieved through lecture, demonstration, listening, and discussion.
Meeting Time: Mondays & Wednesdays 4:15 - 5:35
General Education: Arts

 

Department: Philosophy
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Bradley Armour-Garb
Course: Introduction to Logic (T PHI 210)

Description: The course is an in-depth introduction to formal logic, together with the philosophical issues that test (or determine) the nature and structure of a logic. It serves as an introduction to classical and modern logic with an emphasis on the theory and application of truth functions. It also serves as an introduction to quantification; discussion of the structure and properties of formal systems of logic. Students should be prepared to do daily homework assignments.
The learning objectives of the course include:
To master the propositional and the predicate
To get a sense of the relationships between logic and mathematics and logic and linguistics
Meeting Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 8:45 - 10:05
General Education: Humanities; Math

Department: Physics
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: William Lanford
Course: Honors Physics I: Mechanics (T PHY 141)

Description: Course content will follow A PHY 140. However, topics will be covered in more depth and at a somewhat more advanced level. Students with a strong interest in physical sciences should consider taking T PHY 141 instead of A PHY 140. Only one of A PHY 140 or T PHY 141 may be taken for credit.

Prerequisite (or taking one of these courses concurrently): A MAT 111 or 112 or T MAT 118.

Meeting Time: Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays 11:30 - 12:25
General Education: Natural Science

 

Department: Political Science
College/School: Nelson A. Rockefeller College of Public Affairs & Policy
Instructor: Victor Asal
Course: Comparative & International Politics (T POS 102)

Description: The course is an introduction to the actors, issues and processes of international relations and the theories that attempt to explain them.  We will examine several of the central questions that interest political scientists when they explore international relations.  Why are there wars?  How is peace achieved?  What are the implications of anarchy for world politics?  How do states and decision-makers choose between conflict and cooperation?  How does politics interact with economics on the global scene?  Do morality and norms effect international relations and if so how?  The goal of the course is to create a familiarity with the elements that make up international relations and a critical understanding of the theories that explain them.  The course will stress analytical thinking. Each student will be encouraged to identify the theories that he or she feels best explains international interactions and to justify those choices.
The course will be taught in a seminar fashion that will integrate lectures with classroom discussions.  In addition, the class will use historical and theoretical games and exercises in order to teach theoretical and empirical aspects of international relations.  We will use simulations and “games” to illustrate and explore various aspects of international relations theories. Finally, the class as a whole will work together on an international relations research project, exploring in depth empirical data to test theories about ethnic conflict and inclusion.
Meeting Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 8:45 - 10:05
General Education: Social Sciences, Global & Cross-Cultural Perspectives

Department: Psychology
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Robert Rosellini
Course: Advanced Introduction to Psychology (T PSY 102)

Description: The course explores in greater detail than in A PSY 101 the basic methods and points of view in the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include biological bases of behavior, personality organization, intelligence, motivation, emotions,
learning, and social relations. This course is intended for students who have more than average interest in psychology and who are considering becoming psychology majors. Only
one of A PSY 101 or T PSY 102 may be taken for credit.
The objective of the course is to gain a deep understanding of how the science of psychology has evolved and continues to develop to further our understanding of both human and animal behavior. The principal forms of instruction will be discussion and lecture supplemented with multimedia presentations and laboratory-data collection experiences.
Meeting Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 1:15 - 2:35
General Education: Social Science

 

Spring 2009

Department: Anthropology
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: George Broadwell
Course: The Design of Language  (T ANT 125Z)

Description: The human species has a biologically based potential for particular types of communication. By expressing air from the lungs and wiggling the tongue, for example, I can convey my displeasure with the television choices available to me. Or if I am deaf, I can convey the same idea my moving my fingers and hands in certain specified ways. It appears to be impossible to teach the full system to any non-human species,
though limited language learning by other species is attested. Because we are the only sentient species with a full language capacity, it is difficult for us to distinguish those features of human language which would be necessary components of any intelligent communication system from those which are mere accidents of human biology.

Yet in science fiction and fantasy, we often find examples of constructed languages, which have been designed for communication between intelligent non-human species. Elvish, for example, is a language spoken by immortal elves in The Lord of the Rings. and Klingon is spoken by humanoid aliens from another planet in Star Trek. Both languages attempt to imagine what the communication system of another intelligent species might be like. But in order to construct a credible fictional language, however, we have to think carefully about the nature of human language. Can we imagine other ways to construct intelligent communication systems? What are the biological and conceptual constraints on a system of this type?

Students will be introduced to important concepts of linguistic theory through investigation of how intelligent communication systems might be designed. They will contrast human language structures with constructed languages found in science fiction/fantasy literature. Each student will construct an artificial language which reflects the biology, history, and environment of the creatures who speak it. In the course of creating plausible alien languages, we will read both contemporary linguistics and contemporary science fiction that bear on the nature of human and nonhuman language.

General Education: Writing intensive

Meeting time: T Th 4:15-5:35

Department: Chemistry
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Lawrence Snyder
Course: Chemical Principles II: Advanced General Chemistry (T CHM 131)

Description: Chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, spontaneity, entropy, free energy, electrochemistry, transition metals, coordination chemistry, organic and biochemical molecules. Only one of A CHM 121 and A CHM 131H may be taken for credit.

Prerequisite(s): T CHM 130 or permission of the instructor.

General Education: Natural Sciences

Meeting time: MWF 9:20-10:15

Department: Education & Counseling Psychology
College/School: School of Education
Instructor: Heidi Andrade
Course: Introduction to the Psychological Processes of Schooling (T EPS 200)

Description: The purpose of this course is to provide a basic understanding of theories and research in learning, human development, academic motivation, and intelligence, as well as the ways in which theories about how children grow and learn can be applied to teaching and learning. We will draw on a variety of instructional approaches including assigned readings, reflective writing, hands-on activities, class discussions, group projects, and individual papers.

Goals of the course include:

    * Understanding one’s own and others’ theories about how children learn.
    * Understanding one’s own and others’ theories about children’s cognitive, linguistic, personal, social, moral, and emotional development.
    * Understanding how theories of learning and development can inform teaching practice.
      Knowing the limitations of current theories of learning and development.
    * Being able to think critically and ask questions about educational psychology.

General Education: none

Meeting time: M 2:45-5:35

Department: English and Medieval & Renaissance Studies
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Ineke Murakami
Course: Imagining Renaissance (T ENG 226/ T M&R 298)

Description: The English Renaissance is one of the marvels of virtual reality. Defined in no small part by 19th and early 20th century scholars like E.M.W. Tillyard and T.S. Eliot, this golden age actually began in the minds of 15th century writers and artists who, in striving to fashion ideal selves, turned away from their immediate past to embrace a distant one imagined to be superior.  The resulting disappointments, violent changes, and thrilling flashes of insight are what the renaissance--or “rebirth” of a putatively ancient commitment to the arts, sciences, world-exploration, and social programming--was all about.  But it wasn’t as flattering as early moderns depicted it.  We now realize that “The Elizabethan World Picture” once accepted without question, was less an historically accurate reflection of the period than one of its finest fictions.
This course assumes the constructedness of history, the unevenness of cultural development, and the power of imaginative work to engender reality.  Over the semester, we will examine some of the key imaginative texts of what is now called “early modernity,” from poetry, paintings, and plays that articulate social issues, to discoveries in astronomy and abroad that call the entire universe into question.  We will explore early versions of concerns we have yet to resolve: issues of class, race, religion, and other terms of identity.
Students will be responsible for passing three quizzes, producing two research papers (one with an historical fiction option), engaging in regular, lively dialogue in the classroom and on the electronic Discussion Board associated with EReserve, and presenting their research in oral form at a “symposium” toward the semester’s end, on which their peers will comment.

General Education: Humanities

Meeting time: T Th 11:45-1:05

Department: English (Journalism Program)
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Nancy Roberts
Course: The Mass Media and War in U.S. History (T JRL 1xx)

Description: This course explores the roles, functions, and responsibilities of the mass media in times of war.  Focusing primarily on the news media, it examines how war has been represented in the mass media historically, from the Revolutionary War through the Civil War, World Wars I and II, the Korean War, Vietnam War, and Persian Gulf Wars I and II. The course gives students practice in thinking critically about the roles, functions, and responsibilities of the mass media relative to society, particularly in times of war.  Students will learn how to “read” and interpret mass media messages and to understand the tensions between the media and the military, as well as the development of journalism and its technologies, all in historical context. The principal forms of instruction for this course include: discussion of various written and visual works, including archival news broadcasts, newsreels, films, photojournalism, and print journalism, as well as weekly writing assignments, student presentations, field trips, and other hands-on projects and assignments.

General Education: Writing Intensive; U.S. History

Meeting time: TBA

Department: Geography and Planning and East Asian Studies College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Christopher Smith
Course: Reform & Resistance in Contemporary China (T GOG/EAC 230)

Description: The course provides a survey of economic and social change in reform-era China (1978-present), beginning with a broad review of the policies that have brought about such a monumental restructuring of the economy. In the later sections of the class, discussion will focus on the human impacts of the reforms and the extent to which the Chinese people have been constrained in their struggles for a better life and a more just and equitable society. Readings and materials from other media (e.g., contemporary film) will be used to illustrate some of the ways the Chinese people have been exerting agency in shaping their own fate and resisting the inevitable forces that seem likely to overwhelm them in the new era of free-wheeling capitalism.

Classroom discussions will focus on specific case studies of resistance drawn from a variety of sites and a range of contexts in contemporary China, which will be discussed and analyzed in the context of social science theories about the nature of resistance and its outcomes. Students will be required to read in advance of each class and will be tested on the readings, either with a mini-quiz, or in the context of discussion group topics. Two examinations, both with a short essay answer format, will be given, and a research paper on a pre-determined topic related to the course content will be assigned. This class is offered as part of the Fall 2007 China Semester.

General Education: Social Sciences; Regions Beyond Europe

Meeting time: T Th 2:45-4:05

Department: History
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Ronald Berger
Course: Historical Fiction (T HIS 226)

Description: This course aims to bring together two disciplines with wholly dissimilar assumptions, methods, and goals and, by placing them in a “linear accelerator” and setting off an intellectual chain reaction, to determine if the result
is a quantum leap in understanding.

In this course we will bring together history and fiction, the most uncomfortable of bedmates, to determine what
writers can learn from historians, but, more important, what historians can learn from fiction writers. Why thrash
historians this way: Because fiction writers argue that events are lived as stories, that participants make sense of those
events as stories, that it is necessary to research history [a story] the way writers do [from the elements of story]. The
events we will study include the following: Bubonic plague in medieval Europe; the assassination of Richard II; the birth of modern science; slavery’s Middle Passage; Civil War battles; Polar exploration; New York City on the eve of
the 20th century: the psychiatric effects of World War I; Stalin’s Gulag; working-class women in England, 1970-90;
the Vietnam War.

The objective of the course is to introduce students to the methods, goals, and assumptions of both historical research and creative fiction and, by comparing the way these two fields work, uncover their weakness and strengths.

General Education: Humanities

Meeting time: T Th 2:45-4:05

Department: History
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: David Hochfelder
Course: Go-Getters & Deadbeats: Success & Failure in U.S. History (T HIS 199)

Description: It is a central assumption of American life that anyone can succeed through a combination of hard work, skill, and a bit of luck.  In this course, we will investigate this belief from multiple social positions and cultural perspectives.  We will examine how Americans have experienced and understood success and failure, from Benjamin Franklin to residents of today’s urban housing projects.  Along the way, we will encounter ordinary Revolutionary War soldiers, antebellum advocates of both slavery and free labor, freed slaves seeking economic independence, reformers and robber barons, flamboyant speculators and prudent investors, and World War 2 veterans.

We will engage with several questions.  What can success and failure tell us about the nature of the American democratic experiment?  Can political democracy survive in a society marked by great disparities of wealth and opportunity?  Why have some Americans tolerated these disparities, while others have worked to eliminate them?  Is success and failure a consequence of personal characteristics or larger social and economic forces?  To address these questions we will use a wide range of sources, works by historians who have investigated success and failure, biographies and autobiographies, fiction and film, and studies by economists and political thinkers.

Specific learning objectives are:  to understand how historians use many kinds of sources as evidence, how we construct arguments using this evidence, and how we build these arguments into well-written narratives. Along the way, class participants will improve their skills as critical readers, thinkers, and writers. The principal forms of instruction will be intensive discussion of assigned readings and films and guided writing projects.

General Education: U.S. Diversity & Puralism; U.S. History (the U.S. History requirement still requires approval from the SUNY system - the proposal has been approved by UAlbany and has been sent to the SUNY system for approval - we anticipate that it will be approved but cannot be certain of this - further information will be posted when we receive it)

Meeting time: MWF 12:35-1:30

Department: History and Africana Studies
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Iris Berger
Course: Africa in the Modern World (T HIS/AAS 287)

Description: "Africa in the Modern World" concentrates on the social, cultural, intellectual, political and economic changes in Sub-Saharan Africa during the colonial and post-independence periods.  While taking into account the global and international setting, the course is concerned primarily with how African individuals and communities responded to the imposition of colonial rule and the creation of new nations during the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Readings and discussion will trace issues such as the background to the “scramble” for Africa in the late 1800s, the organization and ideologies of early military and cultural resistance, and varied forms of economic and political domination and their consequences for African societies, particularly the impact of white settler communities and large-scale mining. 

It will also consider religious and educational transformations and their implications, especially African adaptations of Christianity and Islam, the rise of a new western-educated class and the new political movements they developed, and the differing implications of colonial rule and decolonization for women and men. The later sections will cover the national and national liberation movements that put an end to colonial rule, such political and economic challenges as military rule, democratization, human rights, ethnic conflict, poverty and structural adjustment, and health crises such as HIV/AIDs.
The focus of the course will be on how Africans perceived and experienced these changes.  In addition to using fiction and autobiography to introduce students to varied African voices of both women and men, the course also will examine the different ways that historians have interpreted these historical issues. Although the reading takes a continent-wide approach, class lectures and discussions often focus on particular case studies that illustrate larger themes.

General Education: Regions Beyond Europe

Meeting time: T Th 1:15-2:35

Department: History
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Richard Hamm
Course: Trials in United States History (HIS 292)

Description: This course will examine historic United States trials with several ends in mind.  One goal is to establish what purposes trials serve in legal and social settings.  Another goal is to use the trials as points of entry into past societies to show how history is done.  And a final goal is to trace the changing nature of certain issues over time.  Each of these goals connects with the goals and objectives of the general education program.  The focus will be on the American legal tradition with some emphasis laid on trials from the American South and the State of New York.  The course assumes that you have no background in law or history.
Students should come away with a better understanding of the discipline of history and how United States history has developed from the colonial period to current day. This course will be run on a seminar format with a research component, while the non honors course, is basically lecture and discussion of fewer readings.

General Education: U.S. History

Meeting time: MWF 10:25-11:20

Department: Languages, Literatures, & Cultures
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor:   Lotfi Sayahi
Course: The Languages of North Africa (T ARA 290)

Description: This course is a linguistic study of North Africa with a special focus on Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia. We will explore the presence of the different linguistic varieties spoken in the area: the Arabic dialects, the Berber languages, and the former colonial languages (French and Spanish). Special attention will be paid to the cases of diglossia, bilingualism, and multilingualism together with the linguistic phenomena resulting from them such as code-switching and lexical borrowing.

Objectives include:

    * Introduce the students to the North African region through its languages.
    * Introduce the students to Arabic and Berber linguistics: How and why is North Africa Arabic dialects different from Standard Arabic and Middle Eastern dialects? When and by whom is Berber Spoken?
    * Familiarize the students with mechanism and results of language contact: what happens when people use more than one language in their daily life? How does a language changes because of contact with other languages?
    * Principal forms of instruction will be lecture, class and group discussion, and a virtual learning component (use of Blackboard for class management, discussions, note board, and interactions).

***Because this course was only recently submitted for approval, it has not been designated a course yet.  We anticipate that it will be given this designation soon.  If not approved before preregistration begins, students should register for A LLC 200.  When the course is approved, the registrations will be transferred to T ARA 290.

General Education: none

Meeting time: T Th 4:15-5:35

Department: Mathematics & Statistics
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Antun Milas
Course: Honors Calculus II (T MAT 119)

Description: Honors version of second semester calculus. Same topics as A MAT 113, but topics are covered in greater depth. This course is for students with more than average ability and more than average interest in mathematics. Presidential Scholars with a strong interest in mathematics or the physical sciences should consider taking A MAT 119 instead of A MAT 113. A MAT 119 substitutes for A MAT 113 toward the prerequisite in any course. Only one of A MAT 113 & 119 may be taken for credit.

Prerequisite(s): T MAT 118, a grade of A in A MAT 112, or permission of the instructor.

General Education: none

Meeting time: T Th 10:15-11:35

Department: Mathematics and Statistics
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: William Hammond
Course: Honors Calculus of Several Variables (T MAT 214)

Description: Curves and vectors in the plane, geometry of three-dimensional space, vector functions in three-space, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line and surface integrals.

Prerequisite(s): A MAT 113 or T MAT 119.

Meeting Time: Tuesdays & Thursdays 1:15-2:35 & Wednesday 1:40-2:35

General Education: Math

Department: Philosophy
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Bonnie Steinbock
Course: Introduction to Bioethics (T PHI 238Y)

Description: Topics may vary from year to year. Examples of topics include cloning, embryonic stem cell research, gene therapy, genetic enhancement, research on human subjects, euthanasia, physician-assisted death, assisted reproduction, abortion, the right to health care. No previous knowledge of philosophy or bioethics is assumed. Learning objectives include gaining an understanding of the sub-field of bioethics, learning how to reason logically, writing clearly, articulating a position, and arguing coherently. The principal forms of instruction for the course will be lecture, discussion, and debate.

General Education: Humanities; Information Literacy

Meeting time: T TH 10:15-11:35

Department: Philosophy
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Rachel Cohon
Course: Introduction to Ethical Theory (T PHI 212)

Description: What is the basis of our moral judgments and attitudes?  What do right actions have in common that makes them right, and what do wrong actions have in common that makes them wrong?  (Is it that they are commanded by a divine being? Required by existing social rules?  Are actions right or wrong because of their consequences for human happiness?  Their conformity to a rule of reason?)  What sort of person is it best to be?  What is valuable in life?  We will examine answers to these classic philosophical questions about ethics in the works of traditional and contemporary authors.  These answers take the form of moral theories.  We will study a selection drawn from these theories: the divine command theory, ethical relativism, the moral sentiment theory, utilitarianism, Kantian ethics, and virtue ethics.  We will subject these theories to critical analysis.  We will see what consequences some of the theories have for a specific substantive issue, such as the ethical justification of criminal punishment.

Other course objectives include being able to analyze familiar and abstract concepts skillfully, understanding, constructing, and criticizing arguments rationally, and writing clearly about issues in moral philosophy.

As an Honors course, this class offers the opportunity for greater use of original source materials, more contemporary versions of theories, more critical articles, more freedom in paper assignments, and more group discussion. In addition, this course extends non-Honors classes by examining the issue in normative ethnics to which different ethical theories give different solutions.

These course aims will be achieved through lectures, class discussions, small group discussions, written assignments, peer work with papers, and paper conferences with the instructor.

General Education: Humanities

Meeting time: T Th 2:45-4:05

Department: Physics
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: William Lanford
Course: Honors Physics II: Electromagnetism (T PHY 151)

Description: Course content is similar to A PHY 150. However, topics will be covered in more depth and at a somewhat more advanced level. Students with a strong interest in physical sciences should consider taking T PHY 151 instead of A PHY 150. Only one of A PHY 150 or 151 may be taken for credit. Offered in spring semester only.

Pre/corequisite: A MAT 113 or  T MAT 119.
Prerequisite(s): A PHY 140 or T PHY 141 or permission of instructor.

General Education: Natural Sciences

Meeting time: MWF 1:40-2:35

Department: Sociology
College/School: College of Arts & Sciences
Instructor: Richard Lachmann
Course: Social Origins of the Modern World (T SOC 215)

Description: This course examines the transformation of individual and governmental attitudes toward family, knowledge and progress, the natural world, and the capacity of humans to be reformed through individual effort and social programs. The readings and class discussion will draw on the work of historians and social scientists who have written for the most part about Western Europe because that is the region of the world where this transformation first occurred and because it remains the main focus of scholarship on “mentalities.” The questions examined in this course are central to sociology as well as to related disciplines. Students will be exposed to explanations for the transformation from societies that are variously described as traditional, feudal, mechanical, and patrimonial to ones seen as modern, capitalist, organic, bureaucratic and global.

Students will gain a basic understanding of the sweep of European social and cultural history over the past 500 years and be introduced to the ways in which social scientists conduct research, evaluate evidence, and construct historical explanations. Students will refine their writing skills by constructing essays that evaluate evidence and arguments to develop explanations of social change.

Genral Education: Europe; Social Sciences

Meeting time: MW 2:45-4:05

For more information about the Honors College, please call (518) 442-9067 or send an e-mail to honors@uamail.albany.edu.