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4th Annual Hogarty Family Foundation Lecture

How understanding the causes of breast and prostate cancer leads to new drug discoveries

by Donald P. McDonnell, Ph.D.

Steven N. Austad picture
  • Glaxo-Wellcome Professor of Molecular Cancer Biology
  • Chairman, Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology
  • Duke University School of Medicine

Wednesday, May 1, 2013

About the Speaker

Donald P. McDonnell, PhD, is the Glaxo-WellcomeProfessor of Molecular Cancer Biology and Chairman of the Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology at Duke University School of Medicine. In addition, he serves as the Associate Director for Basic Research for the breast, ovarian and prostate programs within the Duke Cancer Institute.

Dr. McDonnell obtained his undergraduate degree in Biochemistry from the National University of Ireland (Galway) in 1983. He then moved to Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, where in 1987, he obtained a PhD under the mentorship of Dr. Bert O´Malley. It was during this time that he cloned the cDNA for the vitamin D receptor and performed a series of experiments that led to the conclusion that this receptor was related in both sequence and function to the classical steroid receptors. He subsequently spent a year as a postdoctoral fellow at Smith-Kline Pharmaceuticals in Philadelphia where he developed an interest in studying the molecular pharmacology of nuclear receptors. He was appointed Assistant Professor in Cell Biology at Baylor College of Medicine, but in 1991 he returned to the private sector as Director and Head of Molecular Biology at Ligand Pharmaceuticals in San Diego. After three very exciting years in industry, he moved to Duke where his work has focused on the genetic and pharmacological dissection of the nuclear receptor signal transduction pathways. The insights from this work have led to the discovery and development of novel estrogen and androgen receptor modulators, some of which have advanced to the clinic and are being evaluated as treatments for a variety of endocrine disorders.

Dr. McDonnell has received the Ernst Oppenheimer Award from the Endocrine Society, the John J. Abel Award from ASPET, the Pharmacia-ASPET Award for Experimental Therapeutics and the NAMS/Eli Lilly and Company SERM Research Award. He was also elected to join the Council of the Endocrine Society. He is an Honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians, Ireland. Dr. McDonnell has published over 225 articles on the molecular pharmacology of nuclear hormone receptors. Currently, he sits on the editorial boards of Oncogene, Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism and Molecular Endocrinology.

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