Gerald Zahavi

Professor
Director, Public History Program

Ph.D., Syracuse University
M.A., Syracuse University
B.A., Cornell University

060R Social Science
Phone: (518) 442-5427
Fax: (518) 442-5301
gzahavi@albany.edu

Teaching:

Undergraduate Courses:

U.S. History Survey (1865-Present)
U.S. History Survey (1600-1865)
Workshop in Oral History (Intensive summer course)
Honors Tutorial (U.S. History, 1600-1865)
U.S. Labor History Undergraduate Research Seminar
Introduction to Documentary Studies
Workers and Work in U.S. History
Emergence of Modern America (The Gilded Age), 1877-1900
Undergraduate Colloquium on U.S. Radicalism, 1880-1980
Special Projects in History: History and Media
History Documentary Production for Broadcast and Internet Radio
Readings and Practicum in Historical Film and Video Documentary Production
Documentary Filmmaking: History and Theory
Readings and Practicum in Oral and Video History
Documentary Studies Seminar and Fieldwork Practicum - History Research Seminar

Graduate Courses:

History Documentary Production for Broadcast and Internet Radio
Readings and Practicum in Historical Film and Video Documentary Production
Documentary Filmmaking: History and Theory
Readings and Practicum in Oral and Video History
Readings in Local/Regional History
Readings in U.S. and Global/Comparative Public History
Quantitative Methods in History
Research Seminar in Local/Regional History
Readings in American Working-Class History
Readings Course on Work and Society
Research Seminar in Work and Society
Research Seminar in Modern American History

Current Research Interests:

I'm a professor of History and Director of the Documentary Studies Program at the University at Albany, State University of New York, where I have been since 1985. I completed my undergraduate education at Cornell (with a BA in European Intellectual History), and received my MA (in European Cultural History) and Ph.D. from the Maxwell School at Syracuse University (the latter with a specialization in modern U.S. economic, social, and labor history).

My academic research interests are diverse. They focus on such topics as: welfare capitalism (a book, The Open Hand of Capital: Welfare Capitalism Modern America, is under contract with Ivan Dee Press); the history of General Electric (projects include an oral history of the corporation and the GE Research Laboratory, as well as a documentary on the history of GE); labor and political radicalism in modern America (two books and a documentary film are currently underway on this); Cold War science and politics (several documentary projects focusing on atomic weapons and testing are in the works); and oral/aural history.

I am also very involved in Public History of all sorts – from digital history and Web site design and creation to filmmaking and radio production.

Most Recent Publication:

"Oral History in the Digital Era: Notes from the Field," in Mary Larson and Douglas Boyd, ed., Voices from the Revolution: Oral History and Digital Humanities. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, forthcoming.

"Ensininando História Pública No Século XXI," in Juniele Rabêlo de Almeida e Marta Gouveia de Oliveira Rovai, eds., Introdução à História Pública. Sao Paulo: Letra e Voz, 2011.

"Uncivil War: An Oral History of Labor, Communism, and Community in Schenectady, New York, 1944-54." Chapter in Labor and the Cold War at the Grassroots: Unions, Politics, and Postwar Political Culture. Edited by Robert W. Cherny, Bill Issel, and Kerry Taylor. Rutgers University Press, 2004.

“The Trial of Lee Benson: Communism, White Chauvinism, and the Foundations of the ‘New Political History’.” History and Theory (October 2003)

Workers, Managers, and Welfare Capitalism: The Shoemakers and Tanners of Endicott Johnson, 1890-1950. Urbana, Ill.: University of Illinois Press, 1988 (261 pp.). Now available online at: http://ejhistory.org/.

Links to:

http://www.geraldzahavi.org/