Readings in U.S. and Global/Comparative Public History
HIS 603 (9984) | HIS 621 (9985) | HIS 626 (9986) | HIS 642 (9987)
Fall 2015

Prof. Gerald Zahavi
Dept. of History, University at Albany-SUNY
Classroom: BB 003 / History Department Conference Room
Course Schedule: Tue. 2:45-5:35
Office: SS 060R
Phone: 518-442-5427
Office Hrs: Mon, 2-4 PM; Tues. 1-2:30 PM
also on-line and by appointment
E-mail: gzahavi@albany.edu

COURSE INTRODUCTION:

This course covers methodological and theoretical issues in the practice of Public History: how historical knowledge and historical interpretations are shaped and communicated to general audiences in popular narratives, media, exhibitions, memorials, and various other forms of public displays. We’ll examine—on a local, regional, national, and international level—the ways that specific social, cultural, and political forces and institutions have shaped collective memory. We’ll look at how public history is practiced in the U.S. and in other parts of the world – Great Britain, Western and Eastern Europe, Australia, South Africa, and Asia. Around half of the semester will be devoted to coverage of Public History as practiced in the U.S. Once grounded in domestic soils, we’ll spend the rest of the semester taking an explicitly comparative approach in surveying the history, theory, and practice of Public History abroad. We’ll examine the relationship between academic and public history; questions and controversies that have arisen around contested “heritage” and “patrimonial” public histories; the cultural and political debates that have been ignited when historians, filmmakers, and museum curators presented controversial historical issues to a public audience; and the relationship between history and memory in a variety of national and regional contexts. The aim of this course is to inspire you to become imaginative and effective public historians and scholars of public history, and to develop a more cosmopolitan and global perspective on the field in general.

REQUIRED READINGS:

  • Annie E. Coombes, History After Apartheid: Visual Culture and Public Memory in a Democratic South Africa (Duke Univ. Press, 2003).
  • Fredrick C. Corney, Telling October: Memory and the Making of the Bolshevik Revolution (Cornell Univ. Press, 2004).
  • Tony Horwitz, Confederates in the Attic: Dispatches from the Unfinished Civil War (Vintage Books, 1999).
  • Richard E. Neustadt, Ernest R. May, Thinking in Time: The Uses of History for Decision-Makers (Free Press, 1988).
  • James W. Loewen, Lies Across America: What Our Historic Sites Get Wrong (Touchstone Press, 2007)
  • Alessandro Portelli, The Death of Luigi Trastulli and Other Stories: Form and Meaning in Oral History (SUNY Series in Oral and Public History, 1990)
  • Hue-Tam Ho Tai, The Country of Memory: Remaking the Past in Late Socialist Vietnam (Univ. of California Press, 2001).
  • Robert Toplin, History by Hollywood, Second Edition Paperback (Univ. of Illiinois Press, 2010).
  • Amy M. Tyson, The Wages of History: Emotional Labor on Public History's Front Lines (University of Massachusetts Press, 2013).
  • Elizabeth Kowaleski Wallace, The British Slave Trade and Public Memory (Columbia Univ. Press, 2010).
  • Mike Wallace, Mickey Mouse History and Other Essays on American Memory (Temple University Press, 1996).
  • Daniel J. Walkowitz and Lisa Maya Knauer, eds., Memory and the Impact of Political Transformation in Public Space (Duke University press, 2004).
  • Paul Williams, Memorial Museums: The Global Rush to Commemorate Atrocities (Bloomsbury Academic, 2008).
  • Selections from: Larry Schweikart and Michael Allen, A Patriot's History of the United States: From Columbus's Great Discovery to the War on Terror (Sentinal Press, 2004), and Howard Zinn, A People’s History of the United States (Harper, 2007). These two books are available widely -- often heavily discounted. Check Amazon.com and other on-line source.
  • Additional material on reserve or on line as specified below.

GRADING:

Grades will be based on:

1) Reviews of any two required books (including introducing/initiating the class discussion of one of the books): 30%.
Reviews should be submitted electronically on or before the day of discussion of the reviewed book. I no longer accept paper copies, only electronic submissions.
2) Class participation: 20%
3) Final paper (20-30 pp): 50%
. Submit electronically. Due May 12th. Focus on any public history controversy -- broadly or narrowly conceived -- that crosses national boundaries and discuss how it played out within two or more countries. Elaborate on and analyze how various individuals, media organizations, and historical and professional associations responded to the controversy (academic scholars, museum and other public history professionals, newspaper and magazine editors, politicians, heritage organizations). You might take off from one or more of the required course texts, but you should pursue the controversy in far more detail and bring in many other texts/publications/media not covered in class, or you can pursue a controversy that was not discussed in class, or only superficially covered in class. For example, take the Arab-Israeli conflict: how is 1948 and the establishment of Israel commemorated and recalled in films, museums, historic sites, and other forms of public historical venues in the U.S. (by various groups), in Israel, and in one or more Arab nations? Unless you know the appropriate languages, you will obviously have to concentrate on English-language sources. If this is a concern, concentrate on controversial areas that can be dealt with in comparisons across English-language nations: England, Canada, US, New Zealand, Australia, and so on [slavery, colonialism, war memorialization, Euro-aboriginal conflicts, for example.]

ACADEMIC DISHONESTY:

The following statement of policy is required by the University at Albany: “Plagiarism is taking (which includes purchasing) the words and ideas of another and passing them off as one's own work.  If in a formal paper a student quotes someone, that student must use quotation marks and give a citation.  Paraphrased or borrowed ideas are to be identified by proper citations.  Plagiarism will result, at the minimum, in a failing grade for the assignment.”

CLASS OUTLINE

Class 1 (Tuesday, Sept. 1): Course Introduction: The Range of Public History

Class 2 (Tuesday, Sept. 8): Historic Sites in the U.S.

READING:

James W. Loewen, Lies Across America: What Our Historic Sites Get Wrong (The New Press).

RECOMMENDED:

1) "James W. Loewen on Historical Lies and Distortions."
Real Media. MP3. Time: 34:22. Gerald Zahavi interviewed sociologist James Loewen in 2002 about "historical lies and distortions" -- by omission and commission -- in textbooks, historical markers, and monuments. Loewen, retired from the University of Vermont, is the best-selling author of Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your High School History Textbook Got Wrong and Lies Across America: What Our Historic Sites Get Wrong, and more recently, Sundown Towns: A Hidden History of American Racism (2005) and Teaching What Really Happened (2009).
2) ExplorePAhistory.com. A Web site that explores and vastly expands upon the many stories only superficially or partially told on Pennsylvania's historical markers. "ExplorePAhistory.com provides users with three principal entry points: "Stories from PA History," "Visit PA Regions," and "Teach PA History." "Stories from PA History" includes histories built around state historical markers. "Teach PA History" includes elementary, middle, and high school lesson plans for teachers of Pennsylvania and American history. "Visit PA Regions" provides useful information for those who are interested in visiting historic sites associated with ExplorePAhistory stories; it includes sample itineraries and directions to local points of interest, hotels, restaurants, and more."
3) The Historical Marker Database: http://www.hmdb.org/

Class 3 (Tuesday, Sept. 15): Living History Museums

READING:

Amy M. Tyson, The Wages of History: Emotional Labor on Public History's Front Lines (University of Massachusetts Press, 2013).

(Tuesday, Sept. 22): NO CLASS

Class 4 (Tuesday, Sept. 29): American Memories, American Narratives

READING:

Mike Wallace, Mickey Mouse History and Other Essays on American Memory (Temple).

Sample and compare selections from: Larry Schweikart, Michael Allen, A Patriot's History of the United States: From Columbus's Great Discovery to the War on Terror (Sentinal Press, 2004), and Howard Zinn, A People’s History of the United States (Harper, 2007). Focus on Columbus and exploration (and its impact on native tribes), late 18th century politics, industrialization, late 19th century expansion (Spanish American War), and McCarthyism. Copies of these two textbooks are widely available on line for a few dollars (they are both heavily discounted). Zinn's book is also available on line: http://www.historyisaweapon.com/zinnapeopleshistory.html. DO make sure to read the prefatory material to the Schweikart and Allen book -- the Rush Limaugh interview with Larry Schweikart, and the "Introduction" -- available through this link: Patriot's History - Intro pages.

"The Great Textbook War of 1974." Radio documentary produced by Trey Kay, 2009.
PART 1: Real Media. Time: 29:51 | PART 2: Real Media. Time: 27:04.
Trey Kay won a 2010 Peabody Award for this documentary. As described by West Virginia Public Radio, where it premiered last year: "In 1974, Kanawha County was the first battleground in the American culture wars. Controversy erupted over newly-adopted school textbooks. School buildings were hit by dynamite and Molotov cocktails, buses were riddled with bullets, journalists were beaten and surrounding coal mines were shut down by protesting miners. Textbook opponents believed the books were teaching their children to question their authority, traditional values and the existence of God. Textbook supporters said children needed to be exposed to a wide variety of beliefs and experiences, and taught to make their own decisions."

Class 5 (Tuesday, Oct. 6): The Contested Civil War

READING:

Tony Horwitz, Confederates in the Attic: Dispatches from the Unfinished Civil War (Vintage).

RECOMMENDED:

"The Last Civil War Widows" (1998)." Real Media. MP3. Time: 11:37.
From Talking History contributing producer Joe Richman, here is a short documentary titled The Last Civil War Widows, originally produced and aired on National Public Radio's All Things Considered in 1998. "On July 1, 1863, Union troops clashed with Confederates at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. The fighting at Gettysburg would mark the beginning of the end for the Confederacy. At that same battlefield on July 1, 1997, Daisy Anderson and Alberta Martin first met. They had come to Gettysburg to be honored as the last known living Civil War widows. Both women married in their early 20s. Their husbands were near 80. Alberta Martin and Daisy Anderson were of course not alive during the Civil War, but they married into history. Producer Joe Richman visited both women and put together an oral history of these two Civil War widows."

Class 6 (Tuesday, Oct. 13): Screening History

READING:

Robert Toplin, History by Hollywood, Second Edition Paperback (Univ. of Illiinois Press, 2010).

Class 7 (Tuesday, Oct. 20: Another Side of Public History: History and Public Policy

READING:

Richard E. Neustadt, Ernest R. May, Thinking in Time: The Uses of History for Decision-Makers (Free Press, 1988).

Class 8 (Tuesday, Oct. 27): Global Public History and the Politics of Public Sites and Collective Memory

READING:

Daniel J. Walkowitz and Lisa Maya Knauer, eds., Memory and the Impact of Political Transformation in Public Space (Duke).

Class 9 (Tuesday, Nov. 3): Holocaust Museums, Memorials, and Dark Tourism

READING:

Paul Williams, Memorial Museums: The Global Rush to Commemorate Atrocities (Bloomsbury Academic, 2008).

Peter Read, "‘The Truth that will Set us all Free’: An Uncertain History of Memorials to Indigenous Australians," in "Places of the Heart: Memorials in Australia," Special issue of the Public History Review (Australian Center for Public History). Free, on-line journal. Go to vol. 15.
URL: http://epress.lib.uts.edu.au/ojs/index.php/phrj/index.

Class 10 (Tuesday, Nov. 10): Great Britain - Remembering the British Slave Trade

READING:

Elizabeth Kowaleski Wallace, The British Slave Trade and Public Memory (Columbia Univ. Press).

Class 11 (Tuesday, Nov. 17): Soviet Union / Russia - Public Memory and the Russian Revolution

READING:

Fredrick C. Corney, Telling October: Memory and the Making of the Bolshevik Revolution.

Class 12 (Tuesday, Nov. 24): Oral History (Italy & US)

READING:

Alessandro Portelli, The Death of Luigi Trastulli and Other Stories: Form and Meaning in Oral History (SUNY Series in Oral and Public History).

Class 13 (Tuesday, Dec. 1): South Africa, Apartheid, and Public History

READING:

Annie E. Coombes, History After Apartheid: Visual Culture and Public Memory in a Democratic South Africa (Duke Univ. Press, 2003).

Class 14 (Tuesday, Dec. 8): Vietnam: Commemorations and Memories of Colonialism and War

READING: Hue-Tam Ho Tai, The Country of Memory: Remaking the Past in Late Socialist Vietnam.

 

FINAL PAPERS ARE DUE BY Monday, Dec. 14th.
Please submit electronically.

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NOTE: This is a "growing" resource but, considering the wide geographical and thematic territory covered, it must necessarily be selective. Additional publications and media will be added periodically. With time, I also hope to add short annotations to each entry. Note that the bibliography is currently restricted to English-language or translated works. This may change in the future.
Please do send along recommendations for additional books, articles, Web resources, and media -- as well as suggestions for improvements (and corrections of any errors you might spot). Your contributions will be much appreciated. You can contact me at: gzahavi@albany.edu.

    • [AFRICA / SOUTH AFRICA] Brink, Elsaba, and Sue Krige. "Remapping and Remembering the South African War in Johannesburg and Pretoria." South African Historical Journal 41 (1999): 404, 418-21.
    • [AFRICA / SOUTH AFRICA] Coombes, Annie E. History After Apartheid: Visual Culture and Public Memory in a Democratic South Africa. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2003.
    • [AFRICA / SOUTH AFRICA] Domint, Graham, and Luli Callinicos. "'Is There Anything to Celebrate?' Paradozes of Policy: An Examination of the State's Approach to Commemorating South Africa's Most Ambiguous Struggle." South African Historical Journal 41 (1999): 384-403.
    • [SOUTH AFRICA] Field, Sean. Oral History, Community, and Displacement. Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
    • [AFRICA / SOUTH AFRICA] Nuttall, Sarah and Carli Coetzee, eds., Negotiating the Past: The Making of Memory in South Africa. New York: Oxford University Press, 1998.

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    • [AFRICA/TANZANIA] Mabulla, Audax Z. P. and John F. R. Bower, "Cultural Heritage Management in Tanzania’s Protected Areas: Challenges and Future Prospects," CRM: The Journal of Heritage Stewardship 7:1 (Winter, 2010). Available on line at: http://crmjournal.cr.nps.gov/04_article.cfm?issue=Volume%207%20Number%201%20Winter%202010

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    • [ARGENTINA] Aizenberg, Edna. "Making Monuments in Argentina, a Land Afraid of Its Past." Chronicle Review, June 21, 2002.
    • [ARGENTINA] "History Under Siege, Episode 4: Battles Over the Past in Argentina" (2008). Available through links to Talking History here, and at the originating Web site in Australia: http://www.abc.net.au/rn/hindsight/stories/2008/2205996.htm/.
      PART 1: Real Media. MP3. Time: 25:05 | PART 2: Real Media. MP3. Time: 28:28.
      This is one of a 4-part series produced by Michele Rayner of Radio National's (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) history-focused radio show, Hindsight. The series explores the cultural "history wars" as waged in four nations: Japan, France, Australia, and Argentina. This segment focuses on Argentina and the traumatic impact of that nation's years of military dictatorship (from 1976 to 1983). It deals with public history and memory, specifically with Argentina's attempts to "find a way in which the history of the dictatorship can be both articulated, and atoned for." For more information about his program and about other segments in this series, check out Hindsight's Web site at: http://www.abc.net.au/rn/hindsight/features/historyundersiege/.
    • [ARGENTINA] James, Daniel. Dona Mari's Story: Life, History, Memory, and Political Identity. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 2000. [Oral history of labor movement activist in Argentina].

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    • [AUSTRALIA] Ashton, Paul, and Paula Hamilton. “Blood Money: Race and Nation in Australian Public History.” Radical History Review. 76 (2000):188-207.
    • [AUSTRALIA] Ashton, Paul and Paula Hamilton, “Streetwise: Public History in New South Wales,” Public History Review [Australia / Professional Historians’ Association], Vol. 5/6 (1996-7): 1-3.
    • [AUSTRALIA] Bennett, Tony, The Birth of the Museum: History, Theory & Politics. New York: Routledge, 1995.
    • [AUSTRALIA] Davison, Graeme, The Use and Abuse of Australian History. St. Leonards NSW, Australia: Allen & Unwin, 2000.
    • [AUSTRALIA] "History Under Siege, Episode 3: Battles Over the Past in Australia" (2008). Available at: http://www.abc.net.au/rn/hindsight/stories/2008/2206111.htm and through links below:
      PART 1: Real Media. MP3. Time: 33:47 | PART 2: Real Media. MP3. Time: 20:24
      This is one of a 4-part series produced by Michele Rayner of Radio National's (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) history-focused radio show, Hindsight. The series explores the cultural "history wars" as waged in four nations: Japan, France, Australia, and Argentina. This segment focuses on Australia's "sustained ideological battles over the interpretation of its national history" -- framing those debates "against comparable experiences in other countries around the world." As summarized by the Hindsight: "The recent focus in Australia on the teaching of national history, amid concerns over historical literacy, was played out in the United States in the early 1990s, and the experience in both countries was mirrored by similar sets of anxieties and arguments regarding historical understanding, citizenship and national identity. And like the United States, and countries in Asia and Europe, Australia has also seen the increasing politicisation of the past -- as politicians invoke history to serve present day interests. What can be learned from more careful scrutiny of the political use of the past, or particular aspects of the past, in the process of governance and policy making? And is there a link between the political use of the past, and the popular interest in one area of history over another? Why, for example, do young people in Australia today say they prefer to learn about the Anzac legend rather than the history of Indigenous Australia?" For more information on this and other Hindsight programs, go to: http://www.abc.net.au/rn/hindsight/features/historyundersiege/.
    • [AUSTRALIA] Hudson, W. and Bolton, G., eds., Creating Australia: Changing Australian History. Crows Nest, NSW, Ausralia: Allen and Unwin, 1997.
    • [AUSTRALIA] Nguyen, Nathalie. Voyage of Hope: Vietnamese Australian Women's Narratives. 2005).
    • [AUSTRALIA] Macintyre, Stuart and Anna Clark, The History Wars. Updated edition. Melbourne University Press, 2004.
    • [AUSTRALIA] Pearson, M. and Sullivan, S., Looking After Heritage Places. Melbourne University Press, 1995.
    • [AUSTRALIA] Public History Review. Open access on-line journal: http://epress.lib.uts.edu.au/ojs/index.php/phrj. "Public History Review investigates the nature and forms of public history: how and to whom is the past communicated and how does the past operate in the present?"
    • [AUSTRALIA] "Places of the Heart: Memorials in Australia,"Public History Review (Australian Center for Public History). 15 (2008). Special issue. Contains: Paul Ashton and Paula Hamilto, "Places of the Heart: Memorial, Public History and the State in Australia Since 1960"; Peter Read, "The Truth That Will Set Us All Free: An Uncertain History of Memorials to Indigenous Australians"; Bruce Scates, "Memorialising Gallipoli: Manufacturing Memory at Anzac"; SueAnne Ware, "Anti-Memorials and the Art of Forgetting: Critical Relfections on a Memorial Design Practice"; Rae Frances, Julie Kimber, "'Joy, Memorialization and the Limits of Tolerance"; Bronwyn Batten , Paul Batten, "Memorializing the Past: Is there an 'Aboriginal' Way?"; Rose Searby, "Red Dog. Horses and Bogong Moths: The Memorialization of Animals in Australia." Free, on-line journal, available at: http://epress.lib.uts.edu.au/ojs/index.php/phrj/index.
    • [AUSTRALIA] Rickard, John and Peter Spearritt, eds., Packaging the Past? Public Histories (special number of Australian Historical Studies). Melbourne, Australia: Melbourne University Press, 1991.
    • [AUSTRALIA] Smith, Laurajane, Archaeological Theory and the Politics of Cultural Heritage. New York: Routledge, 2004.

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    • [BRAZIL] Williams, Daryle. Culture Wars in Brazil: The First Vargas Regime, 1930-1945. Duke University Press, 2001.

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    • [CANADA] English, John R. “The Tradition of Public History in Canada.” The Public Historian 5:1(Winter 1983):47-59.

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    • [CHINA] Jing, Jun, Temple of Memories: History, Power, and Morality in a Chinese Village. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1998. The story of a Confucian temple in Dachuan -- a 500-year-old village in the Yellow River Valley in the northwestern province of Gansu, China -- destroyed during the Chinese Cultural Revolution and rebuilt in 1991. Deals well with memory, tradition, and response to social/cultural engineering.

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    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Bennett, Tony. The Birth of the Museum: History, Theory, Politics. Londond:: Routledge, 1995.
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Boswell, D., and J. Evans, eds. Representing the Nation: A Reader. Histories, Heritage, and Museums. London: Routledge, 1993.
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Bosworth, R. J. B. Explaining Auschwitz: History Writing and the Second World War, 1945-1990. New York: Routledge, 1993.
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Coombes, Annie E. (ed.), Rethinking settler colonialism: history and memory in Australia, Canada, Aotearoa New Zealand and South Africa. Manchester & New York: Manchester University Press/Palgrave, 2006.
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Duffy, Terence. ""The Peace Museum Concept." Museum International 45(177) (Nov. 1993): 4-8.
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Gillis, John. Commemorations: The Politics of National Identity. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1994.
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Hein, kaura and Mark Selden, Eds., Living with the Bomb: American and Japanese Cultural Conflicts in the Nuclear Age. Armonk, N.Y.: M. E. Sharpe, 1997.
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Hein, Laura and Mark Selden, eds. Censoring History: Citizenship and Memory in Japan, Germany, and the United States. Armonk, New York: Sharpe, 2000.
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] "History under siege: Battles over the Past." Four part series from Radio National's Hindsight. "History, like politics, is about national identity. So the work of historians frequently comes under attack, amid calls for the refurbishment or restoration of national identity. From the United States to the decolonised countries in Africa and South East Asia, the trend towards historical revisionism has been surprising in its breadth, scale and diversity of argument." To listen, go to: http://www.abc.net.au/rn/hindsight/features/historyundersiege/. See also individual segments listed under specific countries in this bibliography.
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Journal of Heritage Stewardship. http://crmjournal.cr.nps.gov/Journal_Index.cfm. Contains many articles examining heritage sites around the world.
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Logan, William and Keir Reeves, Places of Pain and Shame: Dealing with ‘Difficult Heritage’ (New York: Routledge, 2009).
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Karp, Ivan, and Steven Levine, eds. Exhibiting Cultures: The Poetics and Politics of Museum Display. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1991.
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Kean, Hilda and Paul Ashton, eds., People and their Pasts: Public History Today. New Yorek: Palgrave, 2009.
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Kirshenblatt-Gimblatt, Barbara. Destination Culture: Tourism, Museum, and Heritage. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Landy, Marchia, ed. The Historical Film: History and Memory in Media. Piscataway, NJ: Rutgers Univ. Press, 2001.
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Levinson, Stanford. Written in Stone: Public Monuments in Changing Societies. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1998.
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Liddington, Jill, “What is Public History? Publics and Their Pasts, Meanings and Practices,” Oral History, 30:1 (Spring 2002), 83-93.
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Keir Reeves, Geoff Bird, Laura James, Birger Stichelbaut, Jean Bourgeois, eds., Battlefield Events: Landscape, commemoration and heritage (Routledge Advances in Event Research Series, 2015).
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Rosenstone, Robert A. History on Film/Film on History (Pearson).
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Rosenstone, Robert A. Visions of the Past: The Challenge of Film to Our Idea of History (Rutgers).
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Sharpley, Richard and Philip R. Stone, eds., The Darker Side of Travel: The Theory and Practice of Dark Tourism. UK: Channel View Publications, 2009.
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Spillman, Lyn. Nation and Commemoration: Creating National Identities in the United States and Australia. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997.
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Walkowitz, Daniel J. and Lisa Maya Knauer, eds., Memory and the Impact of Political Transformation in Public Space. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2004.
    • [COMPARATIVE/GENERAL] Williams, Paul. Memorial Museums: The Global Rush to Commemorate Atrocities. Bloomsbury Academic, 2008.

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    • [EASTERN EUROPE] Apor, Peter and Oksana Sarkisova, eds., Past for the Eyes: East European Representations of Communism in Cinema and Museums After 1989 (Central European University Press, 2008).

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    • [EUROPE] Bucur, Maria, and Nancy M. Wingfield, eds. Staging the Past. The Politics of Commemoration in Habsbur Central Europe, 1848 to the Present. West Lafayette, Ind.L Purdue University Press, 2001.
    • [EUROPE] Johnson, G. Wesley. “An American Impression of Public History in Europe.” The Public Historian 6:4 (Fall 1984): 87-97.
    • [EUROPE] Jones, Harriet, Kjell Ostberg, and Nico Randeraad, eds., Contemporary History on Trial: Europe Since 1989 and the Role of the Expert Historian (Manchester University Press, 2007).
    • [EUROPE] Sutcliffe, Anthony R. “Gleams and Echoes of Public History in Western Europe: Before and After the Rotterdam Conference.” The Public Historian 6:4(Fall 1984):7-16.
    • [EUROPE] Wiedmer, Caroline. The Claims of Memory: Representations of the Holocaust in Germany and France (Cornell Univ. Press).
    • [EUROPE] Winter, Jay. Sites of Memory, Sites of Mourning: The Great War in European Cultural History (Canto).

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    • [FRANCE] Aldrich, Robert. Vestiges of the Colonial Empire in France: Monuments, Museum and Colonial Memories (Palgrave).
    • [FRANCE] "History Under Siege, Episode 2: Battles Over the Past in France" (2008).
      PART 1: Real Media. MP3. Time: 29:28 | PART 2: Real Media. MP3. Time: 24:06.
      This is one of a 4-part series produced by Michele Rayner of Radio National's (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) history-focused radio show, Hindsight. The series explores the cultural "history wars" as waged in four nations: Japan, France, Australia, and Argentina. This segment focuses on France's attempts to come to terms with its colonial past and the Algerian war. For more information on Hindsight's series, go to: http://www.abc.net.au/rn/hindsight/features/historyundersiege/.
    • [FRANCE] Kritzman, Lawrence D., ed. Realms of Memory: Rethinking the French Past. 3 vols. New York: Columbia University Press, 1996-98.
    • [FRANCE] Russo, Henry. The Vichy Syndrome: History and Memory in France since 1944. Cambridge, Maa.: Harvard University Press, 1991.

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    • [GERMANY] Herf, Jeffrey. Divided Memory: The Nazi Past in the Two Germanys. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1997.
    • [GERMANY] Koshar, Judy. Germany's Transient Pasts: Preservation and National Memory in the Twentieth Century. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998.
    • [GERMANY] Ladd, Brian. The Ghosts of Berlin: Confronting German History in the Urban Landscape. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1997.
    • [GERMANY] Moeller, Robert G. War Stories: The Search for a Usable Past in the Federal Republic of Germany. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2001.

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    • [GREAT BRITAIN] Arnold, John, Kate Daviews, Simon Ditchfield, eds., History and Heritage: Consuming the Past in Contemporary Culture (Donhead Publishing, 1998).
    • [GREAT BRITAIN] Broun, Dauvit, R. J. Finley, and Michael Lynch, eds. Image and Identity: The Making and Re-Making of Scotland through the Ages. Edinburgh: John Donald, 1998.
    • [GREAT BRITAIN] Coombes, Annie E. Reinventing Africa: Museums, Material Culture, and Popular Imagination in Late Victorian and Edwardian England
    • [GREAT BRITAIN] Hague, Euan. "Scotland on Film: Attitudes and Opinions and Braveheart." Etudes Ecossaises 6 (1994): 75-89.
    • [GREAT BRITAIN] Hewison, Robert, The Heritage Industry: Britain in a Climate of Decline (London: Methuen, 1987).
    • [GREAT BRITAIN] Lowenthal, David. The Heritage Crusade and the Spoils of History (Cambridge University Press, 1998).
    • [GREAT BRITAIN] Samuel, Raphael. Theatres of Memory: Past and Present in Contemporary Culture (Verso, 1994).
    • [GREAT BRITAIN] Wallace, Elizabeth Kowaleski. The British Slave Trade and Public Memory
      (Columbia Univ. Press).
    • [GREAT BRITAIN] Wright, Patrick, On Living in an Old Country: The National Past in Contemporary Britain. London, 1985.

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    • [HAITI/COMPARATIVE] Trouillot, Michel-Rolph. Silencing the Past: Power and the Production of History. Boston: Beacon Press, 1995. An examination of various neglected aspects of the Haitian independence movement and the legacy of Columbus placed in the broader context of a discussion of power and the shaping of public history.
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    • [IRELAND/NORTHERN IRELAND] Conway, Brian. Commemoration and Bloody Sundy: Pathways of Memory. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. This book explores the politics of collective memory in Northern Ireland and particularly how the events that took place in 1972 in Derry, Northern Ireland -- known as "Bloody Sunday" -- have been remembered and commemorated since that time.
    • [IRELAND/NORTHERN IRELAND] Irish Republican History Museum: http://hubpages.com/hub/Irish-Republican-History-Museum-Iarsmalann-na-Staire-Poblachtach-Eireannach.
    • [IRELAND/NORTHERN IRELAND] Pine, Emilie. The Politics of Irish Memory: Performing Rememberance in Contemporary Irish Culture. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011. Examines post-1980 theatre, film, television, memoir and art obsessions with Irish history and recent "anti-nostalgia" tendencies in Irish culture.

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    • [ISRAEL/PALESTINE] Alsop, Stewart. "The Masada Complex." Newsweek (July 12, 1971).
    • [ISRAEL/PALESTINE] Alsop, Stewart. "Again, the Masada Complex." Newsweek (March 19, 1973).
    • [ISRAEL/PALESTINE] Ben-Ari, Eyal and Yorum Bilu. Grasping Land: Space and Place in Conemporary Israeli Discourse. Albany: SUNY Press, 1997.
    • [ISRAEL/PALESTINE] Ben-Yehuda, Nachman. The Masada Myth: Collective Memory and Mythmaking in Israel. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1995.
    • [ISRAEL/PALESTINE] Ben-Yehuda, Nachman. Sacrificing Truth: Archaeology and the Myth of Masada. Amherst:, NY: Humanity Books, 2002.
    • [ISRAEL/PALESTINE] Dirbas, Sahera. “Stranger in My Land” (film).
    • [ISRAEL/PALESTINE] Katriel, Tamar. Performing the Past: A Study of Israeli Settlement Museums. Mahwah, N.J.: Lawrence Erbaum, 1997.
    • [ISRAEL/PALESTINE] Slyomovics, Susan. The Object of Memory: Arab and Jew Narrate the Palestinian Village. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1998.

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    • [ITALY] Portelli, Alessandro. The Order Has Been Carried Out: History, Memory, and Meaning of a Nazi Massacre in Rome (Palgrave Studies in Oral History).
    • [ITALY and U.S.] Portelli, Alessandro. The Death of Luigi Trastulli and Other Stories: Form and Meaning in Oral History (SUNY Press).

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    • [JAPAN] Hammond, Ellen H. “Politics of the War and Public History: Japan's Own Museum Controversy,” Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars, Vol. 27, 1995.
    • [JAPAN] Hammond, Ellen H. "Commemoration Controversies: The War, the Peace, and Democracy in Japan." In Hein, kaura and Mark Selden, Eds., Living with the Bomb: American and Japanese Cultural Conflicts in the Nuclear Age. Armonk, N.Y.: M. E. Sharpe, 1997.
    • [JAPAN] "History Under Siege, Episode 2: Battles Over the Past in Japan" (2008). Available through links on the producers' Web site at: http://www.abc.net.au/rn/hindsight/stories/2008/2205996.htm/. Also available directly here: PART 1: Real Media. MP3. Time: 25:05 | PART 2: Real Media. MP3. Time: 28:28.
      This is one of a 4-part series produced by Michele Rayner of Radio National's (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) history-focused radio show, Hindsight. The series explores the cultural "history wars" as waged in four nations: Japan, France, Australia, and Argentina. This segment focuses on Japan and how the struggle over the interpretations of that nation's 20th century imperial history has reflected deep ideological divides in that society. For more information on Hindsight's series, go to: http://www.abc.net.au/rn/hindsight/features/historyundersiege/.

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    • [MADAGASCAR] Cole, Jennifer. "The Work of Memory in Madagascar." American Ethnologist. 25(4) (1998): 610-33.

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    • [NICARAGUA] Kunzle, David. The Murals of Revolutionary Nicaragua. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1995.

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    • [RUSSIA/SOVIET UNION] Corney, Fredrick C. Telling October: Memory and the Making of the Bolshevik Revolution. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2004.
    • [RUSSIA/SOVIET UNION] Tumarkin, Nona. The Living and the Dead: The Rise and Fall of the Cult of World War II in Russia. New York: Basik Books, 1994.

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    • [TAIWAN] Li-chun Lin, Sylvia. Representing Atrocity in Taiwan: The 2/28 Incident and White Terror in Fiction and Film. Columbia Univ. Press, 2007.

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    • [U.S.] Adair, Bill, Benjamin Filene, and Laura Koloski, eds. Letting Go? Sharing Historical Authority in a User-Generated World. Pew Center for Arts & Heritage, 2012.
    • [U.S.] Bodnar, John. Remaking America: Public Memory, Commemoration, and Patriotism in the Twentieth Century. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1992.
    • [U.S.] Benson, Susan, Stephen Brier, and Roy Rosenzweig, eds., Presenting the Past: Essays on History and the Public (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1986).
    • [U.S.] Biewan, John and Alexa Dilworth, eds., Reality Radio: Telling True Stories in Sound (UNC Press).
    • [U.S.] Blight, David. Beyond the Battlefield: Race, Memory, and the American Civil War.
    • [U.S.] Bruggeman, Seth C. Here, George Washington Was Born: Memory, Material Culture, and the Public History of a National Monument (Univ. of Georgia Press).
    • [U.S.] Custen,George. Bio/Pics: How Hollywood Constructed Public History (Rutgers).
    • [U.S.] Davis, Natalie. Slaves on Screen: Film and Historical Vision (Harvard Univ. Press, 2002).
    • [U.S.] Engelhardt,Tom. History Wars: The Enola Gay and Other Battles for the American Past. New York: Henry Holt and Co., 1996.
    • [U.S.] Gardner, James B.,  Peter S LaPaglia, P., eds. Public History: Essays from the Field, Rev. edition, Malabar, Florida: Krieger Publishing Company, 2004.
    • [U.S.] Glassberg, David., “Public History and the Study of Memory,” The Public Historian, Vol. 18 (1996). See follow-up roundtable discussion published in Vol. 19 (1997).
    • [U.S.] Green, Howard. “A Critique of the Professional Public History Movement,” Radical History Review, Vol. 25 (1981).
    • [U.S.] Glassberg, David. Sense of History: The Place of the Past in American Life.[U.S.]
    • [U.S.] Grele, Ronald J., “Whose Public? Whose History? What is the Goal of a Public Historian?” The Public Historian, Vol. 3 (1981).
    • [U.S.] Hagopian, Patrick. The Vietnam War in American Memory: Veterans, Memorials, and the Politics of Healing by Patrick Hagopian. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2009.
    • [U.S.] Handler, Richard and Eric Gable, The New History in an Old Museum: Creating the Past in Colonial Williamsburg (Duke).
    • [U.S.] Harwitt, Martin. An Exhibit Denied: Lobbying the History of Enola Gay (Springer).
    • [U.S.] Horwitz, Tony. Confederates in the Attic: Dispatches from the Unfinished Civil War (Vintage).
    • [U.S.] How, Barbara J. “Reflections on an Idea: NCPH’s First Decade,” The Public Historian 11, no. 3 (Summer 1989): 69-85.
    • [U.S.] Huyck, Heather A. “Twenty-Five Years of Public History: Perspectives from a Primary Document,” The Public Historian 21:3 (Summer 1999): 28-38.
    • [U.S.] Kay, Trey. "The Great Textbook War of 1974." Radio documentary produced by Trey Kay, 2009. Available at Talking History [www.talkinghistory.org], at West Virginia Public Broadcasting -- and directly here (you will need a Real Player plugin to listen, available for free at Real.com]: PART 1: Real Media. Time: 29:51 | PART 2: Real Media. Time: 27:04. Trey Kay won a 2010 Peabody Award for this documentary. As described by West Virginia Public Radio, where it premiered last year: "In 1974, Kanawha County was the first battleground in the American culture wars. Controversy erupted over newly-adopted school textbooks. School buildings were hit by dynamite and Molotov cocktails, buses were riddled with bullets, journalists were beaten and surrounding coal mines were shut down by protesting miners. Textbook opponents believed the books were teaching their children to question their authority, traditional values and the existence of God. Textbook supporters said children needed to be exposed to a wide variety of beliefs and experiences, and taught to make their own decisions."
    • [U.S.] Kelley, Robert, “Public History: Its Origins, Nature, and Prospects,” The Public Historian, 1:1 (August 1978): 16-28.
    • [U.S.] Linenthal, Edward T. Preserving Memory: The Struggle to Create America's Holocaust Museum.
    • [U.S.] Loewen, James W. Lies Across America: What Our Historic Sites Get Wrong (The New Press).
    • [U.S.] Loewen, James W. interview by Gerald Zahavi, 2002. Real Media. MP3. Time: 34:22. An interview with sociologist James Loewen focusing on "historical lies and distortions" -- by omission and commission -- in textbooks, historical markers, and monuments. Loewen, retired from the University of Vermont, is the best-selling author of Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your High School History Textbook Got Wrong and Lies Across America: What Our Historic Sites Get Wrong, and Sundown Towns: A Hidden History of American Racism (2005) and Teaching What Really Happened (2009).
    • Miller, Marla R. Miller, “Playing to Strength: Teaching Public History at the Turn of the 21st-Century,” American Studies International, Vol. XLVII, Nos. 2 & 3 (June-October 2004).
    • [U.S.] McCrisken, Trevor B., and Andrew Pepper. American History and Contemporary Hollywood Film. New Brunswick: Rutgers UP, 2005.
    • [U.S.] Miller, Page Putnam, “Reflections on the Public History Movement,” The Public Historian, 14:2 (Spring, 1992): 67-70.
    • [U.S.] Mintz, Steven, and Randy Roberts, eds. Hollywood's America: Twentieth-Century America through Film. Malden: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.
    • [U.S.] Pfitzer, Gregory. Popular History and the Literary Marketplace, 1840-1920 (U. of Massachusetts Press, 2008
    • [U.S.] Ritchie, Donald, “When History Goes Public: Recent Experiences in the United States,” Oral History, Vol. 29 (2001).
    • [U.S.] Rosenstone, Robert A. History on Film/Film on History. New York: Longman/Pearson, 2006.
    • [U.S.] Rosenzweig, Roy and David Thelen, eds., The Presence of the Past: Popular Uses of History in American Life (New York: Columbia University Press, 1998).
    • [U.S.] Savage, Kirk. Monument Wars: Washington, D.C., the National Mall, and the Transformation of the Memorial Landscape. University of California Press, 2011.
    • [U.S.] Scarpino, Philip V., “Common Ground: Reflections on the Past, Present, and Future of Public History and the NCPH,” The Public Historian, Vol. 16 (1994).
    • [U.S.] Toplin, Robert. History by Hollywood: The Use and Abuse of the American Past (Univ. of Illinois Press).
    • [U.S.] "World War II Recollected: Museum and Exhibit Reviews." The Public Historian. Vol. 24:4 (Fall 2002): 141-150. .
    • [U.S.] Wallace, Mike. Mickey Mouse History and Other Essays on American Memory (Temple, 1996).
    • [U.S.] West, Patricia. Domesticating History: The Political Origins of America's Historic House Museums (Smithsonian, 1999).

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    • [VIETNAM] Laderman, Scott. Tours of Vitnam: War, Travel Guides, and Memory (Duke University Press, 2009).
    • [VIETNAME] Kwon, Heonik. After the Massacre: Commemoration and Consolation in Ha My and My Lai (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2006.
    • [VIETNAM] Nguyen, Nathalie. Memory Is Another Country: Women of the Vietnamese Diaspora (Praeger, 2009).
    • [VIETNAM] Tai, Hue-Tam Ho. The Country of Memory: Remaking the Past in Late Socialist Vietnam (Univ. of California Press, 2001).


    ~ End ~

    Readings in U.S. and Global/Comparative Public History -- Course Syllabus & Bibliography
    Copyright © 2014 by Prof. Gerald Zahavi



    Updated 8-11-2015