Completed Hindelang Center Projects

Past projects

The Collaborative Crime Analysis Project (CCAP)

Robert E. Worden
Project Director

The Collaborative Crime Analysis Project (CCAP) provided analytical support for strategic crime-reduction in selected cities in New York State. CCAP operated in conjunction with another State initiative, Operation IMPACT (Integrated Municipal Police Anti-Crime Teams), which supported evidence-based strategic crime-reduction initiatives by multi-agency task forces in each of seventeen jurisdictions across New York State. The CCAP team served as a research partner to each of the selected jurisdictions; the research partner role is to assist with crime analysis and the development (and refinement) of data-driven strategies for crime reduction, and also to monitor the implementation and short-term impacts of the strategies, and evaluate effectivness. CCAP was initially funded by the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS), and it was subsequently funded by the individual jurisdictions with Operation IMPACT funds. Sponsors: NYS Division of Criminal Justice Services; City of Albany Police Department; Onondaga County District Attorney's Office; City of Poughkeepsie Police Department; City of Schenectady Police Department; City of Troy Police Department. Dates of Research: 10/2004-6/2007.

Capital District Arrestee Drug Abuse Monitoring (ADAM) Project

Robert E. Worden
Project Director

The ADAM program was a national program of data collection, conducted under the auspices of the National Institute of Justice (NIJ), which provided for quarterly itnerviews with samples of arrestees, concentrating mainly on drug use and drug-related behavior, and also for drug tests of urine specimens. In 1997, ADAM succeeded the Drug Use Forecasting (DUF) program of NIJ, which ahd operated in 23 sites nationwide since 1987. ADAM improved upon the methods used in DUF, and it operated in 36 sites across the country, all of which had to adhere to the same protcol: using the same interview instrument and procedures, and using probability sampling procedures that are as nearly similar across sites as possible. This meant that drug use patterns among this high-risk population could be traced over time at any one site, and that comparisons could be made across sites. In addition, ADAM served as a platform for date collection and analysis on other issues, such as gangs, domestic violence, and firearms ownership and use based on samples of the arrestee population. The Capital District ADAM project was established in 2000 and encompassed Albany, Schenectady, and Rensselaer counties. It was an "affiliated" site in that it adhered to all of the same data collection protocols, but was funded primarily by the NYS Division of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) rather than NIJ. The pruposes of the Capital district project also mirrored those of other ADAM sites: to a) provide information about local patterns of drug use and dependence, and drug markets, which may have been of use to local policy-makers (e.g., in projecting treatment needs or in evaluating policy initiatives, b) contibuted to a national database that enabled researchers to analyze drug use across jurisdictions and over time in order to learn more about the pehenomenon; and c) provided a platform for research on other questions of crime and justice. Sponsor: NYS Division of Criminal Justice Services. Dates of Research: 5/2000 - 4/2004.

Albany Citizens' Police Review Board (CPRB)

Robert E. Worden
Project Director

CPRB was created by a city ordinance enacted in October 2000. With support from the City of Albany through the Government Law Center of Albany Law School, systematic information about the CPRB and the services provided by the Albany police was generated through survey research on: a) the subjective experiences of complainant with the complaint review process, and b) the perceptions and subjective experiences of people who had contact with the Albany Police Department. Sponsor: Albany Law School. Dates of Research: 10/2002 - 10/2004.

Albany Police Services Study

Robert E. Worden
Project Director

The Albany Police Services Study was a multi-method study of the delivery of police services by the Albany Police Department (APD). It was, in part, action research in that it was conducted in collaboration with the APD: a core component was technical assistance in collecting and analyzing data to inform strategic, programmatic, tactical, and administrative decision-making. Data on calls for service and reported crime were regularly analyzed and results disseminated through the APD's Crime Assessment and Planning meetings. Other data, including survey data on residents' perceptions of public safety problems and subjective assessments of police serve were also collected and analyzed. Programmatic and tactical innovations were designed and empirically evaluated. Sponsor: City of Albany, NY. Dates of Research: 3/2001 - 12/2005.

Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN)

Robert E. Worden
Project Director

PSN is a Department of Justice initiative in each of the 94 federal districts across the U.S., which provided for the formulation and implementation of strategies to reduce gun violence. Local gun crime task forces in each district, including federal, state, and local agencies under the leadership of the U.S. Attorney, developed data-driven approaches to the gun crime problems in each site. Each task force included a research partner who was responsible for collecting and analyzing data on gun violence that may be used to inform the development of the strategy, and for monitoring implementation and outcomes over the course of the project. A team of Albany researchers served as the research partner in the Northern District of New York. Sponsor: Bureau of Justice Assistance. Dates of Research: 10/2002 - 9/2005.

Models of Community Coordination in Response to Partner Violence

Alissa Pollitz Worden
Project Director

Conducted at a time of rapid legal change in New York, this project developed a typology of community coordination models for domestic violence interventions, and assessed the role of leadership, conflict, and resources in the growth of different types of coordination models. Sponsor: National Institute of Justice. Dates of Research: 01/1996 - 06/1999.

Evaluation of the NYS Mandatory Arrest Provision of the Family Protection and Domestic Violence Intervention Act of 1994

Alissa Pollitz Worden
Project Director

This project evaluated the impacts of the 1994 Family Protection and Domestic Violence Intervention Act. The University was partnered with the Division of Criminal Justice Services and the NYS Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence on this five-year evaluation project. Sponsor: NYS Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence. Dates of Research: 04/1995 - 03/2000.

A Policy for Democratic Police Reform Abroad

David H. Bayley
Project Director

One year's fieldwork was conducted under this grant as part of a three-year project, which culminated in a book. The book examines the lessons for institutional reform of the police drawing on experience in developed democracies, foreign countries under American and multilateral auspices, and non-governmental organizations specializing in human rights. Written for policy-makers and overseas practitioners involved in designing and implementing programs of bilateral and multilateral assistance to foreign criminal justice systems, the book discusses the problems of applying these lessons in real-world settings by examining reform efforts in four countries selected as case studies. Sponsor: The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Dates of Research: 11/2001 - 10/2003.

Research on Violence Against Women: Syntheses for Practitioners

Alissa Pollitz Worden
Bonnie Carlson
Project Co-Directors

The research and evaluation literature on violence against women was reviewed and synthesized. A team of authors with expertise in violence against women and a team of practitioners representing diverse audiences in criminal justice and public health were assembled to collaborate in the development of summaries of research on violence against women for practitioners. Products included written syntheses, dissemination through publications, NIJ reports, linkages with web-pages accessed by practitioners, and conference presentations. Sponsor: U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. Dates of Research: 1/1999 - 5/2002.

Police-Community Interaction Project (PCIP)

David E. Duffee
Project Director

The Police-Community Interaction Project had two goals. First, it conceptualized specific ways in which police and neighborhood groups interact in joint attempts to improve neighborhoods, and developing measures for these processes. Second it developed guidelines for police and neighborhood groups so that they can employ these measures in their planning and assessment work, without researcher assistance. Sponsor: U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. Dates of Research: 1/1998 - 12/2001.

Lessons in Projecting Police Reform Abroad Project

David H. Bayley
Project Director

For this research, Dr. Bayley authored a monograph specifying the lessons about changing police organizations that have been culled from previous writing and develop a detailed research plan for fieldwork in four countries that would explore the problems of applying the specified lessons in real-world settings. Research focused on police reform in developed democratic countries, especially the U.S., bilateral and multilateral experience in police reform abroad, and efforts by non-governmental organizations to increase adherence to international standards of human rights. Sponsor: U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. Dates of Research: 9/1999 - 3/2001.

Beliefs and Perceptions About Domestic Violence: The Effects of Individual, Contextual, and Community Factors

Alissa P. Worden
Bonnie Carlson
Co-Project Directors

This research examined the relationships between individual attitudes toward acceptability of partner violence and perceptions about like interventions and sanctions; developed a typology of community coordination models; and assessed the role of leadership, conflict, and resources in the growth of different types of coordination models. Sponsor: U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. Dates of Research: 6/1999 - 11/2000.

Police Department School Partnership Projects

Robert E. Worden
Project Director

These projects studied problems facing local area high schools. Analysis was performed on problem-solving initiatives, including the collection and analysis of several forms of data, in collaboration with project participants, with the objective of formulating and evaluating intervention responses to problems. Sponsor: Subcontracts with City of Albany, NY and Wakefield, MA under U.S. Department of Justice, Community Oriented Policing Services. Dates of Research: 9/1998 - 1/2001.

Childhood Abuse

Cathy Spatz Widom
Project Director

Professor Cathy Spatz Widom conducted numerous studies on childhood abuse/victimization.

National Assessment of the Strategic Approaches to Community Safety Initiative (SACSI) Project

Dennis P. Rosenbaum
Project Director

This research documented and assessed data-driven, problem-solving partnerships in five U.S. cities directed at reducing youth and gun violence. The cities were Indianapolis, IN; Memphis, TN; Winston-Salem, NC; New Haven, CT; and Portland, OR. Dean Rosenbaum served as Principal Investigator and provided overall direction for the project. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago focused on SASCI processes while Rosenbaum developed theory-based designs for estimated program impact on the target problems. Sponsor: U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice; Dates of Research: 6/1/1999-8/31/2000.

Identifying Causal Factors in the Process of Desisting Using the Rochester Youth Development Study

Terence P. Thornberry
Marvin D. Krohn
Project Co-Directors

Using data from the Rochester Youth Development Study containing proximal measures of both offending and concurrent life events during adolescence and early adulthood, causal modeling of the process of desisting was examined. Sponsor: Subagreement with Carnegie Mellon University, National Consortium on Violence Research, National Science Foundation; Dates of Research: 8/1998-7/2000.

Adolescent Violence Among Residents of Public Housing

Terence P. Thornberry
Project Director

Using data collected from the Rochester Youth Development Study and Pittsburgh Youth Study, analysis was conducted to determine if public housing residents have higher rates of violent crime than similar residents who do not live in public housing. Secondly, risk factors and protective factors for violent behavior for adolescents in public housing verus non-public housing were examined. Sponsor: Subagreement with Carnegie Mellon University, National Consortium on Violence Research, under National Science Foundation; Dates of Research: 1/1998-3/2000.

Illicit Gun Markets and Juveniles

Alan J. Lizotte
Terence P. Thornberry
Project Co-Directors

The major goals of this research were the collection and analyses of special data relating to gun involvement from 1,000 members of a cohort group participating in the Rochester Youth Development Study, an ongoing panel study of serious delinquency and drug use.T Sponsor: Subagreement with Carnegie Mellon University, under Alfred P. Sloan Foundation; Dates of Research: 1/1996-12/1999.

Injury Prevention Effects of Violence Interventions

David McDowall
Colin Loftin
Project Co-Directors

This research conducted multiple interrupted time-series studies of two types of interventions that have been implemented to prevent youth violence: 1) relaxed licensing laws for carrying concealed weapons; and 2) youth curfew laws. The time period studied was 1965 through 1995. Sponsor: U.S. Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Dates of Research: 9/1996-8/1999.

Static and Dynamic Models of Youth Violence

Terence P. Thornberry
Project Director

This research examined the validity of static, dynamic, and mixed models to account for the relationship between past and future offending through analysis of data form the Rochster Youth Development Study. Sponsor: Subagreement with Carnegie Mellon University, National Consortium on Violence Research, under National Science Foundation; Dates of Research: 1/1997-6/1999.

Project on Policing Neighborhoods (POPN)

Robert E. Worden
Project Director

The "Project on Policing Neighborhoods" (POPN), in collaboration with Stephen D. Mastrofski (then of Michigan State University), Roger B. Parks (Indiana University), and Albert J. Reiss, Jr. (Yale University), was a multi-method field study of how police and citizens interact at the street level. Field research was conducted in the Indianapolis Police Department in 1996, and in the St. Petersburg Police Department in 1997, and it included in-person observations of police patrol in selected beats, a telephone survey of residents, face-to-face interviews with patrol officers, observations of and interviews with field supervisors, interviews with police managers, and police records of calls for service and reported crime. Subcontract with Michigan State University under U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice. Dates of Research: 1/1996-1/1999.