Graduate Courses

Beyond the basic science offerings in Biology, Chemistry, Psychology and Human Biology/Anthropology, the University at Albany has rich course offerings in Health Sciences. As an example of the comprehensive array of Graduate health science course offerings at the University at Albany, listed below are the courses that were offered in the 2014/15 academic year.

Course Disciplines

Anatomy and Physiology

EHS 515 Environmental Physiology (3)

Provides a basic understanding of physiological responses to natural and manmade environmental conditions by using topics such as regulation and control of respiration, biological effects of specific inhaled inorganic and organic dust, environmental dermatosis, physiological effects of abnormal atmospheric pressure, the ear as a sound transducer, anatomy and physiology of the eye, physiological responses to heat stress, the anatomy of function, anatomy and physiology of the olfactory system, physiological and anatomical responses to low-temperature exposure. Prerequisite: Introductory course in biology.

Biochemistry

BIO 523 Biochemistry and Biomolecular Structure (3)

One of the four courses required of incoming graduate students in the cell, molecular, developmental, and neural biology core area. This course includes an introduction to biophysical chemistry; protein structure, folding and function; nucleic acid structure, folding and function; and protein-DNA interactions. Prerequisite: Biochemistry course equivalent to BIO 365.

BMS 504A Also EHS 504A, B Comprehensive Biochemistry (4)

Chemical characteristics of living matter, amino acids, polypeptides and proteins, supramolecular assembly and membrane structure; enzyme mechanisms and kinetics; bioenergetics and the chemistry of metabolism; electron transport and other transports across membranes; biosynthesis, storage, and expression of genetic information. Additional assignments will be required, including homework assignments. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

BMS 504B Comprehensive Biochemistry: Part B (3)

Focus is on cellular organization, organellar biogenesis and cellular trafficking the biochemical basis for representative human diseases resulting from the failure to properly assemble and target critical cellular components. Prerequisite: BMS 505A.

CHM 546 Chemical Biology Laboratory (3)

The lab will provide the basics for protein purification, protein characterization, and DNA manipulation through the use of chromatographic, electrophoretic, and spectroscopic tools of biochemistry and biophysics. The lab is for graduate students who will be doing research in biochemical and biophysical sciences. More advanced preparative procedures and additional literature searching will be expected. One class period two laboratory periods each week. Prerequisites: CHM 221 and 223. Co-requisites: CHM 540A and 540B, CHM 350.

EHS 504A, B (CHM 540A, B) Comprehensive Biochemistry (3, 3)

Chemical characteristics of living matter, amino acids, polypeptides and proteins, supramolecular assembly and membrane structure; enzyme mechanisms and kinetics; bioenergetics and the chemistry of metabolism; electron transport and other transports across membranes; biosynthesis, storage, and expression of genetic information. Additional assignments will be required, including a term paper and oral delivery. Prerequisite: CHM 216B or consent of instructor.

Bioethics

BIO 515a Responsible Conduct and Skills in Research (1)

Seminar course on good scientific practices and ethical principles that guide scientific research. Topics include: introduction to ethical reasoning, how to give a talk, laboratory safety, scientific record keeping, conflict of interest, scientific misconduct, how to avoid plagiarism, use of animals and humans in research, human genomic research and the protection of privacy and confidentiality, funding opportunities for graduate students, and skills in the use of computer and printed information retrieval sources. Required for all matriculated graduate students. Not open to non-matriculated graduate students.

BIO 515b Responsible Conduct and Skills in Scientific Communication (1)

Seminar course on good scientific practices and ethical principles that guide scientific research. Topics include: effective communication, writing and submitting a scientific paper, peer review, writing grants, ethics of scientific communication, preparing effective and ethical illustrations, use of reference data bases, attending conferences. Overview of skills and training qualifications reflected in current job and postdoctoral opportunities. Students are required to make presentations. Required of all matriculated graduate students. Not open to non-matriculated graduate students. Prerequisite: BIO 515a or permission of the instructor.

BMS 670 (EHS 675) Responsible Conduct of Scientific Research (1)

This is a required course which will explore specific areas of the conduct of research. Aspects of recognition of scientific fraud, peer interaction, and reporting of misconduct will be covered. Bioethical issues will not be covered. A specific issue concerning scientific conduct will be presented at each class through case study and student-led discussion. S/U graded.

HPM 516 (PAD 516) Introduction to Health Policy, Ethics, and Politics (3)

Analysis and description of the health policy processes that stresses both ethical and political factors shaping the emergence of problems, policies and the adaptation and implementation of policy solutions.

HPM 605 Philosophical and Ethical Issues in Public Health (3)

Systematic exploration of the fundamental philosophical and ethical issues in health policy, and the relation of political and ethical theories to policies. Because public health is concerned with the nature and scope of the public, a major focus of the course will be on political philosophy. Course will usually cover one area of public health each time it is given, examining ethical and philosophical issues relevant to that area. May be taken more than once with consent of the instructor Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

Epidemiology

EHS 619 (EPI 609, ANT 609) Reproductive and Perinatal Epidemiology (3)

An overview of epidemiologic methods commonly employed for the study of reproductive and perinatal endpoints including pertinent physiological mechanisms of pregnancy and fetal growth critical to understanding the relevant epidemiologic methods and the unique nature of the circumstances surrounding human reproduction. Prerequisites: EPI 501, STA 552.

EHS 626 Reproductive Environmental Health (3)

This course will review the impact of exposures to various classes of environmental pollutants on human reproduction throughout the life course including, fecundity and fertility, pregnancy, infant and child development, and adult reproductive health. This course combines a “traditional” didactic format with weekly student-led discussions of the literature. Prerequisites: EHS 590, EPI 500 or EPI 501, BMS 505 or equivalent.

EPI 603 Chronic Disease Epidemiology (3)

Presentation of the epidemiologic concepts and methods appropriate to the study of chronic (mostly non-infectious) diseases and diseases of unknown etiology. Approaches and problems in descriptive, analytic, and experimental (controlled trials) epidemiology will be compared with those for the acute infectious diseases. Discussion of the epidemiologic, etiologic, pathophysiologic and clinical features of some of the important chronic diseases. Specific disease examples covered include: cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, arthritis, chronic obstructive lung disease, neurologic disorders and mental illness. Risk assessment and preventive practice in chronic disease (applied epidemiology) are discussed. Materials from Health Department programs are used as case studies. Prerequisites: EPI 501, STA 552.

EPI 604 Cancer Epidemiology (3)

Review of concepts and methodological issues central to the conduct of epidemiologic studies of cancer etiology and control. Overview of the molecular and cellular basis of cancer, the role of experimental studies in assessing human risk, the classification and nomenclature of human cancer and the morphology, natural history and etiologic importance of precursor lesions. Application of descriptive and analytic epidemiologic methods to studies of cancer etiology will be illustrated through in- depth reviews of specific forms of neoplasia: leukemias, lymphomas, melanomas and malignant neoplasms of the breast, respiratory, gastrointestinal, reproductive, urinary and nervous systems. Discussion of the role of epidemiology in cancer control and fundamental issues in cancer screening. Prerequisites: EPI 501 and EPI 510.

EPI 605 Infectious Disease Epidemiology (3)

This course reviews infectious disease principles and the use of epidemiologic methods in the assessment of selected communicable diseases of national and international importance. Emphasis will also be given to methods of transmission, the role of surveillance, and methods of control and prevention. Specific disease examples to be covered will include: tuberculosis, legionellosis, measles, Lyme disease, and syphilis with examples of nosocomial, foodborne, and enteric infections. Case studies and literature examples will be used extensively to give students an appreciation for the application of epidemiologic principles to this field. Prerequisites: None, but previous courses in biology and introductory epidemiology would be useful (check with faculty if in doubt).

EPI 615 Hospital Epidemiology (3)

This course provides an overview of the history of hospital epidemiology, methods of surveillance, risk factors for infection, control measures and impact of infections in health care facilities. Host, agent and environmental factors will be explored in the laboratory, hospital (Albany Medical Center), and through classroom lectures and directed readings. Students will learn to apply the basic principles of public health and epidemiology to the problem of infections acquired in the hospital setting. Prerequisites: EPI 501 and STA 552.

EPI619 Diabetes Epidemiology (3)

The following topics are addressed: 1) biology of glucose regulation, types of diabetes and complications; diagnostic criteria/screening; care and management; 2) epidemiology of diabetes prevalence/incidence/mortality, complications, risk factors; 3) diabetes prevention issues including measurements of obesity and physical activity, types of interventions and evaluation designs, cultural issues. Critical thinking regarding study designs, measurements, bias and results is reinforced through reading and discussions of epidemiology studies.

EPI 620 Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Diseases (3)

The following topics are addressed (1) biology/pathology of cardiovascular diseases (CVD); diagnosis and misclassification of CVD in mortality data, hospital discharge data and community studies (2) descriptive epidemiology of coronary heart disease and stroke, including trends and geographic distributions (3) overview of CVD (4) descriptive epidemiology of CVD, social class and race; discussion of mechanisms (5) epidemiology multi-risk factor studies and current community studies; discussion of high risk vs. population approaches to prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Critical thinking regarding study designs, measurements, bias and results is reinforced through reading and discussions of epidemiology studies.

Experimental Design and Statistics

BIO 540 (Sta 569) Principles of Bioinformatics (3)

This course will introduce the fundamental concepts in various commonly used computational algorithms and in searching biological databases. This is a lab-equipped course where participants will gain hands-on experience in performing BLAST searches etc. to get the best out of public databases and bioinformatics tools. Unix and PERL programming concepts will be introduced.

BMS 510 Communication in Science (1)

This is an introductory course to promote effective scientific writing and data presentation skills. Specifically for writing journal articles, presenting posters and giving oral presentations based on graduate research. The course is restricted to students engaged in research.

EPI 551 Basic Principals of Statistical Inference (3)

General introduction to statistical methods used in the health sciences including basic descriptive and inferential statistics. Computing is introduced and used throughout the course. STA 551 satisfies the core requirement for statistics for students not planning to take HEPI/HSTA 553

EPI 552 (STA 552) Principles of Statistical Inference I (3)

An introduction to descriptive statistics, measures of central tendency and variability, probability distributions, sampling estimation, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Computing will be introduced and used throughout the course. EPI 552 and EPI 553 will satisfy the core requirement in statistics for programs in the School of Public Health.

EPI 553 (STA 553) Principles of Statistical Inference II (3)

Continuation of EPI 552. Topics will include correlation, regression, analysis of contingency tables and non-parametric statistics. Computing will be used throughout the course. EPI 552 and EPI 553 will satisfy the core requirement in statistics for programs in the School of Public Health. Prerequisite: EPI 552.

HPM 520 Fundamentals of Research Design (3)

This course introduces students to the steps involved in designing and/or evaluating a research paper. Topics include translating a curiosity into a researchable question and testable hypotheses, the logic of different modes of inquiry, choosing appropriate study designs and samples, measuring phenomena of interest, and interpreting results, as well as principles of research ethics

PSY 511 Statistics and Experimental Methods II (4)

Advanced methods in regression and multiple regression. Analysis of variance techniques associated with experimental methods in the behavioral sciences, and general linear models. Analysis of categorical data and an introduction to non-parametric statistics. Statistical computing applications of these methods with standard software packages.

STA 552 Principles of Statistical Inference I (3)

An introduction to descriptive statistics, measures of central tendency and variability, probability distributions, sampling estimation, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Computing will be introduced and used throughout the course. STA 552 and STA 553 will satisfy the core requirement in statistics for programs in the School of Public Health.

STA 553 Principles of Statistical Inference II (3)

Continuation of Sta 552. Topics will include correlation, regression, analysis of contingency tables and non-parametric statistics. Computing will be used throughout the course. Sta 552 and Sta 553 will satisfy the core requirement in statistics for programs in the School of Public Health. Prerequisite: STA 552 or equivalent.

STA 562 (MAT 562) Design of Experiments I (3)

Principles in the design and analysis of controlled experiments. Topics include general linear hypotheses, multiple classifications, Latin squares and factorial designs. Prerequisite: STA 555 or equivalent.

STA 563 Design of Experiments II (3)

Continuation of STA 562. More advanced designs, information and efficiency, and introduction to response surface methodology. Prerequisite: STA 562 or equivalent.

STA 650 Advanced Topics in Bioinformatics (3)

This is an advanced graduate-level course in bioinformatics. Topics covered include UNIX-based computer skills, machine learning algorithms, prediction of protein subcellular localization, pathway reconstruction, phylogenetic analysis, protein structure alignment and analysis, microarray data analysis, clustering methods and computational proteome analysis. This course also includes hands-on lab sessions. Prerequisite: BIO 540.

STA 656 Design of Clinical Trials (3)

Introduction to topics in the design and analysis of clinical trials and related experiments. Prerequisite: STA 555 or equivalent.

STA 569 (Bio 540) Principles of Bioinformatics (3)

This course will introduce the fundamental concepts in various commonly used computational algorithms and in searching biological databases. This is a lab-equipped course where participants will gain hands-on experience in performing BLAST searches etc. to get the best out of public databases and bioinformatics tools. Unix and PERL programming concepts will be introduced.

STA 572 Introductory Applied Statistics for Environmental and Biomedical Health Sciences (2)

This introductory course will familiarize students with basic applied statistical methods used in data analysis for laboratory-based studies. Real-world examples will be used to illustrate the application of these methods. The course is designed for students from various natural sciences who have no background in statistics.

Genetics/Genomics

BIO 511 Population Genetics (3)

Advanced course for first and second year students needing a comprehensive survey of population-genetics theory and practical applications. Topics covered include random-genetic drift, the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, natural and artificial selection, mutation, gene flow, and population structure. Emphasis on modern molecular and computer techniques for data acquisition and analysis will be strong. Problem solving and algebraic manipulations will be required. Prerequisites: BIO 2l2 and MAT 113 or the equivalent.

BIO 519 (ANT 512) Human Population Genetics (3)

The genetics of human populations with emphasis on the application of the principles of population genetics to human groups, particularly concerning inbreeding, selection, drift, flow, and the structure of human populations. Prerequisite: ANT 502 or permission of instructor.

BIO 539 Comparative Functional Genomics (3)

This course will provide students with a comprehensive review of concepts, goals and methods of genome analysis. Besides reviewing both classical and molecular genetics and comparatively analyzing model organisms, and gene and protein families, we will also examine relevant technological advances including large-scale genomic analysis, map-based cloning and transgenic technology. Prerequisite: graduate status.

BIO 629 Advanced Genetics (3)

This course will provide an overview of concepts and techniques in genetics and their use in answering fundamental questions in biology. The lectures will focus primarily on studies carried out in model organisms such as yeast, C. elegans, Drosophila, and mouse (human) to illustrate the power of forward and reverse genetics as experimental tools. Genomic approach based on the completely sequenced genomes will be also discussed. Prerequisites: BIO 524 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

BMS 500b Molecular Biology and Genetics (3)

This course will provide in depth detail of essential cellular processes by using examples from the current literature. Topics to be covered are: regulation, both transcriptional and translational, DNA replication, recombination, transposition, cell cycle and cancer. In addition, students will be introduced to the genetics of developmental biology. Prerequisite: BMS 500 or equivalent; and BMS 504a or equivalent.

BMS 551 Introduction to Genetics and Genomics (3)

This distance learning course is designed to introduce to students with no or minimal formal training in molecular genetics to the fields of genetics and genomics with an emphasis on their application in public health. Students will be prepared to use this information in their professions and take higher level courses if desired. Prerequisite: Basic undergraduate biology or permission of instructor.

BMS 663 Mammalian Molecular Genetics (3)

This course will cover topics related to the structure and function of the of the mammalian genome and the molecular mechanisms involved in development, cell fate determination and cellular differentiation. Students will participate by presenting research papers relevant to a current topic. Prerequisite: BMS 500 and 605A, or equivalent.

EPI 624 Genetic Epidemiology (3)

This course is designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of genetic epidemiology. It will provide an in-depth discussion of designs and methodologies involved in conducting both family-based and population-based genetic epidemiologic studies. Furthermore, an overview of the currently available software for genetic epidemiologic analyses will be given. Prerequisites: EPI 501, EPI 552.

HPM 560 Public Health Genomics (3)

This course introduces students to the emerging field of public health genomics, which is the application of genetic/genomic science to population-based health issues such as health promotion, disease prevention, surveillance, and quality assurance. Prerequisites: HBMS 551 or permission of instructor.

Healthcare Management-Related Courses

BUS 681 (HPM 550) Financial Management of Healthcare Institutions (3)

This course covers significant issues in the areas of working capital management, capital financing, cost analysis and rate setting, budgeting, reimbursement, managed care contracting, and cost controls. The course has been developed to maximize student opportunities for independent analysis, development of PC-based problem solving applications, and in-class discussion and evaluation of pertinent financial issues and problems. An emphasis is placed on uses of information generated through accounting and financial management systems to control operations in health care organizations. To promote such understanding, students receive problem oriented assignments and examinations in which they can apply knowledge and reasoning techniques gained from this and other courses to reach logical decisions that would effectively control operations in the simulated exercises. Prerequisites: HPM 500 or Permission of instructor.

HPM 500 Health Care Organization, Delivery and Financing (3)

Introduction to health care policy and services; arrangements for organizing, delivering, paying for, and financing health care are examined with attention to their rationale, implementation, and effectiveness. Government interventions to ensure access, cost containment and quality are assessed and policy alternatives are considered. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

HPM 501 (ECO 509) Health Policy Analysis (3)

This course introduces students to policy analysis by examining issues in the health sector. It fosters an appreciation of the complexity of policy problems and the policy making process and provides the basic tools used in policy design, implementation and evaluation. Prerequisite: HPM 500.

HPM 511 (ECO 511, PAD 503) Economic Analysis for Health Policy and Management I (3)

This course is an introduction to the field of health economics. Health economics is an active field of microeconomics with a large and growing literature. This course will combine economic theory, recent research, and current health reform and policy problems into a comprehensive overview of the field.

HPM 528 Managing Long-Term Care Service

This course aims at analyzing the essential components of the long-term care (LTC) continuum, with attention devoted to demographics of aging, roles of financing and evolving marketplace, and programs designed to serve aging populations. A framework for studying LTC continuum is introduced and used to identify opportunities for interventions.

HPM 570 International Health Economics (3)

This course is designed to introduce basic economic theories, concepts, and tools and apply them specifically to the health care sector under a variety of contexts. In this course, the structure, organization, activities, functions, and problems of health and medical care are considered from a specific point of view-that of an economist. This economic point of view is based on three fundamental observations: resources are scarce relative to wants; resources have alternative uses, making choice necessary; and unique solutions may not exist, since there are significant variations in the relative importance that people in society attach to wants. Therefore the basic economic problem then becomes how to allocate scarce resources so as to satisfy best human wants (individual and/or societal). The purpose of this course is to enhance the ability to use the theories, concepts, and tools of economic analysis to evaluate, systematically, the features, utilization patterns, delivery mechanisms of the health care system, to ensure that more efficient and equitable allocation decisions are attained. This analysis focuses on a variety of health care systems and how the governmental role in these systems varies in the corrections in the market and in the provision and consumption of health care services.

HPM 635 Economic Evaluation in Health Care (3)

This course introduces students to the methods, objectives, and applications of economic evaluations in the health care sector. In this course, students will also participate in a lab to learn decision analysis software such that they can perform analyses themselves as a class project.

HPM 641 Principles of Health Care Organization Management (3)

This course covers the major foundational and operational aspects of managing in both public and private sector health care organizations. It is intended as a survey course that provides an introduction to topics in health management. It is also a course that exposes students to the principles and process of evidence-based management. The topics include systems thinking, organizational learning and change, structure and culture, human resources management, and innovation. A heavy emphasis in the course is on applying the theories and research associated with these topics to contemporary issues in health management that involve quality improvement, performance measurement, and service quality. In addition, quality improvement tools such as Lean Techniques and the Balanced Scorecard are introduced to students for their use. This course heavily emphasizes critical thinking and development of written and oral communication skills. Prerequisite: HPM500 completed.

HPM 642 Health Law (3)

Competence in public health law is being recognized increasingly as essential to the training of public health practitioners. This course aims to provide students with practical understanding of the basic concepts and tools used in public health law, skill in navigating its substantive and procedural realms, appreciation for how it has developed and changed over time, and insight into how law may be harnessed to improve public health in the future.

HPM 643 Long-term Care Administration (3)

This course provides an overview of long-term care policy, financing, and management with concentration on nursing home administration. Discussion will focus on nursing home organization, resident care, personnel, financial, environmental and regulatory management. Effective management, measured by indicators such as quality of care and quality of life of nursing home residents, will be presented. Student evaluations are based on class participation, two in-class exams, and a paper. Prerequisites: HPM500 or permission of instructor.

HPM 648 (PAD 644) Health Care Finance (4)

Examines major policy and implementation issues in the financing of health care, particularly the poor. Among the topics addressed are health cost containment, Medicaid, long term care, AIDS, and the provision of care to the uninsured. Prerequisites: PAD 503 and PAD 505 (or equivalent).

HPM 650 Strategy & Leadership Applications in Health Management (3)

This course is intended as a capstone that deals with business planning and decision making using strategic management principles and the model of strategic planning for the public and private sectors. The course uses the case-based method of learning in applying concepts from strategy, leadership, decision analysis, and health management to the development of situational analyses, corporate and operational level decision making, implementation plan development, and strategic evaluation. Students develop full strategic plans in the class as part of the work expectation. This course is taken at the end of a program of study. Prerequisites: Both HPM500 and HPM641 completed.

HPM 680 Healthcare Informatics (3)

This course examines the application of information technology and the associated knowledge/information management practices in the health care industry. Specifically, the course will focus on three aspects of Healthcare Management Informatics: organizational informatics; consumer informatics; and security informatics. The course will also explore the different types of strategies and practices that healthcare organizations can adopt to enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of their services.

PAD 516 (HPM 516) Introduction to Health Policy and Politics (3)

Analysis and description of the health policy processes, with very strong focus on public health problems, including medical care; nature of the public policy process, especially for health issues; and employment in written work of differing models for analyzing health problems.

PAD 523 (HPM 502) Central Issues in Health Policy (3)

An examination of some of the major issues confronting health policy makers in the areas of health systems, family and community health, and environmental and occupational health. Provides an overview of the impact of public policy on health status, with a more intensive study of a few specific problems such as the financing and organization of medical care for the elderly, retarded and mentally ill.

PAD 654 Your Money or Your Life: Economics of Health Policy (4)

Why is health care so expensive? Why do health care markets tend to be inefficient and unjust? What are major psychological biases in health care behavior? What incentives does the American health care system create for the different actors in the system? How can we evaluate health care outcomes? This course examines major topics in the economics of health care policy, including selection, moral hazard, bargaining power, adoption of new technologies, valuing health, consumer behavior, provider behavior, and psychological health economies. Prerequisites: PAD 503 and 505, or equivalent exposure to microeconomics and statistics.

PAD 656 Health Care Financial Analysis (4)

Examines the use of health care reimbursement as a policy tool and the manner in which health care providers such as physicians and hospitals respond to financial incentives. Course involves considerable hands-on exposure to the design and operation of various reimbursement systems including prospective rate setting, managed care, and bundled payment systems.

PAD 657 (ECO 509, HPM 501) Health Policy Analysis (3)

This course introduces students to policy analysis and management by examining issues in the health sector. It fosters an appreciation of the complexity of policy problems and provides the basic tools used in policy design, implementation and evaluation. Prerequisite: HPM 500.

PAD 586 (POS 586, HPM 586) Health and Human Rights: an Interdisciplinary Approach (3)

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to health and human rights and the contemporary challenges and solutions associated with them. The course will be taught by physicians and human rights champions with guest lectures from experts in public health, philosophy, social welfare, law, gender studies, public administration the United Nations, among others. Through lectures, discussion and case studies, students will develop a broad theoretical understanding of health as a human right, become familiar with legal and policy frameworks to support public health, and acquire skills in the application of these concepts and the implementation and evaluation of solutions to our modern health challenges.

Immunology

BMS 506 Introduction to Immunology (2)

BMS 609 Immunochemistry of Microbial Molecules (1)

Tutorial: current knowledge and strategies and methods for immunochemical analysis of important microbial molecules. Emphasis on procedures applicable in molecular genetics that use calibrated poly- and monoclonal antibody probes to study native and recombinant gene products.

BMS 666 Contemporary Topics in Immunology (0-1)

This is an advanced course that is designed to explore central questions and concepts in immunology through readings and discussion of the current scientific literature. Topics of special interest will be selected and reviewed per semester. Participants will be involved in the selection and presentation of the literature. Prerequisite: BMS 514 or equivalent, or by permission of instructor.

Infectious Disease, Virology and Parasitology

BIO 606 Topics in Parasitology (1-4)

BMS 552 Bioecology of Vector-borne Diseases (3)

This course will focus on the ecology and biology of insect and tick vectors of pathogens causing both tropical and temperate diseases such as malaria, Lyme disease, African sleeping sickness, Chagas' disease, yellow fever, chikungunya and West Nile virus. We may also introduce forensic entomology, depending on class size. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BMS 553 Virology (4)

A general virology survey covering all aspects of structure, replication, and pathogenesis of viruses important in public health. Prerequisites: Cell Biology and Biochemistry.

BMS 555 Biodefense Sciences (1)

Students will be given a working knowledge of the morphology, pathology, treatment, and prevention of potential biological threat agents as well as an understanding of procedures and methods to safely and securely work with these agents in the laboratory. Overviews and appropriate use of diagnostic methods will be presented. Prerequisite: Undergraduate biology and chemistry.

BMS 556 Biodefense Laboratory Sciences (1)

This course will provide an introduction to the procedures and methods to safely and securely work with these agents in the laboratory. Overviews and use of diagnostic methods will be presented including culture, immunoassay and nucleic acid amplification. The laboratories are designed to give students an understanding of the testing flow used for biothreat analysis and emerging infectious disease as well as some of the specialized techniques and technology that the Wadsworth Center has used in real-world testing of these types of samples. The students will take analysis from the beginning stages of specimen/sample arrival through rapid and confirmatory testing that will be taught throughout the laboratories. Prerequisite: Undergraduate biology and chemistry.

BMS 557 Biomedical Sciences: Emerging Infectious Diseases (1)

Students will gain fundamental knowledge of emerging infectious pathogens, ranging from epidemiology, molecular biology, pathogenesis, transmission, and interventions. The emphasis of the course will be on the impact of these pathogens on public health, and their interventions and preventions. Prerequisites: Undergraduate microbiology or permission of instructor.

BMS 610 Microbial Pathogenesis (3)

This course will provide students with a background in the mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis. Students will learn basic principles of host- parasite interactions and how human behavior has influenced both the resurgence of old diseases and the emergence of new ones. Paradigms of host-parasite interactions will be illustrated by studying, at the molecular and cellular levels, specific infectious diseases and the agents that cause them

Microbiology

BMS 575 Structure of Microbial Pathogens (3)

Lecture course covering the structure of bacteria, fungi and viruses, with emphasis on how this information relates to overcoming the different types of pathogens. Prerequisite: Course in basic biology.

EHS 615 Environmental Microbiology (3)

This course will present a brief review of basic microbiology and then focus on information related to bacterial metabolism. Ultimately the material will demonstrate a variety of interactions between microorganisms and their various environments. Included will be general and unique pathways for catabolism, biosysnthesis and energy production in bacteria. Biological processes occurring in the environment, both in solid and liquid phase, aerobic and anaerobic conditions will be presented. In addition, traditional and advanced methods of recovering, detecting and identifying microorganisms from environment will be included. Prerequisites: Undergraduate organic chemistry, biochemistry or microbiology; permission of instructor.

Molecular Biology

BIO 524 Advanced Molecular Biology (3)

Biosynthesis and function of biological macromolecules. Current work on the different species of RNA and RNA-containing structures in the cell, DNA synthesis in chromosome replication, protein synthesis, and control mechanisms operating at the levels of nucleic acid and protein synthesis. Two 1 1/2-hour lecture periods per week. Given spring semester only. Prerequisites: BIO 301; 111N or equivalent; CHM 342 or BIO 365, CHM 343 or BIO 367, or CHM 440A, B or equivalents.

BMS 500 Molecular Cell Biology (4)

This course integrates classical cell biology concepts with current molecular biology for a unified view of cell function. Transmission genetics, eukaryotic and prokaryotic DNA replication, and information flow in transcription translation will be presented. Regulatory and mechanical aspects of cell division, cell architecture and diversity, and intracellular trafficking and targeting will be covered, as will signaling cascades and apoptosis.

BMS 500b Molecular Biology and Genetics (3)

This course will provide in depth detail of essential cellular processes by using examples from the current literature. Topics to be covered are: regulation, both transcriptional and translational, DNA replication, recombination, transposition, cell cycle and cancer. In addition, students will be introduced to the genetics of developmental biology. Prerequisite: BMS 500 or equivalent; and BMS 504a or equivalent.

BMS 635 Introduction to Structural Molecular Biology (3)

BMS 635 covers principles and applications of contemporary Structural Biology methods to examine macromolecules and protein assemblies in size from 1000's of Angstroms down to the atomic level. The goal is to provide students with a general understanding of current techniques most appropriately suited for the broad range of problems in contemporary biomedical research.

Pharmacology

CHM 558 Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry/Pharmacology (3)

Medicinal chemistry is an interdisciplinary course at the interface of chemistry and pharmacy and is involved with designing, synthesizing and developing pharmaceutical drugs. It will include the following topics: molecular modeling, rational drug design, combinational chemistry, QSAR, and cheminformatics. Prerequisites: CHM 221 and CHM 442.

CHM 580A, B Forensic Drug Chemistry Practicum (4, 4)

A faculty and field-instructor supervised practicum in a professional laboratory setting where qualified students will have the opportunity to apply forensic chemistry methods, techniques, and analyses. Students pursuing a M.S. degree in Applied Chemistry with a Forensic Chemistry Concentration may apply to the Department of Chemistry for permission to enroll in this course. Admission to the Forensic Drug Chemistry Practicum course will be dependent upon the acceptability of the candidate to the Department of Chemistry and the host institution or agency. The student will be tested and certified in stages on their knowledge of the various experimental techniques and equipment that they have encountered. A written certified record of the work performed by the student will be the end product of the practicum. Prerequisite: Enrollment in the course is limited in number and is therefore, determined in advance on a competitive basis. Application to the practicum course must be at least six months in advance of the beginning of the proposed program.

EHS 530 Principles of Toxicology (3)

Fundamentals and principles of toxicology including absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of chemicals and drugs in mammalian systems. The toxicology of specific organ systems and of classes of compounds which produce similar toxic effects presented. Current governmental regulations concerning foods, drugs, and environmental policies discussed. Prerequisite: Two years of undergraduate chemistry and one year of undergraduate biology or consent of instructor.

EHS 688 Topics in Pharmacogenetics & Toxicogenomics (3)

Discussions on the basic concepts and current research in the fields of pharmacogenetics and toxicogenomics. The students will learn from real research examples, the techniques used, the approaches to data analysis, and the practical applications in pharmacology and toxicology

PSY 745 Psychopharmacology (3)

The effects of exogenous chemicals on normal biochemistry and physiology will be related to behavioral changes. Prerequisite(s): PSY 601 and PSY 713 or consent of instructor.