Nanoscale Science and Engineering Courses

NNSE 504 Chemical Principles of Nanotechnology (1)

This course introduces the chemical principles behind nanoscale phenomena critical to nanomaterials, nanoengineering, nanoscience and nanobiology.  Fundamental chemical principles are taught using concrete examples relevant to nanotechnology and nanotechnological applications.  Topics covered include the chemical structure of nanomaterials, energetics and kinetics, reactivity, catalysis, and characterization.  Prerequisites: Open to graduate students in the CNSE or Departments of Physics, Mathematics, Engineering, Computer Science or Biology, and with permission of instructor.  No prior chemistry course required.

NNSE 506 Foundations of Nanotechnology I

Crystallography and Diffraction for Nanomaterial Systems (1 Cr)
Fundamental descriptions of crystalline structure and experimental determination for nanomaterial systems.

Phase Equilibria for Nanoscale Systems (1 Cr)
First, second, and third laws of thermodynamics as applied to nanoscale systems; activity and the equilibrium constant; solutions; phase relations (including the phase rule); heterogeneous equilibria; free-energy-composition diagrams and their relation to phase transitions; phase diagrams.

Nanoscale Kinetics and Transport (1 Cr)
Discussion of time-dependent mass transport in nanomaterials system through a formal treatment of diffusion theory.

Practical Solid State Quantum Theory (1 Cr)
Practical descriptions of how physical properties and behaviors of materials become dominated by quantum effects as length scales approach atomic dimensions.

Nanoscale Mechanics of Materials (1 Cr)
Introduction to atomic and continuum scale mechanics appropriate to nanoscale systems and assemblies, including the role of defects.

NNSE 507 Foundations of Nanotechnology II

Mathematical Methods in Nanoscale Research (1 Cr)
Introduction to the critical mathematical tools needed for research and education in nanotechnology.

Practical Modeling for Nanoscale Systems (1 Cr)
Principles of modeling structures and processes at the nanometer scale, including meshing techniques, finite element analysis, and molecular dynamics.

Solid State Quantum Theory IA (1 Cr)
Introduction to the quantum theory of nanoscale material systems and devices.

Molecular Materials (1 Cr)
Structure, chemistry, thermodynamics and physical properties of long chain molecules and molecular structures, including polymers, electronic polymers, proteins, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes, for applications in nanoscale systems, architectures, and devices.

Science of Nanoscale Laboratory Techniques (1 Cr)
Overview of the scientific basis of key technologies in experimental nanotechnology research, including laboratory safety.

NNSE 508 Foundations of Nanotechnology III

Particle-Solid Interactions in Nanomaterials (1 Cr)
Interaction of high energy photons, electrons, and ions with matter in the context of atomic scale characterization of nanoscale materials, systems, and devices.

Nanoscale Analytic Techniques (1 Cr)
Physical basis of the major analytical methods used for nanoscale materials analysis.

Nanoscale Electronic and Magnetic Properties (1 Cr)
Description and atomic scale origins of the electronic and magnetic properties of nanoscale materials, structures, and devices.

Optical/Photonic Properties of Nanostructures (1 Cr)
The interaction between electromagnetic waves and nanoscale materials, structures, and devices (molecular systems, thin film systems, etc...) is treated with particular attention to the increasing role of quantum effects as length scales approach atomic dimensions.

Solid State Quantum Theory IB (1 Cr)
Quantum origins of physical properties in nanoscale systems.

NNSE 509 Foundations of Nanotechnology IV

Deposition Techniques for Ultra-Thin Films (1 Cr)
Overview of deposition and processing methodologies used in ultra-thin film growth and related nanomaterial syntheses.

Nanoscale Device Principles (1 Cr)
The physical principles underlying the design and operation of modern electronic and optoelectronic nanoscale devices and associated device architectures.

Noncrystalline and Soft Nanomaterials (1 Cr)
Introduction to the amorphous state of nanomaterials, including the structure of liquids and glassy nanoscale solids. Introduction to "soft" nanoscale materials including biological films, membranes and membrane polymers, liquid crystals and colloids.

Introduction to NEMS/MEMS (1 Cr)
Design fundamentals of nanometer scale electro-mechanical systems.

Nanoscale Surfaces and Interfaces (1 Cr)
Introduction to surface structure, properties, thermodynamics and analysis and their role in nanotechnology.

NNSE 512 Quantum Theory of Solids II (3)

Applications of the quantum theory of nanoscale solid-state material systems. Fundamentals of free-electron gas in nanoscale systems and Hartree theory. Fundamentals of phonons in nanoscale systems and phonon-electron coupling.  Applications to band structure of ultra-small systems (2D, finite size). Development of Fermi surfaces in metals and nanoscale metallics. Quasi-particles in bulk and nanoscale systems: Plasmons, polaritons, polarons, excitons (and associated optical processes). Prerequisite: NNSE 507 'Solid State Quantum Theory IA' or equivalent.

NNSE 513 Economic Principles of Nanotechnology Management (3)

The principles of economics greatly impact the development of new technologies. Students are introduced to concepts such as markets, production, and consumer demand in order to understand how firms, customers, and government make decisions that will influence the creation, diffusion, and adoption of nanotechnologies. Students will also learn tools of strategic decision making critical to the nanotechnology development. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

NNSE 514 Theoretical Foundations of Nanoeconomics (3)

This course introduces students to the theories, models, and methods used by economists to understand the creation impact of emerging nanotechnologies. Microeconomic models of firm production, consumer utility, and profit maximization will provide insight into the creation and adoption of technologies. Macroeconomic models will focus on topics of growth and international trade in high technology industries. Students will also be introduced to econometric research techniques. Prerequisite: Students must have completed NNSE 513. 

NNSE 518 Nanoelectronic Devices, Circuits, and Systems (3)

The objective of this course is to provide the students with the knowledge of designing emerging nanoelectronic devices and using these devices to build future computing systems.  After an introduction to CMOS devices and circuits, the course will cover CMOS design and simulation topics. Then, emerging nanoscale components that are beyond CMOS devices will be introduced, including: carbon nanotube based devices, quantum dots and molecular devices. More attention will be paid to the applications of these devices in implementation of future computers. The memory and logic architectures that take advantage of the properties of the emerging devices will be discussed. The recently developed CMOS-nano hybrid computing system will also be reviewed.  Prerequisites: NNSE 509 Nanoscale Device Principles, NNSE 616 Nanoscale Semiconductor Devices or permission of the instructor.

NNSE 521 Nanotechnology Applications in Drug Development and Biomanufacturing (3)

Biomanufacturing is described as the production of components used by the biotechnology industry, with a specific emphasis on drugs, antibodies and vaccines used to promote human health. This course introduces late-stage undergraduate or new graduate nanoscale science students to the current and potential uses of nanotechnologies in the biomanufacturing environment. Nanoscience students will be introduced to nanotechnology applications in biomanufacturing, specifically how they relate to large-scale cell culture, engineered cell systems, target purification and validation. Students will learn the details and background necessary for a solid understanding of engineered and large-scale ("bioreactor") biological systems and the nanotechnology that enables the optimization of these systems. The course will also examine laboratory methods and provide details on regulatory and commercialization's aspects pertinent to the use of bio-based drugs, antibodies and vaccines. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NNSE 563 Academia, Business, and Government: Opportunities and Challenges in Science and Technology Partnerships (3)

Science and technology advancements are powerful transformers of society. Government influences the outcomes of science, and in turn, science influences the actions of government, business and academic. Weekly seminar classes will help prepare graduate students to understand and learn the dynamics of developing and managing science and technology policies from individual and combined business, government, and academia perspectives which will help students examine and discuss practical applications, including public-private collaborative efforts in funding research, development, and technology deployment.

NNSE 565 Managing the Adoption of Technological Innovation (3)

A review of alternative models for commercializing technology such as limited exclusive teaming, strategic alliances, and arms length product development within the context of nanoscience-based technologies and the distributed economy. Main issues driving the creation and operation of strategic alliances will be identified as the foundation for understanding the commercialization process for nanoscience-based technologies.

NNSE 570 Nanochip Manufacturing Technology (3)

Introduces the basic principles of integrated circuit “nanochip” operation and presents, in detail, the fundamentals of nanochip fabrication including a description of typical obstacles encountered. Critical aspects are discussed with respect to current nanochip designs to achieve maximum speed and future changes to improve this response with low power loss. The course will also describe structural and functional differences between Logic, Dram, Flash etc types of devices. Working principles of standard fabrication techniques in the semiconductor industry will be overviewed as well as detailed yield-control strategies necessary to keep an IC ‘Fab’ plant profitable. Prerequisites: Open to undergraduate seniors and graduate students in the CNSE or Departments of Physics, Chemistry, Computer Science, or Biology with permission of instructor.

NNSE 603 Nanomaterials Processing (3)

This course is intended for second or third year graduate students with a research focus or interest in the processing of nanoscale materials.  This course will cover practical aspects of the scientific principles guiding the growth of both organic and inorganic nanomaterials by both vapor phase and solution phase processing.  These materials include carbon nanostructures (nanotubes, nanospheres, graphene sheets, etc.), biological systems (polypeptides, proteins, DNA), and metallic nanostructures (Si nanowires, metal whiskers, etc.).  Emphasis will be placed on developing an understanding of the basic growth mechanisms and characteristics of each class of material and growth technique.  Prerequisite: Approval of instructor.

NNSE 605 Integrated Circuit Manufacturing I (3)

Covers basic tools and principles of chip construction. Describes structural and electrical differences between logic, dram, flash, etc. tipes of devices. Covers in detail how a chip is constructed and some of the problem areas encountered. Fundamental modules of ion implantation, pecvd, Lpcvd, Rie behavior, control of profiles, diffusion, Lithography, yield control tactics, deposition, oxidation kinetics, as well as future changes in the technology over the next 10 years will be covered. Future changes will be understood in terms of factors that drive speed of Microprocessors.

NNSE 608 Principles of Reliability for Semiconductor and Nanoscale Applications (3)

Ensuring reliability is commonly one of the most important and time consuming (expensive) efforts accompanying process and product development, yet the degradation processes in small (e.g. nanoscale) devices often challenge our understanding of materials science and the physical principles of failure. This course will introduce the student to the fundamentals of reliability theory and the science of materials degradation as related to semiconductor, MEMS and NEMS devices leading to an appreciation and an understanding of how materials fail. Basic statistics and thermodynamics as applied to reliability will be discussed. Upon completion of this, detailed descriptions of the known failure mechanisms will be described as well as accelerated reliability testing and data manipulation to extract failure rates and to design qualification testing programs to ensure reliability. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NNSE 609 Electronics Packaging Fundamentals (3)

Introductory course to the field of electronic packaging. This course provides an overview of the various types of integrated circuit packaging, the manufacturing processes used to make them, assembly of the packages, and printed circuit boards (PCBs). In addition, 3D integration will be presented in the context of present research and development in the field. This course will give the student a fundamental knowledge of what drives packaging R&D and manufacturing. In addition, the student will receive an overview of what is needed to accommodate the ever increasing need for advanced packaging requirements necessary to meet the demands of increasing integrated circuit function / density. Prerequisites: Foundations sequence and permission of the instructor. 

NNSE 612 Optical Processes in Nanoscale Solids (3)

This course provides a theoretical overview of the optical properties of solids and the experimental methods used to characterize them including ellipsometry, photoreflectance and second harmonic generation.  The course will primarily focus on semiconductor and metal single crystal solids.  Building upon the optical properties of these bulk materials, this course describes research into the changes in bulk materials optical properties due to nanoscale phenomena such as quantum confinement.  The theory behind photoreflectance and second harmonic generation will also be presented, in addition to the use of photoreflectance to measure stress induced changes in the critical point of silicon.  Prerequisites: Foundation modules including, Solid State Quantum 1A and 1B, Nanoscale Electronic and Magnetic Properties, and Optical/Photonic properties of Nanostructures and NNSE 512 Quantum Theory of Solids II, or permission of the instructor.

NNSE 615 Semiconductor Optoelectronic Devices and Nanophotonics (3)

Introduction to semiconductor optoelectronic devices for communications and other applications, covering design, operating principles and practical device features. Review of relevant semiconductor physics. Optical processes of semiconductors, waveguides, and microcavities. Introduction to photonic crystals and photonic bandgap materials.

NNSE 616 Nanoelectronic Semiconductor Devices (3)

This course focuses on the solid-state quantum properties and nanoscale technology of various semiconductor-based electronic and optical devices.  This course will make special emphasis on the properties of various types of junctions (p-n junctions, heterojunctions, metal-semiconductor junctions) leading to various electronic devices such as field effect transistors (FETs), metal-oxide-semiconductor FETS (MOSFETs), high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), etc.  In addition, a large portion of the class is devoted to the study of fundamentals of semiconductor-based photodetectors, various types of detection schemes (Schottky, MSM), and Solar Cell technology.  The importance of miniaturization and heterostructures in modern high-speed quantum-effect devices will be emphasized throughout.  Prerequisite: NNSE 509.

NNSE 617 Principles of Low-Dimensional Nanoelectronics (3)

The objective of this course is to provide students with advanced principles and knowledge of emerging 1-D and 2-D nanoelectronic devices. The first part introduces fundamental principles of nanoscale engineering and key properties of 1D/2D nanostructures. The second part focuses on specific device concepts, device physics, and potential applications in nano-based information processing (computing) and information storage (memory). Particular attention will be paid to low-dimensional nanostructures in implementing future-generation nanoelectronic systems engineered at nanoscale physical dimensions. Prerequisites: NNSE 509 Nanoscale Device Principles, NNSE 616 or permission of the instructor.

NNSE 618 Science and Nanoengineering of Semiconductor Materials and Nanostructures (3)

Physical properties of semiconductor materials and nanostructures critical to optoelectronic devices. Bandgap engineering of nanostructures, two-, one- and zero-dimensional systems, transport in superlattices and quantum wells, carrier diffusion and scattering, kinetic equation, ballistic transport, optical absorption, excitonic effects, radiative and non-radiative recombination, electrostatics and transport in junctions, heteroepitaxy, strain, defects and interfaces.  Prerequisite: Quantum mechanics, Solid State Physics at undergraduate level, NNSE 507 Solid State Quantum Theory IA, NNSE 508 Solid State Quantum Theory 1B, or permission by instructor.

NNSE 621 Quantum Transport (3)  

This course will cover fundamentals of carrier transport in reduced dimensional semiconductors.  The course is intended for graduate students interested in understanding a bottom-up approach to current flow, beyond the classical approach based on drift-diffusion and Boltzmann transport equations.  We will review the electronic properties of materials that are being actively investigated and examine the unique transport properties that arise in these materials.  Current flow based on Landauer equations to more advanced Non Equilibrium Green’s Function formalisms will be covered, and their relation to T-Matrices will be discussed.  The lectures will be supplemented with Matlab examples.  Prerequisites: NNSE 507: Quantum 1A,B; NNSE 512, or permission of instructor. 

NNSE 623 Competitiveness in Nanomanufacturing Industries: Valuation of New Technologies (3) 

This course will focus on using game theory models to understand profitability of firms/technologies affected by the advent of nanomanufacturing techniques. Students will learn how technology is commonly incorporated in economic models used for understanding firm/technology competitiveness and profitability. The course will cover basic game theory equilibrium notions (Nash Equilibrium, Bayes-Nash Equilibrium, Subgame-Perfect Equilibrium).  The applicability of these models to enhance traditional methods used to value firms/technologies will be studied. Students will complete a project under the instructor’s guidance focusing on firm/technology competitiveness in an industry affected by the advent of nanotechnology. Prerequisites: The student should have taken intermediate level undergraduate courses in multivariable calculus and linear algebra. A basic understanding of probability theory (expected value calculation, conditional probability) is necessary to take the course.  Instructor's consent required.

NNSE 624 Finance and Valuation of Nanotechnology Based Firms (3)

The course teaches the students methods for valuing companies in high technology industries, with a special focus on nanotechnology based companies. Students will be exposed to basic valuation techniques. The theory covered will be complemented with case studies. The course will also cover methods of financing early stage companies. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

NNSE 625 Quantum Processes in Solids and Nanostructures (3)

This course addresses the fundamental concepts and methods of quantum mechanics as relevant to the investigation of atomic and electronic properties of nanomaterials and nanodevices.  Topics covered include the mathematical foundations and physical principles of quantum mechanics, exactly solvable quantum models, perturbation theory, variational principles, quantum theory of scattering, and system of many-particles.  Prerequisites: Foundation of nanotechnology modules and NNSE 512 or equivalent and permission of instructor.  

NNSE 626 Quantum Processes in Solids and Nanostructures II (3)

This is the second half of a one-year course that addresses the fundamental concepts relevant to the investigation of nanomaterials and nanodevices by applying the methods of quantum mechanics and nanoscale statistical mechanics to examine the atomic and electronic properties of surfaces and nanostructured materials and devices.  Topics covered include atomic and electronic structure of clean and adsorbed surfaces, scanning tunneling microscopy, surface kinetics and dynamics, scattering view of nanoscale quantum transport, single-electron tunneling, and molecular-scale electronics.

NNSE 636 Bio-MEMS and Bio-NEMS (3)

Cross-disciplinary application of MEMS and NEMS to the biological sciences. Topics include the interaction of living cells/tissues with nanofabricated structures, microfluidics for the movement and control of solutions, and the development of I/O architectures for efficient readout of bio-reactions.

NNSE 640 NanoTechnology and Photovoltaics (3)

Topics focus on the application of nanoengineered materials and structures to photovoltaic technologies and include impact on performance and operation.

NNSE 641 Principles of Sensors: Chemical, Biological and Physical (3)

Fundamentals of sensor design, transduction techniques, and tailored coatings for chemical, biological and physical sensing applications, sensitivity and selectivity concerns, array design and pattern recognition algorithms.

NNSE 644 Nanoelectrochemical Systems (3)

This course will explore the theory and application of electrochemical processes as they apply to integrated nanoelectrochemical systems for use in sustainable ecosystems, including fuel cells, electrolyzers, supercapacitors, batteries, and photochemical solar cells.  As an introduction, a thorough review of classical electrochemical principles, concepts and characterization methods will be given, including the nature and structure of the double layer, as well as the kinetics of electrode reactions. This will be followed by a discussion of and extension of these principles to the nanoscale. The discussion will focus on this area of active research, will involve an examination of recent literature in the field, including recent progress in electrocatalysis with nanoparticles supported on a variety of materials. Specific attention will be given to nanostructured thin film electrodes and electrolytes which are applicable to integrated nanoelectrochemical systems.  The course will include the introduction to and hands on use of an electrochemical scanning microscope.  Prerequisites: Foundations (506) courses and permision of instructor.

NNSE 646 Electrochemical Methods (3)

This course is a companion course to CNSE 644 and will explore both the theory and application of electrochemical methods to nanoelectrochemical systems.  As an introduction, a thorough review of classical electrochemical principles will be given, including the nature and structure of the double layer, as well as the theory of charge transfer and the kinetics of electrode reactions.  This will be followed by a discussion of basic methods of modeling nanoelectrochemical systems.  This will be followed by an in-depth discussion of current applications of potential sweep methods of analysis, polargraphic and pulse voltammetry, controlled current techniques, hydrodynamic methods involving forced convection, as well as techniques based upon concepts of impedance and scanning probe techniques.  The discussion will include a focus on areas of active research and will involve an examination of recent literature in the field.  The course will include individual class projects with hands on use of the rotating ring disk electrode and the scanning electrochemical microscope.  Prerequisites: NNSE 644 and permission of instructor.

NNSE 647 Cellular Signaling and Nanobiotechnology Applications (3)

Cells respond to environmental cues based on their interaction with the extracellular matrix and cell surface receptors that transmit environmental signals into cellular outcomes. This course will cover prominent cell signaling networks that are activated by nanomaterials, as well as those signaling networks harnessed in nanotechnology applications, such as the integration of neural networks and receptors into synthetic devices for biosensing/biomonitoring. Students will gain a thorough understanding of the principles of cellular signaling, including second messengers; signal transduction cascades; receptors and signaling in health and disease (e.g. oncogenes; the immune system). Every module will emphasize particular applications of these signaling networks in Nanobiotechnology, with focus on specific methods and recent advancements in the field. This course ensures that graduate students gain a strong knowledge base on the underlying biological principles used in the development of bio-based nanotechnology and are able to apply these to their own research. Prerequisites: Foundations of Nanotechnology - Principles of NanoBio and permission of instructor.

NNSE 651 Nanolithography I: Photoresists and Optics (3)

Chemistry of photoresists used in high volume manufacture of integrated circuits including resists based on i-line (365 nm), DUV (248 nm), ArF (193 nm), and Extreme Ultraviolet (13.5 nm) wavelengths.  Additionally, the chemistry of SU8 resists used in MEMs application will also be covered.  Optical properties useful for understanding high volume manufacture of integrated circuits will covered including: off-axis illumination, overlay, optical proximity corrections, mask error enhancement factor, phase-shift masks, diffraction limits, and outgassing and optics contamination.  Additionally, the physics and chemistry of the role of secondary electrons in EUV will also be covered. The course will be taught once every two years, alternating with NNSE 652. Prerequisites: Successful completion of both NNSE 507 Molecular Materials and NNSE 508 Optical/Photonic Properties of Nanostructures; and the permission of the instructor.  NNSE 508 may be taken concurrently with NNSE 651 Nanolithography.

NNSE 652 Fundamentals of Nanolithography II (3)

Design data creation and manipulation. Mask making. Metrology and inspection for lithography. Prerequisites: Foundations sequence, permission of instructor.

NNSE 654 Charged Particle Optics (3)

Fundamentals of charged particle optics including conventional and immersion lens approaches to focusing. Aberration theory and source technology. Prerequisites: Foundations sequence, permission of instructor.

NNSE 657 Bioconjugation Techniques and Purification Strategies for Nanobiology (3)

This course will give a detailed overview of reactive groups in biochemical systems and introduce an assortment of conjugation chemistries for biomolecular crosslinking and surface modification for both macro- and nano-biological applications. Likewise, general approaches for separation and analysis of biomolecules and conjugation agents will be discussed. The course will initially focus on the chemical properties of biomolecular functional groups and their reactions in polar environments (with a focus on aqueous systems). Single/multifunctional, cleavable, photo-activated cross-linkers and reagents will be discussed, including self-assembled monolayer chemistry and similar modification strategies for various nanostructured metallic and semiconductor interfaces. Analytical methods and purification strategies such as dialysis, filtration, and liquid chromatography etc will be covered.  Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.  Recommended prerequisite courses: NNSE 504, NNSE 506 and NNSE 508.  Undergraduate coursework in Biochemistry (protein structure/function) and Organic & Inorganic Chemistry.

NNSE 658 Biomedical Nanotechnology (3)

This course will introduce in-depth knowledge of biomedical nanotechnology and nanomedicine. Emphasis will be on the applications of nanotechnology in stem cell research, tissue engineering, drug delivery, gene therapy, cancer therapy, diagnostics, imaging, and nanotoxicity. Students with satisfactory completion of the course will have a demonstrated knowledge of how to apply nanotechnology to address biological and biomedical problems. Prerequisites: NNSE 506 Principles of Nanobiology/NNSE 508 Interfacial Properties of Nanobio Systems and permission of instructor.

NNSE 659 Introduction to Clinical Nanomedicine (3)

This course is designed to introduce graduate students to fundamentals of human anatomy and physiology as related to current and emerging applications in nanomedicine.  Students will gain a basic understanding of the structure and function of major body systems including the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, urinary, and neurological systems.  This course provides a comprehensive overview of challenges and opportunities for biotechnological innovation in health care.  Students will actively engage in discussions about nanomedicine applications that are on the market or currently under development including nano-enabled pharmaceuticals, medical devices, in vivo and ex vivo diagnostics, biomaterials, and imaging techniques.  Prerequisites: Enrollment in this course will be restricted to students who have passed the qualifying exam in their constellation and have successfully completed at least one graduate level nanobioscience lecture course or nanobio foundations courses, etc. Students who do not meet these criteria may petition the instructors for special permission to enroll.

NNSE 661 Semiconductor Metrology (3)

A detailed overview of current characterization methods critical to transistor fabrication, on-chip interconnection, lithography, defect detection and characterization, and process yield analysis. This course would cover the myriad techniques in use in or near semiconductor fabrication facilities that are critical to achieving acceptable process yields. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

NNSE 664 Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Nanotechnology (3)

Innovation is the creation of value through the development of new products or processes.  Innovations can improve efficiency, productivity, and quality.  An entrepreneur is a leader who recognizes market opportunities and creates and implements innovations to meet the demand.  This course introduces students to the theory, process, and practice of innovation and entrepreneurship.  Topics covered include the innovation process, individual and corporate entrepreneurship, financing and legal issues in high-tech entrepreneurship, and developing an entrepreneurial plan.  Students will perform a market analysis, prepare a business plan, and prepare a grant proposal for a nanotechnology they are familiar with.  Prerequisites: One year of graduate research experience or consent of instructor.

NNSE 665A Electron Beam Analysis of Nanostructures (3)

First Part of a two-semester course on the application of electron beam techniques to the extraction of morphological, chemical and crystallographic information about nanomaterials. This course will provide a detailed understanding of the scanning electron microscope including electron probe formation, electron solid interactions, and the measurement and analysis of a variety of emitted signals including secondary and backscattered electrons, x-rays and cathodoluminescent.

NNSE 667 Surface Analysis of Nanostructures (3)

This course will look at a variety of currently used surface analytical techniques for the examination of nanomaterials and nanomaterial systems including Rutherford backscattering, nuclear reaction analysis, secondary ion microanalysis, proton excited x-ray analysis, atomic force microscopy, ultrasonic force microscopy, low energy electron diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and compare them with regard to sensitivity, spatial and depth resolution, sample requirements and the kinds of information they can provide in the examination of nanostructures and materials. Prerequisite: permission of instructor..

NNSE 670 Transmission Electron Microscopy (4)

Basics of nanoscale analysis using specialized transmission electron microscope instumentation such as scanning TEM, HRTEM, cryo-TEM and TEM-STM. Course emphasizes practical training in the operation of advanced TEM instrumentation, stressing hands-on laboratory sessions and a semester-long project involving a specimen of the student's choosing ( a task related to the student's research program in nanotechnology is strongly encouraged). Suitable project topics include: specialized sample preparation for nanostructures (FIB & tripod polishing); amorphous & nanocrystalline materials; imaging and spectroscopy of quantum wells and quantum dots; interface nanostructure and segregation. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

NNSE 673 X-ray Scattering and Crystallography for Nanoscale Materials and Structures (3)

Application of advanced x-ray scattering and diffraction techniques for the investigation of nanomaterials, nanodevice structures, and nanoscale modulated systems. Prerequisites: Foundations sequence, permission of instructor.

NNSE 680 Seminar in Nanosciences and Nanoengineering (1-6)

Advanced individual theoretical and experimental work, conferences, and reports. May be taken in either semester or both.

NNSE 681 Seminar in Nanobiology (1)

This course introduces students to current topics in nanobiology through both reading and discussion of current scientific literature. Critical reading of scientific papers in the field of nanobiology will serve as the basis for weekly discussions. Students will participate in choosing current, high-quality research articles for discussion and will be expected to present at least one article during the course of the semester. In addition to exploring the field of nanobiology, this course is intended to familiarize students with scientific literature. Students will learn to use online databases and search engines to find articles and will learn how to critically review both the written articles and the experimental research procedures. Students will be evaluated based upon participation in discussion sessions, as well as through one in-class oral presentation. Prerequisites: Open to students with permission of instructor; also open to superior undergraduate seniors with the approval of their advisers and the written consent of their department chairs.

NNSE 682 Entrepreneurship, Law and Emerging Technologies (1)

This course offers students the opportunity to work with faculty and students from Albany Law School and will expose them to the science, art and law of entrepreneurship and emerging technologies. Students will not only receive grounding in the law of business development and intellectual property, but will also be steeped in the science behind nanoscale technologies so that they can practice effectively in this rapidly emerging field. Prerequisites: This course follows a nontraditional schedule.  Students will be expected to participate in a one day introductory workshop.  The remainder of the course will be delivered in by weekly sessions.  Please contact faculty member for more schedule details.

NNSE 683 Seminar in Nanoscale Engineering (1)

This course introduces students to current topics in nanoengineering through both reading and discussion of current scientific literature.  Critical reading of scientific papers in the field of nanoengineering will serve as the basis for weekly discussions.  Students will participate in choosing current, high-quality research articles for discussion and will be expected to present at least one article during the course of the semester.  In addition to exploring the field of nanoengineering, this course is intended to familiarize students with scientific literature.  Students will learn to use online databases and search engines to find articles and will learn how to critically review both the written articles and the experimental research procedures.  Students will be evaluated based upon participation in discussion sessions, as well as through one in-class oral presentation.  Prerequisites: Open to students with permission of instructor; also open to superior undergraduate seniors with the approval of their advisers and the written consent of their department chairs.

NNSE 684 Seminar in Nanoscale Engineering: Nanotechnology and Photovoltaics (1)

This course topic introduces students to applications of nanotechnology to materials and devices for Photovoltaics (PVs) through both reading and discussion of current scientific literature. Low-dimensional nanostructures appear to be promising to increase the power conversion efficiency of devices beyond the current efficiency limitation. These structures allow increased flexibility with traditional efficiency enhancement approaches such as those based on ‘stacked’ or tandem cells, which could almost double efficiency limits. Critical reading of scientific papers in the field of nanotechnology and PV physics and principles will serve as the basis for weekly discussions. Students will participate in choosing current, high-quality research articles for discussion and will be expected to present at least one article during the course of the semester. Prerequisites: Open to students with permission of instructor; also open to superior undergraduate seniors with the approval of their advisers and the written consent of their department chairs.

NNSE 689 (Sph 697) Nano and Public Health Internship (3-6)

The internship program at either institution will offer concentrations in the areas of: epidemiology, environmental health, biomedical sciences, health policy, nanoscience, nanoengineering, nanobioscience, or nanoeconomics.  These internships will be in support of research for the NanoLife initiatives which focuses on environmental and human health and safety of engineered nanomaterials.  Internship rotations may be full-time or part-time.  Each credit represents a minimum of 80 hours of work with a host agency or organization.  A paper and an oral presentation are required.  Prerequisite: Admission to the MPH program or CNSE graduate program.

NNSE 695 Introduction to Research Problems in Nanosciences and Nanoengineering (3)

Individually directed research studies into areas of current research interest in nanosciences and nanoengineering. Prerequisite: Consent of faculty instructor.

NNSE 696 Introduction to Research Problems II (3)

Individually directed research studies in areas of current research interest in nanoscale science and nanoscale engineering to be taken in second semester of graduate study at CNSE.  Will conclude with delivery of research results at the end of the semester.  Prerequisite: Completion of NNSE 695 and consent of research advisor.

NNSE 697 Master’s Research in Nanoscale Science (1-9)

Individually directed research studies in Nanoscale Science for Master’s degree students.  Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NNSE 698 Master’s Research in Nanoscale Engineering (1-9)

Individually directed research studies in Nanoscale Engineering for Master’s degree students.  Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

NNSE 699 Masters Thesis in Nanosciences and Nanoengineering (1-12)

NNSE 731 Current Topics in Molecular Materials and Architectures (3)

Individually directed research studies into areas of current research interest in molecular materials and architectures. Pre-requisite: Permission of instructor.

NNSE 737 Current Topics in Optoelectronic Materials, Architectures, and Devices (3)

Individually directed research studies into areas of current research interest in optoelectronic materials, architectures, and devices. Pre-requisite: Permission of instructor.

NNSE 742 Current Topics in Nanosystems Sciences and Technologies (3)

Individually directed research studies into areas of current research interest in nanosystems sciences and technologies. Pre-requisite: Permission of instructor.

NNSE 750 Thin Film Single and Multilayered Material Structures (3)

Individually directed research studies into areas of current research interest in thin film single and multilayered material structures. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

NNSE 756 Nanomaterials for Nanotechnology (3)

Individually directed research studies into areas of current research interest in nanomaterials for nanotechnology. Pre-requisite: Permission of instructor.

NNSE 762 Nanomaterials for Nanoscale Materials Modeling, Characterization, and Metrology (3)

Individually directed research studies into areas of current research interest in nanomaterials for nanoscale materials modeling, characterization, and metrology. Pre-requisite: Permission of instructor.

NNSE 780 Current Topics in Nanosciences and Nanoengineering (1-3)

Selected topics of current interest in nanosciences and nanoengineering such as molecular self-assembly phenomena, emerging hybrid material and system integration protocols, and advanced topics in molecular materials and architectures; optoelectronic materials, architectures, and devices; nanosystems sciences and technologies; thin film single and multilayered material structures; nanomaterials for nanotechnology; and nanoscale materials characterization, modeling, analysis, and metrology.

NNSE 784 Special Topics in Nanosciences and Nanoengineering (1-6)

Selected coverage of specialized topics in non-traditional areas where nanosciences and nanoengineering play an important role, such as design, growth, and properties of nanomaterials, including metals, semiconductors, polymers, and chemical and biological materials; integration, processing, testing and qualification of these materials in integrated nanocircuitry, micro- and nano-systems and sensors, and integrated optics; nanoelectronics; bioelectronics; telecommunications; wireless communications; optical devices and components; leading edge metrology; and sensor-on-a-chip devices for energy, environment, and defense applications. Often staffed by guest lecturers and speakers.

NNSE 810 Research in Nanosciences and Nanoengineering (1-15)

Research in nanosciences and nanoengineering for students working beyond the Masters degree level. Consent of the Dean of the school or the doctoral student's advisory committee required. Residence credit earned in this course becomes applicable upon satisfactory completion of all other requirements established for the Ph.D. degree in nanosciences and nanoengineering.

NNSE 812 Research in Thin Film Single and Multilayered Material Structures (3-15)

Research in Thin Film Single and Multilayered Material Structures for students working beyond the Masters degree level. Consent of the Dean of the school or the doctoral student's advisory committee required. Residence credit earned in this course becomes applicable upon satisfactory completion of all other requirements established for the Ph.D. degree in nanosciences and nanoengineering.

NNSE 812 Research in Thin Film Single and Multilayered Material Structures (3-15)

Research in Thin Film Single and Multilayered Material Structures for students working beyond the Masters degree level. Consent of the Dean of the school or the doctoral student's advisory committee required. Residence credit earned in this course becomes applicable upon satisfactory completion of all other requirements established for the Ph.D. degree in nanosciences and nanoengineering.

NNSE 814 Research in Optoelectronic Material, Architectures, and Devices (3-15)

Research in Optoelectronic Material, Architectures, and Devices for students working beyond the Masters degree level. Consent of the Dean of the school or the doctoral student's advisory committee required. Residence credit earned in this course becomes applicable upon satisfactory completion of all other requirements established for the Ph.D. degree in nanosciences and nanoengineering.

NNSE 816 Research in NanoSystems Sciences and Technologies (3-15)

Research in NanoSystems Sciences and Technologies for students working beyond the Masters degree level. Consent of the Dean of the school or the doctoral student's advisory committee required. Residence credit earned in this course becomes applicable upon satisfactory completion of all other requirements established for the Ph.D. degree in nanosciences and nanoengineering.

NNSE 818 Research in Nanomaterials for NanoTechnology (3-15)

Research in Nanomaterials for NanoTechnology for students working beyond the Masters degree level. Consent of the Dean of the school or the doctoral student's advisory committee required. Residence credit earned in this course becomes applicable upon satisfactory completion of all other requirements established for the Ph.D. degree in nanosciences and nanoengineering.

NNSE 820 Research in Nanomaterials Modeling, Characterization, Analysis, and Metrology (3-15)

Research in Nanomaterials Modeling, Characterization, Analysis, and Metrology for students working beyond the Masters degree level. Consent of the Dean of the school or the doctoral student's advisory committee required. Residence credit earned in this course becomes applicable upon satisfactory completion of all other requirements established for the Ph.D. degree in nanosciences and nanoengineering.

NNSE 822 Research in Molecular Materials and Architectures (3-15)

Research in Molecular Materials and Architectures for students working beyond the Masters degree level. Consent of the Dean of the school or the doctoral student's advisory committee required. Residence credit earned in this course becomes applicable upon satisfactory completion of all other requirements established for the Ph.D. degree in nanosciences and nanoengineering.

NNSE 899 Doctoral Dissertation in Nanosciences and Nanoengineering (1)

Required of all candidates completing the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Prerequisites: Admission to doctoral candidacy, completion of all other credit requirements and benchmark requirements in doctoral program.