Anthropology Courses

Ant 502 Proseminar in Physical Anthropology (3-4)

An intensive review of the major theories and research methods in physical anthropology. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the Department of Anthropology or consent of instructor.

Ant 504 Proseminar in Archaeology (3-4)

Surveys of methods, theories, concepts and data of the subdiscipline of archaeology. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the Department of Anthropology or consent of instructor.

Ant 506 Proseminar in Linguistics (3-4)

An introduction to the goals and methods of linguistic anthropology. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the Department of Anthropology or consent of instructor.

Ant 508 Proseminar in Ethnology (3-4)

Intellectual history of the methods, theories, concepts, and data of the subdiscipline of ethnology. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the Department of Anthropology or consent of instructor.

Ant 509 Primate Evolutionary Biology (3-4)

This course addresses the principles and specifics involved in nonhuman primate evolution. The first portion of the class investigates the relationships between ecology, sociality, and phylogeny on the one hand and the diversity of adaptations among living primates on the other.  The second portion of the class will apply principles derived from the living primates to understanding the adaptations and evolutionary relationships among fossil primates, and the relationships between extinct and living species.  Particular attention will be paid to major research questions relevant to significant periods in primate evolution. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Anthropology.

Ant 510 Human Osteology (3-4)

This course is an intensive study of the anatomy of the human skeleton.  This course will cover bone histology, growth and development of bones, common pathological conditions, the determination of age and sex from skeletal material, and the identification of whole and fragmented bones in archaeological and forensic contexts.  This course will include a laboratory component to provide students with the opportunity to examine the material discussed in class.  Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

Ant 511 Human Population Biology (3-4)

Biological variation and its causes in human populations with emphasis on biological adaptation.

Ant 512 (Bio 519) Human Population Genetics (3)

The genetics of human populations with emphasis on the application of the principles of population genetics to human groups, particularly concerning inbreeding, selection, drift, flow, and the structure of human populations. Prerequisite: Ant 502 or permission of instructor.

Ant 513 Functional Anatomy of the Human Skeleton (3-4)

Laboratory course in skeletal and dental identification and analysis, with emphasis on the interaction of the muscular and skeletal systems. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 514 Forensic Anthropology (3-4)

This course teaches the application of methods from biological anthropology and archaeology to the recovery and analysis of skeletonized human remains.  The primary focus of this course is the application of these methods to investigations of unexplained deaths, including homicides, genocides, and mass disasters.   Students will learn how to determine age at death, sex, ancestral affiliations, and stature from skeletal remains, and how to identify evidence of trauma and disease.  Other topics include forensic botany, forensic entomology, and DNA fingerprinting.  Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 515 Nutritional Anthropology (3-4)

This course provides an introduction to the biological, ecological, and social factors influencing diet and nutrition. Basic nutritional physiology and biochemistry are presented in the first part of the course. Later topics include paleonutrition as well as nutritional issues of contemporary human population groups. The core focus is on the concept of energy balance. Time is spent in the metabolic laboratory learning how to measure metabolic energy expenditure and assess nutritional status in humans. Students participate in the collection and analysis of individual and class data on nutritional intake and energy expenditure, with an emphasis on basic techniques of data presentation, analysis, and interpretation.

Ant 516 (Epi 500) Basic Principles and Methods of Epidemiology (3)

Introduction to epidemiology for students majoring in any aspect of public health other than epidemiology; covers the principles and methods of epidemiologic investigation including describing the patterns of illness in populations and research designs for investigating the etiology of disease.  Introduces quantitative measures to determine risk, association and procedures for standardization of rates.  Other topics include bias, confounding, causality, ethics, and screening. 

Ant 517 (Epi 502) Principles and Methods of Epidemiology II (3)

Review and expansion of the basic concepts introduced in Epi 501 as well as introduction of more complex issues including theory of disease causation, the interrelationships of host, agent and environment, sources of epidemiology data, cohort, case control and other study designs. Emphasis is on practical issues. Prerequisite: Bms 505 (Epi 501).

Ant 518 Culture, Environment and Health (3-4)

Anthropological study of health and disease patterns in human populations with emphasis on man-made influences on the health of contemporary Western societies. The assessment of health status through epidemiological and anthropological methods is explored. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 519 Topics in Biological Anthropology (3-4)

Selected topics in the field of biological anthropology. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 521 (Lin 521) Introduction to Syntactic Theory (3-4)

An introduction to syntactic analysis, focussing on generative approaches. Prerequisites: Ant 220, Lin 220 or permission of instructor.

Ant 522 (Lin 522) Introduction to Phonetics & Phonology (3-4)

Introduction to articulatory phonetics and phonological analysis of a variety of languages within a generative framework. Prerequisite: Lin 220, Ant 220 or permission of instructor.

Ant 523 (Lin 523) Linguistic Structures (3-4)

Investigation of the structure of a selected language, language family, or language area. Prerequisite: A prior course in linguistics or consent of instructor.

Ant 524 Language and Culture (3-4)

The nature of the interrelationships which exist between linguistic behavior and other aspects of culture. A graduate research paper is required. Prerequisite: An introductory linguistics course or consent of instructor.

Ant 525 Comparative and Historical Linguistics (3-4)

Language development and change. Language classification, linguistic reconstruction. Prerequisite: Ant 520 or consent of instructor.

Ant 526 (Rdg 526, Lin 526) Language Acquisition, B-2 (3-4)

Examines theoretical and empirical aspects of first language acquisition and its development in speech and writing, including phonology, syntax, vocabulary, and pragmatics. It views acquisition across languages and (sub)cultures from linguistic, psychological, and social perspectives.

Ant 527 Topics in Anthropological Linguistics (3-4)

Selected topics in anthropological linguistics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 528 Mesoamerican Linguistics (3-4)

Survey of Mesoamerican Indian languages, their classification, description, and implications for Mesoamerican prehistory. Includes consideration of the current state of research in the several language families, areal characteristics, linguistic diffusion, and proposals for distant genetic relationships. Prerequisite: One previous course in linguistics or consent of instructor.

Ant 529 (Lin 529) Field Methods in Anthropological Linguistics (Seminar) (3-4)

An introduction to the techniques of collecting and analyzing primary linguistic data from native speakers, taught through intensive examination of a selected language. Traditional and computational methods of data storage and analysis are used. Prerequisite: A prior course in linguistics or instructor's approval.

Ant 531 Seminar in Social Archaeology (3-4)

Seminar on selected topics in the archaeological study of past social organization. Topics will vary. Examples include settlement patterns, household organization, economic processes, urbanism, and world systems. Topics will be approached in terms of methods, theories, and comparative analysis. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: at least 1 prior course in archaeology.

Ant 533 Mesoamerican Archaeology (3-4)

Archaeological study of the ancient peoples and cultures of Mesoamerica from the earliest inhabitants to the Spanish conquest. Coverage is chronological and evolutionary, with application of anthropological models of cultural change. Emphasis on the major transformations such as the origin of agriculture, the rise of cities, and the expansion of states and empires. Prerequisite: Ant 230 or equivalent.

Ant 534 Seminar in Mesoamerican Writing Systems (3-4)

Seminar on selected Mesoamerican writing systems. Focus varies, but Classic Mayan writing is usually emphasized. Topics include the structure and evolution of the scripts; relations between writing and other communication systems; and anthropological research using hieroglyphic evidence. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Coursework in Mesoamerican archaeology, ethnology, or linguistics is recommended.

Ant 535 Archaeological Surveys (3-4)

Survey of the archaeology of a selected region of the world. Topics vary according to the regional specialty of the professor in charge. May be repeated for credit under different topics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Ant 536 Anthropology of the Great Plains (3-4)

The native American cultures of the Great Plains from the earliest times to the modern era. Utilizes ecological, archaeological, ethnohistorical, and ethnographic data. A research paper is required. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 537 Northeast Archaeology (3-4)

The cultural complexes and sequences of the Northeast from the time of earliest occupation to European contact. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

Ant 538 Museum Research and Curation (3-4)

Emphasis on collections management and research with existing collections, including database management, basic museum methods for anthropologists, and approaches to problems of using data collected by other researchers. Students design and complete projects using existing collections.

Ant 539 Topics in Archaeology (3-4)

Selected topics in the field of archaeology. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 541 (Lin 541) Advanced Syntax (3-4)

Investigations in generative syntax, with a primary focus on government- binding theory. Includes discussion of other approaches to syntax, and current trends in syntactic theory. A research project is required. Prerequisite: Ant 321 or Ant 521.

Ant 542 (Lin 542) Advanced Phonology (3-4)

Generative phonology, including the basic assumptions of generative theory, comparison with other approaches to phonology, and discussion of recent theoretical trends in phonology. Research project required. Prerequisite: Ant 322 or Ant 522.

Ant 549 Ethnographic Surveys (3-4)

Surveys of selected ethnographic areas of the world. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of advisor.

Ant 550 Special Topics in Medical Anthropology (3-4)

Study of a selected topic in medical anthropology. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Consult class schedule for specific topic. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 553 Topics in Social Anthropology (3-4)

Topics may change from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit.

Ant 560 Topics in Cultural Anthropology (3-4)

Selected topics in cultural anthropology. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 571 Mesoamerican Language Instruction (1-6)

Formal instruction in a specific language for purposes of ethnohistoric or ethnographic research. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 575 Seminar in Anthropology and Folklore (3-4)

Overview of anthropological literature pertaining to myth, legend, folktale, folk music, and folk drama; "minor" genres such as riddles, proverbs, and folk humor. Theory and field methods are emphasized. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 582 Practicum in College Teaching (1)

Basic techniques and theory of undergraduate teaching. Workshops on syllabus construction, audio-visual aids, educational ethics, evaluations, the role of teaching in academia. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the Department of Anthropology.

Ant 593 Fieldwork in Mesoamerica: An Orientation (1)

General overview of the social and economic contexts of an ethnographic field site in Mesoamerica. Emphasis is on the pragmatics of living in another cultural setting and preparing for a one-month intensive ethnographic research project. Discusses IRB guidelines and the specific ethnographic field project. Specific content of the course varies according to location of ethnographic project and location of that project. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 600 Quantitative Methods in Anthropology (3-4)

Specific problems of quantification and analysis of anthropological data are approached in seminar/workshop fashion. Emphasis is placed on bioanthropological and archaeological materials, but may be adjusted to emphasize ethnographic and linguistic data as well. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 601 Advanced Quantitative Methods in Anthropology (3-4)

Seminar/workshop in advanced analytic methodology in anthropology including computer applications and multivariate techniques. Students will be expected to present the analysis of project data of their choosing. Prerequisite: Ant 600 or consent of instructor.

Ant 606 Cultural Medical Anthropology (3)

Cultural medical anthropology reveals how our ideas about and experiences of health, "dis-ease," and medicine are profoundly shaped by culture, transnational flows of people, ideas, and resources, histories of colonialism and structural inequalities, and the development of new technologies. In this course, we use cultural anthropological approaches as a lens through which to analyze the relations among: health and illness; culture and history, and: power and social and economic inequalities. Prerequisites: Ant 508 or permission of instructor. 

Ant 608 Field Methods in Ethnology (3-4)

A survey of ethnographic data gathering and analysis techniques. Emphasis placed on participant observation with other methodological issues covered. The value of analytical holistic ethnography will be applied in practical fieldwork exercises. Prerequisite: Ant 508 or its equivalent.

Ant 609 (H Epi 609) Reproductive Epidemiology (3)

An overview by clinical and non-clinical faculty of the pertinent physiological mechanisms of pregnancy and fetal growth which are critical to the understanding of epidemiological methods used to investigate adverse reproductive outcomes and normal pregnancies. Discussion of unique qualities of circumstances surrounding fertility, conception, pregnancy and its outcome in detail to show their peculiar suitability for epidemiological investigation. Exposure through actual case histories and population studies to methods used to investigate problems relevant to perinatal morbidity and mortality, maternal mortality, spontaneous and included abortion, hypertension and infections of pregnancy and the etiology on congenital malformations. Prerequisites: Epi 501 and Sta 552.

Ant 611 Seminar in Physical Anthropology (3-4)

Topics may change from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 612 Topics in Biomedical Anthropology (3-4)

Topics may change from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit.

Ant 614 Topics in Growth and Development (3-4)

Topics may change from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit.

Ant 615 Topics in Population Biology (3-4)

Topics may change from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit.

Ant 617 Topics in Paleoanthropology (3-4)

Topics may change from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 618 Seminar in Human Osteology (3-4)

Readings and research on the use of human skeletal material in the reconstruction of demographic patterns, disease, nutrition, and biological relationships within and among past human populations. Prerequisite: Ant 413 or 513 or consent of instructor.

Ant 624 Seminar in Linguistics (3-4)

Selected topics in the field of linguistics, including phonology, morphology-syntax, sociolinguistics, and language and culture. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 628 Archaeological Field and Laboratory Techniques (3-4)

Problems and techniques in the application of archaeological methods to specific archaeological data; techniques in the analysis of chipped stone, artifacts, ceramics, basketry, and textiles. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 630 Seminar in Archaeology (3-4)

Readings and discussion on archaeology as a branch of anthropology. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 631 Seminar in Archaeological Theory and Method (3-4)

Advanced research and readings in archaeo-logical method and theory and the application of these approaches to interpreting ancient societies. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

Ant 632 Archaeological Research Design (3-4)

In-depth analysis of the design and practice of archaeological research, stressing explicit linkages among theory, models, methods, and data. Topics include explanation, analogy, sampling, fieldwork, formation processes, social theory, and archaeological theory. Students read and discuss grant proposals, and the term paper is in the form of a research proposal. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Ant 504 or permission of instructor.

Ant 633 Seminar in Mesoamerican Archaeology (3-4)

In-depth study of a selected topic in Mesoamerican archaeology. Topics will vary. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Ant 533 or consent of instructor.

Ant 635 Topics in Archaeology and Ethnohistory (3-4)

Selected regional focus of this course will share the theme of the archaeology of colonial encounters. Interdisciplinary approaches using historic resources and archaeological data will be surveyed from a range of case studies. Issues highlighted in the seminar include reconstructing indigenous cultural systems prior to contact as well as cultural transformations resulting from cultural collision.

Ant 636 Zooarchaeology (3-4)

This course introduces you to analytical techniques of the study of animal bone. There is both a practical and theoretical aspect to this course. Each phase of the research process will be covered; including sampling, identifications, data processing, and analysis of publication. Issues of cultural ecology, economic organization, social interaction and ancient dietary patterns as they are determined through faunal analysis well be reviewed.

Ant 637 (Cla 644) Cyprus in Prehistory (3-4)

Survey of the cultural, social and, with reference to the Late Bronze Age, political development of prehistoric Cyprus (10,000 – 1,000 BCE). Emphasis will be placed on the archaeological remains from this period.

Ant 638 (Cla 645) Cyprus in the Iron Age (3-4)

Survey of the cultural and socio-economic development of Cyprus from ca. 1,000 to 300 BCE with equal emphasis on archaeological and textual data.

Ant 639 (Cla 639) The Neolithic of the Near East and the Emergence of Complex Society (3-4)

In-depth analysis of one of the most significant phases of human history, the so-called "Neolithic Revolution" which occurred between 12,000 and 6,500 years ago, and resulted in the rapid change from the nomadic lifestyle of hunter gatherers to a sedentary village-based existence dependent on domesticated agricultural and faunal food resources.  The seminar will focus on Neolithic settlement patterns and organization, material culture and technology, subsistence strategies and ideology.  It will also study key sites and territories on the periphery of the Near East, including the island of Cyprus, which played an important role in the genesis and spread of the "Neolithic package" that lead to the development of complex society in the Old World.

Ant 641 Seminar in Mesoamerican Ethnology (3-4)

Survey course on the aboriginal cultures of Mesoamerica (Mexico and Central America), past and present. Both ethnographic and ethnohistoric sources are drawn upon for the course. Usually, a specific topic or theme within Mesoamerican studies is adopted, such as religion, politics, colonial period, contemporary social movements, community studies, etc. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 643 Seminar in Native Mesoamerican Texts and Literature (3-4)

Survey of the pictorial, hieroglyphic, written and oral text traditions of Mesoamerican native peoples, from preconquest times to the present, with particular attention to colonial written literatures and contemporary oral expression. Reading knowledge of Spanish is helpful but not required. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 660 Seminar in Symbolic Anthropology (3-4)

Critical analysis of theory, methods, and issues addressed by symbolic/interpretive approaches. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 661 Seminar in Political Anthropology (3-4)

Selected topics in the theory and issues of political anthropology., May be repeated for credit with consent of the instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 662 Seminar in Economic Anthropology (3-4)

Advanced study and research in economic anthropology. The analysis of production, distribution, and consumption forms in capitalist and non- capitalist societies. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 663 Seminar in Cross-Cultural Comparison (3-4)

World-wide ethnographic surveys of selected behavioral adaptations, institutional forms, or cultural processes. Includes the logic and methods of systematic cross-cultural comparison. Topical focus may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 664 Seminar in Urban Anthropology (3-4)

Selected topics in the study of complex societies and cities. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 665 Seminar in the Ethnology of Religion (3-4)

Selected research problems in the anthropological study of the religion. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 666 Seminar in Ethnohistory (3-4)

Selected topics in the methods and problems of ethnohistorical research. Geographical area may change. May be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 668 Seminar in Ecological Anthropology (3-4)

Advanced study and research in ecological anthropology. Theories and methods in the interpretation of culture, behavior, and environmental adaptation. Cultural ecology, ecosystematics, environmental decision making, and environmental history are assessed as research frameworks for varying ethnographic contexts. Emphasizes the developing field of ecological anthropology in relation to other materialist paradigms and to economic anthropology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 670 Seminar in Ethnology (3-4)

Selected topics in ethnology. Past topics have included the history of anthropological theory, cross-cultural comparison, and applications of anthropological research to problems of the modern world. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 688 Advanced Research Methods in Anthropology (3-4)

Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study in anthropology.

Ant 690 Seminar in Anthropology (3-4)

Specific topics will be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study in anthropology or permission of instructor.

Ant 690Q/R Special Topics Seminar (2)

Reserved for occasional offerings and visiting faculty. Topics will be announced. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate status in anthropology or permission of instructor.

Ant 691 Directed Reading (1-6)

Independent reading and conferences on subjects pertinent to the student's course of study. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 692 Directed Research (1-6)

Independent research on subjects pertinent to the student's course of study. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 699 Master's Thesis (2-6)

Independent research leading to an acceptable thesis for a master's degree. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of department chair.

Ant 791 Directed Reading (2-4)

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Ant 792 Independent Field Research (2-15)

May be repeated for credit if advised. Prerequisites: Admission to Ph.D. program and consent of advisor.

Ant 899 Doctoral Dissertation (1)

Required of all candidates completing the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy in anthropology. Does not count toward 60 credit requirement.