Graduate Bulletin

School of Social Welfare


The School of Social Welfare was established in 1963 to educate professional social workers for the social services in New York State. The School's faculty and programs are ranked as one of the best social work programs in the country. In keeping with social work's historic and enduring commitments, the mission of the School of Social Welfare is to further social and economic justice and to serve people who are vulnerable, marginalized or oppressed. This mission is implemented through education, knowledge development, and service that promotes leadership for evidence-based social work with a global perspective. The School is committed to the pursuit of excellence in teaching, scholarship, and public service; to knowledge development and professional education that promotes social justice; and to social work practice that serves the vulnerable and oppressed. The School offers an MSW, a Ph.D. degree in Social Welfare, a joint MSW/Ph.D. program in Social Welfare, and a joint MSW/JD with Albany Law School. The MSW program is accredited by the Council of Social Work Education (CSWE). An advanced standing MSW program is offered to students who possess a recent degree from a baccalaureate program accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. The school also offers several joint programs: an MSW and Master's in Criminal Justice (MA) at Albany, and an MSW and Master's in Sociology (MA) with New Paltz. A graduate student in the School must meet the requirements and standards of the School and of the University and be governed by their regulations. Academic credit for life experience or previous work experience will not be given.

PROGRAM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK

The M.S.W. curriculum is a two-year (60 credits) sequence that prepares students for professional social work practice. The M.S.W. program is fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. Students acquire the knowledge and skills that enable them to help alleviate social problems, gain a broad perspective in assessing social needs, and acquire the skills necessary to address needs and challenges of individuals, groups, and communities. Graduate social workers should be able to help others reach the most satisfying social adjustment possible and to work for social conditions that will provide an equitable opportunity for individual fulfillment.

The curriculum offers two areas of concentration. After the second semester of common generalist core courses, students concentrate in Direct Practice or MACRO (Management efficiency, Advocacy and empowerment, Community building, Resource development, and Outcome evaluation). Determination of the area of concentration is made prior to the end of the second semester.

The MACRO Concentration

The MACRO concentration prepares students for management, community development, program development and evaluation, and advocacy positions in social agencies, including state planning and regulatory agencies and service organizations at county, local, and community levels. Students take courses in organizational and management theory, fiscal management, human resources and supervision, management information systems, program planning and evaluation, grant writing and fund raising, advocacy, and community building.

The Direct Practice Concentration

This concentration is designed to prepare students to provide direct services that assist in the restoration, maintenance, and enhancement of the social functioning of individuals, families, and other groups. Students in this concentration are expected to acquire knowledge of human behavior, social systems, and intervention processes with which individuals, families, and small groups are aided to develop and realize their potential.  Students may concentrate their study in areas such as child & family services, mental health, health care & aging, or they may take courses in diverse areas.

Admissions

To be admitted to a graduate program offered by the School of Social Welfare, applicants must hold a liberal arts bachelor's degree from a college or university of recognized standing. Applications may be submitted for admission to a program leading to a master's or doctoral degree, or for nondegree study.

Applications for admission to the M.S.W. program for the following fall are due February 15. Early-decision applications for the following fall are due the preceding November 1. Applicants must have an awarded B.A. degree to be reviewed for the early decision application. The M.S.W. program does not accept students for initial enrollment in the spring semester. Application for doctoral admission and for financial aid must be received by May 15 for fall enrollment and November 1 for spring enrollment in the Ph.D. Program. Application for nondegree admission may be considered up to two weeks prior to the beginning of each session.

Applications are evaluated on four criteria: academic preparation and performance, human services experience, letters of reference, and objectives of graduate study.

Applicants for the M.S.W. degree program must hold a baccalaureate degree and must submit: official transcripts for all undergraduate and graduate work attempted; references from three individuals who know the applicant in an academic, human service, or employment capacity; a two-to-four page statement of personal goals and career objectives that includes why the applicant wishes to pursue a career in social work, a discussion of previous experiences that led to these decisions, and the nature and meaning of all paid and volunteer work experience relevant to social work career goals; and an updated resume. The GREs are not required. However, the dual or joint MSW programs may require submission of standardized test scores, such as the GRE or LSAT.

Applicants for the regular Ph.D. program must possess a master's degree in social work or in a related field (e.g., psychology, sociology, nursing, education). Applicants for the joint M.S.W./Ph.D. program must submit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores and should include their research interests in the statement of goals.

As part of their application packet, international students are required to submit scores for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) and the Test of Spoken English (TSE) administered by the Educational Testing Service. The minimum expected TOEFL is 213 and the TSE is 50.

Students who wish to enter a program or course in the University must apply through the Office of Graduate Admissions, Administration Building, Room 121, 1400 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12222, telephone (518) 442-3980. Students who desire clarification or more detailed information about programs and admission standards may attend an information session or visit our website at http://www.albany.edu/ssw/. To attend an information session, please call (518) 442-5320.

Applicants should be aware that some states restrict or deny professional licensure for persons with a felony conviction, misdemeanor conviction, DWI, or action taken against them by a professional organization.

The Field Practicum

An integral part of the School's curriculum, the field practicum gives students the opportunity to develop, apply, and integrate necessary knowledge, skills, and attitudes while in practice in social work settings. For each practicum students work 500 hours in an agency, equal to two days a week for two semesters. With the exception of those who qualify for advanced standing or the summer block option, students must complete two practica concurrent with classroom courses. Each practicum is in a different agency. Students with experience in human service may apply for two options for completing the field placement requirements: the Work-Study Option and the Summer Block Option.

Students must apply for each practicum; they are evaluated for preparedness and assigned to an agency by the Coordinator of Field Instruction in consultation with a committee of faculty. In each field practicum, students engage in social work practice under the supervision of an experienced practitioner who is qualified and trained to serve as a field instructor. The first practicum is a generalist practicum that provides learning opportunities in a broad range of social work activities. The second specialized practicum focuses on opportunities appropriate to each student's concentration of either Direct Practice or MACRO. Sites used for the field practicum are usually within a 100-mile radius from Albany. Most students are placed within a reasonable distance of their residences; however, students need an automobile for travel to and from the placement as well as for placement-related activities. Students are responsible for expenses and transportation associated with field placement.

Academic credit is given for the field practicum through the field instruction courses. The field instruction courses are graded Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory (S/U). Students must earn a Satisfactory grade to continue in the program.

Approximately 700 agencies and organizations in the Capital District and surrounding counties provide field practica to social work students each year. Settings include public and voluntary agencies in children and family services, health care, aging, mental health, substance abuse, state and community service planning and coordination organizations, and other organizations that provide social work services.

School Calendar

The calendar for the School of Social Welfare varies from the University calendar, particularly in regard to field instruction. Because of educational needs and professional responsibility, students should expect to be in field placement during some recesses. The field instruction calendar is distributed at the beginning of the academic year.

The Curriculum

The curriculum is designed for students to gain a generalist perspective. This perspective is essential to 1) assess and address social needs, and 2) to help individuals, families, groups, and communities develop and function effectively. The generalist perspective fosters
Ø An eclectic theoretical grounding within a systems framework for assessing multiple points and levels for potential intervention.
Ø The need for effective multi-level interventions which may focus simultaneously on individuals, families, groups, communities, or organizations and society
Ø Multi-system and multi-level interventions, using an evidence based and outcomes oriented planned change model.

The curriculum begins with generalist foundation courses required of all students.

Required Generalist Courses for All Students (31 credits)

Core Requirements:

Ssw 600 Social Welfare Policy and Services I (3);
Ssw 610 Human Behavior and Social Environment I (3);
Ssw 611 Human Behavior and Social Environment II (3);
Ssw 620 Micro Practice in Social Work I (3);
Ssw 621 Micro Practice in Social Work II (3);
Ssw 630 Macro Practice in Social Work I (3);
Ssw 631 Macro Practice in Social Work II (3);
Ssw 650 Field Instruction I (3);
Ssw 651 Field Instruction II (4);
Ssw 660 Introductory Research Methodology  (3).
Exemption Examinations

Exemption examinations may be taken for the courses Ssw 600, 610, 611, and 660. Passing of these exams exempts the student from taking the course, but no credit is given. In place of the exempted course(s), electives must be taken to fulfill the required amount of credits. Exemption examinations are given prior to the start of the fall semester.

Advanced Requirements for Students in MACRO Concentration (29 credits)

Ssw 665 Research Methods in Social Welfare Management (3);
Ssw 752 Field Instruction III (4);
Ssw 753 Field Instruction IV (4);
Ssw 790 Human Service Organizations in a Changing Environment (3);
Ssw 791 Managing Systems in Human Service Organizations (3);
Ssw 792 Community Building (3):
One course designated as Advanced MACRO elective (like Ssw 730)(3);
One MACRO elective (like Ssw 730)  (3);
One Elective (3);
One Advanced Policy Course (3);

Advanced Requirements for Students in Direct Practice Concentration (29 credits)

Ssw 661 Evaluation of Clinical Practice (3);
Ssw 752 Field Instruction III (4);
Ssw 753 Field Instruction IV (4);
One course designated as Advanced Behavior (3);
Two courses designated as Advanced Practice (6);
One course designated as Advanced Policy (3);
Electives per advisement to total 60 credits.

Part-Time Program

Approximately one-fifth of M.S.W. students complete the degree through part-time study. Students are admitted directly into the part-time program and are expected to complete the entire M.S.W. degree on a part-time basis. The program requires two courses each Fall and Spring semester and one course in the Summer semester, over a four year period. The sequence of courses is set by the faculty and is the same for all part-time students in each concentration. Part-time students complete the field practicum courses on two work days a week during the second and fourth years of the program.

Advanced Standing

The advanced standing program permits qualified applicants with a baccalaureate degree in social work to receive up to 21 credits of advanced standing toward the M.S.W. and to complete the M.S.W. in a summer and one academic year. To be eligible, the students must have received a baccalaureate degree from a social work program accredited by the Council on Social Work Education within six years of matriculation in the M.S.W. program. The courses for which students may receive advanced standing credit are:

Ssw 600 Social Work Policy and Services
Ssw 610 Human Behavior and Social Environment I
Ssw 620 Micro Practice in Social Work I
Ssw 630 Macro Practice in Social Work I
Ssw 650 Field Instruction I
Ssw 660 Introductory Research

Either one elective (3 credits) (Direct Practice Concentration) or one course (3 credits) to be determined (MACRO Concentration).

The advanced standing program is full-time and begins in late May. In the Summer, students take Ssw 611, Human Behavior and Social Environment II; Ssw 621, Micro Practice in Social Work II; and Ssw 651 Field Instruction II. In the Fall and Spring, they take Ssw 631, Macro Practice in Social Work II (Fall) and meet the requirements of their chosen concentration.

Special Program: Albany Internships in Aging Project (IAP)

The School of Social Welfare at the University at Albany in partnership with 9 area consortium agencies is offering a special opportunity to earn a Master in Social Work (MSW) with a specialization in service to aging persons. The Albany Internships in Aging Project (IAP) provides education for direct and MACRO practice and leadership in social work services.

The Albany IAP is part of the Geriatric Social Work Practicum Development Program, which was intiated by the John A. Hartford Foundation. Students start in the second year of the MSW program after completing the generalist first year curriculum. The curriculum includes an integrative seminar and a specialized second-year curriculum in aging in either direct practice or MACRO. The second year includes coursework in aging, a leadership development project, and a field placement with rotation among sites serving older persons. The second-year IAP program is full-time.

Dual Master's Program in Criminal Justice (MA) and Social Work (MSW)

The dual masters program is directed at students who wish to combine expertise in criminal justice policy and research with the study of direct practice or in the MACRO concentration as available in the School of Social Welfare. The Dual Master's Degree Program in Criminal Justice (M.A.) and Social Work (M.S.W.) requires a minimum of 70 graduate credits. Coursework includes core and specialized courses in both schools and field placements in social work settings. The program requirements during the first semester of study and the following summer term are completed in the School of Social Welfare. The second, third, and fourth semesters combine courses from the School of Criminal Justice and the School of Social Welfare. Most students complete this program on a full time basis. However, the program may be done at a slower pace so long as the student is registered for at least 2 courses each Fall and Spring semester.

Students may be admitted to the dual master's program at the beginning of their graduate studies, but not later than their completion of 20 graduate credits applicable to the dual master's program. Work completed for a previously awarded master's or doctoral degree may NOT be used for this program. A minimum grade point average of 3.0 and three supportive letters of recommendation are required. Scores from the GRE, the LSAT, or the GMAT are required for admission to the School of Criminal Justice. Faculty from both participating academic units will form the admissions committees for the dual master's program.

Sample Program:

Dual Master's Program in Criminal Justice (M.A.) and Social Work - Direct Practice Concentration (M.S.W.)
 

Program of Study (70 graduate credits minimum)


1. Required courses (63 credits minimum):
a.) Social Welfare (48 credits minimum): Including Ssw 600, 610, 611,  620, 621, 630, 631, 650, 651, 752, 753, two advanced practice courses, one advanced behavior course, plus one advanced policy course per field of study or advisement;
b.) Criminal Justice: Students must complete area requirements by taking one course in three of the four following substantive areas: (9-10 credits)
Nature of Crime: Crj 601, 602, 606, 607;
Law and Social Control: Crj 620, 623, 626, 629;
Criminal Justice Process and Policy: Crj 641, 642, 643, 645, 646, 647, 649, 651, 652.
Planned Change: Crj 560 or Crj 561;
c.) Complete course requirements in support sequence (6-7 credits): Crj 504 or Crj 679 or Crj 681 or equivalent; and Crj 682.

2. Electives (5-7 credits minimum): from criminal justice to total 70 credits.

Dual Master's Program in Criminal Justice (M.A.) and Social Work - MACRO Concentration (M.S.W.)

Program of Study (70 graduate credits minimum)

1. Required courses (57 credits minimum):

a.) Social Welfare (42 credits minimum): Including Ssw 600, 610, 611, 620, 621, 630, 631, 650, 651,  752, 753, 790, and either 791 or 792 as advised;
b.) Criminal Justice: Students must complete area requirements by taking one course in two of the three following substantive areas:
Nature of Crime: Crj 601, 602, 606, or 607;
Law and Social Control: Crj 620, 623, 626, 629;
Criminal Justice Process and Policy: Crj 641,642, 643, 645, 646, 647, 649 651, 652
c.) Complete course requirements in support sequence: Crj 504 or Crj 679 or Crj 681 or equivalent; and Crj 682 PLUS Crj 691 or Ssw 665.

2. Electives (11 credits minimum) including at least three credits from each of the substantive area groupings in criminal justice to total 70 credits.

Dual Master’s Program in Public Affairs and Policy (M.A.) and Social Work – MACRO Concentration (M.S.W.)

The Dual Master's Degree Program in Public Affairs and Policy (M.A.) and Social Work (M.S.W.) prepares students with a commitment to humanitarian values, knowledge of U.S. social service delivery systems, and advanced skills to analyze and formulate public policy relevant to social welfare. Because this M.A. in Public Affairs and Policy (MPP) is coupled with the MACRO Concentration of the M.S.W. program, students are given the opportunity to combine a commitment to public social policy with strong analytic skills in formulating and analyzing policy. The dual degree program requires a minimum of 87 graduate credits. Students take the standard MPP program, using social work courses to satisfy the program’s requirement for an elected public policy field and a social work field instruction course to satisfy the requirement for an internship. M.S.W. degree program electives are satisfied with MPP courses.

This program is a Council on Social Work Education accredited M.S.W. program under the School of Social Welfare’s current accreditation.

Students must be accepted through the admissions process set forth by each program and must be eligible to matriculate in both programs. Admission into one program does not guarantee admission into the other program.

Program of Study – 87 Credits

Social Work Courses (51 credits)
Ssw 600 Social Welfare Policy and Services (3)
Ssw 610 Human Behavior and Social Environment I (3)
Ssw 611 Human Behavior and Social Environment II (3)
Ssw 620 Micro Practice in Social Work I (3)
Ssw 621 Micro Practice in Social Work II (3)
Ssw 630 Macro Practice in Social Work I (3)
Ssw 631 Macro Practice in Social Work II (3)
Ssw 650 Field Instruction I (3)
Ssw 651 Field Instruction II (4)
Ssw 660 Introductory Research Methodology (3)
Ssw 752 Field Instruction III (4)
Ssw 753 Field Instruction IV (4)
Ssw 790 Human Service Organizations or Ssw 792 Community Building (3)
Ssw 791 Managing Systems in Human Service Organizations (3)
Ssw 7xx Advanced MACRO course (3)
Ssw 7xx Advanced Policy course (3)

Public Affairs and Policy (36 credits)
Pub 502 Philosophical and Ethical Issues in Public Policy or Pub 529 Law and Policy (4)
Pub 503 Economics and Finance I (4)
Pub 504 Data, Models and Decisions I (4)
Pub 505 Data, Models and Decisions II (4)
Pub 506 Implementation and Impact (4)
Pub 507 Professional Applications I (2)
Pub 508 Current Research Topics in Public Policy Analysis (2)
Pub 514 Economic Analysis for Public Affairs II (4)
Pub 522 Politics and Policy (4)
Pub 698 Master’s Essay in Public Affairs and Policy (4)

The Dual Master’s Program in Sociology (MA at State University College at New Paltz) and Social Work (MSW)

The dual masters program in sociology (New Paltz) and social work (Albany) is intended for students who wish to combine sociology and social work. Approximately half the coursework is taken in New Paltz, N.Y., half in Albany. The field practicum may be taken in the mid-Hudson region. The program requires 72 credits for students with a concentration in Direct Practice, 75 credits in MACRO. Students must complete a separate admissions packet for each program and must be admitted to both programs.

Program required of all students (50 credits):
1. Required courses in Social Welfare: Ssw 610, 611, 620, 621, 630, 631, 650, 651, 752, 753
2. Required courses in Sociology: 87500 Social Structure, 87501 Sociological Theory, 87503 Research Methods, 87532 Social Policy, 87551 Social Statistics, 87552 Seminar in Sociological Issues
3. Electives in Sociology (9 credits minimum)
4. Additional coursework to complete requirements of Direct Practice or MACRO Concentration

Additional courses required of students with a concentration in Direct Practice (12 credits)
1. Ssw 661
2. One course designated as Advanced Behavior (3 credits)
3. Two courses designated as Advanced Practice (6 credits)

Additional courses required of students with a concentration in MACRO(15 credits)
1. Ssw 665, Ssw 790, 791, 792, and one course designated as advanced MACRO for 3 credits.

Joint MSW (MACRO concentration)/JD Program from Albany Law School

The joint Master's in Social Work and Juris Doctor program (MSW/JD) combines a law degree with the MSW with a concentration in direct practice or MACRO. Students are able to earn both degrees in, at most, four years of full-time study, rather than the usual five. Recipients of the joint J.D./MSW degrees hold professional credentials for a broad range of careers in government, consulting, teaching, research, and law. Course work, a minimum of 125 credits (51 MSW credits and 74 JD credits), includes core and specialized courses in both schools and field placements in social work settings. The program requirements during the first and fourth years of study are completed at Albany Law School. The second and third years combine courses from Albany Law School and the School of Social Welfare. The coursework leading towards this joint degree must begin at Albany Law School.

Each school's application procedures and admissions criteria are independent. Albany Law and the School of Social Welfare require that each student submit a complete application package and an application fee. Albany Law requires LSAT scores in addition to application material. Each university has an independent review process for the applications using their own criteria. Applicants are offered admission to each school independently. Admission into one program does not guarantee admission into the other program.

Sample Program

Year 1 - 0 credits SSW, 31 credits at Albany Law School

Full-time at Albany Law School - 31 credits

Fall
Legal Methods(1);
Contracts (3);
Property (3);
Intro to Lawyering (2);
Intro to Civil Procedure(3);
Torts (4);

Spring
Contracts (3);
Property II (3);
Criminal Law (3);
Intro to Lawyering (2);
Constitutional Law (4);

Year 2 - 31 credits SSW, 3 credits at Albany Law School

Full-time at School of Social Welfare

Fall
Ssw 600 Social Welfare Policy and Services (3);
Ssw 610 Human Behavior and Social Environment I (3);
Ssw 620 Micro Practice I (3);
Ssw 630 Macro Practice I (3);
Ssw 650 Field Instruction I (3);

Spring
Ssw 611 Human Behavior and Social Environment II (3);
Ssw 621 Micro Practice II (3);
Ssw 631 Macro Practice II (3);
Ssw 651 Field Instruction II (4);
Ssw 660 Introductory Research Methodology (3);

Spring or Summer at Albany Law School (Legal Profession/Professional Ressponsibility) (3)

Year 3 - 20 credits SSW, 11 credits at Albany Law School

Fall
Ssw 665 Research Methods in Social Work Management (3);
Ssw 790 Human Service Organizations in a Changing Environment (3);
Ssw 792 Community Building (3);
Ssw 7__ Advanced MACRO Course (3)
Ssw 752 Field Instruction II (4)

Spring
Ssw 753 Field Instruction IV (4);
Albany Law School - Electives (11) one course from Finance Options;

Year 4 - 29 credits at Albany Law School

Albany Law School - Electives (29);.

Joint MSW (Direct Practice Concentration) and Master of Science in Bioethics – Albany Medical College and Graduate College of Union University

This dual masters-level program provides students the opportunity to combine a Master of Social Work (with a Direct Practice concentration) offered by the University at Albany with a Master of Science in Bioethics offered by the Center for Medical Ethics at Albany Medical College and the Center for Bioethics and Clinical Leadership of the Graduate College of Union University. This unique combination gives bioethics a strong clinical application and social workers the in-depth education needed to make informed decisions and the credentials needed to become leaders in bioethics in health care.

The dual jointly registered degree program requires completion of 88 credits. Students take 16 of the 19 courses required of the M.S.W. degree (51 credits) and 11 of the 12 required M.S. Bioethics degree (37 credits). Both degrees count courses in the other program as meeting elective courses. Students attend the University at Albany campus for the social work courses. Most Bioethics courses will be offered online (with some on-site options) and three intensive sessions are to be attended in person on the Albany Medical College campus. This program is a Council on Social Work Education accredited M.S.W. program under the School of Social Welfare’s current accreditation.

Applicants to the dual program must submit a complete application package and application fee to both the University at Albany and Albany Medical College/Graduate College of Union University. Students must be accepted through the admissions process set forth by each program and must be eligible to matriculate in both programs. Admission into one program does not guarantee admission into the other program.

Master of Social Work and Master of Science in Bioethics – 88 Credits

Social Work Courses (Albany) – 51 credits

Ssw 600 Social Welfare Policy and Services
Ssw 610 Human Behavior and Social Environment I
Ssw 611 Human Behavior and Social Environment II
Ssw 620 Micro Practice in Social Work I
Ssw 621 Micro Practice in Social Work II
Ssw 630 Macro Practice in Social Work I
Ssw 631 Macro Practice in Social Work II
Ssw 650 Field Instruction I
Ssw 651 Field Instruction II
Ssw 660 Introductory Research Methodology
Ssw 661 Evaluation of Clinical Practice OR Ssw 665 Research Methods in Social Work Management
Ssw 752 Field Instruction III
Ssw 753 Field Instruction IV
Ssw 7xx Advanced Practice (2 courses)
Ssw 7xx Advanced Behavior (1 course)

Bioethics Courses (Albany Medical College and Graduate College of Union University) - 37 credits

Med 202 Clinical Ethics
Med 206 Research Ethics: Scientific Integrity
Med 246 Proseminar in Health and Human Values
Med 274 Biomedical Ethics
Med 281 Health Care Policy
Med 284 Bioethics and the Law
Med 301 Practicum I – Clinical Ethics
Med 302 Practicum II – Online Practicum
Med 391 Masters Project I
Med 392 Masters Project II
Med 399 Capstone in Clinical Ethics

Program Leading to the Doctor of Philosophy

The program of doctoral studies prepares students primarily for careers in teaching and research. It educates students in the theory and practice of social welfare. Graduates of the program gain advanced skills in research methods and the ability to analyze social policy and develop practice theory. The program requires 36 credits of study beyond a master's degree with a minimum of one year of full-time residence. The doctoral program offers students the opportunity to study with an outstanding faculty who are ranked as one of the most productive faculties in social work in the U.S.

Requirements for Admission

In addition to meeting the general University requirements students should have a master's degree from either a school of social work or a closely related discipline or profession. At least two year of professional experience is advisable but not required.

Program of Study and Research (36 credits minimum beyond a master's degree)

All doctoral students are required to enroll in four doctoral proseminars:
Ssw 823 Social Welfare Practice Theory (3)
Ssw 826 Social Welfare Policy (3)
Ssw 862 Social Welfare Research (3)
Ssw 863 Applications of Advanced Methods in Social Welfare Research (3)

A two-term sequence of advanced statistics courses is required (6-8 credits)

One advanced research course (a third research course) approved by the student’s advisor. This third research course must be on a specific research topic or methodology that is not covered or not covered in depth in Ssw 862, Social Welfare Research, and Ssw 863, Applications of Advanced Methods in Social Welfare Research.

One additional course in data analysis beyond the two-semester statistics requirement which may be met by taking an advanced data analysis course offered by other departments or the School of Social Welfare. This third data analysis course must be in advanced data analysis covering topics not covered in the required statistics course sequence or covering those topics in greater depth. Examples of appropriate courses include those on regression, structural equation modeling, and non-parametric statistics as well as those addressing data analysis techniques for qualitative methods such as narrative analysis, ethnography, case studies, and focus groups. This course must be approved by the student’s advisor.

Additional credits as advised to total 36 credits.

Dissertation

A dissertation based on independent research is required. The dissertation should constitute a significant piece of work which makes a contribution to the theory or practice of social welfare.

Examinations

The qualifying examination covers subjects defined generally by the content of the required proseminars and is intended to measure the students' mastery of this content. Examination questions are drawn from a reading list compiled from the proseminar bibliographies.

The examination consists of three parts: 1) Social Policy, 2) Research, and 3) Social Work Practice. There are two questions for each part and each part is scored separately. Students must pass each part in order to pass the examination. If students fail, they need to retake only the part(s) failed.

Language or Computer Proficiency

Each student is required to show research proficiency in one of two ways. The first option a student may choose is to demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language. This may be demonstrated by successfully completing one of the University's standardized language proficiency examinations. The second option for fulfilling this requirement is to demonstrate proficiency in the use of a widely distributed and utilized social science statistical software package; e.g., SPSS or BMDP, as measured by satisfactorily completing an approved computer course or passing a performance or oral examination on computer skills.

Doctoral Essay

A doctoral essay that exhibits mastery of knowledge in a student's selected substantive area is required. The essay serves to further the student's potential for scholarly work and enables the student to complete a review of the literature relevant to his or her substantive area.

Predissertation Research Requirement

A predissertation research requirement demonstrating a set of research competencies is required. It is highly desirable for the student to use the requirements in a way that will advance their dissertaion research.

Full Time Study in Residence
 

  1. Each student in a doctoral program must engage in full-time study beyond the master's degree or equivalent at the University in at least two sessions after admission to the advanced program. This requirement is designed to insure for each doctoral student a sustained period of intensive intellectual growth. For this purpose a student will enroll in full-time study (9 credits) taken in each of two sessions, or in a regular session and a summer session, not necessarily consecutive, which must be completed satisfactorily, except as indicated here:
    1. Students authorized to register for work on a dissertation may meet this 12 credit per session requirement by satisfactorily completing a minimum of 8 earned course credits and registering for work on the dissertation for load credits that will bring the total to 12 credits for each of two sessions.
    2. Graduate assistants holding a full assistantship may meet the residency requirement by completing one academic year in such a position, including the satisfactory completion of a minimum of 15 registered credits during the year plus satisfactory completion of assigned duties.
Admission to Candidacy
  1. A student is admitted to candidacy for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy upon the following:
    1. Satisfactory record in course and seminar study;
    2. Satisfactory completion of the research tool and predissertation research requirement;
    3. Satisfactory completion of the qualifying examination;
    4. Satisfactory completion of a doctoral essay.
    5. Completion of the University residence requirements.
Joint M.S.W./Ph.D. Program in Social Welfare

The joint M.S.W./Ph.D. program permits exceptionally qualified students "with a high level of demonstrated academic competence, leadership potential, and a strong interest in scholarship in social welfare research" to reduce the 96 serial credits required for the M.S.W. and Ph.D. programs in Social Welfare to 84 credits.

Program of Study

54 graduate credits, minimum, including the following:

Required courses for all M.S.W./Ph.D. students:

Ssw 600 Social Welfare Policy and Services (3);
Ssw 610 Human Behavior and Social Environment I (3);
Ssw 611 Human Behavior and Social Environment II (3);
Ssw 620 Micro Practice I (3);
Ssw 621 Micro Practice II (3);
Ssw 630 Macro Practice I (3);
Ssw 631 Macro Practice II (3);
Ssw 650 Field Instruction I (3);
Ssw 651 Field Instruction II (4);
Ssw 752 Field Instruction III (4);
Ssw 753 Field Instruction IV (4);
Ssw 823 Social Welfare Practice Theory (Proseminar) (3);
Ssw 826 Social Welfare Policy (Proseminar) (3);
Ssw 862 Social Welfare Research (Proseminar) (3);
Ssw 863 Applications of Advanced Methods in Social Welfare Research (Proseminar) (3);

Plus two courses in statistics.

Required Courses for Students Concentrating in Social Welfare MACRO:

Ssw 790 Human Service Organizations Within a Changing Environment (3);
Ssw 791 Managing Systems in Human Service Organizations (3);
Ssw 792 Community Building (3):

One course designated MACRO elective as advised (3):

Ssw 752 Field Instruction 3 (4)
Ssw 753 Field Instruction 4 (4)

Required Courses for Students Concentrating in Direct Practice:

An advanced Human Behavior course (e.g., Ssw 733 Adult Disorders);
An advanced Practice course (e.g., Ssw 741 Practice with Mature and Aging Adults);
A second Advanced Practice course;
Plus a minimum of 3 credits of elective graduate courses related to direct practice.

Supporting and Elective Courses Required for All Students:

Appropriate courses totaling at least 22-25 graduate credits to complete the master’s concentration and to develop the doctoral social welfare problem and practice intervention area of study.

Additional Requirements

  1. Additionally, all students must:
    1. Have a satisfactory record in all course and seminar study;
    2. Complete satisfactorily the research tool requirements;
    3. Complete satisfactorily the qualifying examination;
    4. Complete satisfactorily the University residence requirements;
    5. Submit an acceptable dissertation based on independent research; and
    6. Complete at least two acceptable substantive courses outside of the School of Social Welfare.