Graduate Bulletin

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY

The Department of History offers a Doctor of Philosophy degree, a Master of Arts degree in History, a Master of Arts degree in Public History and a Certificate of Advanced Study (C.A.S.) in Public History. In addition, it participates in several interdepartmental programs, such as Social Studies, Liberal Studies, and Library Science.
The Ph.D. program aims to prepare students for academic careers as scholars and teachers as well as for profession opportunities in research, history and media, and policy analysts and other pursuits in the public and private sectors. The program is interdisciplinary in nature and is organized by thematic fields (Public Policy, International History, Work, Gender, and Culture). The M.A. program serves several purposes. It is a stepping stone to the doctorate; it is a qualifying degree for secondary-school teaching; and it is a way for interested students to extend their liberal education. The CAS and the MA in Public History are designed to train professional historians who will work as curators, researchers, and archivists outside conventional academic settings.

Program Leading to the Master of Arts Degree in History
Program of Study (30 credits, minimum)
1. History (21 credits, minimum):
a. Courses, as advised, including at least one research seminar in the appropriate major field and one reading seminar;
b. With departmental approval a thesis in history for 4-6 credits may be presented in place of or in addition to the research seminar;
2. Supporting courses (0-9 credits): Courses in the social sciences and other fields as advised;
3. Satisfactory completion of a major field examination in one concentration chosen from Group A or one concentration chosen from Group B:
Group A
United States History
Modern European History
Latin America History
African History
Asian History
Group B
Local and Regional History
International History
Social and/or Economic History
Public Policy
Gender and Society
Culture and Society
Work and Society

Major Field Examination
With departmental approval a student may prepare for examination a field of concentration not listed under Groups A or B. The major field examination is waived for those students who write a master's thesis in history (His 699).

Foreign Language Requirement
A reading knowledge of one foreign language appropriate to the student's major field is required for M.A. candidates writing Master's theses on non-U.S. topics. This requirement can be fulfilled by an examination in the Department, by an examination administered by a language department with approval of the History Department, or by satisfactory completion of a graduate level language course that has been approved by the History Department. A student may not take the language examination more than twice for the M.A. degree.

Combined B.A.-M.A. Program - History
Qualified undergraduates may apply for admission to the M.A. program and, if accepted, simultaneously work toward completion of the requirements for both undergraduate and graduate degrees. See Combined Baccalaureate-Master's Degree Programs for details.


Programs Leading to the Master of Arts Degree in Social Studies

The University offers two masters degree programs in social studies. The first program is designed to permit individuals to pursue an interdisciplinary program in social studies. Within the general limits outlined here, programs are tailored to individual interests. The second program is open only to students who possess a provisional certification in social studies. Students with a bachelor's degree in a general liberal arts program with a major in one of the social studies who wish to prepare themselves for secondary-school teaching should consult the requirements for the Master of Science in Secondary Education offered by the School of Education.

General Sequence (30 credits minimum)
In this program social studies includes the following disciplines: Africana Studies, anthropology, economics, geography, history, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, political science, public affairs, sociology, and women's studies.
1. A concentration in one of the social studies disciplines (12-15 credits):
a. Courses as advised;
b. A research seminar of at least 3 credits;
c. With departmental approval, a thesis from 4 to 6 credits may be presented in place of or in addition to the research seminar;
2. Supporting courses in social studies (9-18 credits): Courses as advised in social studies outside the student's area of concentration;
3. Supporting courses outside social studies (0-6 credits): Courses as advised in academic fields outside social studies.

Sequence Limited to Students with Provisional Certification in Social Studies (30 credits, minimum)
1. Social Studies (18-24 credits):
a. Courses as advised;
b. A research seminar in economics, geography, history, political science, or sociology (of at least 3 credits);
c. With departmental approval a thesis in history from 4 to 6 credits may be presented in place of, or in addition to, the research seminar in history.
2. Supporting courses (0-6 credits): Courses in social sciences and other academic fields as advised. (Education courses are excluded from this category.)
3. Courses in education (6 credits including E Phl 601).
4. Prerequisite preparation: Open only to students who have completed initial preparation for a provisional certificate for secondary-school teaching (social studies), including required professional courses in education, and who plan to qualify for a permanent certificate.

Dual Program Leading to the MA/MS in History and Information Science and Policy

The Department of History in conjunction with the School of Information Science and Policy offers a dual degree program combining the M.A. in History and the M.S. in Information Science and Policy. By applying six credits in Information Science and Policy to the History degree program and nine credits from History to the Information Science and Policy program, a student can reduce the total number of credits needed for both degrees to 57. However, faculty responsible for concentrations in both programs may require additional course work. Students may be admitted to a dual master's degree program at the beginning of their graduate studies, but not later than after completing 20 graduate credits applicable to a dual master's degree program. Work done for an awarded master's or doctoral degree may not be used for this program. Students may leave a dual program before completion of both degrees. If the requirements for one degree have been fulfilled, that degree may be awarded. You must be admitted to graduate study in both the M.A. in History and M.S. in Information Science and Policy degree programs for the dual degree program.

Program of Study - History and Information Science and Policy – 57 credits
History (30 credits, minimum)
1. History (21 credits, minimum):
a. Courses, as advised, including at least one research seminar in the appropriate major field and one reading seminar;
b. With departmental approval a thesis in history for 4-6 credits may be presented in place of or in addition to the seminar;
2. Supporting courses (0-9 credits): Courses in the social sciences and other fields as advised (6 credits from Information Science and Policy);
3. Satisfactory completion of a major field examination in one concentration chosen from Group A or one concentration chosen from Group B:

Group A
United States History
Modern European History
Latin America History
African History
Asian History

Group B
Local and Regional History
International History
Social and/or Economic History
Public Policy
Gender and Society
Culture and Society
Work and Society

4. Major Field Examination
With departmental approval a student may prepare for examination a field of concentration not listed under Groups A or B. The major field examination is waived for those students who write a master's thesis in history (His 699).

5. Foreign Language Requirement
A reading knowledge of one foreign language appropriate to the student's major field is required for M.A. candidates writing Master's theses on non-U.S. topics. This requirement can be fulfilled by an examination in the Department, by an examination administered by a language department with approval of the History Department, or by satisfactory completion of a graduate level language course that has been approved by the History Department. A student may not take the language examination more than twice for the M.A. degree.

Note: The programs leading to the M.A. degree in Public History has additional credit requirements.

B. Information Science and Policy (42 credits minimum)
1. Required core courses: Isp 601, 602, 603, 605, 614, Isp 523 for 6 credits (21 credits);
2. Required internship Isp 668 or independent study Isp 669 (3 credits)
3. Required research methods and statistics course: Isp 608 (3 credits).
4. Supporting courses as advised: (15 credits). A maximum of nine credit hours may be taken in other professional and academic fields as advised. Seven credit hours of approved course work in History must be part of the supporting courses sequence.

Program Leading to the Master of Arts Degree in Public History

Program of Study (36 credits, minimum)
1. Academic courses in History (21 credits, minimum) including: His 621 Readings in Local and Regional History or His 630 Readings in Public Policy or a reading course from any of the other M.A. concentrations as advised and a research seminar.
2. Professional courses (9 credits) including His 501 Introduction to Public History and two other professional courses.
3. Internship (6 credits): His 798A Internship in Public History.
4. Satisfactory completion of a major field examination in Local and Regional History or one of the other M.A. fields as advised. A Master's thesis may be substituted for the field exam with approval of the student's advisor.

Program Leading to the Master of Arts Degree in Public History With Certificate in Advanced Study in Public History

Program of Study (54 credits minimum)

Students enrolled in this program will be required to make their M.A. concentration public history and to take courses and an internship appropriate to one of the three areas of emphasis: Historical Agency Studies, Historical Records Administration, History and Public Policy.
1. History content, reading, and seminar courses (25 credits): History courses, as advised, including His 621 or His 630 or a reading course from any of the other M.A. concentrations as advised, and a research seminar or a thesis (His 699).
2. Professional courses (15 credits): His 501 and 12 credits chosen from among the following: His 503 (required of students emphasizing Historical Agency Studies), 504, 505, 506, 507 (required of students emphasizing History and Public Policy), 508, Isp 501, 611, 646, 650, 655, 656 (required of students emphasizing Historical Records Administration), 658, 666 (with consent of director of the program), Pad 500.
3. Satisfactory completion of a major field examination in Local and Regional History or one of the other M.A. fields as advised. A Master's thesis may be substituted for the field exam with approval of the student's advisor.
4. His 798A,B Internship in Public History (12 credits).
5. His 797 Directed Reading in Public History (2 credits).

 

MASTER OF ARTS in PUBLIC AFFAIRS and POLICY/MASTER OF ARTS in HISTORY - DUAL DEGREE (M.A./M.A.)

The Department of Public Affairs and Policy and the Department of History offer a dual degree program combining the M.A. in Public Affairs and Policy and the M.A. in History. Students must meet the requirements for the M.A. in History as well as the requirements for the M.A. in Public Affairs and Policy. Of the 30 credits required for the M.A. in History, 21 must be History credits. Six of the other 9 credits must come from courses approved for credit for the Master’s in Public Affairs and Policy. Of the 44 credits required for the M.A. in Public Affairs and Policy, 8 credits must come from History and must include His 630. A cumulative grade point average of 3.0 is required for completion of the Master’s degrees in both History and Public Affairs and Policy. The dual degrees require a minimum of 60 credits.

Program Advisement. Students should receive advisement in both the History Department and in the Department of Public Administration and Policy to ensure satisfactory completion of both degrees. Students may consult with the Graduate Director in History regarding their history program or choose another faculty mentor. Likewise, students should consult with the Director of the M.A. in Public Affairs and Policy program or their advisor in the public policy program.

For the M.A. in Public Affairs and Policy component, students must take all of the required courses for the M.A. in Public Affairs and Policy program, as indicated in the following listing.

Public Policy (44 credits)
Pub 503 Public Economics and Finance I
Pub 504 Data, Models and Decisions I
Pub 505 Data, Models and Decisions II
Pub 506 Implementation and Impact
Pub 507 Professional Applications I
Pub 508 Current Research Topics in Public Policy
Pub 514 Economic Analysis for Public Affairs II
Pub 522 Policy and Politics
Pub 529 Law and Policy or Pub 502 Philosophical & Ethical Issues in Public Policy
Pub 698 Master's Essay in Public Affairs and Policy (4 credits)
8 History credits that would serve in partial fulfillment of a Public Policy concentration

For the History component, students must take all of the required courses for the history program, as indicated in the following listing.

History (30 credits)
A History Research Seminar (or Master’s Thesis 2-6)
History 630 Readings in Public Policy History (4)
6 credits Public Policy program
13–18 other History credits
0–3 supporting course credits in the social sciences as advised

Program Concentrations in History. Students may choose to concentrate in thematic fields of study or in geographic areas of study. Most joint degree students will concentrate in Public Policy history, but may choose one of the other thematic areas: Social and/or Economic History; Local and Regional History; Global, Comparative and International History; Culture and Society; Gender and Society; and Work and Society. Students may also select, with the permission of both departments, thematic fields from among those offered in the public policy program, and may combine courses from History, Public Policy, and other programs. Students choosing geographic concentrations may work in the United States, European, Latin American, or Non-Western Areas. Students in the joint program need not declare a policy concentration in the M.A. Public Affairs and Policy program, as the history program will constitute a concentration.

Research Seminars, Reading Seminars, Required Courses, and Thesis or Comprehensive Field Exam. Students must complete at least one research seminar in the major field in history and one reading seminar in history. With departmental approval a thesis in history for 2-6 credits may be presented in place of the research seminar. If the student does not write a thesis, they must take a comprehensive field exam in history. For information on the thesis in history and the comprehensive field examination, see Section IV.A.6 and IV.A.7 of Graduate Programs and Policies, History Department, University at Albany.

Research seminars must be completed at this University.

Foreign Language Requirements. Students who choose to write theses in history in areas which require a foreign language competency will have to pass a foreign language requirement. Language requirements will be satisfied by a two-hour departmental examination or by an examination administered by a language department with the approval of the History Department or by satisfactory completion of a graduate level language course approved by the History Department. Course work taken to satisfy a foreign language requirement may not be used for credit toward the degree. If the student fails a language exam, he or she may take it a second time, but no more than two times for a particular language. When a student takes a qualifying foreign language examination the results should be recorded on the Registrar’s Form (7/94). The original is sent to the Registrar’s office and a copy is placed in the student’s departmental file.

 

PROGRAM LEADING TO THE DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREE

Program of Study (60 credits, minimum)
The program has a thematic orientation. The student will choose a major concentration and a minor concentration from among these five fields: Public Policy History; International, Global, and Comparative History; Social and Economic History; Gender History; Cultural History. The student must also choose one or more areas of geographic specialization. Those available are: United States, Europe, Latin America, Africa, and Asia.
1. History (44-60 credits):
a. Teaching Practicum His 500 (2 credits);
b. Introductory Colloquium in State and Society His 600 (4 credits);
c. Courses as advised, including two history research seminars, one of which must also be in the studentís area of geographic specialization, and two reading seminars in the major field, and one history reading seminar appropriate to the required minor field.
2. Cognate Discipline (0-16 credits): Students are required to demonstrate competence in the content and research methods of at least one cognate discipline.
3. Research Tool Requirement: Students are required to demonstrate reading proficiency in one foreign language, or in quantitative methods, or in multimedia methods in historical research and publishing. The major concentration and geographic specialization of a student will determine if more research tools are required before the start of the dissertation. When a foreign language examination is required as a research tool, it will be satisfied by a two-hour departmental examination or by an examination administered by a language department with the approval of the History Department or by satisfactory completion of a graduate-level language course approved by the History Department. In the event that a student fails a language exam, it may be taken a second time, but not more than two times for a particular language.
4. Comprehensive Doctoral Qualifying Examination: Students should take this examination by the end of their third year in the program or, if they have entered with an M.A. degree in hand, by the end of their second year. The students will be examined in a major thematic concentration with one or more geographic specializations, in a minor thematic concentration, and in a cognate discipline. In the event of failure the first time, a student will be afforded a second opportunity to take the examination.
5. Full Time Study in Residence: Students must engage in full-time study beyond the Master's degree or its equivalent at the University in at least one session after admission to the advanced program. Full time study is defined as 12 credits in a semester. Students who are authorized to work on a dissertation may count 4 of their dissertation load credits towards the 12 credits. Graduate assistants holding a full assistantship may meet the residency requirement by completing one academic year in such a position, including the satisfactory completion of 9 registered credits each semester, plus satisfactory completion of assigned duties.
6. Dissertation: The dissertation will consist of a substantial body of original work which, upon completion and before acceptance by the department, candidates will defend in an oral examination.