Graduate Bulletin

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATIONAL THEORY AND PRACTICE

The Department of Educational Theory and Practice offers programs for advanced study and research in math and science teaching and learning, language in education (English, literacy, English as a Second Language, English as a Foreign Language, and World Languages), technology and learning, research and evaluation methods, and related issues in teacher education, learning, and instruction.

The Department also continues the University at Albany's long tradition of preparing teacher-leaders in the core subjects of English, Social Studies, Science, Mathematics, and World Languages.


DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION

The Ph.D. program prepares students for positions in a wide variety of settings. It requires at least three academic years of full- time study and research, or the equivalent over a longer period, beyond the baccalaureate. Students typically complete the program in four years of full-time study. In addition to the requirements described below, students should review the general regulations governing doctoral degrees as outlined in the University at Albany Graduate Bulletin, including the sections on advanced standing and transfer of credit.

Requirements for Admission
In addition to the general University requirements for admission to doctoral study, an applicant should present scores from the aptitude section of the Graduate Record Examination.
An applicant who holds a master's degree with specialization in an appropriate field may apply for admission with advanced standing.

Program of Study (78 credits minimum)
Students follow a program of study planned with their departmental advisors who take into account previous preparation, areas of specialization, and professional objectives. A general description of the program of study follows.

Core Courses: These courses must be taken at the University at Albany by all candidates for the doctoral degree in curriculum and instruction.

Tap 710 Principles of Curriculum Development (3);
Tap 720 Principles of Instruction (3);
Tap 773 Foundations of Research in Curriculum and Instruction (3)

In addition, students must take at least two advanced seminars from the 600- -800 series of courses in ETAP (6 credits).

Specialization (15 credits minimum)

The student can determine areas of specialization in consultation with his or her advisor that reflect the student's interests and career goals. At least 15 credits of coursework beyond that used to satisfy the core requirements are required in an area of specialization. The Department offers a flexible array of specilizatoins based on the interests of current faculty and students. Most current students pursue one of four broad areas of study, though students are encouraged to combine elements across these areas and to integrate them with offerings from other departments to develop their own specializations. The four Departmental specializations are (1) Instructional Theory, Design, and Technology; (2) Research and Evaluation in Curriculum and Instruction; (3) Language in Education; and (4) Science and Mathematics Teaching and Learning.

· Instructional Theory, Design, and Technology: This area fosters scholarly expertise in instructional theory, design, and technology for students who intend to assume leadership roles in matters related to instruction in schools, government agencies, professions, research, or industry. The focus is on theories of effective instruction, the design of educational materials, and uses of instructional technology that apply across a variety of contexts, subject matter domains, types of students, and educational tasks.
· Language in Education: This area focuses on research and scholarship in first and second language teaching and learning, including literacy, writing, English, and literature. Related coursework highlights language, thought, and socialization as the underpinnings of literacy development. The area considers contextual as well as cognitive processes of reading and writing, the ways in which contexts affect learning and instruction, and how these understandings can most effectively influence learning, teaching, testing and policy. The TESOL and TEFL concentrations within this area of study focus on conceptual and pragmatic development in more than one language, and computer assisted language learning.
· Science and Mathematics Teaching and Learning: This area fosters scholarly expertise in the research, theory, and practice of science and mathematics teaching and learning. The focus is on developing an understanding of teaching and learning processes and how they interact with disciplinary knowledge in science and/or mathematics to shape educational theory and curricular and instructional practices in research, instruction and evaluation.
· Research and Evaluation in Curriculum and Instruction: This area helps prepare students for research and evaluation positions in higher education, school districts, state and federal government agencies, private industry, and private consulting. Related coursework provides a grounding in the philosophy of educational research and evaluation, an examination of critical issues in research and evaluation, experience with a range of approaches to systematic inquiry, including feminist methodologies, and directed practice in designing, conducting and reporting research and evaluation studies.

Minor Field/Elective Courses
The study of educational theory and practice requires the use of many concepts drawn from the humanities and from the social and behavioral sciences. In conjunction with their advisors, students should plan a coherent set of supporting courses drawn from areas within ETAP, from related departments within the School of Education, and from other departments within the University. Such courses should be selected to support the student's concentration. In some cases a formal minor field may be appropriate, and must be arranged so as to meet the requirements of the relevant academic department.


Inquiry Courses (12 credits)
Research in education draws on a wide variety of research methodologies, including but not limited to historical, philosophical, anthropological, psychological, sociological, and linguistic traditions. Within these traditions, specific methods of inquiry are sometimes roughly divided into those which are primarily quantitative and those that are more qualitative. To insure a breadth of understanding of current research, students should develop: a) familiarity with the premises of inquiry and methodologies of both quantitative and qualitative approaches to educational research; and b) the ability to employ one of these approaches in a manner sufficient to do dissertation research. These requirements can be met through the completion of at least one course in each area (qualitative and quantitative), and at least two additional courses in one area of inquiry (four courses in all).

A wide variety of relevant inquiry-related courses are offered in the Department, in other departments in the School of Education, and in other departments of the University. Specific courses should be chosen in consultation with the student's advisor, keeping in mind the twin goals of familiarity with diverse traditions and the competence to work within a particular tradition.

Research Tool Examination
All students are required to pass a research tool exam. Details of the research tool exam are available from the Department office.

Qualifying Examination
Advancement to candidacy requires successful completion of the Doctoral Qualifying Examination. This is accomplished via faculty evaluation of a portfolio prepared by the student under the guidance of his or her advisor. Details of the Qualifying Examination are available from the Department Office.

Policy on Doctoral Residency
Doctoral students are not required to complete a period of full-time study (residency) in the Department of Educational Theory and Practice. However, the faculty strongly recommends that students enroll for one or two semesters of full-time study while completing their doctoral programs. Full-time study without the obligations of other work allows students to fulfill doctoral degree requirements in a timely way and to have sustained engagement with the faculty of the Department of Educational Theory and Practice and with the larger university community.

Admission to Candidacy

The student admitted to advanced study leading to a doctoral degree in Curriculum and Instruction is considered for admission to candidacy upon:
1) Satisfying the residency requirements;
2) Achieving a satisfactory record in courses and seminars;
3) Completing satisfactorily the Research Tool Examination;
4) Passing the Doctoral Qualifying Examination;
5) Receiving approval of the dissertation proposal and submission of such to the School of Education Doctoral Council;
6) Completion of any other University requirements that may be in effect.

Admission to candidacy is not automatic, and a graduate student becomes a candidate for a doctoral degree only with the approval of the Dean of Graduate Studies acting on the recommendation of the Graduate Academic Council and the Dean of the School of Education.
Students must be admitted to candidacy at least one session, exclusive of a summer session, before the acceptance of their dissertation and the completion of all requirements for the doctoral degree.

Dissertation
The dissertation is the culmination of the doctoral program. As such, it must attest to a high degree of scholarly competence. The dissertation must report in accepted scholarly style an original investigation of a problem of significance in the major field of study. It must demonstrate that the candidate is capable of conducting and reporting research and analyses that make a substantial contribution to knowledge in an area relating to educational theory and practice in curriculum and instruction.


CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED STUDY IN CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION

Program of Study (60 credits)

The Certificate of Advanced Study in Curriculum and Instruction requires a minimum of sixty hours of study and research beyond the baccalaureate. This program is suggested for those who wish advanced study in a particular topic but are not interested in pursuing research. The program of study can include courses in several colleges and schools of the University.

Core Courses consists of three courses which must be taken at the University at Albany by all candidates for the CAS. These courses are:
Tap 710 Principles of Curriculum Development (3);
Tap 720 Principles of Instruction (3);
Tap 740 Principles of Evaluation (3).

In addition, students must take two advanced courses or seminars,

Specialization (15 credits minimum)

The student's specialization should be selected in consultation with his or her advisor and should reflect the student's career goals and interests. The Department currently supports four broad areas of study which students may elect to pursue. These are (1) Instructional Theory, Design, and Technology; (2) Research and Evaluation in Curriculum and Instruction; (3) Language in Education; and (4) Science and Mathematics Teaching and Learning. Students may also elect a general program of study on issues of educational theory and practice, tailored to their specific background and career goals.

Minor Field/Elective Courses
The study of educational theory and practice in the area of curriculum and instruction requires the use of many concepts drawn from the humanities and from the social and behavioral sciences. In conjunction with their advisors, students should plan a coherent set of supporting courses drawn from areas within ETAP, from related departments within the School of Education, and from other departments within the University. Such courses should be selected to support the student's concentration and are not unrestricted courses. In some cases a formal minor field may be appropriate, and must be arranged so as to meet the requirements of the relevant academic department.

Inquiry Skills (3 credits)
Each student must take at least one course devoted to the interpretation of research for educators. The selection of the course should be discussed with the student's advisor.

Comprehensive Examination
Upon completion of 45 credits, minimum, of post- baccalaureate study applicable to the certificate, the student must complete satisfactorily a comprehensive examination to qualify for the certificate. Details are available from the department office.

Residence Requirements
The student must complete the University residence requirements described earlier in this bulletin.


PROGRAMS LEADING TO MASTERS DEGREES

The department offers a variety of master's degree programs. These are described briefly below and elaborated in the following sections.

General Masters Programs

The Master of Science in Curriculum Development and Instructional Technology (CDIT) is designed for those who wish to extend their expertise in curriculum and instruction, and for those with an interest in instructional design and technology. The program is appropriate for people with a general interest in education and may also be appropriate for elementary and secondary teachers seeking permanent certification.

This program can be completed either through classroom-based or online coursework.

The Master of Arts or Master of Science for Teachers of an Academic Discipline (ACT) satisfies the academic requirements for provisionally certified teachers seeking permanent certification at grades 7-12 in the subject areas of English, a foreign language, mathematics, a natural science, or social studies.

The Master of Science in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) provides interdisciplinary graduate study for those who wish to teach English as a second language or English as a foreign language (EFL) in adult, college-level, or overseas situations .A related program leads to New York State certification in TESOL for Grades K-12 (see below).

The Master of General Educational Studies complements a variety of undergraduate preparations and is appropriate for people with a general interest in education.


Masters Programs Providing Initial Preparation to Teach

The Master of Science in Secondary Education (MSSE) offers a strong research-based preparation for prospective classroom teachers at Grades 7-12 in English, World Languages (French, Spanish), Social Studies, Science (Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Earth Science), and Mathematics. The program leads to a masters degree and to New York State initial certification.


The Master of Science in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL): Certification Option
leads to New York State K-12 certification in TESOL.

General Masters Programs

Master of Science in Curriculum Development and Instructional Technology (CDIT)

The Master of Science in Curriculum Development and Instructional Technology is designed for students who wish to extend their expertise in curriculum and instructional design and in instructional technology. Practicing teachers, including those who teach at an elementary level or in specialized areas, may qualify through this program for permanent teaching certificates. It is also useful for students wishing to prepare for leadership positions in government, social service, health-related fields, corporate training, and development of educational media products. Students in the CDIT program can alternatively create a general program of study on issues of educational theory and practice tailored to their specific background and career goals.
Students can complete the CDIT masters through either classroom-based or online coursework.

Program of Study (30 credits)
One course (3 credits) in Instruction, such as Tap 621 or Tap 623;
One course (3 credits) in either:
Curriculum Development, such as Tap 510, Tap 652, or Tap 655;
or
Instructional Technology, such as Tap 523, Tap 525, Tap 526, Tap 527, or Tap 550;
Two courses (6 credits) in the Foundations of Education
One course in Educational and Social Thought
One course in Human Learning and Development;
Specialization
At least five courses (15 credits) in the student's chosen area of specialization as developed with their advisor.
Research. One of:
Tap 680 Research Seminar: Critical Introduction to Educational Research Paradigms (3 credits)
Tap 681 Research Seminar: Research in Practice (3 credits)
Tap 699 Master's Thesis (3 credits)

Master of Arts or Master of Science For Teacher Of An Academic Discipline (ACT)
These programs fulfill the academic requirements for permanent certification in the teaching field in New York State for teachers holding provisional certification.

Program of Study (33 credits minimum)
Requirements for the M.A. or M.S. in Mathematics or Science education:

Teacher education - mathematics and/or science education (18-21 credits minimum):

Courses as advised including:
Tap 652S or Tap 652M Teaching Mathematics (Science) in the Secondary School (3);
Tap 650 Microcomputers and the Math/Science Class (3-9);
Tap 680 or 681 Research Seminar in ETAP (3) or Tap 699 Master's Thesis;
Electives;

Supporting courses as advised (12 credits minimum) including:

Academic field (6 credits minimum) selected from Atm, Bio, Chem, Csi, Geo, Mat, Phy as appropriate;

Foundations of education (6 credits minimum), with at least one course in educational and social thought, and one in human learning and development.

Program of Study (30 credits minimum)
Requirements for the M.A. or M.S. in English, World Languages, or Social Studies Education:

Specialized education courses (18 credits minimum):

* Teaching of Subject Field: Two courses in the teaching of the subject field (Tap courses as advised);

* Foundations of education (6 credits minimum), with at least one course in educational and social thought, and one in human learning and development.

* Educational Research and Measurement: One course such as: Psy 530, 540, 630, 640, 650, 750as advised;

* Tap 680 or 681 Research Seminar in ETAP or Tap 699 thesis;

Supporting courses as advised: 12 credits, including:

* A minimum of two courses in the principal subject;

* A minimum of two courses in professional education.

Master of Science in Teaching of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

This masters program is designed for those who wish to teach English as a second language or English as a foreign language in adult, college-level, or overseas situations. For K-12 teaching in the U.S., the TESOL program with certification option is more appropriate and is described below under Masters Programs Providing Initial Preparation to Teach.

Applicants who are native speakers of English must have 12 hours of study of another language and culture. Non-native speakers must have a minimum score of 600 on the paper-based or 250 on the computerized Test of English as a Foreign Language proficiency (TOEFL). An introductory course in linguistics (3 credits) is also required.

Program of Study (36 Credits)

Language Core (12 credits)
  Lin 552 Approaches to English Grammar (3)
  Tap 536 Second Language Learning (3)
  Tap 652B Perspectives in Bilingualism and Bilingual Education (3)
  One course in Linguistics (3) Recommended are: Lin 522, Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology; Lin 523,
  Linguistic Structures; Lin 501 Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers or other as advised.

Language in Use (9 credits)
 Choose three out of the following courses:
    Com 577 Culture and Communication (3)
    Ant 524 Language and Culture (3)
    Rdg/Tap 610 Literacy in Society (3)
    Tap 636 Pragmatics (3)
    Com 582 Language Pragmatics and Communication Strategy (3)
    Com 585 Conversation Analysis (3)
    Rdg 648 Discourse and Language in the Classroom (3)

Language Teaching Methodology (6 credits)
  Tap 501 The Teaching of English to Speakers of Other Languages (3)
  Tap 598 Practicum (clinic classes; two semesters for 3 credits)

Research and Educational Technology (6 credits)
  One research seminar from the following (3):
       Tap 680, Critical Introduction to Educational Research Paradigms (3)
       Tap 681, Research in Practice (3)
       Tap 699, Master’s Thesis in Educational Theory and Practice (for a minimum of 3 credits)
  One course from the following (3):
       Tap 634, Using Media in the Language Classroom (3)
       Tap 653, Language, Literacy and Technology (3)

Electives (3 credits)
  Choose one of the following courses
    Rdg 657 Reading in a Second Language (3)
    Lin 501 Applied Linguistics for Language Teachers (3)
    Psy 565 Psychology and Language (3)
    Psy 624 Human Memory (3)
    Lin/Rdg/Ant 526 Language Acquisition (3)
    Other course as advised (3)

Combined Baccalaureate-Master’s Degree Program

Qualified undergraduates may apply for admission to the combined B.A. Linguistics/M.S. in Teaching of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) program and, if accepted, simultaneously work toward completion of the requirements for both undergraduate and graduate degrees. See Combined Baccalaureate-Master's Degree Programs http://www.albany.edu/graduate_bulletin_archive/grad2007/requirements_general_admissions.html#combined_baccalaureate for details.

The Master of Science in General Educational Studies

This master's degree program is designed to complement a variety of undergraduate preparation and thus assist the student to acquire a generally well-rounded educational background.

The program requires a minimum of 30 graduate credits and includes a master's research seminar (currently ETap 680 or 681), at least one course in the area of educational and social thought, and specialized courses to support the student's area of concentration.

Masters Programs Providing Initial Preparation to Teach


The Master of Science In Secondary Education (MSSE)

The MSSE offers a strong research-based preparation for prospective classroom teachers at Grades 7-12 in English, World Languages (French, Spanish), Social Studies, Science (Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Earth Science), and Mathematics. The program provides course work linked to fieldwork at school sites, and seminars that enhance students' pedagogical and content knowledge. The program emphasizes reflective practice, preparing teachers for a lifelong process of professional development and inquiry. Students have opportunities to work with diverse student groups, explore the integration of technology into teaching and curriculum, and understand the history and development of schooling within American society.

The program is based on 3 full semesters of study, leading to a masters degree and initial certification to teach in grades 7-12 in New York State schools.

Admission Requirements

· Minimum 3.0 undergraduate GPA overall and in a major in the prospective teaching field
· 3 letters of recommendation, with at least two from college teachers in the content area
· A competitive Praxis Exam I score
· Two semesters of a world language other than English
· Evidence of
· effective social skills for working in secondary school classrooms
· commitment to the subject area and teaching adolescents
· A personal interview
· For MSSE in Science (Biology, Chemistry, Physics or Earth Science): general coursework in all four science areas and in mathematics, as well as a major (or equivalent) in the area they wish to teach.
· For MSSE in Mathematics: a major in Mathematics (or its equivalent), including appropriate coursework in calculus, algebraic theory, geometry, statistics, and probability.
· For MSSE in English: a major in English (or its equivalent), with at least one course each in Shakespeare, American Literature, British Literature, World Literature, Composition, and Grammar/linguistics.
· For MSSE in Social Studies: a major (or its equivalent) in a social studies area including 6 credits each in U.S. and European History.
· For MSSE in World Languages (French, Spanish): a major (or its equivalent) in the subject they wish to teach.

For detailed information on specific course requirements equivalent to a major (36 credit minimum) in the appropriate content area, consult the Pathways in Education Center in the School of Education.

Program of Study (42 credits)

Foundations of Education
E Tap 512 Teachers in Context (3)
E Psy 522 Adolescent Development (3)
E Psy 540 Assessment in Education (3)
E Spe 562 Characteristics of and Methods for Teaching Exceptional Secondary Students in Inclusive Settings (3)

Methods and Field Experiences
E Tap 590 Teaching Middle School: Methods and Field Experience (Concentration in English, Social Studies, Mathematics, Science, or World Languages, as appropriate) (6)
E Tap 690 Teaching High School: Methods and Field Experience (Concentration in English, Social Studies, Mathematics, Science, or World Languages, as appropriate (9)
E Tap 652 Teaching in the Secondary School (Concentration in English, Social Studies, Mathematics, Science, or World Languages, as appropriate) (3)

Technology and Media
E Tap 638 Media Literacy (3)

Literacy. One of:
E Tap 530 Reading and Writing across the Curriculum (for concentrations in Social Studies, Mathematics, Science, or World Languages (3)
E Tap 655L Teaching Composition in the Secondary School (for concentration in English) (3)

Advanced Study in Content Area
6 graduate credits taken from the studentís academic content area


Master of Science in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL): Certification Option

This program leads to New York State K-12 certification in TESOL. Applicants must have a minimum of 12 credits in a language other than English and an introductory course in linguistics (3 credits).

Program of Study
(48 Credits)

Required Core Courses (39 credits)
E Psy 522 Adolescent Development (3)
E Spe 560 Introduction to Human Exceptionality (3)
E Tap 501 TESOL Methodology (3)
E Tap 536 Second Language Learning (3)
E Tap 550/A Eng 552/A Lin 552 Approaches to English Grammar (3)
E Tap 598 Directed Field Experience in Education (3)
E Tap 635 Methods for Teaching Limited English Proficiency Children (3)
E Tap 652B Perspectives in Bilingual Education (3)
E Tap 690T TESOL: Guided Field Experience and Seminar (12)
Choose one of the following for 3 credits:
E Tap 680 Research Seminar: Critical Introduction to Educational Research Paradigms (3)
E Tap 681 Research Seminar: Research in Practice (3)

Elective Courses (9 credits)
Choose one technology course for 3 credits:

E Tap 634 Using Media in the Language Classroom (3)

E Tap 653 Language, Literacy, and Technology (3)

Other technology course as advised (3)

Choose one linguistics course for 3 credits:
A Lin 521 Introduction to Syntactic Theory (3)

A Lin 522 Introduction to Phonetics & Phonology (3)

Other linguistics course as advised (3)

Choose one language and culture course for 3 credits:
A Ant 524 Language and Culture (3)

A Com 577 Culture and Communication (3)

E Tap 610/ E Rdg 610 Literacy in Society (3)

E Tap 657/ E Rdg 657 Reading in a Second Language (3)

Other language and culture course as advised (3)

THE CERTIFICATE OF GRADUATE STUDY PROGRAM IN ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE (EFL)

The EFL Graduate Certificate program meets the needs of students who have or who are pursuing degrees in different areas such as business, computer science, economics, or social studies, etc. An EFL CGS qualifies recipients to teach English as a Foreign Language overseas, in language schools, or at the post-secondary level in the U.S.

Program of Study (16 Credits)

E Tap 501 The Teaching of English to Speakers of Other Languages (3)
E Tap 536 Second Language Learning (3)
E Tap 550/ Eng 552/Lin 552 Approaches to English Grammar (4)
E Tap 598 Directed Field Experience (3)
E Tap 652 B Perspectives in Bilingual Education (3)