ETAP 512:
Teachers in Context


Fall, 2009


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ETAP


Welcome to the website for ETAP 512.

The UAlbany course catalogue describes ETAP 512 as "an examination of the influences of sociological, cultural, and historical factors on the place of teachers in society and the professional practice of teaching with an emphasis on representative countries." As such, ETAP 512 is intended to help students develop a more complicated and sophisticated understanding of teachers and teaching and to consider what it means to be a teacher in American society. In the process, this course will encourage students to examine conventional assumptions about teachers and teaching and perhaps to question their own assumptions and beliefs about both.

ETAP 512 is also a required course in the Masters of Science in Secondary Education program (MSSE), which leads to certification to teach in public middle and high schools. In this regard, the course serves as a kind of introduction to the MSSE program. Accordingly, in this course students are introduced to some principles of reflective practice that inform the MSSE program, and they are encouraged to develop a critical and self-reflective approach to teaching that will enable them to become committed, caring, and effective educators.

This course is a rigorous examination of teachers and teaching that requires a good deal of reading, active participation, and writing. As this syllabus makes clear, writing is a central component of ETAP 512. The amount and nature of the writing students do in this course reflect the view that writing well is important in teaching, regardless of discipline, and that writing is an integral component of intellectual inquiry, which is part of effective teaching.

Ideally, ETAP 512 will not only help students develop a deeper appreciation of what it means to be a teacher but will also lead to a deeper commitment to teaching as an important human activity.




Please direct any inquiries about this web site to Robert Yagelski.

This site last updated 29 August 2009.