Richard Barney

Associate Professor

Richard BarneyPh.D. University of Virginia, 1991

Early Modern British Philosophy and Literature, History of the Sublime, Critical Theory, Film

Humanities 319
(518) 442-4062

rbarney@albany.edu

Professor Barney researches and publishes in the areas of 18th-century British Plots of Enlightenment: Education and the Novel in Eighteenth-Century Englandstudies, critical and cultural theory, gender studies, and film. He is currently working on several projects, including Sublimations, a book-length study of the links between early modern medical thinking and representations of sublimity in 18th-century literature; an essay on Edmund Burke's revision of contemporaneous ocular physiology; and a collection of interviews with the filmmaker David Lynch. He teaches graduate courses on 18th-century fiction, philosophy, and criticism, and contemporary critical theory; and undergraduate courses on cultural studies, 18th-century British literature, and film.

Selected Items:

Publications

Plots of Enlightenment: Education and the Novel in Eighteenth-Century England. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1999.

Edited Volumes

Rhetorics of Plague, Early and Late, co-edited with Helene Scheck, a special issue of The Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies 10.2 (Fall/Winter 2010).

Oliver Goldsmith's She Stoops to Conquer, for The Broadview Anthology of Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Drama. General Ed. Douglas Canfield. Orchard Park, N.Y.: Broadview Press, 2001. Republished in the Anthology's Concise Edition, 2003.

The Culture of Filth. A special issue of Genre 27.4 (Winter 1994). Co-edited with Grant Holly.

Education, Identity, and Constructions of the Novel. A special issue of Genre 26.4 (Winter 1993).

Essays

"Between Swift and Kafka: Animals and the Politics of J. M. Coetzee's Elusive Fiction," World Literature Today, Winter 2004.

Fellowships and Awards

National Endowment for the Humanities, Huntington Library (2009-10).

Huntington Library / South Central Modern Languages Association Fellowship (2002).

Helfand Fellowship, The New York Academy of Medicine (2000).

Newberry Library Short-Term Fellowship (1999).

Clark Library / American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Fellowship (1993; 1999).

Research Fellow, Humanities Center, University of California, Santa Barbara (1998-99).

Oklahoma Foundation for the Humanities Grant (1997).

Huntington Library / South Central Modern Languages Association Fellowship (1996).

Service and Teaching

Member of the Delegate Assembly, MLA

Co-founder, Group for Early Modern Cultural Studies (GEMCS)