Undergraduate Courses

To check class times and locations for a specific semester, see the Schedule of Classes

Counseling Psychology
Education
Educational Administration
Educational and Social Thought
Educational Psychology and Methodology
Educational Theory and Practice
Reading
School Psychology
Special Education


Counseling Psychology

E Cpy 120 (= U Uni 100) The Psychology of Academic and Personal Effectiveness (3)

Examination and application of psychological theory and research in learning, memory, motivation, decision making, behavioral self-control, and young adult development with implications for academic performance and personal effectiveness. Open only to freshmen, and other students by permission of the department.

E Cpy 204 Principles of Career and Life Planning (3)

Review of theories of decision-making career development, occupational choice, and job satisfaction. Additional topics: vocational measurement and assessment, evaluation and use of occupational information, and strategies of life-span planning. Some sections restricted to freshmen and sophomores only. [IL]

E Cpy 301 Methods in Peer Helping I (2)

Introduction to the counseling theories and skills used in a variety of helping roles. Opportunities to develop basic relationships and communication skills. Case studies that examine motivational variables in helping activities. Prerequisite(s): A Psy 101 and permission of instructor.

E Cpy 302 Methods in Peer Helping II (2)

Group activities for greater understanding of interpersonal skills. Interpersonal skill development and understanding of relevant theoretical concepts. Optional individual research projects. Prerequisite(s): E Cpy 301 and permission of instructor.

E Cpy 303 Methods in Peer Helping III (2)

Theories and research concerning young adult development. Practice with both individual and group helping skills. Research projects related to young adult development. Prerequisite(s): E Cpy 301, E Cpy 302 and permission of instructor.

E Cpy 311 Helping Skills in Human Services: Sexuality and Young Adults (3)

Introduction to the major theories and research regarding human sexuality and young adults. Opportunities are provided for students to develop helping skills in the area of human sexuality. Prerequisite(s): A Psy 101 and permission of instructor

E Cpy 360 Psychology, Cultural Diversity, & Social Justice (3)

This course will examine several aspects of diversity as it relates to U.S. culture and society. Moreover, the course will examine and explore the psychological effects of various types of oppression (i.e., racism, heterosexism, and classism) as they impinge upon specific communities within the U.S. and individuals within those communities. In addition, this course will include topics related to social justice and advocacy related to the improvement and empowerment of marginalized groups studied. The course will incorporate various sources of knowledge and content to provide a comprehensive perspective on the multiple layers of cultural diversity represented in U.S. culture. These sources include readings, class discussions, video presentations, experiential activities, and guest lecturers

E Cpy 387 Institute (1-9)

A special course, not part of the regular pattern of offerings, designed to meet non-recurring needs. Available for division use and subject to division approval.

E Cpy 400 Foundations of Peer Counseling and Peer Education(3)

In this course, students will be introduced to peer counseling and peer educations through classroom presentations, experiential exercises, and participation in a weekly “training shift” at the Middle Earth Peer Assistance Program. The classroom portion of the course will consist of lectures on basic listening and communication skills as well as an introduction to peer counseling and peer education. There will also be classroom sessions on specific topics related to campus issues, such as alcohol and substance abuse, sexual assault, eating disorders, and other topics addressed by peer counselors and peer educators. In addition to participating in the lecture portion of the course, students will be required to complete a weekly three-hour “training shift” in which they will be paired with a peer mentor to practice the skills that are discussed in class. In this way, students will have an opportunity to observe and work with experienced peers in the context of a service agency that is located on campus. Prerequisite(s): Students must obtain the permission of the instructor in order to enroll in this course.

E Cpy 403 Peer Counseling and Peer Education: Theory and Practice I (3)

In this course, which is a companion to A Cpy 400 (Foundations of Peer Counseling and Peer Education), students will have the opportunity to practice peer counseling and peer education skills through supervised experiences which will occur on the Middle Earth crisis hotline and/or in the Middle Earth outreach education service. Students will also participate in weekly supervision groups which are facilitated by instructional staff. A primary strength of this course is that learning can take place in the context of a campus service agency, allowing students the opportunity to apply skills which they have learned. Prerequisite(s): Students must complete A Cpy 400 or the equivalent and obtain the permission of the instructor in order to enroll in this course.

E Cpy 404 Peer Counseling and Peer Education: Theory and Practice II (3)

In this course, which is a companion to A Cpy 400 (Foundations of Peer Counseling and Peer Education), students will have the opportunity to practice peer counseling and peer education skills through supervised experiences which will occur on the Middle Earth crisis hotline and/or in the Middle Earth outreach education service. Students will also participate in weekly supervision groups which are facilitated by instructional staff. A primary strength of this course is that learning can take place in the context of a campus service agency, allowing students the opportunity to apply skills which they have learned. Prerequisite(s): Students must complete A Cpy 400 and A Cpy 403 or the equivalent and obtain the permission of the instructor in order to enroll in this course.

E Cpy 405 Peer Counseling and Peer Education: Theory and Practice III (3)

In this course, which is a companion to A Cpy 400 (Foundations of Peer Counseling and Peer Education), students will have the opportunity to practice peer counseling and peer education skills through supervised experiences which will occur on the Middle Earth crisis hotline and/or in the Middle Earth outreach education service. Students will also participate in weekly supervision groups which are facilitated by instructional staff. A primary strength of this course is that learning can take place in the context of a campus service agency, allowing students the opportunity to apply skills which they have learned. Prerequisite(s): Students must complete A Cpy 400, A Cpy 403, and A Cpy 404 or the equivalent and obtain the permission of the instructor in order to enroll in this course.

E Cpy 406 Theory and Practice in Peer Counseling and Peer Education, Peer Supervision (3)

In this course, which is a companion to E Cpy 403, 404, and 405 (Peer Counseling and Peer Education: Theory and Practice I, II, and III), students will have the opportunity to practice peer counseling and peer education supervision skills through practical experiences which will occur on the Middle Earth crisis hotline and/or in the Middle Earth outreach education service. Students will also participate in weekly supervision groups facilitated by instructional staff. A primary strength of this course is that learning can take place in the context of a campus service agency, allowing students the opportunity to apply skills which they have learned. Prerequisite(s): Students must complete E Cpy 400, E Cpy 403, and E Cpy 404 or the equivalent and obtain the permission of the Instructor in order to enroll in this course.

E Cpy 421 Introduction to Counseling Psychology (3)

The history, philosophy, and organization of counseling psychology both as an academic discipline and as a helping profession are explored. Emphasizes understanding of personal, academic, and professional aspects of counseling psychology in the context of modern economic and social influences. For the student considering a career in the helping professions. Prerequisite(s): A Psy 101.

E Cpy 462 Psychology of Disability (3)

Study of the psychological aspects of disability. Emphasizes physical disability, but also includes other disabling conditions. Topics include reactions to disability, adjustment to disability, rehabilitation approaches, community resources and affirmative action policies. Prerequisite(s): A Psy 101 or its equivalent.

E Cpy 497 Independent Study (3–6)

Designed to meet needs of undergraduate students who possess interest in counseling or counseling psychology and plan for graduate education. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing and permission of instructor.


Education

E Edu 300 Independent Study (1–3)

Independent study with variable credit. Contingent upon the consent and willingness of instructor(s) to function as adviser(s) and the dean, School of Education, or designate(s). The credits may be apportioned in whole or in part as major credit, second field credit, or elective credit as appropriate and as determined by the student’s major department. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing. S/U graded.

E Edu 301 Independent Study (4-6)

Independent study with variable credit designed to provide large blocks of time for independent study projects. Contingent upon the consent and willingness of instructor(s) to function as adviser(s), and the dean, School of Education or designate(s). The credits may be apportioned in whole or in part as major credit, second field credit, or elective credit as appropriate and as determined by the student’s major department. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing. S/U graded.

E Edu 390 Community Service Projects (3–6)

Special projects involving community activities and collateral study, to be approved as designated by the dean, School of Education. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing. S/U graded. This course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

E Edu 487 Institute in Education (1-3)

Special course, not part of regular course offerings, designed to meet particular, nonrecurring needs.


Educational Administration

E Aps 400 United States Educational Governance, Policy and Administration (3)

Historical and current trends in educational governance, policymaking, and administration. Analyses of K-12 and higher education issues at the federal, state, and local levels. Special emphasis on education reform issues specific to New York State. [SS]

E Aps 470 Introduction to Law and Education (3)

Legal rights and responsibilities of professional personnel and students in K–12 American education, with an emphasis on constitutional principles. Topics include: public-private distinction, freedom of speech, free exercise of religion, academic freedom and tenure, and due process and equal protection guarantees.


Educational and Social Thought

E Est 300 Social Foundations of Education (3)

Inquiry into educational policies, purposes, and ideas based upon the resources and insights of the humanities and the social sciences. Only one of E Est 300 and E Est 301 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing.

E Est 301 Issues in American Education (3)

Study of the structure and function of American education in the light of contemporary problems. Only one of E Est 300 and E Est 301 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing.

E Est 497 Independent Study in Educational and Social Thought (3–6)

Independent reading, study, and research in educational and social thought. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing and consent of department.


Educational Psychology and Methodology

E Psy 200 Introduction to the Psychological Process of Schooling (3)

Critical analysis of the psychological process of schooling. Interpretive survey of the literature and research in learning, motivation, development, and intelligence and their impact on American education and society.

E Psy 387 Institute (1-9)

A special course, not part of the regular pattern of offerings, designed to meet non-recurring needs. Available for division use and subject to division approval.

E Psy 400 Instructional Psychology (3)

Intensive investigation of theories and research in learning and motivation as they apply to classroom instruction. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing.

E Psy 420 Child and Adolescent Development (3)

Theory and research in social, emotional, physical, and intellectual development and its application to instruction. Emphasis on the late childhood through middle adolescence. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing.

E Psy 440 Evaluation (3)

Evaluation considered as a process beginning with the planning stage. Provides experiences to develop competencies (e.g., writing objectives, choosing appropriate means of evaluation, constructing test items, analyzing data). Discussion of related issues (e.g., testing for mastery, uses of standardized tests, accountability, grading practices). Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing.

E Psy 441 Social Issues in Testing (3)

Social issues related to the use of tests for critical employment, admissions, and competency decisions. Considers legal, ethical, and psychometric aspects of such issues as test bias, open admissions, privacy, and truth-in-testing. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing.

E Psy 480 Educational Psychology: Independent Study (3–6)

Designed to allow the student to learn how to conduct educational psychological research by participating as an assistant to a faculty member in an ongoing faculty project in areas such as children’s learning, child development, special education, evaluation, etc. Regular meetings with faculty mentor are required. E Psy 480Z is the writing intensive version of E Psy 480. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing and permission of instructor.

E Psy 480Z Educational Psychology: Independent Study (3–6)

E Psy 480Z is the writing intensive version of E Psy 480. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing and permission of instructor. [WI]


Educational Theory and Practice

E Tap 201 Exploring Teaching as a Profession (3)

Review and exploration of contemporary education with a major focus on the secondary school. Emphasis on concepts of schooling, changing role of teachers, restructuring schools and teaching as a career. Examine theories of teaching and learning for the purpose of challenging assumptions about today’s schools and extending expectations concerning tomorrow’s schools. May not be offered during 2005-2006.

E Tap 403 Issues in Urban Education (3)

This course focuses on the social, political, and economic conditions that impact schools serving inner city urban communities in the United States. Although schools in urban communities differ considerably and should not be stereotyped, they all face a number of similar challenges that may be linked to changing urban conditions - as well as challenges that may result from the interplay of diverse stakeholders-administrator, teachers, parents, community/school activists concerned about the academic achievement, retention, and graduation of youth served in urban school environments.

E Tap 404 (Previously E Edu 440) Teaching in Urban Schools: Strategies for Implementing the New York State Learning Standards (3)

An examination of effective instructional strategies for meeting the New York State Learning Standards in urban schools. The course will review the Learning Standards, demonstrate pertinent strategies that may be appropriate in urban schools and provide practical experiences in developing lesson plans. Subject area will vary.

E Tap 487 Institute in Education (2–9)

A special program, not part of the pattern of regular offerings, designed to meet particular nonrecurring needs. Available for department use and subject to department approval.

E Tap 497 Independent Study in Teacher Education (2–6)

Independent reading, study, and research in teacher education. Prerequisite(s): senior class standing and consent of Department of Educational Theory and Practice.


Reading

E Rdg 250 Introduction to Literacy Instruction (3)

This course provides a broad introduction to teaching reading, writing, speaking, and listening to children and adolescents. The course will focus on literacy areas such as phonemic awareness, word knowledge, fluency, comprehension, writing, assessment, literature selection, and engagement.

E Rdg 404 Literature for Reading Programs (3)

Examination of the broad range of genres and the rich variety of materials for use in classroom settings. Focus includes strategies for incorporating texts into various curricular areas. Topics include literacy events with text for emergent readers, knowledge of book difficulty, and uses of literature in the classroom.

E Rdg 406 Young Adult Literature (3)

Examines the broad range of genres and the rich variety of texts for use in classroom settings. Presents strategies for incorporating literature into various curricular areas. Topics include motivation issues, text difficulty, and use of literature with controversial themes.

E Rdg 410 Literacy in Social Contexts (3)

This course examines historical and contemporary aspects of literacy, focusing particularly on the relation between literacy and forms of social and cultural life. Topics include: (1) perspectives on literacy; (2) the role of literacy in society; (3) implications of diversity on literacy development; (4) relationships among diverse communities of practice.

E Rdg 487Z Literate Thinking (3)

This class is designed to strengthen the reading, writing and critical thinking skills of participants using a variety of challenging texts and rigorous writing exercises. Beginning with a discussion of folk tales and creation myths, the class will move through a variety of texts (including short fiction, novels, poetry, essays, journalism, and film) to examine how “story” addresses and expresses human experience. Throughout the semester the course examines why humans are drawn to narrative and why certain topics/themes appear repeatedly in stories of all cultures and periods. The course will also spend time thinking about the role of language in thinking and how language serves to limit expression. [WI]



School Psychology

E Spy 387 Institute (1-9)

A special course, not part of the regular pattern of offerings, designed to meet non-recurring needs. Available for division use and subject to division approval.


Special Education

E Spe 369 Special Education for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Problems (3)

Presentation of theoretical positions, assessment techniques; planning procedures, and teaching methods relevant to students with emotional and behavioral disorders. Emphasizes current educational practice in the least restrictive environment. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing.

E Spe 387 Institute (1-9)

A special course, not part of the regular pattern of offerings, designed to meet non-recurring needs. Available for division use and subject to division approval.

E Spe 460 Introduction to Human Exceptionality (3)

Characteristics of individuals whose cognitive, physical, or emotional development differs from typical individuals. Special education history and laws are discussed, as is the process leading to the development of individualized education plans and special education services. Selected strategies for students with special needs are also presented. [DP]

E Spy 360 Positive Youth Development (3)

An introduction to current theory and research in the field and practices of positive youth development within the context of important societal issues; cultivating environments to promote optimal development and behavior in disadvantaged, trouble youth through strengths and family practices, and healthy alternatives to interpersonal, family, and community violence. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior status.

E Spy 387 Institute (1-9)

A special course, not part of the regular pattern of offerings, designed to meet non-recurring needs. Available for division use and subject to division approval.