<h1><%=MyTitle%></h1>

The graduate certificate program in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity is designed to prepare students with undergraduate degrees or previously completed master's degrees that did not train them directly or extensively for service in the fields of emergency preparedness, homeland security, and cybersecurity to be more competitive when seeking jobs in government, non-profits, and for-profit organizations. The curriculum was designed by University faculty in consultation with law enforcement, intelligence, emergency services, and public management experts to provide graduates with the foundation to become more effective homeland security and cybersecurity professionals and managers.

Program of Study

The Certificate consists of five graduate-level courses (minimum 16 credits). Students may concentrate in one of three tracks: Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security or Cybersecurity.

 The following course is required of all students in the EHS certificate program, regardless of track:

PAD 557 (EHC 557) - Intelligence Analysis for Homeland Security (4)

This course provides instruction in conducting intelligence analysis, with emphasis on homeland security issues at the State and local levels.  After an overview of the history and structure of the US foreign intelligence community, we review the fundamentals of intelligence analysis tradecraft as practiced within the CIA and other federal intelligence agencies.  Extensive time is devoted to learning and using structured analytic techniques through student-led analytic exercises on terrorism and major crimes.

 Emergency Preparedness Track

The following course is required of all students concentrating in the Emergency Preparedness track:

PAD 555 (POS 555/EHC 555) - Disaster, Crisis, and Emergency Management and Policy (4)

 Study of the policies designed to prepare for, respond to, mitigate, and recover from natural and technological disasters, accidents, or terrorist attacks. Surveys government, nonprofit, and private sector activities in emergency and crisis management and policy.

 Students may then select three additional courses from the following list with the consent of their advisor:

PAD 504 - Data Models, and Decisions I (4)

Introduction to computer-based tools for planning, policy analysis, and decision making. Topics include administrative and policy models in spreadsheets, dynamic models in difference equations and spreadsheets, making decisions with multiple criteria, resource allocation, probability and decision trees, data bases and information management, and telecommunications in local networks and the Internet. Prerequisites: Familiarity with word processing on either IBM or Macintosh platforms.

PAD 505 (POS 505) - Data, Models, and Decisions II (4)

 Basic introduction to statistical methods and tests. Specific course topics include measurement, probability, distribution, tables and graphs, estimation and hypothesis testing, and linear models. Emphasis is placed on interpreting and presenting statistical outputs, including reports generated by computer programs. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

PAD 517 (POS 517) - Empirical Data Analysis (4)

Introduction to a variety of data-analysis techniques ranging in complexity from simple table construction and interpretation to causal analysis. Within this range are coding, scale and index construction, multidimensional scaling, levels of measurement, measures of association, correlation and regression, panel and cohort analysis, and Markov chains. Introduction to computer technology and functional software. Basic competence in statistics necessary. Prerequisite: One course in statistics or consent of instructor.

PAD 518 (POS 518) - Regression Analysis (4)

 This course will give students familiarity with multivariate regression analysis, including Ordinary Least Squares and other regression methods. Prerequisites: Pos 517 or PAD 505 or Pub 505 or equivalent.

PAD 545 (EHC 545) - Principles and Practices of Cyber Security (4)

Our world is more connected today than it has ever been in our history. Tomorrow we will be more connected than we are at this very moment. While each connection we make in the virtual world is intended to make our lives easier, we must ask ourselves, “What if someone pulled the plug? How do we respond? Should we have been able to prevent it?” Since the creation of electronic devices that transmit information there have been criminals, terrorists, and nation states that seek to exploit them for financial, social, or political/ideological gain. This threat has become one of the top national security priorities, requiring a cyber force that includes the training of people who don’t even work as cyber professionals. Maybe you have seen the signs in your current work places, “Security is everyone’s responsibility.” A simple statement has never been truer.

PAD 546 (EHC 546) - Homeland Security Risk Analysis and Risk Management (4)

 Homeland security is a continuously changing field with close connections to numerous academic disciplines (political science, public administration, criminal justice, etc) and numerous practitioner communities (law enforcement, emergency management, public safety, the military, etc). This course is designed to draw on insights from both these academic disciplines and practitioner communities, as well as useful insights from other areas - like business, economics and organizational studies – to examine how homeland security strategy and policy is made. The risk assessment and risk management processes that underpin the making of strategy and policy are similar to those used in other fields, but focused on some unique problem sets and missions that other fields do not have to contend with. Homeland security strategy and policy are made much like strategy and policy in other fields of public administration; however the breadth of missions, the myriad stakeholders, the politically charged nature of security issues –combined with the relative newness of the field - all conspire to make understanding homeland security risk management quite complicated.

PAD 550 - Foundations of Government Information Strategy and Management (4)

 Introduces the interaction of policy, management, and information technology in the design, operation, and evaluation of government operations and public services. Relies heavily on case studies to illustrate how these domains play out in multiple settings and across sectors-public, private, and not-for-profit. Prerequisites: PAD 500 and PAD 506, and Permission of Instructor.

PAD 551 (CRJ 648) - Terrorism, Public Security and Law Enforcement (3)

 This course reviews the role of domestic law enforcement in homeland security, including the prevention of and response to terrorism. Consideration of strategic issues that arise with respect to specific forms of terrorist threats, and of managerial issues, including the collection, analysis, and dissemination of intelligence, risk assessment and resource allocation, intergovernmental and interagency cooperation and conflict, and investigative authority and civil liberties.

PAD 553 (EHC 553) – Topics in Homeland Security and Terrorism (4)

This course examines an array of topics related to homeland security, terrorism, responses to terrorism, and the role of terrorism in public policy problems.  Depending on the semester, the course will focus on a subset of issues in this field and may include both substantive and methodological topics relevant to the study of homeland security and terrorism.

PAD 554 (EHC 554, POS 554, INT 543) - Political Violence, Insurgency and Terrorism (4)

This course examines the relationships among, and differences between the following activities in the international political system: political violence, insurgency, and terrorism.  The course will include a consideration of the causes of these activities, their effects on national and international politics, and an evaluation of governmental responses to them.

PAD 556 (EHC 556) - Homeland Security Intelligence (4)

This course examines Homeland Security Intelligence at the Federal, State, and local levels.  We begin with an overview of the US foreign intelligence community, its mission, history, structure, and capabilities.  We examine how this community's composition and structure have changed as its mission was fundamentally altered twice, first with the end of the Cold War and then with the rise if terrorism.  Next, we look at the capabilities of new producers of terrorism related intelligence at federal law enforcement agencies and at the Department of Homeland Security.  The main thrust of the course is intelligence at the State and local levels. The federal government has worked with the states to create significant intelligence capabilities outside the beltway since the events of 9/11/2001.  This course identifies and discusses the State and local customers for homeland security intelligence and examines the degree to which these intelligence requirements are being met.

PAD 559 (EHC 559) – Homeland Security: Building Preparedness Capabilities (4)

 The short but significant history of the creation of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) will serve as the starting point for this course which will provide a comprehensive and functional approach to understanding this department and its role.  The preponderance of time will be spent in developing an understanding of the nation's effort, led by DHS to develop preparedness capabilities to prevent, protect from, respond to, and recover from high consequence events caused by acts of terrorism, natural disasters, and accidents.  The course will rely heavily upon scenario-based activities and case studies to guide the student through the DHS maze and the nation's preparedness efforts at the federal, state, and local levels.

PAD 571 (EHC 571) - Military Forces in Support of Civil Authorities (4)

This on-line course provides a comprehensive strategic level examination of the Homeland Security Enterprise and the methodology for integrating Federal and State military forces in support of civil authorities during the planning, training and response phases of emergency operations. Federal, State and Local civilian authorities are responsible for preparing for and responding to natural and man-made emergency incidents and disasters. Emergency managers often include military forces in their emergency management planning and training programs as necessary to support potentially overwhelmed civilian first-responders during an incident. This course examines various agencies associated with homeland security and focuses on specialized military forces mission support sets such as Weapons of Mass Destruction, Critical Infrastructure Protection and defense of the homeland.

PAD 572 (EHC 572) - Disaster and Crisis Management in the Public, Private, and Nonprofit Sectors (4)

This course will examine how disaster and crisis management has evolved over time in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. We begin by identifying key issues and challenges facing emergency managers and other crisis management professionals. We will then systematically examine the similarities and differences across the various sectors and analyze contemporary trends and common challenges, to include risk management, crisis communication and crisis leadership. Through the use of conceptual models and real-world case studies, we will further explore the application of theory and practice within the field. We will examine specific events, how organizations responded to those events, and how those events changed and shaped the various organizations, and the discipline itself.

PAD 585 (POS 585, INF 585) – Information Technology and Homeland Security (4)

 This graduate course primarily examines the political, legal and policy aspects of the use of information technologies by the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) but also considers non-technological dimensions of information collection, use and management as well as the use of technologies other than computing in the homeland security domain. Topics include: the DHS enterprise architecture; data-mining, information sharing and data-integration; risk assessment and risk management; project management, system development and acquisitions; information technologies used for screening people, goods and conveyances at borders; managing immigration, investigations and forensics; cyber-terrorism, critical infrastructure protection, data security, privacy and civil liberties; international standard setting and information sharing; robotics and potential applications of nanotechnology. The course is primarily focused on information technology use by the US federal government but will also examine state and local governments and other countries as well as international issues such as information sharing and international technical standards.

PAD 610 – Organizational Theory and Behavior (4)

 This graduate course primarily examines the political, legal and policy aspects of the use of information technologies by the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) but also considers non-technological dimensions of information collection, use and management as well as the use of technologies other than computing in the homeland security domain. Topics include: the DHS enterprise architecture; data-mining, information sharing and data-integration; risk assessment and risk management; project management, system development and acquisitions; information technologies used for screening people, goods and conveyances at borders; managing immigration, investigations and forensics; cyber-terrorism, critical infrastructure protection, data security, privacy and civil liberties; international standard setting and information sharing; robotics and potential applications of nanotechnology. The course is primarily focused on information technology use by the US federal government but will also examine state and local governments and other countries as well as international issues such as information sharing and international technical standards. 

PAD 624 – Simulating Dynamic Systems (3-4)

 Introduction to the basic principles underlying dynamic feedback systems. The principles underlying growth, exponential decay, and sigmoid growth. Students construct computer models of social systems with examples drawn from economic, urban, sociological, and biological systems. Prerequisite(s): PAD 504 and PAD 505 or consent of the instructor.

PAD 636 – Cultural Analysis of Organizations (4)

 Exploration of the cultural approach to organizational analysis: theory and methods from anthropology, sociology, and history that focus on the subjective experience of organization members. Students complete a study in which these theories and methods are applied to a public, private or non-profit organization. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

PAD 637 – Social and Organizational Networks in Public Policy, Management, and Service Delivery: Theory, Methods and Analysis (4)

 The concept of "network" has become central to many discussions of public policy, management, and service delivery but is rarely studied systematically. This course is designed to explore the theoretical underpinnings of network analysis, introduce basic network analytic methods, and examine and compare insights gained through network analysis with other forms of analysis. Prerequisites: Completion of required statistical courses for the Master's or Ph.D. program; permission of instructor.

PAD 705 – Research Methods II (4)

 This course introduces students to multiple regression analysis for analyzing data in the social sciences. Students will learn how to read and critique empirical analyses used in academic publications, what empirical techniques should be utilized given different situations, and how to perform empirical analyses and interpret the results. Topics ordinary least squares, heteroskedasticity, time series, panel data, instrumental variables, logit and probit models, and model building techniques.

POS 582 – Global Security (4)

 An introduction to competing theoretical approaches to the study of international security that considers alternative conceptual approaches, such as societal security and human security.  Reviews the evolution of nuclear deterrence and explores issues of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons proliferation, asymmetric warfare and homeland security. Prerequisite(s): As specified for M.A. and Ph.D. students.

CRJ 504 – Applied Statistics I (3)

 Introduction to statistical techniques appropriate for use in the criminal justice field. Descriptive statistics; scales of measurement; measure of central tendency, variability, and association. Introduction to statistical inference including sampling distributions and tests of significance.

IST 532 – Terrorism, Public Security and Information Analysis (3)

 This course discusses information technologies available to assist in intelligence analysis, as well as defensive tools used to combat cyberterrorism and protect our information-based infrastructure. Techniques include advanced information retrieval, summarization, and linking, data analysis and data mining technologies. Legal and ethical issues related to intelligence gathering and monitoring will also be included.

 Homeland Security Track

The following course is required of all students concentrating in the Homeland Security track:

PAD 554 (POS 554/EHC 554/INT 543) – Political Violence, Insurgency, and Terrorism (4)

 This course examines the relationships among, and differences between the following activities in the international political system: political violence, insurgency, and terrorism.  The course will include a consideration of the causes of these activities, their effects on national and international politics, and an evaluation of governmental responses to them.

 Students may then select three additional courses from the following list with the consent of their advisor:

PAD 504 – Data Models, and Decisions I (4)

 Introduction to computer-based tools for planning, policy analysis, and decision making. Topics include administrative and policy models in spreadsheets, dynamic models in difference equations and spreadsheets, making decisions with multiple criteria, resource allocation, probability and decision trees, data bases and information management, and telecommunications in local networks and the Internet. Prerequisites: Familiarity with word processing on either IBM or Macintosh platforms.

PAD 505 (POS 505) – Data, Models, and Decisions II (4)

 Basic introduction to statistical methods and tests. Specific course topics include measurement, probability, distribution, tables and graphs, estimation and hypothesis testing, and linear models. Emphasis is placed on interpreting and presenting statistical outputs, including reports generated by computer programs. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

PAD 517 (POS 517) – Empirical Data Analysis (4)

 Introduction to a variety of data-analysis techniques ranging in complexity from simple table construction and interpretation to causal analysis. Within this range are coding, scale and index construction, multidimensional scaling, levels of measurement, measures of association, correlation and regression, panel and cohort analysis, and Markov chains. Introduction to computer technology and functional software. Basic competence in statistics necessary. Prerequisite: One course in statistics or consent of instructor.

PAD 518 (POS 518) – Regression Analysis (4)

This course will give students familiarity with multivariate regression analysis, including Ordinary Least Squares and other regression methods. Prerequisites: Pos 517 or PAD 505 or Pub 505 or equivalent.

PAD 545 (EHC 545) - Principles and Practices of Cyber Security (4)

Our world is more connected today than it has ever been in our history. Tomorrow we will be more connected than we are at this very moment. While each connection we make in the virtual world is intended to make our lives easier, we must ask ourselves, “What if someone pulled the plug? How do we respond? Should we have been able to prevent it?” Since the creation of electronic devices that transmit information there have been criminals, terrorists, and nation states that seek to exploit them for financial, social, or political/ideological gain. This threat has become one of the top national security priorities, requiring a cyber force that includes the training of people who don’t even work as cyber professionals. Maybe you have seen the signs in your current work places, “Security is everyone’s responsibility.” A simple statement has never been truer.

PAD 546 (EHC 546) – Homeland Security Risk Analysis and Risk Management (4)

Homeland security is a continuously changing field with close connections to numerous academic disciplines (political science, public administration, criminal justice, etc) and numerous practitioner communities (law enforcement, emergency management, public safety, the military, etc). This course is designed to draw on insights from both these academic disciplines and practitioner communities, as well as useful insights from other areas - like business, economics and organizational studies – to examine how homeland security strategy and policy is made. The risk assessment and risk management processes that underpin the making of strategy and policy are similar to those used in other fields, but focused on some unique problem sets and missions that other fields do not have to contend with. Homeland security strategy and policy are made much like strategy and policy in other fields of public administration; however the breadth of missions, the myriad stakeholders, the politically charged nature of security issues –combined with the relative newness of the field - all conspire to make understanding homeland security risk management quite complicated.

PAD 551 (CRJ 648) – Terrorism, Public Security and Law Enforcement (3)

 This course reviews the role of domestic law enforcement in homeland security, including the prevention of and response to terrorism. Consideration of strategic issues that arise with respect to specific forms of terrorist threats, and of managerial issues, including the collection, analysis, and dissemination of intelligence, risk assessment and resource allocation, intergovernmental and interagency cooperation and conflict, and investigative authority and civil liberties.

PAD 553 (EHC 553)– Topics in Homeland Security and Terrorism (4)

 This course examines an array of topics related to homeland security, terrorism, responses to terrorism, and the role of terrorism in public policy problems.  Depending on the semester, the course will focus on a subset of issues in this field and may include both substantive and methodological topics relevant to the study of homeland security and terrorism.

PAD 555 (POS 555/EHC 555) – Disaster, Crisis, Emergency Management and Policy (4)

 Study of the policies designed to prepare for, respond to, mitigate, and recover from natural and technological disasters, accidents, or terrorist attacks. Surveys government, nonprofit, and private sector activities in emergency and crisis management and policy.

PAD 556 (EHC 556) – Homeland Security Intelligence (4)

This course examines Homeland Security Intelligence at the Federal, State, and local levels.  We begin with an overview of the US foreign intelligence community, its mission, history, structure, and capabilities.  We examine how this community's composition and structure have changed as its mission was fundamentally altered twice, first with the end of the Cold War and then with the rise if terrorism.  Next, we look at the capabilities of new producers of terrorism related intelligence at federal law enforcement agencies and at the Department of Homeland Security.  The main thrust of the course is intelligence at the State and local levels. The federal government has worked with the states to create significant intelligence capabilities outside the beltway since the events of 9/11/2001.  This course identifies and discusses the State and local customers for homeland security intelligence and examines the degree to which these intelligence requirements are being met.

PAD 558 (EHC 558/INT 542) – Intelligence & US National Security Policymaking (4)

This seminar examines the role of intelligence in the formulation and implementation of US foreign policy.  Through critical analysis and case studies, students will develop techniques to increase intelligence's contribution to policy deliberations while ensuring that it does not prescribe policy.  The course will assess the most appropriate role for the CIA and the Intelligence Community in supporting this executive branch process.  After an overview of the CIA, its functions, structure, and capabilities.  We review the US foreign policy process, key players, and institutional bias.  The bulk of the course is devoted to a series of mock intelligence and policy meetings on the Bosnia, Kosovo, Afghanistan, and Iraq crises to critically analyze the CIA's proper role in supporting the policy process.

PAD 559 (EHC 559) – Homeland Security: Building Preparedness Capabilities (4)

The short but significant history of the creation of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) will serve as the starting point for this course which will provide a comprehensive and functional approach to understanding this department and its role.  The preponderance of time will be spent in developing an understanding of the nation's effort, led by DHS to develop preparedness capabilities to prevent, protect from, respond to, and recover from high consequence events caused by acts of terrorism, natural disasters, and accidents.  The course will rely heavily upon scenario-based activities and case studies to guide the student through the DHS maze and the nation's preparedness efforts at the federal, state, and local levels.

PAD 571 (EHC 571) - Military Forces in Support of Civil Authorities (4)

This on-line course provides a comprehensive strategic level examination of the Homeland Security Enterprise and the methodology for integrating Federal and State military forces in support of civil authorities during the planning, training and response phases of emergency operations. Federal, State and Local civilian authorities are responsible for preparing for and responding to natural and man-made emergency incidents and disasters. Emergency managers often include military forces in their emergency management planning and training programs as necessary to support potentially overwhelmed civilian first-responders during an incident. This course examines various agencies associated with homeland security and focuses on specialized military forces mission support sets such as Weapons of Mass Destruction, Critical Infrastructure Protection and defense of the homeland.

PAD 583 (POS 583) – Global Governance (4)

 The organization of world politics in the context of globalization.  Overview of international organizations such as the United Nations and regional organizations such as the European Union.  Examination of the historical and current international legal frameworks.  Analysis of international cooperation beyond the confines of formal organizational structures with particular emphasis on international regimes, institutions and norms that govern state practices in particular issue areas – from trade and weapons proliferations to the environment and refugees.  Also examines transnational relations of non-state actors such as nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and multinational corporations as well as transgovernmental relations of sub-national governments and government agencies that shape policymaking at a global level.

PAD 585 (POS 585, INF 585) – Information Technology and Homeland Security (4)

This graduate course primarily examines the political, legal and policy aspects of the use of information technologies by the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) but also considers non-technological dimensions of information collection, use and management as well as the use of technologies other than computing in the homeland security domain. Topics include: the DHS enterprise architecture; data-mining, information sharing and data-integration; risk assessment and risk management; project management, system development and acquisitions; information technologies used for screening people, goods and conveyances at borders; managing immigration, investigations and forensics; cyber-terrorism, critical infrastructure protection, data security, privacy and civil liberties; international standard setting and information sharing; robotics and potential applications of nanotechnology. The course is primarily focused on information technology use by the US federal government but will also examine state and local governments and other countries as well as international issues such as information sharing and international technical standards.

PAD 610 – Organizational Theory and Behavior (4)

 This course uses social science theories and methods to understand human behavior in organizations.  It explores such important areas as decision-making, perception, communication, group dynamics, and such managerial issues as organizational politics, organizational culture, and organizational change.  Students employ case studies and exercises to develop skills in organizational analysis.

PAD 624 – Simulating Dynamic Systems (3-4)

 Introduction to the basic principles underlying dynamic feedback systems. The principles underlying growth, exponential decay, and sigmoid growth. Students construct computer models of social systems with examples drawn from economic, urban, sociological, and biological systems. Prerequisite(s): PAD 504 and PAD 505 or consent of the instructor.

PAD 625 (POS 626) Bargaining and Negotiation (4)

 Survey of theories of bargaining and negotiation, with emphasis on the use of analytic and quantitative methods to help understand and facilitate negotiation processes. Extensive use of simulation, exercises, role playing, and cases.

PAD 636 – Cultural Analysis of Organizations (4)

 Exploration of the cultural approach to organizational analysis: theory and methods from anthropology, sociology, and history that focus on the subjective experience of organization members. Students complete a study in which these theories and methods are applied to a public, private or non-profit organization. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

PAD 637 – Social and Organizational Networks in Public Policy, Management, and Service Delivery: Theory, Methods and Analysis (4)

 The concept of "network" has become central to many discussions of public policy, management, and service delivery but is rarely studied systematically. This course is designed to explore the theoretical underpinnings of network analysis, introduce basic network analytic methods, and examine and compare insights gained through network analysis with other forms of analysis. Prerequisites: Completion of required statistical courses for the Master's or Ph.D. program; permission of instructor.

PAD 705 – Research Methods II (4)

 This course introduces students to multiple regression analysis for analyzing data in the social sciences. Students will learn how to read and critique empirical analyses used in academic publications, what empirical techniques should be utilized given different situations, and how to perform empirical analyses and interpret the results. Topics ordinary least squares, heteroskedasticity, time series, panel data, instrumental variables, logit and probit models, and model building techniques.

POS 550 – Field Seminar in Comparative Political Systems (4)

Survey of the basic substantive, methodological, and normative concerns of contemporary scholars of comparative political systems. Offered jointly by the faculty in comparative politics.

POS 566 – Ethnic Conflict (4)

Since the end of the cold war, ethnicity has served as a key source of identity conflict. This course will examine on the domestic and international aspects of ethnic conflict and the possibilities for management offered by a variety of institutional arrangements and international intervention.

POS 567 - Contentious Politics: Theory and Research (4)

 Contentious politics focuses on politics outside of the normal boundaries of institutionalized politics. From protests to riots and revolutions, contentious politics have often led to major shifts in domestic political orders. This course will explore key theories and methods in the study of contentious politics.

POS 570 – Field Seminar in International Political Systems (4)

 A survey of the substantive, methodological, and normative concerns of contemporary scholars of international relations. Offered jointly by the faculty in international relations as the basic foundation course.

POS 582 – Global Security (2)

 An introduction to competing theoretical approaches to the study of international security that considers alternative conceptual approaches, such as societal security and human security.  Reviews the evolution of nuclear deterrence and explores issues of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons proliferation, asymmetric warfare and homeland security. Prerequisite(s): As specified for M.A. and Ph.D. students.

CRJ 504 – Applied Statistics I (3)

 Introduction to statistical techniques appropriate for use in the criminal justice field. Descriptive statistics; scales of measurement; measure of central tendency, variability, and association. Introduction to statistical inference including sampling distributions and tests of significance.

IST 532 – Terrorism, Public Security and Information Analysis (3)

This course discusses information technologies available to assist in intelligence analysis, as well as defensive tools used to combat cyberterrorism and protect our information-based infrastructure. Techniques include advanced information retrieval, summarization, and linking, data analysis and data mining technologies. Legal and ethical issues related to intelligence gathering and monitoring will also be included.

 Cybersecurity Track

The following course is required of all students concentrating in the Cybersecurity track:

PAD 545 (EHC 545) – Principles and Practices of Cybersecurity (4)

Our world is more connected today than it has ever been in our history. Tomorrow we will be more connected than we are at this very moment. While each connection we make in the virtual world is intended to make our lives easier, we must ask ourselves, “What if someone pulled the plug? How do we respond? Should we have been able to prevent it?” Since the creation of electronic devices that transmit information there have been criminals, terrorists, and nation states that seek to exploit them for financial, social, or political/ideological gain. This threat has become one of the top national security priorities, requiring a cyber force that includes the training of people who don’t even work as cyber professionals. Maybe you have seen the signs in your current work places, “Security is everyone’s responsibility.” A simple statement has never been truer.

 Students may then select three additional courses from the following list with the consent of their advisor:

PAD 504 – Data Models, and Decisions I (4)

 Introduction to computer-based tools for planning, policy analysis, and decision making. Topics include administrative and policy models in spreadsheets, dynamic models in difference equations and spreadsheets, making decisions with multiple criteria, resource allocation, probability and decision trees, data bases and information management, and telecommunications in local networks and the Internet. Prerequisites: Familiarity with word processing on either IBM or Macintosh platforms.

PAD 505 (POS 505) – Data, Models, and Decisions II (4)

 Basic introduction to statistical methods and tests. Specific course topics include measurement, probability, distribution, tables and graphs, estimation and hypothesis testing, and linear models. Emphasis is placed on interpreting and presenting statistical outputs, including reports generated by computer programs. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

PAD 517 (POS 517) – Empirical Data Analysis (4)

 Introduction to a variety of data-analysis techniques ranging in complexity from simple table construction and interpretation to causal analysis. Within this range are coding, scale and index construction, multidimensional scaling, levels of measurement, measures of association, correlation and regression, panel and cohort analysis, and Markov chains. Introduction to computer technology and functional software. Basic competence in statistics necessary. Prerequisite: One course in statistics or consent of instructor.

PAD 518 (POS 518) – Regression Analysis (4)

 This course will give students familiarity with multivariate regression analysis, including Ordinary Least Squares and other regression methods. Prerequisites: Pos 517 or PAD 505 or Pub 505 or equivalent.

PAD 546 (EHC 546) – Homeland Security Risk Analysis and Risk Management (4)

Homeland security is a continuously changing field with close connections to numerous academic disciplines (political science, public administration, criminal justice, etc) and numerous practitioner communities (law enforcement, emergency management, public safety, the military, etc). This course is designed to draw on insights from both these academic disciplines and practitioner communities, as well as useful insights from other areas - like business, economics and organizational studies – to examine how homeland security strategy and policy is made. The risk assessment and risk management processes that underpin the making of strategy and policy are similar to those used in other fields, but focused on some unique problem sets and missions that other fields do not have to contend with. Homeland security strategy and policy are made much like strategy and policy in other fields of public administration; however the breadth of missions, the myriad stakeholders, the politically charged nature of security issues –combined with the relative newness of the field - all conspire to make understanding homeland security risk management quite complicated.

PAD 549 (EHC 549) - Cyber Security: Long Term Planning and Risk Management (4)

The goal of this course is to equip decision makers with the principles and methods that will allow for more informed budget decisions as it relates to Cyber Security. First this class will review budgeting basics as well as the core of budgeting for Information Technology and Cyber Security. We will then examine Risk Management as a total program component of Cyber Security as well as applying it to the budgeting process. Finally this class will take a comprehensive approach to managing IT/IS projects from a risk management, budgeting, and procurement point of view.

PAD 550 – Foundations of Government Information Strategy and Management (4)

 Introduces the interaction of policy, management, and information technology in the design, operation, and evaluation of government operations and public services. Relies heavily on case studies to illustrate how these domains play out in multiple settings and across sectors-public, private, and not-for-profit. Prerequisites: PAD 500 and PAD 506, and Permission of Instructor.

PAD 553 (EHC 553) – Topics in Homeland Security and Terrorism (4)

 This course examines an array of topics related to homeland security, terrorism, responses to terrorism, and the role of terrorism in public policy problems.  Depending on the semester, the course will focus on a subset of issues in this field and may include both substantive and methodological topics relevant to the study of homeland security and terrorism.

PAD 569 (EHC 569) - Cyber Threats and Intelligence (4)

Cyber threats currently are posed by state and non-state actors whose motivations include financial gain, notoriety, social activism, espionage and even revenge. This course will examine cyber threats from different angles to introduce students to today's actors, motivations, tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs), and mitigation techniques, while providing insight into the impact of cybercrime on victim organizations and employees. A variety of case studies will be used to study how TTPs are applied, and aid students in understanding attack consequences, responding agency abilities, and the various protection, mitigation, and remediation measures. The course will also examine models of cyber activity, as well as how models from other fields can be applied to thinking about cyber threats. The objective of the course is to provide students with a foundation for leading their organization in prevention mitigation, and remediation of cyber-attacks.

PAD 572 (EHC 572) - Disaster and Crisis Management in the Public, Private, and Nonprofit Sectors (4)

This course will examine how disaster and crisis management has evolved over time in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. We begin by identifying key issues and challenges facing emergency managers and other crisis management professionals. We will then systematically examine the similarities and differences across the various sectors and analyze contemporary trends and common challenges, to include risk management, crisis communication and crisis leadership. Through the use of conceptual models and real-world case studies, we will further explore the application of theory and practice within the field. We will examine specific events, how organizations responded to those events, and how those events changed and shaped the various organizations, and the discipline itself.

PAD 583 (POS 583) – Global Governance (4)

The organization of world politics in the context of globalization.  Overview of international organizations such as the United Nations and regional organizations such as the European Union.  Examination of the historical and current international legal frameworks.  Analysis of international cooperation beyond the confines of formal organizational structures with particular emphasis on international regimes, institutions and norms that govern state practices in particular issue areas – from trade and weapons proliferations to the environment and refugees.  Also examines transnational relations of non-state actors such as nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and multinational corporations as well as transgovernmental relations of sub-national governments and government agencies that shape policymaking at a global level.

PAD 585 (POS 585, INF 585) – Information Technology and Homeland Security (4)

 This graduate course primarily examines the political, legal and policy aspects of the use of information technologies by the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) but also considers non-technological dimensions of information collection, use and management as well as the use of technologies other than computing in the homeland security domain. Topics include: the DHS enterprise architecture; data-mining, information sharing and data-integration; risk assessment and risk management; project management, system development and acquisitions; information technologies used for screening people, goods and conveyances at borders; managing immigration, investigations and forensics; cyber-terrorism, critical infrastructure protection, data security, privacy and civil liberties; international standard setting and information sharing; robotics and potential applications of nanotechnology. The course is primarily focused on information technology use by the US federal government but will also examine state and local governments and other countries as well as international issues such as information sharing and international technical standards.

PAD 624 – Simulating Dynamic Systems (3-4)

 Introduction to the basic principles underlying dynamic feedback systems. The principles underlying growth, exponential decay, and sigmoid growth. Students construct computer models of social systems with examples drawn from economic, urban, sociological, and biological systems. Prerequisite(s): PAD 504 and PAD 505 or consent of the instructor.

PAD 636 – Cultural Analysis of Organizations (4)

 Exploration of the cultural approach to organizational analysis: theory and methods from anthropology, sociology, and history that focus on the subjective experience of organization members. Students complete a study in which these theories and methods are applied to a public, private or non-profit organization. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

PAD 637 – Social and Organizational Networks in Public Policy, Management, and Service Delivery: Theory, Methods and Analysis (4)

The concept of "network" has become central to many discussions of public policy, management, and service delivery but is rarely studied systematically. This course is designed to explore the theoretical underpinnings of network analysis, introduce basic network analytic methods, and examine and compare insights gained through network analysis with other forms of analysis. Prerequisites: Completion of required statistical courses for the Master's or Ph.D. program; permission of instructor.

PAD 705 – Research Methods II (4)

 This course introduces students to multiple regression analysis for analyzing data in the social sciences. Students will learn how to read and critique empirical analyses used in academic publications, what empirical techniques should be utilized given different situations, and how to perform empirical analyses and interpret the results. Topics ordinary least squares, heteroskedasticity, time series, panel data, instrumental variables, logit and probit models, and model building techniques.

POS 582 – Global Security (2)

An introduction to competing theoretical approaches to the study of international security that considers alternative conceptual approaches, such as societal security and human security.  Reviews the evolution of nuclear deterrence and explores issues of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons proliferation, asymmetric warfare and homeland security. Prerequisite(s): As specified for M.A. and Ph.D. students.

CRJ 504 – Applied Statistics I (3)

Introduction to statistical techniques appropriate for use in the criminal justice field. Descriptive statistics; scales of measurement; measure of central tendency, variability, and association. Introduction to statistical inference including sampling distributions and tests of significance.

IST 532 – Terrorism, Public Security and Information Analysis (3)

 This course discusses information technologies available to assist in intelligence analysis, as well as defensive tools used to combat cyberterrorism and protect our information-based infrastructure. Techniques include advanced information retrieval, summarization, and linking, data analysis and data mining technologies. Legal and ethical issues related to intelligence gathering and monitoring will also be included.

ITM 604 – Data Communications, Computer Networking and Computer Security or ITM 644 – Introduction to Information & Cyber Security (3)

 This class introduces communications and networking concepts, including types of networks, data/signal transmission, basic ideas such as error control and multiplexing, as well as the costs and benefits of different wired and wireless media and communications hardware.  It covers network topologies, the OSI/Internet models, associated protocols (TCP/IP), network architectures, and network routing and switching.  Information security concepts are introduced, including common risks to information systems and their controls.  Specific areas covered include wireless security, application security, password security and access control, cryptography and secure electronic commerce (PKI, digital certification, digital signatures, and other electronic authentication), intrusion detection/prevention, incident response, and computer forensics.  Students also perform a risk analysis exercise using a real-world case and learn to develop information security policy.  Prerequisite: Itm 522 or permission of instructor.  Co-requisite: Itm 602

ITM 640 – Information Security Risk Assessment (1-3)

 This course provides students with an introduction to the field of information security risk assessment. Initially, the students will be introduced to basic definitions and nomenclature in the area of security assessment. Thereafter they will be taught different approaches for assessment of risk. The course will incorporate cases in risk analysis derived from state and law enforcement agencies. Students will learn how to use a risk analysis matrix for performing both quantitative and qualitative risk analysis. As part of the course the students learn of the different threats that they need to incorporate in their risk analysis matrices.

ITM 641 – Security Policies (1-3)

This course provides students with an introduction to information security policies. Students will be introduced to sociological and psychological issues in policy implementation in general and then provided with a focused dialogue on information security specific policies. The class discusses the entire lifecycle of policy creation and enactment and presents students with issue specific policies in different domains of security. The structure of the policy is also discussed to assist the students in design and modification of policies. Several examples from different domains are incorporated in the curriculum to assist students to learn in context of real life situations.

ITM 642 – Computer Forensics (1-3)

Computer forensics is a relatively new field focused on solving computer crime that is an amalgamation of forensics investigative techniques, computer security, and law. Computer forensics is the study of cyber attack reporting, detection, and response by logging malicious activity and gathering court-admissible chains-of-evidence using various forensic tools able to trace back the activity of hackers.  The course provides students with training in collection and preserving evidence from computers and networks.

ITM 643 – Incident Handling (1-3)

 The course primarily involves management of computer security incidents, including detailing different types of incidents, identification, preparation, and analysis of incidents; as well as gathering of evidence, recovery and follow-up to computer security incidents.

ITM 645 – Psychology & Information Security (3)

This course provides students with an appreciation for and understanding of the psychological processes that impact information security. Three broad themes are covered. The first explores the psychology of the attacker, and examines the motivation and techniques of cyber criminals and hackers. The second theme stresses the importance of the user in the success of security systems. Students will be introduced to basic perceptual, cognitive, and motivational processes and biases that compromise security and increase vulnerability to attacks. The third theme examines how humans interact with machines and technology and how this interaction affects security in organizations.

ITM 646 – Mathematical Models for Information Security (3)

 This course teaches students to navigate sections of classical mathematics and computer science used to construct mathematical models of information security. This course will help students understand the need for mathematical models in different security paradigms along with the essential definitions, concepts and results for developing the models. The course will also help students figure out the limitations of the mathematical model: its strengths and weaknesses, and, consequently, its application to practical problems. The student will know what specific areas of mathematics and computer science will be necessary for the problems at hand and where further investigation is required.

ITM 647 – Security Implementation (3)

 This course will teach students how to implement security in networks. Students learn how to harden their information security environment and set up secure infrastructure. The course covers both wired and wireless network security, database security, and general computer security practices.

ITM 691 – Field Study in Information Technology Management (3)

 Field projects are conducted by students under faculty supervision in a variety of business and not-for-profit organizations. The projects provide students with an opportunity to apply and further develop their skills in information technology management. Must be repeated for 3 credits. Prerequisites: Itm 522 and permission of the department chairperson.

CSI 516 – Computer Communication Networks (3)

 Efficient algorithms for optimization and search problems involving networks and other combinatorial structures. Efficient solutions from integer, linear, or mixed programming formulations. Application of advanced data structures and algorithm analysis techniques to algorithms from current literature. Prerequisite: Csi 503.

CSI 524 – Information Security (3)

 This course covers the broad spectrum of technical issues surrounding computer security and intrusion detections. Topics considered include: viruses, worms, host-and network-based vulnerabilities and countermeasures, database security, intrusion detection, and privacy and legal issues. Facilities for securing hosts and limiting vulnerability are also discussed. Unlike in a systems administration class, detailed operational issues are not discussed. Prerequisites: Csi 500 or permission of instructor.

CSI 526 – Cryptography (3)

 The making of ciphers to encode information is the subject of cryptography. This course covers the field from its origins in early historic times through its most up-to-date implementations and uses in digital computers. Various ciphers will be shown and their security assessed. This latter is known as cryptoanalysis - the attempt to break cipher in order to read the underlying message. The course will emphasize how cryptography and cryptoanalysis are intimately related, and how the arms race between the two has motivated progress throughout their history. Prerequisites: Csi 503 and 518.

CSI 628 – Cryptographic Protocols (3)

 This course is on analyzing cryptographic protocols on security issues. The emphasis will be on formal methods, i.e., logically analyzing the protocols to establish the presence or absence of security flaws. The students will read and present latest cutting-edge literature and there will be a term project. Prerequisites: Csi 503 (or equivalent) as a co-requisite, departmental examination in Discrete Mathematics, CSI 524 or 526.

FOR 610 – International Cyber Conflicts (3)

Cyber Security is an international problem where the perpetrators and victims of attacks may be in completely disparate locations. Cyber attacks have morphed from cyber crime and amateur display of prowess into cyber warfare and espionage among nations. While the issues are international there is little consensus on how to investigate them, create universally acceptable norms, and create international laws across multiple countries to manage them. This course discusses some of these sensitive issues regarding information security and cyber warfare. The hope is to improve understanding between professionals and students across countries in order to foster cooperation in resolving cyber conflicts. The class will include cases and discussions that will touch on the sensitive security related topics.

FOR 611 – Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) Forensics (3)

 Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems are computer systems controlling large-scale, industrial equipment, often underlying important infrastructural assets such as power plants, water distribution facilities, and communication networks. This class is intended to familiarize students with how to forensically investigate and secure SCADA system. Due to the nature and impact of SCADA systems on human lives they typically have more requirements than standard systems. Because SCADA systems are imbedded into critical infrastructure it is vital to understand the regulatory compliance and system governance associated with these systems. As recent events, both domestically and internationally, have demonstrated, SCADA forensics skills are increasingly important and in demand today. Prerequisites: R CRJ 281, A MAT 108, or equivalent; recommended B FOR 201 and 202.

FOR 613 – Multimedia Forensics (3)

This course prepares students to conduct digital forensic examinations on multimedia evidence, specifically images, videos and audio files. The course builds student knowledge from the basics of multimedia types to being able to recognize anomalies in the files and identify file creation attributes. Students will learn how to examine multimedia files manually and through automated processes utilized by digital forensic tools. Students will prepare written reports outlining their findings of analysis, in a professionally acceptable manner, pursuant to administrative, civil and criminal legal proceedings. Graduate students will be expected to do extra or more advanced assignments. Prerequisites: R CRJ 281, A MAT 108, or equivalent; recommended B FOR 201 and 202.

INF 503 – Advanced Networking and Security (3)

This course is designed to provide an advanced coverage of networking with a specific focus on network security and cryptography.  Networking security is examined through a study of digital signatures and certificates, authentication protocols, and firewalls and key establishment and management.  Also considered are security issues related to people's use of computer networks, communication channels, mobile devices, and the Internet.  Also examined are new access control paradigms such as Java security and .NET security.  (The programming experience will allow the course to include a hands-on security project).  Prerequisite: Some programming.

INF 504 – Advanced Systems and Security (3)

This course is designed to provide an advanced coverage of systems with a specific focus on cyber security.  Engineered security is examined through the application and introduction to authentication protocols and intrusion detection for Unix, Windows and databases and general software security.  Also considered are security issues related to people's use of systems including policies and practices for password management and protecting privacy rights.  Students also study options for maintaining business continuity in the event of a disruption of business operations.  Security models such as Bell-LaPadula are introduced and studied.  Specific case studies are used to highlight the choices that must be made to balance operational efficiency of business functions with protecting the business from the onslaught of security threats.  Prerequisite: Some programming.

INF 552 – Computer and Network Security (3)

Theoretical, conceptual and practical aspects of computer and network security.  The role of algorithms, systems, humans, software and hardware in computer and network vulnerabilities and defense.  The two primary focuses of the course will be on the computer and networks, as centers of vulnerability and defense.  The course will emphasize hands on analysis of security issues.  Prerequisite: Inf 306 or background in cyber-security.

INF 553 – Information Security and Privacy (3)

Security and Privacy issues in computer and networked systems.  The role of systems, design, implementation, etc. on data security in digital systems.  Case studies of those roles and how they affect both data security and vulnerability.  The legal and ethical aspects of data security and privacy.  Prerequisites: Inf 306 or background in cyber-security.

INF 554 – Human Aspects of Cyber-security (3)

The roles of individuals, groups, organizations and governments in computer and network security.  How the interactions of these with the technical nature of digital systems in many cases forms the core of vulnerabilities.  The trade-offs between security and various measures of utility.  Conflicting definitions of security at different levels (e.g. governmental v. individual).  Societal measures and values of security.  The course will feature case studies to explore many of these issues.  Prerequisite: Inf 306 or background in cyber-security.

INF 555 – Prevention and Protection Strategies in Cyber-security (3)

The role of security policies and design strategies to minimize security vulnerabilities in computer and networked systems.  The affected areas range from the overall design of systems, networking protocols, operating systems and applications software on individual computers.  The role of coding standards.  End user education and role in security.  Prerequisite: Inf 306 or background in cyber-security.