Undergraduate Minor

The minor in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity is designed to provide students with a broad overview of these three critical fields, as well as help students develop critical thinking skills and subject area knowledge of public policy, management, and risk analysis.

To declare an undergraduate minor in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity send an email to advisor@albany.edu with a subject line of "Declare a Minor." In the body of the email state that you would like to minor in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity.

Minor Requirements

The minor requires that you take at least 6 classes, for a total of 18 credits, including four specifically required courses listed below and two electives. At least half of these courses you take will need to be at the 300-level or above.

Four specifically required core courses:

1.) Intro to Emrgncy Prep, Hmlnd Sec & Cyber CEHC/RPAD 101

From hackers to hurricanes, suicide bombing to supply chain interruptions, infrastructure failures to infectious disease outbreaks, the nation's governments, companies and non-profits must prepare for, protect against, respond to, and recover from a growing array of risks and threats. The fields of emergency preparedness, homeland security and cybersecurity are central to those efforts, and there is an ever growing demand for individuals prepared in these areas. Through lectures, discussion, and case studies, students in this course will develop a broad theoretical, substantive, and practical understanding of the fields of emergency preparedness, homeland security and cybersecurity. Students will be exposed to various ways to think about, measure, assess and compare risks, as well as how to mitigate them and respond to incidents that do occur. The three disciplines will be explored through the crosscutting themes that tie them together, including prevention, incident management and response, crisis communication, recovery and resiliency.

2.) Homeland Security - RPAD 343/RPOS 343

This undergraduate survey course introduces students to the US government response to the attacks of September 11, 2001, specifically, the second largest reorganization of the executive branch that produced the US Department of Homeland Security. Topics examined include border and transportation security, customs, immigration policy and enforcement; preparedness and capabilities building, response and resilience; critical infrastructure protection; threat and vulnerability assessment and risk management; cyber security; counter-terrorism. Although the course is primarily focused on US federal government activities, it will also examine state and local dimensions of homeland security as well as US government interactions with other countries in the homeland security domain. Only one version of R PAD 343 may be taken for credit.

3.) Emergency Preparedness - CEHC/RPAD 344

This course provides a study of applicable policies, protocols, and laws that impact the practice of emergency preparedness at the federal, state, and local levels of government. The study includes a brief review of the history of emergency management setting the stage for an examination of "best practices" and philosophies. These drive the nation's preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation efforts of various levels of emergencies and disasters which in turn helps facilitate a community's resilience in the face of disasters. The methodology used in this course includes classroom discussions and activities, studies of applicable case studies, and individual exploration resulting in a well crated paper. Where applicable, simulation activities provide opportunities for the student to "experience" realistic situations similar to real-world emergencies and disaster operations. Prerequisite(s): R PAD/C EHE 101, Introduction to Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity, recommended.

4.) Cybersecurity (Choose from)

 

A. Introduction to Digital Forensics - BFOR 201

In this course, students will learn the fundamental process of analyzing data collected from electronic devices (including computers, media, and other digital evidence). Students will become familiar with proper techniques and tools utilized for securing, handling and preserving digital and multimedia evidence at physical crime scenes. Students will utilize examination and chain of custody forms, as well as prepare crime scene and digital acquisition reports related to administrative, civil and criminal investigations. Only one version of B FOR 201 may be taken for credit. Offered fall and spring semesters.

B. Computer Security Basics - ICSI 124x

An introduction to security in computers and networks for a general audience. The operation of computers and networks is explained to show how they are the basis for attacks. The course will confer a basic but comprehensive understanding of how computer and network attacks (e.g., viruses, worms, denial of service) work. Also, how general users of computers can defend themselves from current and future attacks.

C. Fundamentals Information and Cyber Security - BFOR 204

This course covers computer and network security. This course will examine general security concepts that include: communication security, infrastructure security, operation/organizational security, basic cryptography and steganography. Students will learn and apply de facto security best practices administering clients, servers and firewalls in a dedicated computer network laboratory. Students will have the opportunity to assess vulnerabilities and administer information security. Offered spring semester only.

D. CEHC 242 Cybersecurity

The purpose of this class is to acquaint students with the policy issues associated with cyber security, this includes issues like cyber-attacks, network security, incident response, cyber-crime, cyber espionage, and cyber conflict.  Students will look at how government agencies and private sector entities assess and respond to the changing cyber security landscape – how they assess the risks they face, how they manage those risks through security procedures and practices, and how they mitigate the impact of attacks that do happen on their systems.

 

Two Electives:

5.) Elective Course #1 (any level) - choose from a list of courses in:

A. Emergency Preparedness

B. Homeland Security

C. Cybersecurity

6.) Elective Course #2 (300-level or above) - choose from a list of courses in:

A. Emergency Preparedness

B. Homeland Security

C. Cybersecurity

Elective Courses in Emergency Preparedness:
 

The Atmosphere - AATM 100

Non-technical survey of the atmosphere; the physical environment of society and its historical development; intentional and unintentional modifications of the environment; cloud types and structure; severe storms; weather forecasting; air pollution; major wind and weather systems. Does not yield credit toward the B.S. in atmospheric science. Three lectures per week.

Introduction to Climate Change - AATM 103

An introduction to the current scientific understanding of Earth's climate, climate change and climate variability; factors that determine climate, climate in the past, and Earth system connections; exposition of scientific observation, theory, and modelling that are used to make scientific predictions of climate outcomes and potential societal choices; examination of climate change impacts at local, regional, and global scales including environmental, societal and economic impacts; consideration of different approaches to deal with climate change, including mitigation and adaptation. Does not yield credit toward the B.S. in atmospheric science.

Introduction to Public Policy - RPOS 140/RPAD 140

Introduction to theories of how democracies make public policy. Describes the roles of government institutions, the media, and interest groups in the policy process. Reviews current theories of how problems are identified and how policies are formulated, enacted, and implemented to address public problems. Only one version of R POS 140 may be taken for credit.

Natural Disasters - AATM 200

Disasters due to natural phenomena such as climate change, hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, tsunami, volcanic eruptions, asteroid/comet impacts, and mass extinctions are examined from an environmental perspective; each type of event will be characterized in terms of its origin, evolution, warning potential, range of significant environmental impacts and possible mitigation strategies; historical case studies will be analyzed; additional student selected topics may include ice storms, blizzards, landslides, avalanches, floods, drought, fire, heat and cold waves. Does not yield credit toward the B.S. in atmospheric science. Three lectures per week.

Introductory Urban Planning - AUSP 201

Introduces the basic concepts and techniques of urban planning and provides an overview of planning history. Covers land use, transportation, environment, urban design, economic development, and social issues. Explores the connections between planning and politics, economic restructuring, social change, and competing ideologies of urban form.

Introduction to Public Health - HSPH 201

A general introduction to what public health is, its importance for everybody’s health, and how it functions as a combination of science and politics. The role of the public health system will be illustrated by describing issues confronting New York State and what is being done about them.

Concepts in Epidemiology - HSPH 231

This course is designed to introduce students to the science of epidemiology. Specific subjects will include causal thinking, the epidemiologic framework, and study designs utilized in epidemiologic studies and the role of epidemiology in public health. Prerequisite(s): A MAT 108.

Health and Human Rights: and Interdisciplinary Approach - TSPH 272

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to health and human rights and the contemporary challenges and solutions associated with them. The course will be taught by physicians and human rights champions Kamiar Alaei and Arash Alaei, with guest lectures from experts in public health, philosophy, social welfare, law, gender studies, public administration and the United Nations, among others. Through lectures, discussion and case studies, students will develop a broad theoretical understanding of health as a human right, become familiar with legal and policy frameworks to support public health, and acquire skills in the application of these concepts and the implementation and evaluation of solutions to our modern health challenges. Only one version may be taken for credit. Open to Honors College students only.

Introduction to Cartography - AGOG 290

An introductory course in the theory and techniques of map production. Reviews and discusses the elements of cartographic theory including the relationships between human perception and map symbology. Students will produce a series of hand-drafted maps over the duration of the course.

State and Regional Planning - AUSP 315z

Reviews the theory and practice of state and regional planning in the United States, evaluating a range of contemporary examples. Covers metropolitan regional planning, river basin planning, regional water resource management, state planning and growth management, and environmental impact assessment. Prerequisite(s): A USP 201.

Methodological Tools for Public Policy - RPOS 316/RPAD 316

Introduction to research design, statistics, and computer usage in public policy with an emphasis on the interpretation of results. Students examine experimental, quasi-experimental, and non-experimental research designs, summarize and present univariate distributions, perform bivariate and multivariate analyses including simple cross-tabulations and multiple regression analysis, and learn to use a computer to perform statistical and data management operations. Only one version of R POS 316 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): R PAD 204.

Global Environmental Issues and Their Effect on Human Health - HSPH 321

Globalization has made the earth a much smaller place so that we can no longer focus merely on issues in the United States. This course will address global environmental concerns and their impact on human change, atmospheric pollution, sanitation, etc.) within the context of their impacts on populations throughout the world. Faculty and invited lecturers will be guest presenters. Prerequisite(s): one semester of college-level course in biology or chemistry.

State and Local Government - RPOS 321/RPAD 321

Course focus is on intergovernmental relations; the interdependent roles of governors, legislatures, and courts in policymaking and implementation; the organization, functions, and jurisdiction of local governments; interaction of political parties and interest groups with formal institutions and processes; and problems in selected functional areas. Emphasis will be placed upon socio-economic trends leading to change in state and local governments, consequent issues raised, and proposals made in response to such issues. Only one of R POS 321 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): R POS 101.

Environmental Laboratory Perspectives in Public Health - HSPH 323

The course will define current public health issues in environmental health sciences, highlighting emerging concerns faced by researchers and practitioners. This course will explore environmental agents of disease, including elemental, organic and biological current and emerging contaminants from an environmental laboratory perspective. The course will define characteristics of and describe toxicological and analytical considerations of disease derived from environmental agents. Heavy emphasis will be placed on how laboratory techniques have driven policy and regulation. Prerequisite(s): one year of college-level biology.

Promoting Healthy People and Communities - HSPH 341

This course focuses on how health promotion strategies influence healthy behaviors, healthy people, and healthy communities. Current public health issues will guide us in examining key health promotion concepts, health concerns at different ages, and the causes of different health behaviors. Health inequalities and mass media’s role will also be highlighted.

Environmental Planning - AUSP 430/430Z/AGOG 430

Environmental planning is much more than preservation of pristine land. Through the examination of environmental movements, energy policy, the land use-transportation nexus, environmental justice, and environmental policy formation, at the end of this course, students will be able to: (1) identify how normative bias influences planning and policy choices; (2) describe major conflicts in environmental planning and policy; and (3) understand the relationship of scale and environmental planning/policy options. Only one version of A USP 430 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A USP 201 or permission of instructor.

Geographic Information Systems - AUSP 456/AGOG 496

Introduction to the structure, design, and application of data base management systems designed to accept large volumes of spatial data derived from various sources. The student will learn how to efficiently store, retrieve, manipulate, analyze, and display these data according to a variety of user-defined specifications. Only one version of A USP 456 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): familiarity with maps and coordinate systems.

Remote Sensing I - AGOG 484

Introduction to the concepts and interdisciplinary applications of remote sensing. The basic principles of theory and practice are presented for earth resource management. Photographic and non-photographic sensors are examined. Visual and digital image analysis techniques are introduced. Students will interpret color infrared, multispectral, and other sensor imagery for a variety of purposes. May not be taken by students with credit for A GOG 385. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

Elective Courses in Homeland Security:
 

American Politics - RPOS 101

Introduction to the study of politics, focusing on American national government. Includes some discussion of theoretical questions (such as authority, representation, and consent) and some illustrative examples from the area of comparative and international politics. Only one version of R POS 101 may be taken for credit.

Introduction to the Criminal Justice Process - RCRJ 201

Analysis of the decisions made in the process whereby citizens become suspects, suspects become defendants, some defendants are convicted and in turn become probationers, inmates and parolees. Analysis of operational practices at the major criminal justice decision stages. Analysis of innovative programs and the dilemmas of change in policing, diversion, court administration, sentencing, and community correctional programs.

Introduction to Law and Criminal Justice - RCRJ 202

Students will study judicial decisions involving constitutional and other legal issues relevant to criminal justice, including the government’s power to define conduct as criminal, procedural rights, defenses, the rights of juveniles, and punishment. In addition to class meetings, students will enroll in a discussion section where they will engage in legal writing and moot court exercises.

Criminology - RCRJ 203

Introduction to the study of crime, including the development of criminal law, the relationship between crime and social structure, and the individual and social causes of crime. Only one of A SOC 203, A SOC 381, R CRJ 203, or T CRJ 203 can be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

Political Violence - TPOS 260

This course is designed to introduce students to the study of violent political conflict. We will examine the how, why, and when of violent political conflict both domestic and international. What are the key empirical and normative questions raised by violent political conflict and what answers to these questions does the literature offer? What other strategies, like nonviolence and negotiation are available to actors instead of political violence? In this course, in addition to studying the theories that have been developed to explain the politics and history of violent political conflict, students will have an opportunity to participate in simulation exercises designed to sharpen their analytic skills in the subject area. Open to Honors College students only.

Comparative Ethnicity - TPOS 261Y

The composition and problems of various ethnic and religious minorities: their origins, characteristics, political mobilization, and degree of integration into the social and political systems of the new post-colonial nations of Asia, Africa, and Latin America examined against a background of European, American, and Russian experience. T POS 261 is the Honors College version of R POS 361. Only one may be taken for credit. Open to Honors College students only.

Introduction to Statistics in Criminal Justice - RCRJ 281

Provides an introduction to statistical methods useful for analyzing the types of data most often encountered in criminal justice research, and it is intended primarily for criminal justice undergraduates. The course has a “practitioner” orientation, emphasizing how to understand and use statistics rather than how to create them. A variety of widely used statistical methods will be considered, including descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, hypothesis testing (inferential statistics), and contingency tables. A working knowledge of high school algebra will be assumed. May not be taken for credit by students with credit for A SOC 221.

American Criminal Courts - RCRJ 353/RPOS 363

Examines the organization and operations of state and local criminal court systems from the perspective of social science research and public policy analysis. Major issues include: the role of courts in American society; bail and pre-trial procedures; the roles and decisions of prosecutors, judges and the defense bar; selection and operation of grand juries and trial juries; sentencing of criminal defendants; and others. The operations of juvenile and adult courts are compared, and efforts directed toward court reform are assessed. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

Comparative Criminal Procedure - RPOS 317

"Due process" is a core element of democracy and the rule of law. Criminal procedure encompasses all the legal actors, institutions, and steps between them that make due process possible in the criminal justice system — from police to prison, initial detention to final custody. In an effort to identify best practices in criminal procedure and understand the causes and consequences of these practices, this course examines the criminal process across different countries and criminal procedure reform over time within individual countries.

American Federalism - RPOS 320

This course focuses on the theoretical, constitutional, and political dimensions of American federalism, including the tensions between the planes of government, interstate relations, and the problem-solving capabilities of the federal system. Particular emphasis is placed upon the formal powers of each plane of government and the limitations upon these powers. The reasons for and the political significance of the increasing use of preemption powers by the Congress will be examined.

Government & Politics of New York City - RPOS 322/R PAD 322

Introduction to New York City's major political and governmental institutions, with an emphasis on the recurring efforts to provide for borough and community input into the city's policy making and implementation processes and to increase inter- and intra-party competition. Only one of R POS 322 may be taken for credit.

Civil Liberties - RPOS 336

The ways in which the courts have interpreted the Constitution with respect to individual freedoms. Examines a range of source materials to assess the role of the judiciary in arbitrating between the individual and the state, and its implications in American political life.

Policing in a Free Society - RCRJ 351

Introduction to the study of the local police in the United States, which provides the basis for a continuing study of policing. Also for the individual whose concern is to be an informed citizen dealing effectively with the problems which policing in America does raise. Policing is seen from three perspectives: the police -officer-citizen interaction, the agency-community relationship, and the legal and ethical questions of policing in a democratic society. Considers the background of policing, the problems it must meet in the future, the police task, the major kinds of police work, and the system relationships that tie the police to the community and the criminal justice system. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

Violent Political Conflict - RPOS 360

This course is designed to introduce students to the study of violent political conflict. We will examine the how, why, and when of violent political conflict both domestic and international. The course will focus on the key empirical and normative questions raised by violent political conflict and what answers to these questions the existing literature offers. In this course, in addition to studying the theories that have been developed to explain the politics and history of violent political conflict, students will have an opportunity to participate in simulation exercises designed to sharpen their analytic skills in the subject.

Crime Deviation and Conformity - RCRJ 401

Crime and criminal behavior is viewed as one of the many forms of deviation from political, moral and conduct norms of the majority culture. Studies the parallel genesis of crime and other parallel forms of deviance, and the relationship between some forms of deviance (such as mental illness and political extremism) and some forms of criminality. Studies the forces that produce conformity and indirectly promote deviation. Prerequisite(s): R CRJ 203.

Order and Disorder in Society - RCRJ 414z

An examination of problems of social control in different cultural settings and historical epochs. Students gain insight into the variety of solutions that have been devised for the problems of crime and disorder and thereby begin to understand the potentialities as well as the constraints in social ordering. Key questions addressed are: what kinds of disorder problems did a particular society face?, and what was the preferred solution adopted? Reading will be historical, literary, and social scientific. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

Cross-National Crime - RCRJ 417

The purpose of this course is to describe and understand geographic and temporal variations in the amounts and types of crime across countries. Students will critically examine the data, methods, and theories used to measure and explain crime across nations and over time.

Elective Courses in Cybersecurity:
 

Introduction to Information Systems - BFOR 100

This course provides a foundation of information systems concepts that can be applied to future learning in advanced topics. The course will include background in the history and social implications of computing including cyber ethics; emergent and contemporary information technology and its nomenclature; information and data abstraction, representation, manipulation and storage; operating systems; networking and the Internet, programming languages, logic, and algorithms; database systems; digital graphics and multimedia; and information security.

Computer Security Basics - ICSI 124X
(If not already taken for the core – Not open for credit toward the minor by students who have completed BFOR 204)

This course covers computer and network security. This course will examine general security concepts that include: communication security, infrastructure security, operation/organizational security, basic cryptography and steganography. Students will learn and apply de facto security best practices administering clients, servers and firewalls in a dedicated computer network laboratory. Students will have the opportunity to assess vulnerabilities and administer information security. Offered spring semester only.

Introduction to Digital Forensics - BFOR 201
(If not already taken toward the core)

In this course, students will learn the fundamental process of analyzing data collected from electronic devices (including computers, media, and other digital evidence). Students will become familiar with proper techniques and tools utilized for securing, handling and preserving digital and multimedia evidence at physical crime scenes. Students will utilize examination and chain of custody forms, as well as prepare crime scene and digital acquisition reports related to administrative, civil and criminal investigations. Only one version of B FOR 201 may be taken for credit. Offered fall and spring semesters.

Introduction to Data and Databases - IINF 202

This course introduces students to data and databases. It covers both long-standing relational (SQL) databases and newly emerging non-relational (NoSQL) data stores. The nature of data, Big Data, intellectual property, system lifecycle, and development collaboration are also explored. Team-based activities alternate with hands-on exercises. Prerequisite(s): I CSI 101, 105, 110 or 201 or B ITM 215; not open to students who are taking or have completed I CSI 410 or 411 or B ITM 331.

Cyber Crime Investigations - BFOR 202

This course will teach students forensic investigative techniques specifically for managing cyber crimes including collection and preservation of data from different sources, such as the Internet and "cloud" computing environments. Students will learn the legal processes available for collecting and preserving such evidence in conducting cyber investigations. Only one version of B FOR 202 may be taken for credit. Offered fall semester only.

Networking: Introduction to Data Communication - BFOR 203

The past couple of decades have witnessed the digital revolution profoundly altering our society. Most of the business affairs have been linked to communication and networking technologies. With tremendous advances in networking, it is now feasible to connect all the devices such as computers, tablets, smart phones, and mainframes together. However, the newly innovative communication and networking technologies pose additional challenges to business and IT management. Nowadays, IT professionals must have an elementary understanding of those technologies that facilitate them better impose management in the organization or perform advanced analysis such as for network forensics. Balanced technical and managerial contents are incorporated to enable students to learn from various perspectives. This course will introduce the student to the organization and design of data networks. Topics include networking media, Ethernet technology, the TCP/IP protocol suite, subnets, routers and routing protocols, Wide Area Networks (WANs), and fundamentals of network management. This course includes hands-on experience of networking techniques. Offered fall semester only.

Introduction to Digital Forensics - BFOR 204
(If not already taken for the core – Not open for credit toward the minor by students who have completed ICSI 124x)

This course covers computer and network security. This course will examine general security concepts that include: communication security, infrastructure security, operation/organizational security, basic cryptography and steganography. Students will learn and apply de facto security best practices administering clients, servers and firewalls in a dedicated computer network laboratory. Students will have the opportunity to assess vulnerabilities and administer information security. Offered spring semester only.

Databases for Digital Forensics - BFOR 300

A large part of digital forensics deals with extraction and collection of data across electronic devices each of which has different architecture. In this class students learn the traditional relational database design and then understand the architecture of data storage in mobile electronic devices. The class also discusses in depth the storage of data on the cloud and the ramifications of that on digital forensics. Students also learn the basic techniques for analyzing data including use of Structured Query Language, data mining techniques and social network analysis. Students will also use scripting languages to efficiently clean up data from text files and extract information from files. Prerequisite(s): B FOR 100 or permission of instructor. Offered fall semester only.

Computer Forensics I - BFOR 301

This course prepares students to conduct digital forensic examination of computers, removable media and other electronic devices. Students will use digital forensics tools and techniques to analyze digital evidence pursuant to an investigation, while utilizing industry standards and best practices. This course will prepare students in the development and implementation of forensic incident response plans, policies and procedures. Students will engage in oral and written reporting outlining digital forensic analysis findings and conclusions, in a professionally acceptable manner, pursuant to administrative, civil and criminal legal proceedings. Only one version of B FOR 301 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): B ITM 201 or B FOR 201 or permission of instructor. Offered fall semester only.

eDiscovery Forensics - BFOR 302

This course prepares students for the electronic collection, preservation and management of corporate information. It provides a foundation on basic corporate incident response challenges and proper collection methods for electronic data subject to legal and regulatory requirements. Students will utilize forensics tools for searching, culling and presenting corporate data, pursuant to administrative and civil eDiscovery cases. Only one version of B FOR 302 may be taken for credit. Offered fall semester only.

Computer Forensics II - BFOR 303

This course prepares students for the electronic collection, preservation and management of corporate information. It provides a foundation on basic corporate incident response challenges and proper collection methods for electronic data subject to legal and regulatory requirements. Students will utilize forensics tools for searching, culling and presenting corporate data, pursuant to administrative and civil eDiscovery cases. Only one version of B FOR 302 may be taken for credit. Offered fall semester only.

Network and Mobile Forensics - BFOR 304

This course exposes students to procedures for conducting live network forensics of computer system components and data. It prepares students to collect, preserve, and examine networks, computers, mobile devices and relevant data that may be critical to an investigation. Students will develop network incident response plans, policies and procedures relevant to corporate networks and data, as well as mobile corporate assets, such as mobile devices. It prepares students to compose and present oral and written reports that outline network and mobile device forensic analysis findings that are technically and legally acceptable in administrative hearings and court proceedings. Prerequisite(s): B FOR 203 and B FOR 301. Offered spring semester only.

Information Security and Assurance - IINF 306

Technical aspects of cybersecurity in computer and network systems. The nature of attacks and defense in digital systems; models of vulnerabilities, threats and security; cryptography; forensics; security policies and procedures; software and network security. Prerequisite(s): I INF 202.

Advanced Digital Forensics - BFOR 401W

Instructor will guide students through proficiency testing by utilizing digital forensic skills obtained in previous coursework to develop an incident response plan to guide a forensic investigation. Based on case-study scenario, students will also conduct forensic analysis of several items of digital evidence, prepare comprehensive written forensic laboratory reports and present findings to a panel of legal, forensics and management subject matter experts for constructive feedback. Students will also prepare exhibits and other materials for court presentation purposes based on the case-study scenario, forensic analysis findings and written laboratory reports. Instructor will conduct quality control assessments to ensure students are performing forensic analysis that is in compliance with industry standards guiding forensic and laboratory work environments. Prerequisite(s): B FOR 302, B FOR 303, and B FOR 304. Offered fall semester only.

Digital Forensics Moot Court - BFOR 402

This is a capstone course where students will learn how to provide expert testimony as a part of presenting their findings from completion of an advanced level digital forensic analysis. Students will learn how to prepare for and give expert witness testimony related to digital evidence, including how to deal with opposing counsel cross-examinations and how to effectively relay such information to a jury. Students will engage in a "mock" court grand jury, suppression hearing, and trial proceedings. Panel of subject matter experts from the legal, forensic and management fields will assist in the guidance and constructive feedback of students participating in "mock" court proceedings. Instructor will assess student's competence in providing a technical testimony to a group of non-technical listeners, such as judges, juries, as well as administrative and human resource officers. Prerequisite(s): B FOR 302, B FOR 303, B FOR 304 and B FOR 401W. Offered spring semester only.

Advanced Networking and Security - IINF 403

This course is designed to provide an advanced coverage of networking with a specific focus on network security and cryptography. This course builds on the concepts and issues examined in I INF 404. Networking security is examined through a study of digital signatures and certificates, authentication protocols, and firewalls and key establishment and management. Also considered are security issues related to people's use of computer networks, communication channels, mobile devices, and the Internet. Also examined are new access control paradigms such as Java security and .NET security. Prerequisites: I INF 303, I INF 404, and some programming experience.

Information Security - ICSI 424

This course covers the broad spectrum of technical issues surrounding computer security and intrusion detection. Topics considered include: viruses, worms, host- and network-based vulnerabilities and countermeasures, database security, intrusion detection, and privacy and legal issues. Facilities for securing hosts and limiting vulnerability are also discussed. Unlike in a systems administration class, detailed operational issues are not discussed. Prerequisite(s): I CSI 400 or 402.

Cryptography - ICSI 426

The making of ciphers to encode information is the subject of cryptography. This course covers the field from its origins in early historic times through its most up-to-date implementations and uses in digital computers. Various ciphers will be shown and their security assessed. This latter is known as cryptanalysis – the attempt to break a cipher in order to read the underlying message. The course will emphasize how cryptography and cryptanalysis are intimately related, and how the arms race between the two has motivated progress throughout their history. Prerequisite(s): I CSI 333. Corequisite(s): I CSI 403.