Undergraduate Major

The major in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity is designed to provide students with broad overview of these three critical fields. Students in the major will develop critical thinking skills and subject area knowledge of public policy, management and risk analysis. The major program provides a solid liberal arts education that emphasizes critical thinking, oral and written communication, creativity and innovation, problem solving skills, cultural literacy, and interpersonal and teamwork skills. In addition, the major will also emphasize leadership, public administration, management, risk analysis, ethics, policy making, planning, strategic communication, and systemic thinking. One of the unique and central elements of this major is the focus on experiential learning.

Major Requirements

The major requires a total of 13 courses, for a total of 39 credits. All students must select one concentration from the three fields. Students will be required to take the core courses and applied learning courses, for a total of 9 courses, which will help extend their classroom knowledge into applied environments. The remaining 4 courses will be focused on their concentration, where at least half of the concentration courses will be at the 300-level or above.

100 hours of training is required for the completion of the major.

   

Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity Core Requirements

From hackers to hurricanes, suicide bombing to supply chain interruptions, infrastructure failures to infectious disease outbreaks, the nation's governments, companies and non-profits must prepare for, protect against, respond to, and recover from a growing array of risks and threats. The fields of emergency preparedness, homeland security and cybersecurity are central to those efforts, and there is an ever growing demand for individuals prepared in these areas. Through lectures, discussion, and case studies, students in this course will develop a broad theoretical, substantive, and practical understanding of the fields of emergency preparedness, homeland security and cybersecurity. Students will be exposed to various ways to think about, measure, assess and compare risks, as well as how to mitigate them and respond to incidents that do occur. The three disciplines will be explored through the crosscutting themes that tie them together, including prevention, incident management and response, crisis communication, recovery and resiliency.
This course is designed as an introduction to argumentation and analysis.  Students will learn to evaluate arguments, build arguments, evaluate evidence, generate evidence, and present conclusions within the context of public policy and administration.  Students will be introduced to a wide range of methods of inquiry (e.g., qualitative case studies, large-N statistical analysis, and survey research) and will explore the strengths and weaknesses of individual approaches.  Students will also will explore ethical considerations in policy analysis and research.  Finally, students will have multiple opportunities to communicate arguments in both written and oral forms.
The purpose of this class is to acquaint students with the policy issues associated with cyber security, this includes issues like cyber-attacks, network security, incident response, cyber-crime, cyber espionage, and cyber conflict.  Students will look at how government agencies and private sector entities assess and respond to the changing cyber security landscape – how they assess the risks they face, how they manage those risks through security procedures and practices, and how they mitigate the impact of attacks that do happen on their systems. Prerequisites(s): C EHC/R PAD 101 recommended.
This undergraduate survey course introduces students to the US government response to the attacks of September 11, 2001, specifically, the second largest reorganization of the executive branch that produced the US Department of Homeland Security.  Topics examined include border and transportation security, customs, immigration policy and enforcement; preparedness and capabilities building, response and resilience; critical infrastructure protection; threat and vulnerability assessment and risk management; cyber security; counter-terrorism. Although the course is primarily focused on US federal government activities, it will also examine state and local dimensions of homeland security as well as US government interactions with other countries in the homeland security domain. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.
This course provides a study of applicable policies, protocols, and laws that impact the practice of emergency preparedness at the federal, state, and local levels of government. The study includes a brief review of the history of emergency management setting the stage for an examination of "best practices" and philosophies. These drive the nation's preparedness, response, recovery, and mitigation efforts of various levels of emergencies and disasters which in turn helps facilitate a community's resilience in the face of disasters. The methodology used in this course includes classroom discussions and activities, studies of applicable case studies, and individual exploration resulting in a well crafted paper. Where applicable, simulation activities provide opportunities for the student to "experience" realistic situations similar to real-world emergencies and disaster operations. Prerequisite(s): R PAD/C EHE 101, Introduction to Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity, recommended. Prerequisite(s): C EHC/R PAD 101 recommended.
This course provides a foundation for applying philosophical and ethical understanding to homeland security professions by drawing on both theoretical and practical approaches.  It includes an overview of philosophical theories of ethics and political philosophy relevant to security practices and policies, as well as opportunities to develop critical thinking and communication skills in their application to particular cases related to homeland security through analysis and discussion.  Historical and contemporary material will be examined to investigate issues such as the right to privacy, the nature and value of freedom, the justification of state security, and rights and responsibilities of public officials and health professionals. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.
Experiential or Applied Learning
Over the course of the semester students will be developing hypotheses, constructing research designs, testing hypotheses, and communicating findings. In small groups, they will apply the research skills and knowledge to address a real world question in the areas of emergency preparedness, homeland security, and cybersecurity. The research topic will be selected by the instructor in consultation with an external partner. The course is designed to equip students with the tools necessary for doing independent research in different areas. Prerequisite(s): C EHC/R PAD 101 and C EHC 210.
This course is intended to give students an opportunity to effectively apply what they have learned in their classroom studies through work in relevant professional settings.  Students will work with the staff of the College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity to secure placement at an off-campus agency or organization, including public, private, and not-for-profit organizations.  Alongside that internship, there will be an accompanying class meeting in which students will integrate the theoretical concepts that they have learned in their courses with the practical experience of their internship, as well as engaging in career preparation activities.
Students will be assigned to a team and each team will be assigned a client with a real world puzzle. The student teams examine the problem, develop an action plan, conduct the analysis, and present a final report and oral presentation highlighting their findings and recommendations. Capstone Projects are designed to be the synthesizing educational experience for students majoring in Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security, and Cybersecurity.  The experience provides students with an opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge acquired in their academic careers to solve a problem for a client. Prerequisite(s): C EHC 210 and C EHC 310 or permission of instructor.

Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity Concentrations (Choose One): Total of 12 credits

Emergency Preparedness Concentration

manager in this unique simulation-based course.  This intensive course provides the student with an opportunity to blend "practice" with "theory" through a mix of high-end simulations and other blended learning activities. The course will focus on incident command and control, emergency operations center activities, and catastrophic event policy level decision-making. It is being developed and delivered in close partnership with the National Center for Security and Preparedness (NCSP).  It will be a blended course, with ~75% online and ~25% in person.  Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing or permission of instructor.
The course studies the policies, statutes and priorities established by federal, state, and local governments to plan and prepare for emergencies, disasters, and catastrophic events caused by nature, technology, or humans. The course's scope will include all mission areas established by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and prioritized by the the New York State Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services as an example of state policies. The course will rely heavily upon primary source documents, and will involve simulations. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing or permission of instructor.
This on-line course provides a comprehensive strategic level examination of the Homeland Security Enterprise and the methodology for integrating Federal and State military forces in support of civil authorities during the planning, training and response phases of emergency operations. Federal, State and Local civilian authorities are responsible for preparing for and responding to natural and man-made emergency incidents and disasters. Emergency managers often include military forces in their emergency management planning and training programs as necessary to support potentially overwhelmed civilian first-responders during an incident. This course examines various agencies associated with homeland security and focuses on specialized military forces mission support sets such as Weapons of Mass Destruction, Critical Infrastructure Protection and defense of the homeland. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.
This course will examine how disaster and crisis management has evolved over time in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. We begin by identifying key issues and challenges facing emergency managers and other crisis management professionals. We will then systematically examine the similarities and differences across the various sectors and analyze contemporary trends and common challenges, to include risk management, crisis communication and crisis leadership. Through the use of conceptual models and real-world case studies, we will further explore the application of theory and practice within the field. We will examine specific events, how organizations responded to those events, and how those events changed and shaped the various organizations, and the discipline itself. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing or permission of instructor.
Non-technical survey of the atmosphere; the physical environment of society and its historical development; intentional and unintentional modifications of the environment; cloud types and structure; severe storms; weather forecasting; air pollution; major wind and weather systems. Does not yield credit toward the B.S. in atmospheric science. Three lectures per week.
An introduction to the current scientific understanding of Earth's climate, climate change and climate variability; factors that determine climate, climate in the past, and Earth system connections; exposition of scientific observation, theory, and modelling that are used to make scientific predictions of climate outcomes and potential societal choices; examination of climate change impacts at local, regional, and global scales including environmental, societal and economic impacts; consideration of different approaches to deal with climate change, including mitigation and adaptation. Does not yield credit toward the B.S. in atmospheric science.
Introductory survey of the physical, chemical, geological, and biological processes in the marine environment; promise and problems of the oceans as a natural resource. Does not yield credit toward the B.S. in atmospheric science. Three lectures each week. Offered fall semester only.
Disasters due to natural phenomena such as climate change, hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, tsunami, volcanic eruptions, asteroid/comet impacts, and mass extinctions are examined from an environmental perspective; each type of event will be characterized in terms of its origin, evolution, warning potential, range of significant environmental impacts and possible mitigation strategies; historical case studies will be analyzed; additional student selected topics may include ice storms, blizzards, landslides, avalanches, floods, drought, fire, heat and cold waves. Does not yield credit toward the B.S. in atmospheric science. Three lectures per week.
Survey of contemporary environmental issues related to health and disease, nuclear waste disposal, water resources, energy use and conservation, land reclamation, global climate change, and industrial pollution. Scientific principles and data needed for gaining an understanding of environmental challenges on local, regional, and global scales will be emphasized. Three lectures per week. Only one version of A ENV 105 may be taken for credit. Offered spring semester only.
Introduces the basic concepts and techniques of urban planning and provides an overview of planning history. Covers land use, transportation, environment, urban design, economic development, and social issues. Explores the connections between planning and politics, economic restructuring, social change, and competing ideologies of urban form.
Reviews the theory and practice of state and regional planning in the United States, evaluating a range of contemporary examples. Covers metropolitan regional planning, river basin planning, regional water resource management, state planning and growth management, and environmental impact assessment. Prerequisite(s): A USP 201.
Environmental planning is much more than preservation of pristine land. Through the examination of environmental movements, energy policy, the land use-transportation nexus, environmental justice, and environmental policy formation, at the end of this course, students will be able to: (1) identify how normative bias influences planning and policy choices; (2) describe major conflicts in environmental planning and policy; and (3) understand the relationship of scale and environmental planning/policy options. Only one version of A USP 430 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A USP 201 or permission of instructor.
Introduction to the structure, design, and application of data base management systems designed to accept large volumes of spatial data derived from various sources. The student will learn how to efficiently store, retrieve, manipulate, analyze, and display these data according to a variety of user-defined specifications. Prerequisite(s): familiarity with maps and coordinate systems.
This course is designed as a workshop for students to be introduced to the practical aspects of site planning – a specific site in the region is studied and plans developed for future new use or renewal of the site. Experience is gained in recording site conditions, use; influence of microclimate, landform; condition of existing building on the site and adjacent to it. The site is analyzed for future potential within the context of existing community policies and regulations. Alternative proposals for future use are drawn up and evaluated for appropriateness, context, and design quality. During the course students will record, photograph, annotate site information, draw up plans to scale, develop a concise planning report incorporating data, analysis, and plan. Team work is encouraged, with small teams organized to develop projects.
Urban design focuses on “the space between the buildings.” Effective treatment of this space in projects and their environs is important for a host of aesthetic, social, and functional reasons, but above all because it is linked to something more abstract and more important: the public realm of civil, political, and social interaction. This course provides a broad theoretical introduction to urban design integrating three perspectives: historical patterns and practices in architecture and planning; findings in the social and behavioral sciences relevant to small urban spaces; and contemporary design criteria and practice. Analytical writing, design proposals, and a field trip are required. Prerequisite(s): AGOG/AUSP 125 or AGOG/AUSP 220 or AUSP 201.
An introductory course in the theory and techniques of map production. Reviews and discusses the elements of cartographic theory including the relationships between human perception and map symbology. Students will produce a series of hand-drafted maps over the duration of the course.
Introduction to the concepts and interdisciplinary applications of remote sensing. The basic principles of theory and practice are presented for earth resource management. Photographic and non-photographic sensors are examined. Visual and digital image analysis techniques are introduced. Students will interpret color infrared, multispectral, and other sensor imagery for a variety of purposes. May not be taken by students with credit for A GOG 385. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.
A general introduction to what public health is, its importance for everybody’s health, and how it functions as a combination of science and politics. The role of the public health system will be illustrated by describing issues confronting New York State and what is being done about them.
This course is designed to introduce students to the science of epidemiology. Specific subjects will include causal thinking, the epidemiologic framework, and study designs utilized in epidemiologic studies and the role of epidemiology in public health. Prerequisite(s): A MAT 108.
This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to health and human rights and the contemporary challenges and solutions associated with them. The course will be taught by physicians and human rights champions Kamiar Alaei and Arash Alaei, with guest lectures from experts in public health, philosophy, social welfare, law, gender studies, public administration and the United Nations, among others. Through lectures, discussion and case studies, students will develop a broad theoretical understanding of health as a human right, become familiar with legal and policy frameworks to support public health, and acquire skills in the application of these concepts and the implementation and evaluation of solutions to our modern health challenges. Only one version may be taken for credit. TSPH is open to Honors College students only.
Globalization has made the earth a much smaller place so that we can no longer focus merely on issues in the United States. This course will address global environmental concerns and their impact on human change, atmospheric pollution, sanitation, etc., within the context of their impacts on populations throughout the world. Faculty and invited lecturers will be guest presenters. Prerequisite(s): one semester of college-level course in biology or chemistry.
The course will define current public health issues in environmental health sciences, highlighting emerging concerns faced by researchers and practitioners. This course will explore environmental agents of disease, including elemental, organic and biological current and emerging contaminants from an environmental laboratory perspective. The course will define characteristics of and describe toxicological and analytical considerations of disease derived from environmental agents. Heavy emphasis will be placed on how laboratory techniques have driven policy and regulation. Prerequisite(s): one year of college-level biology.
This course focuses on how health promotion strategies influence healthy behaviors, healthy people, and healthy communities. Current public health issues will guide us in examining key health promotion concepts, health concerns at different ages, and the causes of different health behaviors. Health inequalities and mass media’s role will also be highlighted.
Introduction to theories of how democracies make public policy. Describes the roles of government institutions, the media, and interest groups in the policy process. Reviews current theories of how problems are identified and how policies are formulated, enacted, and implemented to address public problems. Only one version of R POS 140 may be taken for credit
Course focus is on intergovernmental relations; the interdependent roles of governors, legislatures, and courts in policymaking and implementation; the organization, functions, and jurisdiction of local governments; interaction of political parties and interest groups with formal institutions and processes; and problems in selected functional areas. Emphasis will be placed upon socio-economic trends leading to change in state and local governments, consequent issues raised, and proposals made in response to such issues. Only one of R POS 321 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): R POS 101.
The ways in which the courts have interpreted the Constitution with respect to individual freedoms. Examines a range of source materials to assess the role of the judiciary in arbitrating between the individual and the state, and its implications in American political life.

Homeland Security Concentration

This course looks at the challenging problem of terrorism from a psychological and social psychological perspective both in terms of how terrorism can be explained at the individual and group level and how psychological factors can interact with other factors to impact when terrorism starts and how terrorist campaigns might end. In addition to studying the theories that have been developed to explain the politics and history of violent political conflict, students will have an opportunity to participate in simulation exercises designed to sharpen their analytic skills in the subject area and to allow them to examine the psychological determinants of behavior in experimental environments.
This course looks at the challenging problem of Human Trafficking from a comparative politics and international perspective both in terms of how Human Trafficking can be explained and how Human Trafficking impacts people as well as the efforts governments are taking to try to stop Human Trafficking.  In this course, in addition to studying the theories that have been developed to explain the politics and history of Human Trafficking, students will have an opportunity to participate in data collection designed to sharpen their analytic skills in the subject area.
In this course, students will examine the tensions between civil liberties and government responses to cybersecurity, homeland security, and emergency preparedness.  Students will draw from contemporary and historical case studies and a range of legal materials to develop their own analytical and normative views about the appropriate balance between civil liberties and security.   Students will be asked to evaluate how the law governing relevant topics has changed and whether it has changed in desirable ways.  Students will also be asked to determine what relevant information we do not yet possess to answer these questions.
Students will be able to gain understanding of what the critical infrastructure sectors are and why they are so vital to the United States. They will obtain knowledge on each sector’s assets, systems, and networks, both physical and virtual. Learning that critical infrastructure is a shared responsibility, they will also understand how the Federal, State, local, tribal, and territorial governments; private companies; and individual citizens play a role in keeping it strong, secure, and resilient.
Studying the cultural, historical and political differences from different countries, students will be able to determine the shared characteristics they play with the US and be able to determine the relevance with current Homeland Security policies. Students will be able to analyze different policy issues, including both political and public policies, using various methods of review.
This class introduces the major ideas and problems associated with the study of international and transnational crime in the context of global politics.  It will examine transnational criminal activities, illicit markets, those individuals and organizations involved in such crime, and how governments attempt to respond to and cope with such criminality.
Play the role of emergency manager in this unique simulation-based course.  This intensive course provides the student with an opportunity to blend "practice" with "theory" through a mix of high-end simulations and other blended learning activities. The course will focus on incident command and control, emergency operations center activities, and catastrophic event policy level decision-making. It is being developed and delivered in close partnership with the National Center for Security and Preparedness (NCSP).  It will be a blended course, with ~75% online and ~25% in person. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing or permission of instructor.
This course examines homeland security intelligence at the Federal, State, and local levels. It begins with an overview of the U.S. foreign intelligence community, its mission, history, structure, and capabilities. The course will examine how this community's composition and structure have changed as its mission was fundamentally altered twice, first with the end of the Cold War and then with the rise of terrorism. Next, it looks at the capabilities of new producers of terrorism related intelligence at Federal law enforcement agencies and at the Department of Homeland Security. The main thrust of the course is intelligence at the State and local levels. The Federal government has worked with the states to create significant intelligence capabilities outside the beltway since the events of 9/11/2001. This course identifies and discusses the State and local customers for homeland security intelligence and examines the degree to which these intelligence requirements are being met. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing or permission of instructor.
This course provides instruction in conducting intelligence analysis, with emphasis on homeland security issues at the State and local levels. After an overview of the history and structure of the U.S. foreign intelligence community, the class will review the fundamentals of intelligence analysis tradecraft as practiced within the CIA and other Federal intelligence agencies. Extensive time is devoted to learning and using structured analytic techniques through student-led analytic exercises on terrorism and major crimes. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing or permission of instructor.
The short but significant history of the creation of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) will serve as the starting point for this course which will provide a comprehensive and functional approach to understanding this department and its role. The preponderance of time will be spent in developing an understanding of the nation's effort, led by DHS, to develop preparedness capabilities to prevent, protect from, respond to, and recover from high consequence events caused by acts of terrorism, natural disasters, and accidents. The course will rely heavily upon scenario-based activities and case studies to guide the student through the DHS maze and the nation's preparedness efforts at the Federal, State, and local levels. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing or permission of instructor.
Analysis of the decisions made in the process whereby citizens become suspects, suspects become defendants, some defendants are convicted and in turn become probationers, inmates and parolees. Analysis of operational practices at the major criminal justice decision stages. Analysis of innovative programs and the dilemmas of change in policing, diversion, court administration, sentencing, and community correctional programs.
Students will study judicial decisions involving constitutional and other legal issues relevant to criminal justice, including the government’s power to define conduct as criminal, procedural rights, defenses, the rights of juveniles, and punishment. In addition to class meetings, students will enroll in a discussion section where they will engage in legal writing and moot court exercises.
Introduction to the study of crime, including the development of criminal law, the relationship between crime and social structure, and the individual and social causes of crime. Only one of A SOC 203, A SOC 381, R CRJ 203, or T CRJ 203 can be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.
Provides an introduction to statistical methods useful for analyzing the types of data most often encountered in criminal justice research, and it is intended primarily for criminal justice undergraduates. The course has a “practitioner” orientation, emphasizing how to understand and use statistics rather than how to create them. A variety of widely used statistical methods will be considered, including descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, hypothesis testing (inferential statistics), and contingency tables. A working knowledge of high school algebra will be assumed. May not be taken for credit by students with credit for A SOC 221.
Introduction to the study of the local police in the United States, which provides the basis for a continuing study of policing. Also for the individual whose concern is to be an informed citizen dealing effectively with the problems which policing in America does raise. Policing is seen from three perspectives: the police -officer-citizen interaction, the agency-community relationship, and the legal and ethical questions of policing in a democratic society. Considers the background of policing, the problems it must meet in the future, the police task, the major kinds of police work, and the system relationships that tie the police to the community and the criminal justice system. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.
Examines the organization and operations of state and local criminal court systems from the perspective of social science research and public policy analysis. Major issues include: the role of courts in American society; bail and pre-trial procedures; the roles and decisions of prosecutors, judges and the defense bar; selection and operation of grand juries and trial juries; sentencing of criminal defendants; and others. The operations of juvenile and adult courts are compared, and efforts directed toward court reform are assessed. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.
Crime and criminal behavior is viewed as one of the many forms of deviation from political, moral and conduct norms of the majority culture. Studies the parallel genesis of crime and other parallel forms of deviance, and the relationship between some forms of deviance (such as mental illness and political extremism) and some forms of criminality. Studies the forces that produce conformity and indirectly promote deviation. Prerequisite(s): R CRJ 203.
The purpose of this course is to describe and understand geographic and temporal variations in the amounts and types of crime across countries. Students will critically examine the data, methods, and theories used to measure and explain crime across nations and over time.
The information technology revolution has had a large impact on the criminal justice system. This course will use contemporary examples to explore the ways in which criminal justice information is used for different purposes and to examine some common mistakes made when interpreting such information.
Introduction to theories of how democracies make public policy. Describes the roles of government institutions, the media, and interest groups in the policy process. Reviews current theories of how problems are identified and how policies are formulated, enacted, and implemented to address public problems. Only one version of R POS 140 may be taken for credit
This course is designed to introduce students to the study of violent political conflict. We will examine the how, why, and when of violent political conflict both domestic and international. What are the key empirical and normative questions raised by violent political conflict and what answers to these questions does the literature offer? What other strategies, like nonviolence and negotiation are available to actors instead of political violence? In this course, in addition to studying the theories that have been developed to explain the politics and history of violent political conflict, students will have an opportunity to participate in simulation exercises designed to sharpen their analytic skills in the subject area. Open to Honors College students only.
The composition and problems of various ethnic and religious minorities: their origins, characteristics, political mobilization, and degree of integration into the social and political systems of the new post-colonial nations of Asia, Africa, and Latin America examined against a background of European, American, and Russian experience. T POS 261 is the Honors College version of R POS 361. Only one may be taken for credit.
Introduction to research design, statistics, and computer usage in public policy with an emphasis on the interpretation of results. Students examine experimental, quasi-experimental, and non- experimental research designs, summarize and present univariate distributions, perform bivariate and multivariate analyses including simple cross-tabulations and multiple regression analysis, and learn to use a computer to perform statistical and data management operations. Only one version of R PAD 316 may be taken for credit.
This course focuses on the theoretical, constitutional, and political dimensions of American federalism, including the tensions between the planes of government, interstate relations, and the problem-solving capabilities of the federal system. Particular emphasis is placed upon the formal powers of each plane of government and the limitations upon these powers. The reasons for and the political significance of the increasing use of preemption powers by the Congress will be examined.
This course is designed to introduce students to the study of violent political conflict. We will examine the how, why, and when of violent political conflict both domestic and international. The course will focus on the key empirical and normative questions raised by violent political conflict and what answers to these questions the existing literature offers. In this course, in addition to studying the theories that have been developed to explain the politics and history of violent political conflict, students will have an opportunity to participate in simulation exercises designed to sharpen their analytic skills in the subject.

Cybersecurity Concentration

This course provides a broad introduction to cybersecurity and the way in which cybersecurity is viewed, studied, or executed by professionals in industry, government, the military, and academia. For students that approach the topic from a policy management perspective, this class will enhance their understanding of the interaction between social, technical, policy, and management factors that affect the creation and management of secure cyber infrastructure. A brief introduction to the technical side of cybersecurity will be provided. The course will offer technically advanced students an opportunity to better understand management, policy, and political equities involved in cybersecurity. Students approaching the subject from either the technical or policy/management perspective will be equipped to take more advanced technical courses in a multitude of disciplines that make up cybersecurity. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing or permission of instructor.
The goal of this course is to equip decision makers with the principles and methods that will allow for more informed budget decisions as it relates to cybersecurity. First this class will review budgeting basics as well as the core of budgeting for information technology and cybersecurity. Then the class will examine risk management as a total program component of cybersecurity as well as apply it to the budgeting process. Finally the class will take a comprehensive approach to managing IT/IS projects from a risk management, budgeting, and procurement point of view. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.
Cyber threats currently are posed by state and non-state actors whose motivations include financial gain, notoriety, social activism, espionage, and even revenge. This course will examine cyber threats from different angles to introduce students to today's actors; motivations; tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs); and mitigation techniques, while providing insight into the impact of cyber crimes on victim organizations and employees. A variety of case studies will used to study how TTPs are applied, and aid students in understanding attack consequences, responding agency abilities, and the various protection, mitigation, and remediation measures. The course will also examine models of cyber activity, as well as how models from other fields can be applied to thinking about cyber threats. The objective of the course is to provide students with a foundation for leading their organization in prevention, mitigation, and remediation of cyber attacks. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing or permission of the instructor.
This course provides a foundation of information systems concepts that can be applied to future learning in advanced topics. The course will include background in the history and social implications of computing including cyber ethics; emergent and contemporary information technology and its nomenclature; information and data abstraction, representation, manipulation and storage; operating systems; networking and the Internet, programming languages, logic, and algorithms; database systems; digital graphics and multimedia; and information security.
In this course, students will learn the fundamental process of analyzing data collected from electronic devices (including computers, media, and other digital evidence). Students will become familiar with proper techniques and tools utilized for securing, handling and preserving digital and multimedia evidence at physical crime scenes. Students will utilize examination and chain of custody forms, as well as prepare crime scene and digital acquisition reports related to administrative, civil and criminal investigations. Only one version of B FOR 201 may be taken for credit. Offered fall and spring semesters.
This course will teach students forensic investigative techniques specifically for managing cyber crimes including collection and preservation of data from different sources, such as the Internet and "cloud" computing environments. Students will learn the legal processes available for collecting and preserving such evidence in conducting cyber investigations. Only one version of B FOR 202 may be taken for credit. Offered fall semester only.
The past couple of decades have witnessed the digital revolution profoundly altering our society. Most of the business affairs have been linked to communication and networking technologies. With tremendous advances in networking, it is now feasible to connect all the devices such as computers, tablets, smart phones, and mainframes together. However, the newly innovative communication and networking technologies pose additional challenges to business and IT management. Nowadays, IT professionals must have an elementary understanding of those technologies that facilitate them better impose management in the organization or perform advanced analysis such as for network forensics. Balanced technical and managerial contents are incorporated to enable students to learn from various perspectives. This course will introduce the student to the organization and design of data networks. Topics include networking media, Ethernet technology, the TCP/IP protocol suite, subnets, routers and routing protocols, Wide Area Networks (WANs), and fundamentals of network management. This course includes hands- on experience of networking techniques. Offered fall semester only.

BFOR 204:
This course covers computer and network security. This course will examine general security concepts that include: communication security, infrastructure security, operation/organizational security, basic cryptography and steganography. Students will learn and apply de facto security best practices administering clients, servers and firewalls in a dedicated computer network laboratory. Students will have the opportunity to assess vulnerabilities and administer information security. Offered spring semester only.

ICSI 124X:
An introduction to security in computers and networks for a general audience. The operation of computers and networks is explained to show how they are the basis for attacks. The course will confer a basic but comprehensive understanding of how computer and network attacks (e.g., viruses, worms, denial of service) work. Also, how general users of computers can defend themselves from current and future attacks.

A large part of digital forensics deals with extraction and collection of data across electronic devices each of which has different architecture. In this class students learn the traditional relational database design and then understand the architecture of data storage in mobile electronic devices. The class also discusses in depth the storage of data on the cloud and the ramifications of that on digital forensics. Students also learn the basic techniques for analyzing data including use of Structured Query Language, data mining techniques and social network analysis. Students will also use scripting languages to efficiently clean up data from text files and extract information from files. Prerequisite(s): B FOR 100 or permission of instructor. Offered fall semester only.

Cybersecurity is an international problem where the perpetrators and victims of attacks amy be in completely disparate locations. Cyber-attacks have morphed from cybercrime and amateur display of prowess into cyber warfare and espionage among nations. While the issues are international there is little consensus on how to investigate them, create universally acceptable norms, and create international laws across multiple countries to manage them. This course discusses some of these sensitive issues regarding information security and cyber warfare. The hope is to improve understanding between professionals and students across countries in order to foster cooperation in resolving cyber conflicts. The class will include cases and discussions that will touch on the sensitive security related topics.

This course will discuss detection, management, and recovery from different types of incidents. The goal of this course is to provide students with a method for performing cyber incident analysis. Real incident data will be used to illustrate difference incident analysis techniques. Students will learn to identify the data sources, e.g. log files, and how to process the data into a meaningful analysis format. The class will cover analysis of individual files as well as techniques to correlate information across multiple log sources to build a chain of evidence across those log files. Prerequisite(s): BFOR 100 and BFOR 204 or permission of instructor.

This course introduces students to data and databases. It covers both long-standing relational (SQL) databases and newly emerging non-relational (NoSQL) data sores. The nature of data, Big Data, intellectual property, system lifecycle, and development collaborations are also explored. Team-based activities alternate with hands-on exercises. Prerequisite(s): ICSI 101, 105, 110 or BITM 215; not open to students who are taking or have completed ICSI 410 or 411 or BITM 331.

Technical aspects of cybersecurity in computer and network systems. The nature of attacks and defense in digital systems; models of vulnerabilities, threats and security; cryptography; forensics; security policies and procedures; software and network security. Prerequisite: IINF 202.