B.S. in Atmospheric Sciences (Meteorology)

There is tremendous demand for expertise in atmospheric science/meteorology. Weather and climate change have a significant effect on people, the economy, and the planet. We invite you to learn more about our major and opportunities in atmospheric science (meteorology).

What Students Are Saying

“The Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences is great because it’s a small, close knit department in a large school. The atmospheric science classes are small, so the professors know you by name and really encourage everyone to succeed.”

-Hannah Attard, Class of 2012

What Students Are Saying

“One of the things that really stood our the first time I visited was the positive energy radiating throughout this department. The professors’ doors are rarely closed, allowing great relationships to form with their students.”

-Rachel O’Donnell, Class of 2016

What Students Are Saying

"My undergrad experience at UAlbany was excellent in that it provided both a solid education in the theory of atmospheric science and practical experience in applied meteorology through internships with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The skills I obtained during my time at Albany I continue to use to this day in my career. The tight knit atmosphere of the department allowed you to really learn a lot from your professors and develop great friendships with my classmates...many of whom I am proud to now have as colleagues.”

-Timothy Humphrey, Class of 2012

What Students Are Saying

“The Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences is great because it’s a small, close knit department in a large school. The atmospheric science classes are small, so the professors know you by name and really encourage everyone to succeed.”

-Hannah Attard, Class of 2012

What topics do I learn about in the major?

Weather systems and weather forecasting; severe weather: tornados, hurricanes, blizzards; precipitation processes; hands-on experience running weather and climate models and using software and statistics to unlock the secrets of weather data; major issues such as climate change, energy, and air quality; and much more. Click here for a full listing of our atmospheric science/meteorology courses .

Why study atmospheric science/meteorology at the University at Albany?

We have one of the largest programs in the nation. We are the only department in the nation that has three professors who have won the American Meteorological Society’s Edward N. Lorenz Teaching Excellence Award. Our faculty are world leaders in their fields of research, so you will learn cutting-edge science in your coursework. We have a state-of-the-art map room to display and analyze weather data. The Albany National Weather Service office is right on campus. UAlbany is also home to the , a collection of over 100 advanced weather observation stations across New York State.

Are there opportunities to add a minor?

Yes! A minor is a great way to diversify your education and learn extra skills that make you more attractive to future employers. Some common minors among atmospheric science/meteorology majors include broadcast meteorology, sustainability, math, informatics, physics, or a Geographical Information Systems (GIS) certificate. A full list of minors is here.

What student groups are our majors involved in?

There are hundreds of campus groups where you can meet up with others that share your interests. We have social and leadership opportunities in the American Meteorological Society student chapter. Our students are also involved in sustainability and environmental campus groups (The UAlbany Outdoors Club, UAlbany Students for Sustainability, and UAlbany Grow Green).

What internship opportunities are there?

Internships are a great way to gain real world experience, try on different careers, and get your foot in the door of potential employers. We keep track of the many internship and summer job opportunities in the region and match our students up with the experience that is right for them. Local opportunities include: The National Weather Service, New York State Mesonet, local TV stations, NYS Department of Environmental Conservation, and a number of private forecast companies.

Are there research opportunities?

Our students have the opportunity to work on a research project with a professor, and have researched major weather events (snowstorms, severe weather, hurricanes) and climate processes, sometimes traveling to national conferences to present their work. Research can be done for credit.

Student Research

“A Climate Forecast System Reanalysis of Tropical/Extratropical Interactions”
-Nicholas Schiraldi, Class of 2012

“Analysis of Banding in the 26-27 December 2010 East Coast Blizzard”
-Sara Ganetis, Class of 2011

“Evaluation of Convective Available Potential Energy Tendency in Tornado Outbreaks”
-Timothy Humphrey, Class of 2012

“Large-scale Precursors to Major Lake-effect Snowstorms Lee of Lake Erie”
-Hannah Attard, Class of 2012

What jobs can I get with an atmospheric science/meteorology degree?

There are many types of jobs available for atmospheric science majors. Examples include:

  • Forecast jobs in the private sector
  • National Weather Service forecaster
  • Jobs in the energy, insurance, or finance sectors
  • Emergency management
  • Broadcast meteorology
  • Earth science teacher or professor
  • Researcher

...and many more!

Alumni Current Jobs

Michael Ventrice (B.S. 2008; Ph.D. 2012)
-Operational Scientist at WSI Corporation, the Professional Division of the Weather Company

Kyle MacRitchie (B.S. 2009; Ph.D. 2015)
-Data Support Scientist, NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center

Carlie Buccola (B.S. 2009)
-Meteorologist Intern at the National Weather Service, Upton, N.Y.

Ted Phaeton (B.S. 2010)
-Weekend Meteorologist at Fox Carolina in Greenville, S.C.

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