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Albany Outcomes Assesment Model

The Albany Model is a data-driven, formative approach to assessment that relates students' college experiences and their pre-college characteristics to important educational outcomes. UAlbany has a long history in assessing institutional level educational outcomes. Examples of research founded on the Albany Model can be found in Institutional Research's Assessment Report Series.

Scroll down for a description of the student survey items and measures used in the Albany Model. Click here for a short narrative that more fully describes the Albany Model.

Most scales are based on five-point Likert type response scales.

Personal Traits

Pre-College Characteristic Measures (from University records and Entering Student Survey)

Age, Ethnicity, and Gender

Parents' Education
Mother's education
Father's education

Aptitude Test Scores
Total SAT score
ACT equivalent

High School Achievement
High school GPA
High school percentile rank in class

High School Characteristics and Preparation (scale: yes or no)
Pre-calculus or calculs
Foreign language
3 years or more of science
Advanced placement (AP) courses

Psychological Factors (from Entering Student Survey)

Parental Influence (scale: not true to true)
My parents encourage me to do the best in whatever I do
I can go to my parents when I have a problem

Educational Aspirations (scale: importance)
To gain a broad, well-rounded education (in the sciences, humanities, and arts)
To learn to think creatively and analytically
To learn more about myself, my values, and my life's goals
To learn more about other cultures and groups of people.

Involvement (scale: degree of chance)
Participate in intercollegiate or intramural sports
Belong to a fraternity or sorority
Join a student club (academic, political, or cultural)
Participate in student government, student newspaper, and/or campus radio station

Receptivity to Academic Services (scale: degree of chance)
Visit professors during their office hours
Attend a study group from one of your classes
Contact my academic advisor more than once per semester
Visit the Career Development Center

Academic Motivation - Intrinsic (scale: not true to true)
I enjoy the classes that challenge my mind.
I will feel successful if I have the highest test scores.
Thinking about my future motivates me to work hard in school.
Solving difficult problems in my classes gives me a sense of satisfaction.
I feel successful when I learn something interesting.
Learning new things gives me a sense of accomplishment.
Schoolwork is interesting because you see yourself making progress.
I read books not assigned in classes.

Academic Motivation - Extrinsic (scale: not true to true)
I study hard because I want to prove myself as capable as anyone else in class.
I worry about not doing as well academically as others in college.
I don't feel I can gain much in college other than obtaining a degree.
I feel that as long as my teachers are satisfied with my academic performance, that is enough.
I don't really care how well I will do in college, as long as I can pass.
Getting a high paying job is the main reason I study hard in college.
I feel ashamed if I don't do as well as other students do in college.
I worry about failing exams and getting into academic trouble.

Self-Regulation (scale: not true to true)
When I get something wrong in school, I always stop and try to find out what went wrong rather than simply asking my instructor the correct answer.
I take notes while reading textbooks.
When I run into difficulties in schoolwork, I feel if I put in extra effort, I will eventually figure them out.
When I am reading my textbooks, I stop and check whether I really understand what I have just read.
If I study harder my academic abilities will improve.
I keep a regular study schedule.
When learning a new concept, I never check if I really understand its meaning.

College Experiences

Academic Integration Scales and Measures:

Academic Conscientiousness (scale response categories vary)
How frequently have you worked harder than you thought you could to meet an instructor's expectations?
How frequently have you developed your study skills?
How frequently have you utilized your study skills?
I put a good deal of effort into being well prepared for examinations.
My primary goal at UAlbany is to take advantage of academic opportunities.
Managed your time effectively?

Course Experiences (scale: never to almost always)
How frequently have you received feedback (written or oral) from instructors on the quality of your work?
How frequently have you been satisfied with your academic experiences?
How frequently have you had out-of-class assignments that were good learning experiences?
How frequently have you worked with other students on class assignments?
How frequently have you had to critically appraise the value of information, arguments, or methods in your classes or class assignments?
How frequently have you had discussions, meetings, or conversations with instructors outside of class?

Classroom Attendance (not used as a scale)
Average number of class meetings missed per week?

Student-Faculty Contact
(not used as a scale)
Visit professors during their office hours
Seek out a faculty mentor?

Social Integration:

Peer Relations (scale: disagreement to agreement)
I have developed strong friendships with other students.
My interpersonal relationships with other students have had a positive influence on my personal growth.
I know several UAlbany students who would be willing to help me if I had a personal problem.
It has been difficult for me to make friends with other students. (reversed)
My interpersonal relationships with other students have had a positive influence on my intellectual growth.
Developed or sustained friendships with other students? (scale: never to almost always)

Extra-Curricular Activities (not used as a scale)
Participate in intercollegiate or intramural sports
Belong to a fraternity or sorority
Join a student club (academic, political, or cultural)
Participate in student government, student newspaper, and/or campus radio station

Employment (not used as a scale)
Hours working on-campus per week (paid).
Hours working on-campus per week (volunteer).
Hours working off-campus per week (paid).
Hours working off-campus per week (volunteer).

Institutional Integration:

Institutional Commitment (not used as a scale)
Visit the Writing Center?
Visit the Career Development Center?
Contact your academic advisor more than once per semester?

Advisement (agreement scale)
Advisor was knowledgeable about course requirements for the major(s).
Advisor was knowledgeable about course requirements for the minor(s).
Advisor was helpful in assisting with scheduling/ registration procedures.
Advisor showed genuine interest in my academic progress.
Advisor went over my degree audit with me to inform me of course requirements I have not yet met.
Advisor was knowledgeable about academic policies (e.g., graduation requirements, GPA requirements, General Education guidelines, residence requirements, etc.).
Advisor was available when I needed him/her.
Advisor showed concern for my personal growth and development.
Advisor helped me to identify career areas (or graduate school opportunities) which fit my skills, abilities, and interests
Advisor encouraged me to talk about myself and my college experience.
Advisor was easy to talk with.
Advisor promptly returned my phone calls, e-mails, and/or messages.

Affinity of Educational Values (scale: level of importance)
To gain a broad, well-rounded education (in the sciences, humanities, and arts).
To learn to think creatively and analytically.
To learn more about myself, my values, and my life's goals.
To learn more about other cultures and groups of people.
To gain knowledge and skills directly applicable to a career.

Educational Outcomes

Intellectual Growth Scales and Measures:

Writing, Creativity, and Appreciation, UAlbany contribution to… (scale: none to very large)
Writing effectively.
Developing intellectual curiosity.
Developing the ability to formulate creative ideas and/or solutions.
Appreciating artistic and creative expression.
Placing current problems in historical perspective.

Scientific Method
Evaluating ideas, materials, and methods critically.
Developing problem solving skills.
Thinking analytically and logically.
Understanding scientific findings.
Understanding mathematical concepts.

Disciplinary Study
Gaining factual knowledge.
Learning how to learn.
Synthesizing a body of information.
Understanding a particular discipline's research methods.
Understanding a particular discipline's various schools of thought.
Understanding the inter-relatedness of different fields of study.
Using information and/or computer technology in your academic discipline

Academic Achievement (Institutional Records)
GPA performance
Credits completed
Awards and honors

Persistence/Graduation (Institutional Records)
Graduated or not

Personal Growth Scales and Measures:

Interpersonal Skills
Speaking effectively.
Developing interpersonal and social skills.
Functioning effectively as a member of a team.
Preparing for active participation in a democratic society.
Coping with conflict.

Openness & Tolerance
Gaining exposure to a variety of new intellectual areas.
Developing an openness to new ideas.
Coping with moral and ethical issues.
Developing a better understanding of myself (e.g., interests, talents, values, limitations).
Understanding cultural differences.
Relating well to people of different races
Adapting to different social situations
Exercising personal responsibility.

Functioning Independently
Functioning independently (self-reliance).

Change in Aspirations & Goals from Entering Student Survey
To gain a broad, well-rounded education (in the sciences, humanities, and arts).
To learn to think creatively and analytically.
To learn more about myself, my values, and my life's goals.
To learn more about other cultures and groups of people.
To gain knowledge and skills directly applicable to a career.

Post Graduation Plans
Graduate school
Area of study
Name of school
Job/career
Employer
Employer location
Field
Title

Salary

Control Variables (in addition to pre-college characteristics)
Admissions program (e.g, native vs frosh, eop, mrp, traditional)
Department of major
Time since major declaration for department level analyses

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For additional information about the Undergraduate Student Experience Survey please contact:

Bruce Szelest
Assistant Vice President for
Institutional Research, Planning and Effectiveness
518/437-4928

or

Joel Bloom
Associate Director, Office of Institutional Research, Planning and Effectiveness
518/437-4791

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