George A. Broadwell

Office: Arts & Sciences Building, Room 239
Ph: (518) 442-4711
E-mail: gbroadwell@albany.edu

Dr. Aaron Broadwell
Ph.D., UCLA, 1990

Academia: http://albany.academia.edu/GeorgeAaronBroadwell

Curriculum Vitae

Research Interests

Linguistic anthropologist with primary research interest in syntactic theory and language and cognition. Area specialization is American Indian languages, with research in Choctaw, Timucua, Trique, and Zapotec.

George Aaron Broadwell is a Professor in the Dept of Anthropology and the Program in Linguistics and Cognitive Science.  His primary research agenda focuses on endangered languages, primarily Native American languages of the United States and Mesoamerica.  He is interested in the issues of integrating language description and documentation with contemporary work in linguistic theory.

 

His long-term descriptive commitments have been to grammatical and lexical descriptions of Choctaw, contemporary Zapotec (San Dionisio Ocotepec, Macuiltianguis, and Sierra Juarez varieties), colonial Zapotec, Copala Triqui, Timucua, with occasional work on grammatical issues in a number of other languages around the world (Mon, Kaqchikel, Kiche, Turkish, Crow, Creek).

 

From a theoretic point of view, he has been interested in word order, causative structures, lexical semantics, negation, diachronic syntax, and syntactic typology.

 

In recent years, Dr Broadwell has also developed a series of research collaborations with colleagues from the Institute for Informatics, Logic, and Security Studies, to work on issues involving language and computation.  His current project is Robust Extraction of Metaphors from Novel Data, in which his team seeks to develop methods to identify and interpret metaphors in natural language text.

 

His recently concluded project, Detecting Social Actions and Roles in Multiparty Discourse, was an exercise in computational sociolinguistics, which sought to identify characteristics like leadership and persuasion in small groups based solely on linguistic interaction.

 

Interests: Linguistics, syntax

Areas: North America, Mesoamerica

 

Teaching

I frequently teach the field methods in linguistics course for our department. Our 1996 field methods course involved creating a series of web pages on the Mon language.

For a guide to writing linguistics papers you can download a PDF file here.

Copies of many recent papers are available at http://albany.academia.edu/GeorgeAaronBroadwell

Research of George Broadwell

  • Vidal-Lopez, Román. (2012). Nana naguan' rihaan nij síí chihaan' | Consejos para la gente Triqui | Words of counsel for the Triqui people. Edited by George A Broadwell, Ashley LaBoda, Sharone Horowit-Hendler, and Gabriela Aquino Dehesa.  IMS Occasional Publication No. 16. Albany NY: University at Albany.

     

  • Broadwell, George Aaron; Jennifer Stromer-Galley; Tomek Strzalkowski; Samira Shaikh, Sarah Taylor, Umit Boz, Alana Elia, Laura Jiao, Ting Liu, and Nick Webb (2012). Modeling socio-cultural phenomena in discourse. Journal of Natural Language Engineering.
  •  Broadwell, George A; Castellucci, Gregg, and Megan Knickerbocker (2011). Toward an optimal account of partial agreement in Kaqchikel..  in Miriam Butt and Tracy Holloway King, eds. Proceedings of the Lexical Functional Grammar 2011 conference.  (Available at http://csli-publications.stanford.edu)
  • Broadwell, George A. (in press). Timucua -ta: Muskogean parallels. in Michael Picone and Catherine Evans Davies, eds. Language Variety in the Southeast III: Historical and contemporary perspectives. Tuscaloosa, AL: University of Alabama Press.
  • Samira Shaikh, Tomek Strzalkowski, Aaron Broadwell, Jennifer Stromer-Galley, Sarah Taylor, and Nick Webb (2010) MPC: A Multi-Party Chat Corpus For Modeling Social Phenomena In Discourse. Proc. of LREC-2010 Conference, Malta
  • Broadwell, George A. (2010). Two movement paradoxes in Zapotec. in Miriam Butt and Tracy Holloway King, eds. Proceedings of the Lexical Functional Grammar 2010 conference. (Available at http://csli-publications.stanford.edu)
  • Broadwell, George A. (2008). Turkish suspended affixation is lexical sharing. in Miriam Butt and Tracy Holloway King, eds. Proceedings of the Lexical Functional Grammar 2008 conference. (Available at http://csli-publications.stanford.edu)
  • Broadwell, George A. (2007). Lexical sharing and non-projecting words: The case of Zapotec adjectives. in Miriam Butt and Tracy Holloway King, eds. Proceedings of the Lexical Functional Grammar 2007 conference. (Available at http://csli-publications.stanford.edu)  
  • Broadwell, George A. (2006). Alignment, precedence, and the typology of pied-piping with inversion. in Miriam Butt and Tracy Holloway King, eds. Proceedings of the Lexical Functional Grammar 2006 conference. (Available at http://csli-publications.stanford.edu)
  • Broadwell, George A. (2005). It ain't necessarily S(V)O: Two kinds of VSO languages. in Miriam Butt and Tracy Holloway King, eds. Proceedings of the Lexical Functional Grammar 2005 conference. (Available at http://csli-publications.stanford.edu)
  • Broadwell, George A. (2005).  It ain't necessarily S(V)O: Two kinds of VSO languages.  in Miriam Butt and Tracy Holloway King, eds. Proceedings of the Lexical Functional Grammar 2005 conference. (Available at http://csli-publications.stanford.edu)

  • Broadwell, George A. (2005). The morphology of Zapotec pronominal clitics.in Rosemary Beam de Azcona and Mary Paster, eds. Survey of California and Other Indian Languages, Report 13: Conference on Otomanguean and Oaxacan Languages, pp. 15-35. University of California at Berkeley.

  • Broadwell, George A. (2003).  Optimality, Complex Predication, and Parallel Structures in Zapotec.  in Miriam Butt and Tracy Holloway King, eds. Proceedings of the Lexical Functional Grammar 2003 conference. (Available at http://csli-publications.stanford.edu/

  • Broadwell, George A. (2003). Branching consistency as a constraint on Zapotec syntax. in Proceedings of the 38th Chicago Linguistics Society. Broadwell, George Aaron and Lachlan Duncan. (2002).  A new passive in Kaqchikel.  Linguistic Discovery, v. 1 no 2.

  • Broadwell, George Aaron. (2002). Constraint symmetry in optimality theoretic syntax. [PDF version] Miriam Butt and Tracy Holloway King, eds. Proceedings of the 2002 Lexical-Functional Grammar conference.

  • Broadwell, George Aaron. (2002).  Branching consistency as a constraint on Zapotec syntax.  [PDF version].  Presented at the Chicago Linguistic Society.

  • Broadwell, George Aaron. (1999). Focus alignment and optimal order in Zapotec. Proceedings of the 35th Chicago Linguistic Society. PostScript version. PDF version. [This version is shortened to fit the page requirements for CLS. For a fuller version, see the manuscripts section below.]

  • Broadwell, George Aaron. (1998) Directionals as complex predicates in Choctaw. Miriam Butt and Tracy Holloway King, eds. Proceedings of the 1998 Lexical-Functional Grammar Conference. Also available in PostScript and PDF.

  • Bickmore, Lee and George Aaron. Broadwell. (1998) High tone docking in Sierra Juárez Zapotec. International Journal of American Linguistics 64:37-67.

  • Broadwell, George Aaron. (1997). Binding theory and switch-reference. Atomism and Binding, ed. by Hans Bennis, Pierre Pica and Johann Rooryck. Dordrecht:Foris Publications. PDF version PostScript version

  • Broadwell, George Aaron. Switch-reference phenomena as evidence for structure-based approaches to binding theory. Presented at the LINGUIST On-line Conference Geometric and thematic structure in binding

  • Broadwell, George Aaron. (1996) Directional particles and abstract motion in Choctaw. Proceedings of the 1996 Mid-America Linguistics Conference. pp. 53-66. PDF version PostScript version

  • Broadwell, George Aaron. (1995a). 1990 census estimates for speakers of Native American languages. International Journal of American Linguistics 61:145-149.

  • Justeson, John and George Aaron. Broadwell. (1995b). Language and languages in Mesoamerica. in Carmack, Gasco, and Gossen, The legacy of Mesoamerica: History and culture of a Native American civilization. Prentice Hall. pp. 379-406.

  • Broadwell, George Aaron. (1994a) Causation and affectedness in Choctaw. Proceedings of the 1993 Mid-America Linguistics Conference. PDF version PostScript version

  • Broadwell, George Aaron. and Jack Martin. (1993a) The clitic/agreement split: Asymmetries in Choctaw person marking. Proceedings of the Berkeley Linguistic Society. pp. 1- 10.

  • Broadwell, George Aaron. (1993b) Subtractive morphology in Southern Muskogean. International Journal of American Linguistics . 59: 416-429

  • Broadwell, George Aaron. (1993c) Is Choctaw a pronominal argument language? Proceedings of the 1992 Mid-America Linguistics Conference, pp. 389-401.

 

  • Broadwell, George A. (1991b) Speaker and SELF in Choctaw. International Journal of American Linguistics 57:411-425.

     

Some manuscripts in progress and conference handouts (with commentary from me)
  • Choctaw PDF version

    This is a sketch of about 65 pages, which should be appearing later this year in a volume on Southeastern languages, edited by Janine Scancarelli and Heather Hardy, published by University of Nebraska Press. It gives a nice overview of prominent phonological, morphological, and syntactic properties of the language, and is intended for a general linguist with no special knowledge of Muskogean or Native American languages. The sketch includes an analysed text, 'My first days at school', told by Mr. Henry Willis, a native speaker of Oklahoma Choctaw. Some details of the glossing and discussion are superceded by my forthcoming book A Choctaw reference grammar, but they don't affect the main thrust of the discussion.

     [The PDF version did not display phonetic characters properly, so a few substitutions had to be made to the original ms. These are explained in footnote 1 of ms.]

  • Reconstructing Proto-Muskogean Language and Prehistory: Preliminary results PDF version

    This is a paper that I gave at a 1992 conference in St. Augustine, FL, which has not been published. In it, I look at lexicostatistical data for the modern Muskogean languages (Choctaw, Chickasaw, Alabama, Koasati, Mikasuki, Creek, Seminole) and make arguments for the correct subgrouping of the languages, for the approximate date of Proto-Muskogean, and for some features of the Proto-Muskogean environment (particularly the flora and fauna).

  • When causative means intensive.

A paper given at the 1997 Workshop on Structure and Constituency in Languages of the Americas, Winnipeg, Manitoba. March 1997. PDF version

This paper looks at two possible readings of the causative morpheme in Choctaw, and proposes a lexical semantic account, using Jackendoff's framework of Conceptual Semantics. Choctaw is compared with Amharic, Oromo, Fijian, and Tuvan. I would now no longer accept the non-lexicalist treatment of the causative assumed in this paper, but I think the semantic account still holds up.
  • On the phonological conditioning of clitic placement in Zapotec.

To appear in Proceedings of the Workshop on Structure and Constituency in Languages of the Americas PDF version

In this paper I argue that the distribution of certain "2nd position" clitics in San Dionicio Ocotepec Zapotec is best described through alignment with the intonational phrase rather than 1) through syntactic movement or 2) alignment with a syntactic category.

  • Coordination, clitic placement, and prosody in Zapotec.

Presented at the Berkeley Linguistic Society, Feb 2000.  PDF version.

This is a slightly different version of the WSCLA paper above.

  • Word order and markedness in Kaqchikel.

Handout for a talk presented at the LFG2000 conference, July 2000, Berkeley CA. PDF version

This paper uses ideas from Aissen's (1999) implementation of markedness within optimality theory to predict the distribution of SVO vs. VX order in Kaqchikel Maya.

  • Preverbal positions and phrase boundaries in Zapotec.

Handout for a talk presented at the 2002 LSA conference, San Francisco, CA. PDF version.

This paper presents a general theory of the phrase structure of San Dionicio Ocotepec Zapotec.  It looks at the relative ordering of external topics, interrogatives, internal topics, and adverbs.  I argue here that the evidence supports a fairly conservative view of the phrase structure -- there is good evidence for only three categories: CP,  IP, and S (a non-endocentric, flat category).  There is little evidence to support a derivation of the VSO order through movement of either V or VP.

  • The conjunctions of Colonial and Modern Valley Zapotec: Evidence from Feria (1567).

Handout for a talk presented at the 2002 American Society for Ethnohistory. Quebec City. October 2002.  PDF version.

This is an examination of the morphosyntax of conjunctions in colonial Valley Zapotec, in comparison to modern Valley Zapotec.  It is based on examination of a 16th century Zapotec/Spanish doctrina by Juan de Feria.  I believe that this paper is the first linguistic study of the Zapotec material in Feria.
 
  • Macuiltianguis Zapotec tone paradigms.

This is an unpublished manuscript which surveys tone in Macuiltianguis Zapotec verbs, focussing on the interaction between a  floating H tone associated with the 1st person singular and other H tones in the language.  PDF version.

Some of the material in this manuscript was discussed in an 1999 LSA paper, Tonal alignment constraints and the nature of evaluation coauthored with Jie Zhang.  [Unfortunately the association lines don't come out properly in this  PDF version]

    This page last updated on March 25, 2013.

Select Publications

Book
Vidal López, Román. (narrator.) 2009. The origin of the sun and moon: A Copala Triqui legend. Transcribed and edited by George Aaron Broadwell, Kosuke Matsukawa, Edgar Martín del Campo, Ruth Scipione, and Susan Perdomo. Munich: LINCOM Europa.
Broadwell, George A. 2006. A Choctaw reference grammar.  Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press. 

Book Chapters

2006
Broadwell, George A. 2006. Valence, information structure, and passive constructions in Kaqchikel.  in L. Kulikov, A. Malchukov, and P. de Swart, eds. Case, Valency, and Transitivity. John Benjamins.

2005
Broadwell, George A. (2005) Choctaw. in Heather Hardy and Janine Scancarelli, eds. Native languages of the southeastern United States, pp.157-199. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press.

Choctaw. In The native languages of the southeastern United States. Heather Hardy and Janine Scancarelli (eds). Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press.

2001
Optimal order and pied-piping in San Dionicio Zapotec. In Formal and Empirical Issues in Optimality Theoretic Syntax. Peter Sells (ed). Stanford: CSLI Publications.

2000
Choctaw directionals and the syntax of complex predication. In Argument realization. Miriam Butt and Tracy Holloway King (eds). Stanford, CA: CSLI Publications.

Look for the stick: Some remarks on globalization and language endangerment. In Lectures on endangered languages, 2nd ed. Osamu Miyaoka (ed). Endangered Languages of the Pacific Rim Publication C002.

Encyclopedia articles

2005
Broadwell, George A. (2005).  Zapotecan languages.  Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics, 2nd edition. Elsevier.

Broadwell, George A. (2005).  Muskogean languages.  Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics, 2nd edition. Elsevier.

Journal articles

2002
Broadwell, George Aaron and Lachlan Duncan.  A new passive in Kaqchikel.  Linguistic Discovery, 1(2).

1998
Bickmore, Lee S. and George A. Broadwell. High tone docking in Sierra Juárez Zapotec. International Journal of American Linguistics, 64:37-67.