Assign Priority

You have identified the accessibility errors on your webpages – now where to go from here?

Before any edits are made, it is a good idea to create a triage system for web fixes based on the content of the pages and/or the severity of the accessibility issues you have identified.

Here are two examples of web edit hierarchies that you can draw from to organize your own workflow:

WCAG 1.0 Priority Levels

 

This system was used until 2008 to evaluate whether web content met the conformance requirements set by the W3C.

WCAG Priority 1

A Web content developer must satisfy this checkpoint. Otherwise, one or more groups will find it impossible to access information in the document. Satisfying this checkpoint is a basic requirement for some groups to be able to use Web documents.

Examples of Priority 1 Checkpoints:
  • Ensure that all information conveyed with color is also available without color, for example from context or markup.
  • For data tables, identify row and column headers.

WCAG Priority 2

A Web content developer should satisfy this checkpoint. Otherwise, one or more groups will find it difficult to access information in the document. Satisfying this checkpoint will remove significant barriers to accessing Web documents.

Examples of Priority 2 Checkpoints:
  • Use header elements to convey document structure and use them according to specification.
  • Until user agents allow users to turn off spawned windows, do not cause pop-ups or other windows to appear and do not change the current window without informing the user.

WCAG Priority 3

A Web content developer may address this checkpoint. Otherwise, one or more groups will find it somewhat difficult to access information in the document. Satisfying this checkpoint will improve access to Web documents.

Examples of Priority 3 Checkpoints:
  • Create a style of presentation that is consistent across pages.
  • Identify the primary natural language of a document.

Penn State Blockers

 

Penn State has divided the most prevalent features of their website into two categories: “Blockers” and “Beyond the Blockers.” “Blocker” items may prevent users from understanding the content on your webpage completely, while the items in the latter category include considerations that were given a lower priority rating in the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0.

Examples of “Blockers”: Examples from “Beyond the Blockers”: