Writing and Critical Inquiry Program

Robert P. Yagelski, Ph.D., Director

The program in Writing and Critical Inquiry (WCI) is intended to introduce new students to intellectual inquiry at the university with a focus on academic writing. The seminar U UNI 110, required for students matriculating Fall 2013 and thereafter, is devoted to rigorous practice in writing as a discipline itself and as an essential form of inquiry in postsecondary education. This requirement reflects the importance of writing as a vehicle for learning and a means of expression. The course also emphasizes the essential role of writing in students’ lives as citizens, workers, and productive members of their communities.

Based on established principles of rhetorical theory, Writing and Critical Inquiry provides students opportunities for sustained practice in writing so that students gain a deeper understanding of writing as a mode of inquiry and develop their ability to negotiate varied writing and reading tasks in different academic and non-academic contexts. Through rigorous assignments that emphasize analysis and argument, students learn to engage in writing as an integral part of critical inquiry in college-level study, become familiar with the conventions of academic discourse, and sharpen their skills as researchers, while improving their command of the mechanics of prose composition. Writing and Critical Inquiry also helps students develop competence in the uses of digital technologies as an essential 21st century skill for inquiry and communication.

Writing and Critical Inquiry seminars are limited to 19 students, which enables students and their instructors to work together closely as they explore the nature, uses, and practice of writing. The small size of the seminars also provides opportunities for students to explore the rich diversity of thought and the varied perspectives that are an integral part of the university experience. Through shared experiences as writers, students will learn to think critically and carefully about the complex questions that are the focus of inquiry across the many different academic disciplines that make up the university curriculum.

Writing and Critical Inquiry provides a foundation for students to continue to develop their abilities to think critically about the world around them, to communicate effectively in written and oral discourse in a variety of settings, and to engage in sophisticated inquiry as a way to address the questions they will confront in their classes and in their lives outside the university.

For additional information visit: http://www.albany.edu/wci.

U UNI 110 Writing and Critical Inquiry (3)
Introduction to college-level critical inquiry with a focus on the practice of writing. Based on principles of rhetorical theory, the course emphasizes intensive practice in academic writing as well as writing in other contexts. Students complete various projects in order to deepen their understanding of writing as a vehicle for inquiry and enhance their ability to produce clear and effective prose for different audiences and purposes and in different media. Only one of T UNI 110, U UNI 110, or A ENG 110 may be taken for credit. Must be completed with a grade of C or better or S to meet the Writing and Critical Inquiry requirement.

T UNI 110 Honors Writing and Critical Inquiry (3)
T UNI 110 is the Honors College version of U UNI 110; only one of T UNI 110, U UNI 110, or A ENG 110 may be taken for credit. Must be completed with a grade of C or better or S to meet the Writing and Critical Inquiry requirement. Prerequisite(s): first-year student in the Honors College.

Approved Writing and Critical Inquiry Equivalent:

A ENG 110 Writing and Critical Inquiry in the Humanities (3)
Introduction to the practice and study of writing as the vehicle for academic inquiry in the Humanities at the college level. Students will learn the skills necessary for clear, effective communication of ideas through careful attention to the writing process and the examination of a variety of rhetorical and critical practices. Only one of T UNI 110, U UNI 110, or A ENG 110 may be taken for credit. Must be completed with a grade of C or better or S to meet the Writing and Critical Inquiry or Writing Intensive requirements.

  

University-Wide Offerings

The Interdisciplinary Studies Committee of the Undergraduate Academic Council works with all University schools and colleges and other appropriate campus offices for the purposes of encouraging, promoting, and coordinating interdisciplinary studies on a campus-wide basis. This committee reviews requests for Faculty-Initiated Majors and Minors, as well as student requests for individually designed interdisciplinary majors and minors. In addition, the committee recommends and monitors University course offerings to facilitate appropriate independent study, research, and internships not provided through other course offerings as well as specific courses taught by faculty from more than one school or college.

All “U FSP,” “U UNI,” and “U UNL” courses are defined as liberal arts and sciences courses for purposes of degree requirements for the B.A. and B.S. degrees.

The University offers several undergraduate courses designed to facilitate independent study and research as well as internship opportunities that cannot be undertaken through regular course work or through existing offerings of the colleges and schools. Students interested in the courses described in this section may obtain further information and application forms from the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, LC 30.

Credits earned through these courses are generally applied to the degree as liberal arts and sciences elective credits. However, when appropriate, such credits may be applied as major credits or minor credits as determined by the student’s respective major or minor departments. Students are advised to check with the department for particular policies or prerequisites regarding the approval of major or minor credit.

  

Faculty-Initiated Interdisciplinary Courses

The Interdisciplinary Studies Committee has approved the following Faculty-Initiated Interdisciplinary Courses. Some are not offered on a regular basis and, therefore, the schedule of classes should be consulted to determine if a course is being offered. The instructor should be contacted for further information about the course.

U UNI 150 Selected Interdisciplinary Topics (1–4; as approved)
Experimental class, the subject varying with instructors and the term offered. Course is designed to present a large body of information without expecting a mastery of detail (e.g., as in a survey course) or to present general theoretical or methodological approaches (e.g., as in a foundations course). See special announcements of courses to be offered under this heading. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Topic must be approved by the Vice Provost of Undergraduate Education and the Interdisciplinary Studies Committee of the Undergraduate Academic Council. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

U UNI 310 (= A BIO 311 & A GOG 310) World Food Crisis (3)
Interdisciplinary approach to understanding world food problems through analyses of social, political, economic, nutritional, agricultural, and environmental aspects of world hunger. Faculty from several departments in the sciences, humanities, and social and behavioral sciences present views from various disciplines. Only one version of U UNI 310 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

U UNI 350 Selected Interdisciplinary Topics (1–4; as approved)
Experimental class, the subject varying with instructors and the term offered. Course content should be beyond the introductory or survey level and the course should require prior academic achievement and/or experience related to the topic. See special announcements of courses to be offered under this heading. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Topic must be approved by the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education and the Interdisciplinary Studies Committee of the Undergraduate Academic Council. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

U UNI 350 Topic for 2016-2017 The Threat Within (3)
A new operating reality is confronting public and private sector organizations and institutions of all shapes and sizes everywhere: the threat from within that is able to exploit and expose an organization’s greatest competitive edge – the “secret sauce.” Initially many experts thought of the insider threat challenge as a technical problem to solve. However, if there is anything that one of the largest and most damaging data breaches in U.S. Government history – Edward Snowden – has taught us, it is that this challenge is simply not one dimensional. Insider threats can surface at the strategic, operational and tactical layers of an organization, and therefore, the solution needs to be comprehensive, logical, and balanced. In this course, students from a variety of disciplines will work in teams of six to eight students with course faculty, student liaisons, and industry experts as mentors using an online/cloud communication platform. The goal of the course is to enable students to analyze realistic case scenarios and identify the depth and breadth of the cybersecurity challenge from multiple perspectives. Students will focus on the interrelated dimensions of the threat (which may include but are not limited to technical, procedural, legal, behavioral, skills/proficiencies) and the spectrum of constituent cyber domains/functional areas in which to identify solutions. Prerequisite(s): sophomore, junior, or senior standing.

  

Freshman Year Experience Courses

U FSP 100 Freshman Seminar (1)
A class that meets once per week with a member of the teaching faculty. Course topics vary and will offer students a chance to interact with a faculty member about a topic of mutual interest. At the same time it will introduce first-year students to the University at Albany community and assist them in understanding the academic expectations, intellectual challenges, and personal opportunities available to them as learners. Course enrollment is limited to 25 students per section. Consult schedule of classes for individual seminar topics. Open to freshmen only.

U FSP 102 Living-Learning Community Seminar (1)
A class that meets once a week with a member of the teaching faculty. Course topics vary but are connected to Living-Learning Communities. The course is designed to integrate discipline-based learning with an understanding of the academic expectations, intellectual challenges, and personal opportunities available to students as university learners. Additionally, students forge connections with teaching faculty members. May be repeated once for credit. Only one of U FSP 102 and U FSP 100 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): admission into a Living-Learning Community.

U UNI 099 Student Engagement Recurring Class Meeting (0)
A recurring and scheduled class meeting time to allow and encourage groups of students to interact with faculty and staff around a topic, theme or major. Students enrolled in U UNI 099 would meet as a community at a scheduled time and location to discuss issues around the community's theme, class topics, host guest speakers, get help with transitional issues, form study and review sessions, and/or meet with faculty, advisors, and staff. Non-graded. May be repeated.

U UNI 100U The Freshman Year Experience (3)
The purpose of this course is to help you become a more effective student. During the course of the semester, you will learn about the college experience—experiences unique to first year students, transitional stages that you may undergo, and coping strategies that can help you pass through this phase of college life. You will learn how to use and locate important campus resources. You will learn about who you are and how that information helps you choose a major and a career. Finally, you will learn how to increase your chances of succeeding at the University at Albany as your transition through this most critical first year. Only one of U UNI 100 and E SPY 120 may be taken for credit.

U UNI 103 College Transition (1)
The purpose of this course is to help students become more effective in the college setting. During the course, students will learn about the college experience - experiences unique to first year students, transitional stages that students may undergo, and coping strategies that can help freshmen maneuver through various phases of college life. Students will learn how to use and locate important campus resources, manage intellectual challenges, and pursue professional opportunities as well as develop appropriate academic expectations in the college setting. Students will learn more about personal and societal characteristics that influence decision making and career exploration. Finally, students will learn how to increase leadership and civic engagement while in college. Prerequisite(s): open only to rising junior (11th grade) or senior (12th grade) high school students participating in STEP. Permission of instructor required.

U UNI 200 Sophomore Year Experience (3)
Sophomore Year is nationally known as college students' "slump" period in their four year journey. It is during this second year that students are pressured to make major decisions (i.e., major, minor, internships, work or graduate school track, staying or transferring, and so on). This SYE course would seek to guide second year students through this make-or-break point by discussing ways to successfully navigate through this difficult time. Second to third year retention strategies will also be emphasized.

  

University Libraries Courses

Distinguished Librarian
Trudi Jacobson, M.L.S., M.A.

Associate Librarians
Greg Bobish, M.L.S., M.A.
Irina Holden, M.S.I.S., M.S.

Senior Assistant Librarian
Allison Hosier, M.S.I.S.

U UNL 205X Information Literacy (1-2)
One-quarter course to acquaint students with the processes of finding, organizing, using, producing, and distributing information in print, electronic, and other formats. Students will learn about the flow of information in a variety of disciplines, how to be effective at the research process, how to access information in a variety of formats, and how to formulate effective searches on electronic databases and the Internet. Students will be taught to evaluate the quality of Web-based and print information, and will become familiar with social, ethical, and legal issues relating to information. When offered for two credits, there will be added emphasis on the broad scope of literacies needed in today’s information environment and on social, legal, and ethical issues. Only one course from U UNL 205X and 206X may be applied toward graduation.

U UNL 206X Information Literacy in the Sciences (1-2)
Using examples from scientific, technical, and medical literatures, this one-quarter course acquaints students with the processes of finding, organizing, using, producing, and distributing information in print, electronic, and other formats. Students will learn about the flow of information in a variety of disciplines, how to be effective at the research process, how to access information in a variety of formats, and how to formulate effective searches on electronic databases and the Internet. Students will be taught to evaluate the quality of Web-based and print information, and will become familiar with social, ethical, and legal issues relating to information. When offered for two credits, there will be added emphasis on the broad scope of literacies needed in today's science and technologies information environment and on social, legal, and ethical issues. Only one course from U UNL 205X and 206X may be applied toward graduation.

U UNL 207X Information Literacy in the Humanities and Arts (1-2)
Students majoring in the humanities and arts need to be information literate both in regard to the information environment in their discipline, and also more generally for their role as informed citizens. This course will address both of these needs. The literature of the field will take a central place in the course, including identifying an information need, understanding the organization of resource materials and learning how to best tap into them. Students will be introduced to the complexities of the information environment, in the field and in general, and the personal dispositions that will allow them to be flexible and effective when hunting for information. When offered for two credits, there will be added emphasis on the broad scope of literacies needed in today's collaborative information environment. Offered as a quarter course.

U UNL 299 Information Literacy in Mathematics and Statistics (1-2)
Students majoring in mathematics and statistics need to be information literate both in regard to the information environment in that field, and also more generally for their role as informed citizens. This course will address both of these needs. The literature of the field will take a central place in the course, including identifying an information need, understanding the organization of resource materials and learning how to best tap into them. Students will be introduced to the complexities of the information environment, in the field and in general, and the personal dispositions that will allow them to be flexible and effective when hunting for information. Students will gain experience searching the key research tool MathSciNet, but will also be introduced to appropriate databases, including Web of Science, INSPEC, and more. When offered for two credits, there will be added emphasis on the broad scope of literacies needed in today's collaborative information environment. Offered as a quarter course. Corequisite: A MAT 299.

U UNL 300/300X Advanced Topics in Information Literacy (1-3)
Special topics course designed to provide students with a more sophisticated level of information literacy abilities than U UNL 205X, 206X, or 207X courses, either through increased familiarity with the resources and flow of information in a particular discipline (e.g., humanities, social sciences, sciences) or field (e.g., English, theater) or through examination of issues related to the evolving information environment (e.g. social media as information sources, visual literacy). May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): U UNL 205X, 206X, or 207X, or permission of instructor.

U UNL 395T (= A PSY 395T) Information Literacy in Psychology (2)
This course emphasizes a broad range of information sources and strategies for finding information with an emphasis in the discipline of psychology. An emphasis is also placed in understanding issues associated with psychological research. U UNL/A PSY 395T meets the requirements for Information Literacy, Oral Discourse, and Advanced Writing in the psychology major. Prerequisite(s): major in Psychology.

  

University Tutors Courses

U UNI 498 (formerly A CAS 498) STEM Tutors (3)
Prospective tutors will develop techniques to facilitate group and individual tutoring sessions for science foundation courses. Course components are: formal training in tutoring processes, study skills, and learning strategies; seminars on related topics; monitored tutoring throughout the semester. Mandatory attendance for all class meetings and seminars. Prerequisite(s): previous enrollment in course(s) to be tutored; a grade of B+ or better in each course; a letter of recommendation from the professor of each course the student wishes to tutor; permission of instructor. S/U graded.

U UNI 499 University Tutors (3)
The University Tutors are a group of student volunteers who assist with University-wide and EOP English, Math, and Freshmen Year Experience courses offered through the Educational Opportunities Program and the Office of Access and Academic Enrichment. They are trained to assist students on an individual and group basis. Students are selected to assist in these courses by the course instructors themselves. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. S/U graded.

  

Independent Study

Independent study and research is considered advanced work that enables undergraduates to go beyond existing coursework to investigate a topic or a hypothesis or a relationship either in the library or in the laboratory. The work generally culminates in a significant paper or report.

  

Independent Study and Research Courses

U UNI 397 Independent Study and Research (3)
Independent study course to provide students the opportunity to explore a subject beyond the introductory or survey level. This experience will commonly build upon the student’s prior research experience via the CSTEP / University at Albany Summer Research Program (UASRP) and will include faculty oversight. Contingent on the consent of instructor willing to supervise study.

  

Internships

An internship should be viewed as a three-way partnership that brings together an undergraduate student, an employer, and the University at Albany to provide supervised practical work experience that complements the student's academic program. An internship must include a learning component with clearly defined projects and learning goals that draw on knowledge and skills previously attained through the student's coursework. The work is supervised and evaluated by a designated individual in the agency, institution, or corporate body providing the internship. This supervisor provides an evaluation of the student’s work to the UAlbany faculty member who is responsible for the final evaluation of the student's attainment of the agreed-upon learning goals and assignment of the appropriate academic grade.

U UNI 290 internships are open only to qualified sophomores who have an overall grade point average of 2.00 or higher. U UNI 390 internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.00 or higher. Students interested in integrating their academic study with practical experience are encouraged to explore the feasibility of participating in an internship.

Some majors, such as social welfare, require fieldwork as part of their major requirements, and these opportunities are open only to students who have been admitted in the major program. Other majors offer opportunities for students to participate in internships that involve experiences related to the academic focus of the degree program. For example, there are opportunities in various aspects of the performing arts (e.g., A ARH 490, A ART 490, A MUS 490, A THR 390), business (B BUS 497), computing (I CSI 490, 498) humanities (e.g., A CLA 490, A ENG 390, A JRL 495), natural sciences (e.g., A ATM 490) social sciences (e.g., A ANT 338, A ANT 490, COM 390, A PLN 490, A SOC 490),  political science (R POS 390), and public policy (R PAD 498).

The University also offers a total of 15 credits for students participating in the following special, formalized internships: the Internship in or Seminar in Operational and Applied Communication Theory (A COM 392, 393), the Senate Sessions Assistant Program (U UNI 391), and the Assembly Sessions Intern Program (U UNI 392). These latter established internships take advantage of Albany’s location in the state’s capital. Albany is also affiliated with the Washington Center.

Through U UNI 290 (1-4 credits) and U UNI 390 (1–15 credits), students have obtained approval for full- or part-time internships in a very wide variety of areas. For these pursuits, it is assumed the student will secure the opportunity on his or her own, find appropriate faculty sponsorship, and then apply to the Interdisciplinary Studies Committee for approval of the desired credit.

There is a wide range of possible internship opportunities. Some of the more common internships pursued by previous students through U UNI 290 and U UNI 390 involved work with such organizations as: the U.S. Congress, the federal judiciary and numerous federal executive agencies, various state agencies (Lt. Governor’s Office, Attorney General, Correctional Services, Division of Criminal Justice, etc.), the New York Public Interest Research Group, the Civil Liberties Union, the Environmental Planning Lobby, Albany Medical Center, stock brokerage firms, law firms, and media organizations, including local and national television stations and corporations. Further information and application forms for U UNI 290 and U UNI 390 may be obtained from the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, LC 30. Deadlines for proposals for each semester are very specific and are not flexible. All internships must be preapproved. Because of the academic component of U UNI 290 and U UNI 390 internships, under no circumstances will students be permitted to earn credit retroactively for a previous experience.

In addition to the credit-bearing internships, there are also many opportunities for noncredit internships, mostly during the summer, some of which pay the participants a stipend. Information on many of these programs and their application process is available through Career Services.

  

Internship Courses

U UNI 290 Internships for Sophomores (1-4; as approved)
Internships involving participation in the work of an agency, institution, or corporate body, with collateral academic study. Contingent on the approval of a University at Albany full-time member of the instructional staff willing to supervise the study and evaluate on-site reports of the student's progress. Part-time faculty may supervise a U UNI 290 internship with the approval of their department chair. The Interdisciplinary Studies Committee retains the final authority to approve internship projects and supervisors. U UNI 290 internships may be taken for 1-4 credits. U UNI 290 internships are open only to sophomores who have an overall grade point average of 2.00 or higher. May be repeated, but each registration must be for an approved project. Prerequisite(s): approval of the Interdisciplinary Studies Committee. Application deadlines: May 1st for summer; August 1st for fall; December 1st for spring. S/U graded.

U UNI 390 Internships for Juniors and Seniors (1–15; as approved)
Internships involving participation in the work of an agency, institution, or corporate body, with collateral academic study. Contingent on the approval of a University at Albany full-time member of the instructional staff willing to supervise the study and evaluate on-site reports of the student's progress. Part-time faculty may supervise a U UNI 390 internship with the approval of their department chair. The Interdisciplinary Studies Committee retains the final authority to approve internship projects and supervisors. U UNI 390 internships are usually taken for 1-9 credits. Under extraordinary circumstances, a student may petition the committee for a maximum of 15 credits. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.00 or higher. May be repeated, but each registration must be for an approved project. Prerequisite(s): approval of the Interdisciplinary Studies Committee. Application deadlines: May 1st for summer; August 1st for fall; December 1st for spring. S/U graded.

U UNI 391 Senate Sessions Assistant Program (15)
A full-time internship program in the New York State Senate. Session assistants work as staff members in senators’ offices for a minimum of 30 hours per week and complete a required academic component including seminars, readings, short papers, book reports, and term paper. Offered spring semester only. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 3.0 or higher through a competitive selection process. Application deadline in early fall through the campus liaison officer (LC 30). Prerequisite(s): selection process, permission of campus liaison officer. S/U graded.

U UNI 392 Assembly Sessions Intern Program (15)
A full-time internship program in the New York State Assembly. Interns are assigned to work with members of the Assembly or its committees and research staff for a minimum of 30 hours per week and complete a required academic component including seminars, readings, short papers, mini courses, and term paper. Offered spring semester only. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher through a competitive selection process. Application deadline in early fall through the campus liaison officer (LC 30). Prerequisite(s): selection process, permission of campus liaison officer. S/U graded.

  

Community and Public Service

The Community and Public Service Program (CPSP) provides students with opportunities to engage with public, non-profit, and campus organizations in exchange for elective credits. Settings include healthcare, education, criminal justice, social services, state government, and social action, to name a few. With more than 400 organizations to choose from, CPSP, administered by the School of Social Welfare, offers a wide range of opportunities for students from all majors to serve in the community. 

Students may enroll in R SSW 290 Community and Public Service Program, which requires 100 hours of service for 3 credits, R SSW 291 Human Service in the Community which requires 60 hours of service for 2 credits, or R SSW 190 Community Engagement, which requires 35 hours of service for 1 credit. These courses are graded S/U and require the development of individual learning objectives. Students who have successfully completed R SSW 290 or R SSW 291 may enroll in R SSW 390 Community and Public Service Program II, which is graded A-E. This course requires 100 hours of service and advanced academic requirements for 3 credits. 

The CPSP service learning experience positively influences the capacities of public and non-profit organizations in the Capital Region while students develop or strengthen their individual commitments to community service and civic engagement. In addition, CPSP courses help students integrate their service experience with future academic and career goals. The CPSP staff is available to help students select an appropriate placement and to assist them in satisfactorily completing the course requirements. Each student is supervised on-site, and the field supervisors communicate student progress directly to the CPSP Office. For more information, visit www.albany.edu/cpsp, come by Social Sciences 112 or call 442-5683.

  

CPSP Courses

R SSW 190 Community Engagement (1)
This is a service based course that requires a minimum of 35 hours per semester (about 2.5 hours per week for full semester, about 5 hours per week for 8 Week 2) of volunteer work in public or nonprofit organizations that provide service to the community. In addition to volunteering, the course requires the development of learning goals, reflection on service experience and additional required documents. Open to freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. S/U graded.

R SSW 290 Community and Public Service Program (3)
This is a service based course that requires a minimum of 100 hours per semester (about 7.5 hours per week full semester; about 12.5 hours per week for 8 Week 2) of volunteer work in public or nonprofit organizations that provide service to the community. In addition to volunteering, the course requires the development of learning goals, reflection on service experience and additional required documents. Prerequisite(s): at least second semester freshman and permission of instructor. S/U graded.

R SSW 291 Human Service in the Community (2)
This is a service based course that requires a minimum of 60 hours per semester (about 4.5 hours per week full semester; about 7.5 hours per week for 8 Week 2) of volunteer work in public or nonprofit organizations that provide service to the community. In addition to volunteering, the course requires the development of learning goals, reflection on service experience and additional required documents. Prerequisite(s): at least second semester freshman and permission of instructor. S/U graded.

R SSW 390 Community and Public Service Program II (3)
This is a service-learning course that builds on prior community service experience by asking students to think critically about their community service experience through the lens of the scholarly literature. Each student is required to engage in 100 hours of service at a not-for-profit or public organization. Each student is also required to read selected articles and reflect on their experience by responding to discussion questions and writing a critical reflective essay. Prerequisite(s): R SSW 290 or R SSW 291 and permission of instructor.

  

Cross-Registration

University at Albany undergraduate students may cross-register for courses at participating institutions if they meet all eligibility requirements. Credits earned through cross-registration are recorded on the University at Albany transcript with a cross-registration course entry and the appropriate number of credits attempted and earned. Letter grades earned through cross- registration, at participating institutions, are translated to a grade of S or U (satisfactory or unsatisfactory) and posted to the University at Albany transcript. The grade of S is defined as equivalent to the grade of C or higher and is acceptable to fulfill graduation requirements where applicable. The grade of U (C- or lower) is unsatisfactory and is not acceptable to fulfill graduation requirements. In addition, cross-registered courses do not count towards university, major, or minor residency requirements. More information about these programs can be found at: www.albany.edu/registrar.   

ROTC (Reserve Officers Training Corps)

Army ROTC

Professor of Military Science
Lieutenant Colonel Andrew Beal

Military Science Instructors
Sergeant First Class Colin Murphy
Captain Roosevelt McCray

Mohawk Army ROTC trains and develops future leaders of the United States Army.

Students may participate in the program during their freshman and sophomore years with no obligation. They will learn leadership fundamentals including communications, leadership processes, and Army organizational concepts.

Students enrolled in the advanced course (junior and senior years) earn a commission as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Army serving on active duty or in the Army Reserve or National Guard.

To request information visit www.siena.edu/academics/academics-at-siena/additional-academic-opportunities/military-science-rotc/ or contact:

Michael Dengler
Scholarship & Enrollment Officer
mdengler@siena.edu
518-783-2477

Air Force ROTC

Students can also enroll in the Air Force ROTC program at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute through the Hudson-Mohawk Association of Colleges and Universities’ Cross-Registration Program. Students should contact the Department of Air & Space Studies at RPI for precise information regarding course content, sequencing, and summer expectations. The procedure for obtaining University approval for enrollment in Air Force ROTC courses is the same as for any other cross-registration enrollment. No more than a total of 12 ROTC credits may be counted toward a student’s graduation.

The Department of Air and Space Studies at RPI offers an elective program to eligible male and female students who are U.S. citizens wishing to pursue a commission as future Air Force officers. The program has two phases, a General Military Course and a Professional Officer Course. The General Military Course is taken during the first two years. After the General Military Course, students compete for entry into the two-year Professional Officer Course.

Admission to the Professional Officer Course is based on demonstrated proficiency in the General Military Course, medical qualifications, academic standing, physical conditioning requirements, the successful completion of field training, aptitude for further officer training, and citizenship.

Air Force scholarships are awarded on a merit basis to high school seniors and full-time college students who meet specific program requirements. Multiple-year scholarships are available, ranging from full tuition to in-state tuition.

For more information visit http://aas.union.rpi.edu/site_det550/ or contact
Jennifer Fredericks
fredej4@rpi.edu
518-276-6236

  

ROTC Courses

R PAD 110 Introduction to Military Leadership I (1)
The course introduces students to fundamental components of service as an officer in the United States Army. These initial lessons are the building blocks of progressive lessons in values, fitness, leadership, and officership. Students will learn how the personal development of life skills such as cultural understanding, goal setting, time management, mental/physical resiliency, and stress management relate to leadership, officership, and the Army profession. The focus is on developing basic knowledge and comprehension of Army leadership attributes and core leader competencies while gaining an understanding of the ROTC program, its purpose in the Army, and its advantages for the student. Prerequisite(s): not open to juniors and seniors without instructor approval. S/U graded.

R PAD 111 Introduction to Military Leadership II (1)
The course builds upon the fundamentals introduced in RPAD 110 by focusing on leadership theory and decision making. "Life skills" lessons in the semester include: problem solving, critical thinking, leadership theory, followership, group interaction, goal setting, and feedback mechanisms. Upon completion, students are prepared to advance to more complex leadership instruction concerning the dynamics of organizations. Prerequisite(s): R PAD 110 or permission of instructor. S/U graded.

R PAD 210 Foundations of Military Leadership I (1)
The course contains the principal leadership instruction of the Basic Course. The use of practical exercises is emphasized, as students are increasingly required to apply communications and leadership concepts. The focus continues to build on developing knowledge of the leadership attributes and core leader competencies through the understanding of Army rank, structure, and duties as well as broadening knowledge of land navigation and infantry squad tactics. Case studies will provide a tangible context for learning and understanding the Soldier's Creed and Warrior Ethos. Upon completion of this semester, students are well grounded in the fundamental principles of leadership, and prepared to intensify the practical application of their studies during the Advanced Course. Prerequisite(s): R PAD 111 or permission of instructor. S/U graded.

R PAD 211 Foundations of Military Leadership II (1)
The course focuses principally on officership, providing an extensive examination of the unique purpose, roles, and obligations of commissioned officers. It includes a detailed look at the origin of the Army's institutional values and their practical application in decision making and leadership. Students examine the challenges of leading teams in a complex, combat operational environment. The course highlights dimensions of terrain analysis, infantry patrols, and operation orders.  Further study of the theoretical basis of the Army Leadership Requirements Model explores the dynamics of adaptive leadership in the context of military operations. This course draws on the various components of values, communications, decision making, and leadership together to focus on a career as a commissioned officer. Upon completion of this course, students possess a fundamental understanding of both leadership and officership and demonstrate the ability to apply this understanding in real world situations. Prerequisite(s): R PAD 210 or permission of instructor. S/U graded.

R PAD 380 Applied Military Leadership I (2)
In this course students will study, practice, and apply the fundamentals of Army leadership, Officership, Army Values and ethics, personal development, and small unit tactics at the team and squad level. At the conclusion of this course, students will be capable of planning, coordinating, navigating, motivating and leading a team or squad in the execution of a tactical mission during a classroom PE, a Leadership Lab, or during a Situational Training Exercise (STX) in a field environment. Successful completion of this course will help prepare students for success at the ROTC Leader Development and Assessment Course (LDAC) during the summer following the junior year, at Fort Knox, KY. This course includes reading assignments, homework assignments, small group assignments, briefings, case studies, and practical exercises, a mid-term exam, and a final exam.  Students will receive systematic and specific feedback on leader attributes values and core leader competencies from instructor and other ROTC cadre and MSL IV Cadets who will evaluate students using the ROTC Leader Development Program (LDP) model. The course closes with instruction in small unit battle drills to facilitate practical application and further leader development during labs and Situational Training Exercises (STX). Prerequisite(s): R PAD 211.

R PAD 381 Applied Military Leadership II (2)
The course continues to focus on doctrinal leadership and tactical operations at the small unit level.  It includes opportunities to plan and conduct individual and collective skill training for military operations to gain leadership and tactical experience. The course synthesizes the various components of training, leadership and team building. Students are required to incorporate previous military science instruction for their practical application in a performance-oriented environment. Upon completion of the course, students possess the fundamental confidence and competence of leadership in a small unit setting and are prepared to attend the Leadership Development and Assessment Course. Prerequisite(s): R PAD 380.

R PAD 480 Adaptive Military Leadership I (2)
The course concentrates on leadership, management and ethics.  The course focuses students, early in the year, on attaining knowledge and proficiency in several critical areas they will need to operate effectively as Army officers.  These areas include:  Coordinate Activities with Staffs, Counseling Theory and Practice within the "Army Context," Training Management, and Ethics. While proficiency attained in each of these areas will initially be at the apprentice level, students will continue to sharpen these skills as they perform their roles as Cadet Officers within the ROTC program and after commissioning. At the end of the course, students possess the fundamental skills, attributes, and abilities to operate as competent leaders. Prerequisite(s): R PAD 381.

R PAD 481 Adaptive Military Leadership II (2)
The course focuses on completing the transition from Cadet to lieutenant. As a follow-on to the Ethics instruction in RPAD 480, the course starts with a foundation in the legal aspects of decision making and leadership. The curriculum reinforces previous instruction on the organization of the Army and introduces how the Army organizes for operations from the tactical to the strategic level. This is followed by instruction on administrative and logistical management that will focus on the fundamentals of Soldier and unit level support. Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared for the responsibility of being a commissioned officer in the United States Army. Prerequisite(s): R PAD 480.  

  

Summer Sessions

Registration for Summer Sessions usually begins in late March or early April and is coupled with fall registration. Registration for summer continues until the first day of classes for each session.

All UAlbany students, graduate and undergraduate, are eligible to register for summer classes as are college students from other institutions and those who are college-bound. Newly admitted freshmen or transfers due to begin at UAlbany in the fall term must update their admission status to include summer in order to register for summer classes. Only high school seniors, high school juniors about to enter their senior year, or graduated high school seniors are eligible to attend summer classes.

Albany Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Current University at Albany students must follow the fall/summer advance registration reporting schedule. Students may register at or after their appointment time up to the first day of each session. After this time, late registration goes into effect. Students must contact their academic advisor to obtain a summer AVN in addition to a fall AVN in order to enroll.

Visiting Undergraduate Students

Students who attend a college other than UAlbany will be admitted and registered by the Office of General Studies and Summer Sessions. Visiting students may apply and register online, or by mail, fax, or in-person using the printable Nondegree Registration Application.

Once received, the Office of General Studies and Summer Sessions will process the application and registration and respond by email with a registration confirmation. Information to access the University’s Web-based student self-management system (MyUAlbany) will be given at this time.

All visiting students are responsible for appropriate approvals from their home institution ensuring course transferability to their degree program.

General Studies Students

Those wishing to register for undergraduate courses but who are not currently attending college may apply for summer admission through the Office of General Studies. The student must possess at least a high school diploma or the equivalent in order to be eligible. General Studies’ students may apply and register online, or by mail, fax, or in person using the downloadable Nondegree Registration Application.

Limited advisement is available to students through the Office of General Studies to help review course selections and answer academic inquiries.

Students who were once matriculated at UAlbany and have not yet completed a Bachelor’s degree should refer to the section in this bulletin on Readmission Procedures.

Visiting High School Students

High school juniors entering their senior year or high school seniors, each in good academic standing, may be eligible for admission to Summer Sessions. Visiting high school students must follow the guidelines for admission as outlined in the Nondegree Admission section of this Bulletin under High School Students.

Academic Regulations and Policies

Complete academic regulations and standards appear in detail in this Bulletin or online at www.albany.edu. Should you require information regarding grading standards and academic policy, please refer to the appropriate section of this Bulletin.

Course descriptions as detailed in this Bulletin or online via MyUAlbany should be reviewed to be sure that all prerequisites have been met prior to registering.

The recommended maximum course load in Summer Sessions is as follows:
four-week session: maximum course load is two courses
six-week session: maximum course load is three courses
twelve-week session: maximum course load is three courses
overlapping sessions: maximum course load at one point in time is three courses

Under no circumstances may a student exceed nineteen credit hours during Summer Sessions.

Students who no longer wish to attend a summer class must drop themselves from that class on MyUAlbany or in writing to the Office of Summer Sessions. Nonattendance does not constitute a drop. Students who fail to drop their class remain liable for the tuition charges. Only dropping within the 0% liability period will cancel a tuition obligation. Students should refer to each session’s academic calendar or to the Tuition Liability Schedule for withdrawal dates without liability. 

Students may not informally audit any summer course. However, students may formally audit a course with instructor consent. All rules and regulations for formal audits can be found in the Auditing Courses section of this Bulletin.

Policies pertaining to Online Classes

The University at Albany offers a variety of online classes during Summer Sessions. All academic regulations and policies apply equally to online courses.

UAlbany courses are offered in the online format via Blackboard Learning System. Instructions for accessing an online course will be sent by email to each registered student prior to the start of the class. Students are not admitted to online classes after the first day of the course.

All drop deadlines, including those involving tuition liability, apply to online courses. Students wishing to drop their online class must drop via MyUAlbany within the stated deadlines for the session. Nonattendance (not signing into the class) does not constitute a drop.

A blended (or hybrid) course, which is a combination of classroom and online learning, does not constitute an online course. Students should be aware of any class meetings prior to enrolling to ensure proper attendance.

  

Wintersession

The University at Albany’s Wintersession is a four-week term offered each year between the end of the fall semester and the beginning of the spring semester. Wintersession is comprised primarily of online courses.

Admission/Registration Information

The Wintersession term is available to UAlbany graduate and undergraduate students, students visiting from other colleges, General Studies’ students, and qualified high school seniors. 

Registration for Wintersession begins in October with the spring term advance registration period and runs until the start of winter classes. Current UAlbany students wishing to register should obtain a separate winter term AVN from their academic advisor and enroll online at their designated appointment time. All other undergraduate students must apply through the Office of General Studies and Summer Sessions by visiting the winter website at www.albany.edu/winter and filling out the online application, or by submitting the printable version via mail or fax.

Newly admitted freshmen or transfer students due to begin at UAlbany in the spring term are not eligible to register for Wintersession. All new UAlbany students must begin classes with the spring semester.

Academic Regulations and Policies

Complete academic regulations and standards appear in detail in this Bulletin. Course descriptions should be reviewed in this Bulletin to be sure that all course prerequisites have been met. Visiting students from other colleges should meet with their academic advisor at their home school for proper transferability approvals. 

The maximum course load during the four-week Wintersession is two courses.

Students may not formally or informally audit any Wintersession course.

Policies Pertaining to Online Classes

The University at Albany offers a variety of online classes during Wintersession. All academic regulations and policies apply equally to online courses. 

UAlbany courses are offered in the online format via Blackboard Learning System. Instructions for accessing an online course will be sent by email to each registered student prior to the start of the class. Students are not admitted to online classes after the first day of the course. 

All drop deadlines, including those involving tuition liability, apply to online courses. Students wishing to drop their online class must drop via MyUAlbany within the stated deadlines for the term. Nonattendance (not signing into the class) does not constitute a drop. 

A blended (or hybrid) course, which is a combination of classroom and online learning, does not constitute an online course. Students should be aware of any class meetings prior to enrolling so that proper attendance can be achieved.