Digital Forensics Course Map - Content

These course maps provide a semester-by-semester breakdown of courses for the students. In addition to the UAlbany course map, we have equivalent course maps defined for each of our partner community college as well to make transition of transfers from these colleges easier into the University. Students from other majors at UAlbany who are interested in Digital Forensics may also use the UAlbany course map to determine the courses needed in addition to their current degree requirements. These maps may not include all the electives that are offered in the Digital Forensics program. We are also willing to work with individual students and other community colleges to define customized course maps from other programs not currently listed.

For UAlbany students, the freshman year is primarily focused on the General Education and foundational courses and sophomore year is focused primarily on core competency courses. Also, the junior year is focused on specialized forensics concentration courses, and the senior year is focused on capstone courses. Transfers from community colleges have slightly modified course maps based on their associate's degree requirements. There will be several opportunities to take elective courses (especially in the junior and senior year) that students should use to focus on their area of interest.

Year 1 Fall       Credits
**ASOC 115 Introduction to Sociology2   3
**BFOR 100 Introduction to Information Systems   3
GE U.S. History   3
GE Foreign Language   3
GE UUNI 100 Writing and Critical Inquiry   3
  15
Year 1 Spring  
BITM 215 Information Technologies for Business   3
APSY 101 Introduction to Psychology2   3
**BFOR 201 Introduction to Digital Forensics   3
**RCRJ 281 Intro to Statistics1 or AMAT 108 Elementary Statistics1   3
GE Natural Science   3
  15
     
Year 2 Fall   Credits
RCRJ 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice   3
**BFOR 202 Cyber Crime Investigations (Fall Only)   3
**BFOR 203 Networking - Intro. to Data Comm. (Fall Only)
  3
GE Humanities (suggested APHI 210 Introduction to Logic)   3
**BACC 211 Financial Accounting   3
  15
Year 2 Spring  
RCRJ 202 Introduction to Law and Criminal Justice w/ discussion   4
RCRJ 203 Criminology w/ discussion   3
BFOR 204 Fundamentals of Information and Cyber Security   3
GE International Perspectives   3
GE Arts   3
  16
     
Year 3 Fall   Credits
BFOR 300 Databases for Digital Forensics (Fall Only)   3
BFOR 301 Computer Forensics I (Fall Only)   3
GE Challenges for 21st Century   3
Elective   3
Elective   3
  15
Year 3 Spring  
BFOR 302 eDiscovery Forensics (Spring Only)   3
BFOR 303 Computer Forensics II (Spring Only)   3
BFOR 304 Network and Mobile Forensics (Spring Only)   3
Elective   3
Elective   3
  15
     
Year 4 Fall   Credits
BFOR 401W* Advanced Digital Forensics (Fall Only)   4
BACC 400 Forensic Accounting and Fraud Detection (Fall Only)   3
Elective   3
Elective   3
Elective   3
  16
Year 4 Spring  
BFOR 402 Digital Forensics Moot Court (Spring Only)   4
BACC 401 Forensic Accounting Investigative Techniques (Spring Only)   3
Elective   3
Elective   3
  13

 

1 Satisfies the GE Mathematics and Statistics requirement;
2 Satisfies the GE Social Sciences requirement;
3 Satisfies GE Information Literacy requirement

  

Interdisciplinary Program in Financial Market Regulation

Faculty

Professors
Hany A. Shawky, Ph.D.
Ohio State University
Giri Kumar Tayi, Ph.D.
Carnegie Mellon University

Associate Professors
George Berg, Ph.D.
Northwestern University
Rita Biswas, Ph.D.
Texas A&M University
Peter A. Bloniarz, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Indushobha Chengalur-Smith, Ph.D.
Virginia Tech
Jakov J. Crnkovic, Ph.D.
University of Belgrade
Jagdish Gangolly, Ph.D.
University of Pittsburgh
Sanjay Goel, Ph.D.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Lakshmi Mohan, Ph.D.
Columbia University
David M. Smith, Ph.D., CFA
Virginia Tech

Research Associate Professor
Theresa Pardo, Ph.D.
University at Albany

Service Assistant Professor
Jennifer J. Goodall, Ph.D.
University at Albany



Financial markets are among the most important and dynamic systems in the world. Public and private regulators, financial services firms, law firms, and other organizations all play key roles in operating these systems effectively and ethically.

The University at Albany’s Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies with a faculty-initiated concentration in Financial Market Regulation provides a unique program that prepares students for professional work in the field or further study in graduate and law school.

The interdisciplinary minor in Financial Market Regulation complements majors such as Accounting, Business, Computer Science, Economics, Political Science, Public Policy and Management, and Sociology, introducing students to market regulation as part of their program at the University. While the interdisciplinary major and minor focus on financial market regulation, they also provide knowledge applying to diverse areas in the private, public, and nonprofit sectors. Students normally are able to combine studies in Financial Market Regulation, such as through a second major, with majors in Accounting, Business, Computer Science, and other related fields. Graduates have found such combined programs to be a major advantage in pursuing work in the business and regulation of financial markets.

Students pursuing the Interdisciplinary Studies major or minor study four areas:

A recurring theme in the program is the importance of ethical considerations and issues. These include judgments confronted constantly by individuals, business, and regulatory organizations, such as distinguishing "aggressive" but permissible conduct from legal and regulatory violations.

Students in the FMR concentration take ten required courses, listed below. Students also choose a minimum of two courses from specified electives in accounting or information technology. Entry-level positions in the examination of financial institutions commonly require at least nine credits of accounting; thus students wanting to compete for such positions should select two electives in accounting to complement the required B ACC 211. In contrast, entry-level positions focused on market surveillance require detailed coursework on information technology. Advisors work with students to identify the appropriate mix of electives given students' career interests.  

Advisory Council

An Advisory Council of professionals in financial services, law, and regulation assists the Financial Market Regulation Program as part of the Institute for Financial Market Regulation, a joint initiative of the University at Albany, Albany Law School, and the professional community in financial market regulation and supervision. The Council members work actively with the University at Albany and Albany Law School to design course offerings, internship experiences, and other career services. The Advisory Council membership can be found at: http://www.albany.edu/ifmr/advisory_council.php.

Internship Program for the Interdisciplinary Studies Major and Minor

Students in the Interdisciplinary Studies major with a faculty-initiated concentration in Financial Market Regulation or the minor in Financial Market Regulation are encouraged, but not required, to complete an internship, usually over the summer between the junior and senior years, in a regulatory organization, financial firm, law firm, or related organization. Employing organizations provide these internships on a competitive basis, and the participating academic units and the Advisory Council work with students to prepare them for the selection processes.

Admission to the Interdisciplinary Studies Major and Minor

Students pursuing the Interdisciplinary Studies major with a faculty-initiated concentration in Financial Market Regulation or the minor in Financial Market Regulation take a designated series of courses or appropriate substitutes approved by the Academic Program Advisor; the major has a minimum of 36 credits of coursework and the minor has a minimum of 21 credits. Students should apply for admission to the major or minor by contacting the Academic Program Advisor.

To be admitted to the major or minor, students must have an overall grade point average of 3.25. They also must have completed the 200-level courses in accounting, computer science, information technology, and regulatory policy for the major (B ACC 211; I CSI 105 or I CSI/I CEN 201; B ITM 215 and B FIN/R PAD 236) and for the minor (B ACC 211; I CSI 105 or I CSI/I CEN 201; and B FIN/R PAD 236) with an average of 3.00 (B) or better.

Students should apply to the major after completing at least three of the four specified lower-level courses, though a final decision on admission will be made only after completion of all four. Students should apply to the minor after completing at least two of the three specified lower-level classes, and a final admission decision will be made only after completion of the third. At the time of application, and also at admission, the student’s overall GPA must be 3.25 or better, with an average of 3.00 or better in the specified lower-level classes. Admitted students also should have completed at least 56 credits toward graduation. Students must maintain their 3.25 until at least the end of their junior year (sixth semester) in order to retain their status in the major and minor.

Because of the requirement of a 3.00 average in specified lower-level courses, candidates for the major must take the lower-division classes used to fulfill admissions requirements on a graded (not S/U) basis. Similarly, candidates for the minor must take the required lower-level courses noted above on a graded basis. 

While B ITM 215 (Information Technologies for Business) is not required for the minor, B ITM 215 is required for certain courses in the program and for effective work in the field. Thus, students should take B ITM 215 as early as possible as part of their preparation for the major or minor. For additional information about the minor, see the Bulletin section 'Approved Minors.'

Degree Requirements: Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies with a faculty-initiated concentration in Financial Market Regulation

A minimum of 36 credits, as follows:

Business and Finance
B ACC 211 Financial Accounting
B FIN 300 Financial Management
B FIN 301 Corporate Financial Policy and Strategy 
B FIN 333 Investment Management
B FIN 375 Money and Capital Markets

Public Policy and Law
B FIN/R PAD 236 Institutions and Policy in Business Regulation 
B FIN/R PAD 435 Law in Financial Market Regulation
B FIN 439/R PAD 436 Technology in Financial Market Regulation

Information Management and Data Analysis
B ITM 215 Information Technologies for Business
I CSI 105 Computing and Information or I CSI 201 Introduction to Computer Science

Electives in Accounting or Information Technology
Choose at least two courses from the list below, or approved substitutes, in consultation with advisors:
B ACC 313 Financial Statement Analysis
B ACC 461 Auditing  
B ITM 330 Improving Business Performance with Information Technologies
(Students normally will need to take A MAT 106 and A MAT 108 or A ECO 320 or other equivalent
class in statistics as prerequisites for B ITM 330.)
B ITM 331 Database Applications for Business
B ITM 416 Communications, Networking, and Security or I INF 423 Networking Essentials

Department Contact:
Chair, Finance Department

  

School of Business

Faculty

Interim Dean
Hany A. Shawky, Ph.D.
Ohio State University

Director of Undergraduate Student Services 
Susan Maloney, M.B.A.
University at Albany

Assistant Director of Undergraduate Student Services
Jason C. Cotugno, M.S.
University at Albany

Distinguished Professor Emeritus
William K. Holstein, Ph.D.
Purdue University

Professors Emeriti
Donald D. Bourque, Ph.D.
University of Washington
Hugh T. Farley, J.D.
American University
Ronald W. Forbes, Ph.D.
State University of New York at Buffalo
Michael J. Kavanagh, Ph.D.
Iowa State University
Paul A. Leonard, Ph.D. (Collins Fellows)
University of Oregon
Charles M. Schaninger, Ph.D.
University of Rochester
Gary A. Yukl, Ph.D.
University of California

Professors
Peter Duchessi, Ph.D.
Union College
Sanjay Goel, Ph.D.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute       
Hany A. Shawky, Ph.D.
Ohio State University
Donald S. Siegel, Ph.D.
Columbia University
Thomas D. Taber, Ph.D.
University of Illinois
Giri Kumar Tayi, Ph.D.
Carnegie Mellon University

Associate Professors Emeriti
Donald D. Ballou, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
Salvatore Belardo, Ph.D.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
W. Christian Buss, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania
William D. Danko, Ph.D.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
David J. Marcinko, Ph.D.
Boston College 
Nicholas Mastracchio, Jr., Ph.D.
Union College
Lakshmi Mohan, Ph.D.
Columbia University
Harold L. Pazer, M.B.A.
University of Washington
John P. Seagle, Ph.D.
Stanford University

Associate Professors
Rita Biswas, Ph.D.
Texas A. & M.
Dennis Caplan, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley
Uday Chandra, Ph.D.
Purdue University
Seok-Joo Chang, Ph.D.
University of Connecticut
Indushoba Chengalur-Smith, Ph.D.
Virginia Tech 
Suraj Commuri, Ph.D.
University of Nebraska at Lincoln 
Jakov J. Crnkovic, Ph.D.
University of Belgrade, Yugoslavia  
Na Dai, Ph.D.
University of Kansas
Saurav K. Dutta, Ph.D.
University of Kansas 
Guy Dinesh Fernando, Ph.D.
Syracuse University
Ingrid Fisher, Ph.D.
University at Albany       
Richard Johnson, Ph.D.
University of Maryland 
Janet H. Marler, Ph.D.
Cornell University
Paul Miesing, Ph.D.
University of Colorado
Saggi Nevo, Ph.D.
York University
Eliot H. Rich, Ph.D.
University at Albany
David M. Smith, Ph.D.
Virginia Tech
Kinsun Tam, Ph.D.
University of Connecticut
William Wales, Ph.D.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Yvonne Wang, Ph.D.
Pennsylvania State University
Wei Zhang, Ph.D.
University of Nebraska at Lincoln 

Assistant Professors
Stephanie Black, Ph.D.
University of Texas, San Antonio       
Kathryn Enget, Ph.D.
Virginia Tech
Justin Giboney, Ph.D.
University of Arizona
Yuan Hong, Ph.D.
Rutgers University
Ioannis Kareklas, Ph.D.
University of Connecticut
Victoria Kisekka, Ph.D.
University at Buffalo
Alfred Liu, Ph.D.
University of California, Irvine
Louis Piccotti, Ph.D.
Rutgers University
Damira Pon, A.B.D.
University at Albany
William Riccardi, Ph.D.
Florida International University
Richard Schneible, Ph.D.
Syracuse University      

Visiting Assistant Professors
Martin L. Fogelman, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Raymond K. Van Ness, Ph.D.
Union Institute & University

Lecturers
Fabio Auffant, M.S.
Champlain College
Thomas Collura, J.D.
Albany Law School of Union University
Chandan DeSarkar, Ph.D.
Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
Marisa Lester, M.S.
University at Albany 
Michelle Moshier, M.S.
University of Hartford
Eric Ofori, Ph.D.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Ethen Spressler, M.S
University at Albany
Mary Wladkowsky, Ph.D.
Northcentral University, Prescott Valley, Arizona

Adjuncts (estimated): 15–20
Teaching Doctoral Assistants (estimated): 2–3


The School of Business offers degree programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels that prepare students to enter managerial and professional careers. All programs are accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). The School is one of only three public universities in New York State to have dual AACSB accreditation in business administration and accounting.

All School of Business courses are preceded by the prefix letter B. The following School of Business courses are considered “Liberal Arts and Sciences” courses by the University: B BUS 250, B LAW 200, 220, B MGT 341, 430, 465, 481, B MKT 351, B ITM 215, 220. No more than six credits from these courses may be counted as “Liberal Arts and Sciences” courses by students majoring in business administration or accounting.

At the undergraduate level, the school offers Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degrees in accounting, business administration, digital forensics, and an interdisciplinary studies major with a concentration in financial market regulation. The B.S. degree is granted only to students who have been formally admitted to the School of Business prior to taking their upper division courses in business.

At the graduate level, the school offers a Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.), a Master of Science in Accounting (M.S.), and a Master of Science in Taxation (M.S.). The full-time M.B.A. is a two-year program open primarily to non-business undergraduates. In addition, the School participates in the Information Science Ph.D. in cooperation with other academic units. Information on this graduate program is available in the Graduate Bulletin.

The UAlbany School of Business has developed a national reputation for the quality of its undergraduate programs. The school is unable to accommodate all undergraduate students who wish to enroll as upper-division majors.

Majors in Accounting or Business Administration

Application and Admission

The following guidelines have been developed as a means of selecting the best-qualified students to study accounting or business administration.

Initial Admission of Freshmen to the School of Business

All students admitted to the University whose basis of admission is “FRESHMAN” can be admitted to the School of Business as Accounting or Business Administration majors by declaring their major as “School of Business.” To remain a School of Business major during the freshman and sophomore years, each student must meet the retention standards set by the School of Business. These standards require students to maintain a 3.25 overall average at the University at Albany and at least a 3.00 average for the designated admission core course categories taken at Albany.

To remain a School of Business major in Accounting or Business Administration, students must also have satisfactorily completed any five of the seven admission core course categories after three semesters at the University, and all seven of the admission core course categories after four semesters at the University. (Note: all core course categories not completed prior to matriculation must be taken at the University and graded on an A–E basis.) These categories are: (1) B ACC 211 (2) B ITM 215 (3) A MAT 108 or A ECO 320 (4) A ECO 110 (5) A ECO 111 (6) A PSY 101 and (7) A SOC 115 or A ANT 108. In addition, students must have completed a total of at least 56 degree applicable credits after four semesters at the University to remain a School of Business major.

Students’ records will be evaluated after their second semester, and those falling below the retention standards will receive a warning letter indicating they are in jeopardy of losing their status as a School of Business major. Students’ records will again be evaluated after their third and fourth semesters to determine that all of the above retention standards have been met.

Students not meeting these standards by the end of their fourth semester at the University at Albany are not guaranteed admission to the School of Business.

Students in the School of Business who have attained junior standing (i.e., 56 degree applicable credits) and who have met all the retention standards shall be eligible to enroll in the upper division School of Business courses. 

Direct Admission as Freshmen

A select group of freshmen will be offered admission to the School of Business Accounting or Business Administration majors without any additional conditions beyond those for continuing enrollment at the University. Such admission will be based on a review of the student’s performance in high school as reflected in grade point average (HSGPA) and performance on school-based tests such as Regents exams, scores on the SAT or ACT national exams; and a competitive rank in class. The minimum criteria for consideration will be a minimum score of 3,000 calculated as: HSGPA times 20 plus SAT score.

Students must complete the same set of business core course categories during their first two years that are required of all students in order to begin the upper division sequence of business courses in the junior year. The business core course categories must be completed with an average grade of at least C (2.00).

Direct admission as freshmen to the School of Business represents an act of confidence in a cadre of well-prepared students, and it is expected that these students will perform at the highest academic levels at the University at Albany. Students must meet University at Albany requirements for good academic standing to retain their enrollment in the School of Business.

Initial Admission of Transfers with Sophomore Standing or Above to the School of Business

All students whose basis of admission is “TRANSFER” can be admitted to the School of Business by declaring their major as either Accounting or Business Administration at the time of their application to the University as long as they will have met the following criteria:

Students must have completed a total of at least 32 degree applicable credits by the end of the spring semester preceding their summer or fall admission to the University, or by the end of the fall semester preceding their spring admission to the University. They must also have a final cumulative average of 3.25 or higher and have completed elsewhere a minimum of four of the designated admission core courses with at least a 3.00 average prior to matriculation.

To remain a School of Business major, students must achieve a minimum overall average at the University at Albany of at least a 3.25 and a minimum 3.00 average for the admission core course categories taken at Albany by the end of their second semester at this university. They must also have satisfactorily completed all seven of the admission core course categories after those two semesters. These categories are: (1) B ACC 211 (2) B ITM 215 (3) A MAT 108 or A ECO 320 (4) A ECO 110 (5) A ECO 111 (6) A PSY 101 and (7) A SOC 115 or A ANT 108. (Note: all core course categories not completed prior to matriculation must be taken at the University and graded on an A–E basis.) Additionally, they must have achieved 56 degree applicable degree credits after two semesters at the University.

Subsequent Admission to the School of Business

Students who did not declare their major as “School of Business” by the deadlines stated above but whose basis of admission is “FRESHMAN” or whose basis of admission is “TRANSFER” with fewer than 32 degree-applicable credits may directly apply (or reapply) for admission to the School of Business Accounting or Business Administration major once they have attained junior standing (i.e., 56 degree applicable credits) and have satisfactorily completed all seven of the admission core course categories. These categories are: (1) B ACC 211 (2) B ITM 215 (3) A MAT 108 or A ECO 320 (4) A ECO 110 (5) A ECO 111 (6) A PSY 101 and (7) A SOC 115 or A ANT 108.

(Note: all core course categories not completed prior to matriculation must be taken at the University and graded on an A–E basis.)

Other “TRANSFER” students who were admitted with 32 or more degree-applicable credits but who were not initially admitted to the School of Business may still be considered for admission within the following guidelines:

a. Students who can demonstrate that their previous transfer record would have qualified them for admission had they applied initially to the School of Business will be admitted under the conditions and criteria described above for other sophomore or junior transfers.

b. Students who do not initially qualify for admission as a transfer student to the School of Business may apply directly to the School of Business in the semester in which they will have completed 56 credits and all seven core course categories. Applications are available in the Office of Student Services in BB 201 on May 1st, June 1st, or December 1st and are due in that same office prior to the end of final exams for a fall, spring, and summer session.

Appeals

Special Admissions: Students not admissible by any of the established criteria but who believe they have extenuating circumstances may write a letter of appeal to the School of Business. Contact the Director of Undergraduate Student Services, BB 201, for the procedure.

Degree Requirements for the B.S. in Accounting

Required Liberal Arts & Sciences Courses
*A ECO 110 Principles of Economics I: Microeconomics 3
*A ECO 111 Principles of Economics II: Macroeconomics 3
Writing (A lower level writing intensive or writing and critical inquiry course) 3
*A PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology 3
*A SOC 115 Introduction to Sociology or
*A ANT 108 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
3
Economics elective 300 level or above where A ECO 110 and 111 are prerequisites, excluding A ECO 320, 496, and 497 3
A MAT 106, 111, 112, 118, or equivalent Calculus 3
B MGT 341 Behavioral Foundations of Management 3
B BUS 300 Accounting and Communications 1
  25
General Education Requirements: as needed to fulfill University General Education Program requirements, minimum 30 credits; some credits may be filled by required Liberal Arts & Sciences or Business courses. (For clarification, see the General Education section of this Bulletin.)  
Other Liberal Arts & Sciences elective credit: total credits will vary based on courses selected for General Education requirements.  
Total Liberal Arts & Sciences credits 60
 
Business and Accounting Requirements
*B ACC 211 Financial Accounting 3
B ACC 222 Cost Accounting Systems For Managerial Decisions 3
B ACC 311 Financial Accounting Theory I 3
B ACC 312 Financial Accounting Theory II 3
B ACC 381 Financial Information Systems 3
B ACC 411 Financial Accounting Theory III 3
B ACC 440 Survey of Taxation 3
B ACC 461 Auditing 3
B LAW 220 Business Law 3
*B ITM 215 Information Technologies for Business 3
*A MAT 108 or A ECO 320 Statistics 3
B FIN 300 Financial Management 3
B FIN 301 Corporate Financial Policy and Strategy or B FIN 375 Money and Capital Markets or A ECO 350 Money and Banking 3
B LAW 321 Law of Business Organization 3
B MKT 310 Marketing Principles 3
B ITM 330 Improving Business Performance with Information Technologies 3
B MGT 481W Strategic Management 3
Total Business and Accounting Requirement Credits 51
Additional Business or Liberal Arts & Sciences Elective Credits 9
Total Graduation Credits (minimum) 120#


* These are Admission Core Course Requirements (see above).

Degree Requirements for the B.S. in Business Administration

The programs in business administration, combining a major-minor sequence, are designed for students planning careers in management science, marketing, and financial analysis, or a combination of these three major areas.

Required Liberal Arts & Sciences Courses
*A ECO 110 Principles of Economics I: Microeconomics 3
*A ECO 111 Principles of Economics II: Macroeconomics 3
Economics elective 300 level or above where A ECO 110 and 111 are prerequisites, excluding A ECO 320, 496, and 497 3
A MAT 106, 111, 112, 113, 118 (or equivalent) Calculus 3
*A PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology 3
*A SOC 115 Introduction to Sociology or
*A ANT 108 Cultural Anthropology
3
  18
General Education Courses: as needed to fulfill University General Education Program requirements, minimum 30 credits; some credits may be filled by required Liberal Arts & Sciences or Business courses. (For clarification, see the General Education section of this Bulletin.)  
Other Liberal Arts & Sciences Electives: total credits will vary based on courses selected for General Education requirements.

  


Minimum Total Liberal Arts & Sciences Credits


60

Business and Accounting Requirements
*B ACC 211 Financial Accounting 3
B ACC 222 Cost Accounting Systems For Managerial Decisions 3
B FIN 300 Financial Management 3
*B ITM 215 Information Technologies for Business 3
*A MAT 108 or A ECO 320 Statistics 3
B ITM 330 Improving Business Performance with Information Technologies 3
B LAW 220 Business Law or B LAW 200 Legal Environment of Business 3
B MKT 310 Marketing Principles 3
B MGT 341 Behavioral Foundations of Management 3
B MGT 481W Strategic Management 3
Credits in selected concentration 15 -21
Total Business and Accounting Requirement Credits 45 -51
Unrestricted Elective Credits: these may be Liberal Arts & Sciences courses or other electives 9 -15
Total Business and Unrestricted Elective Credits 60
Total Graduation Credits (minimum) 120

* These are Admission Core Course Requirements (see above.)

Approved Concentrations:

Entrepreneurship/Finance Concentration (18 credits): B FIN 301, B FIN 333, B FIN 375, B FIN 404, B MGT 400, B MGT 460.

Entrepreneurship/Information Technology Management Concentration (18 credits): B FIN 404, B ITM 322, B ITM 331, B ITM 415Z, B MGT 400, B MGT 460.

Entrepreneurship/Marketing Concentration (18 credits): B FIN 404, B MGT 400, B MGT 460, B MKT 300 or 400-level elective, B MKT 351, B MKT 400-level elective.

Finance/Information Technology Management Concentration (18 credits): B FIN 301, B FIN 333, B FIN 375; B ITM 322, B ITM 331, B ITM 415Z.

Finance/Management Concentration (18 credits): B FIN 301, B FIN 333, B FIN 375; B MGT 430, 6 Credits B MGT 400-level electives.

Finance/Marketing Concentration (18 credits): B FIN 301, B FIN 333, B FIN 375; B MKT 351, 3 credits B MKT 300-level or B MKT 400-level elective, 3 credits B MKT 400-level elective.

Financial Analyst Honors Program Concentration (21 credits): B ACC 313; B FIN 380, B FIN 400, B FIN 410, B FIN 436, B FIN 485 or B FIN 470 if offered, B FIN 490Z.

Information Technology Management Concentration (15 credits): B ITM 322, B ITM 331, B ITM 415Z, B ITM 416, B ITM 434.

Management/Information Technology Management Concentration (18 credits): B ITM 322, B ITM 331, B ITM 415Z; B MGT 430, 6 credits B MGT 400-level electives.

Marketing Concentration (15 credits): B MKT 312, B MKT 351, 3 credits B MKT 300-level or 400-level elective, 6 credits B MKT 400-level electives.

Marketing/Information Technology Management Concentration (18 credits): B ITM 322, B ITM 331, B ITM 415Z;  B MKT 351, 3 credits B MKT 300-level or B MKT 400-level elective, 3 credits B MKT 400-level elective.

Marketing/Management Concentration (18 credits): B MGT 430, 6 credits B MGT 400-level electives; B MKT 351, 3 credits B MKT 300-level or 400-level elective, 3 credits B MKT 400-level elective.

Note: In order to complete concentrations in a timely manner it is necessary to follow specific course sequencing. For more detailed information on concentrations, consult Undergraduate Student Services in the School of Business.

Financial Analyst Honors Program

This program is designed to provide serious students of finance with the opportunity for a special educational experience in small seminars where they can develop their analytical and communication skills.

School of Business students may continue in the Honors Program at the end of the first semester of the junior year so long as they have achieved a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.50 for:
(1) all courses taken through the first semester junior year, and
(2) the following four courses: B ACC 211, B ACC 222, B FIN 300, and B ACC 313.

NOTE: Students will be allowed to advance register for second semester junior year courses with the understanding that if they do not meet the minimum qualification for retention in the Honors Program, they will receive a letter informing them of their non-retention in the Honors Program and will be deregistered for courses in the program.

Maintenance of a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.50 overall and a 3.50 in all courses required in the Honors sequence is required to remain in the program.

The Honors Program has a mandatory mentoring program and all students in the program will be matched with a mentor as assigned by Finance department faculty in consultation with the Office of Student Services. Students will retain the mentor relationship so long as they are registered in the program.

Required Honors Program courses for the concentration are:
B ACC 313; B FIN 380, B FIN 400, B FIN 410, B FIN 436, B FIN 470 or B FIN 485, B FIN 490Z.

Financial Analyst Honors Program Sequence:
Fall semester junior year:
B ACC 313 Financial Statement Analysis
B FIN 300 Financial Management (Required of all School of Business students)

Spring semester junior year:
B FIN 380 Investment Valuation and Analysis
B FIN 400 Financial Case Problems
B FIN 410 Fixed Income Securities Market

Fall semester senior year:
B FIN 490Z Financial Analysis Seminar and Thesis

Spring semester senior year:
B FIN 436 International Financial Management
B FIN 470 Special Topics in Finance or B FIN 485 Derivatives and Risk Management

During the Financial Analysis Seminar and Thesis course, students will be required to present oral and/or written progress reports on their ongoing research and critique each other’s work. Each student must submit his or her senior honors thesis to the Finance faculty for review and eventual acceptance.

NOTE: Students who drop or are dropped from the Financial Honors Program at the end of their junior year will be allowed to use any completed courses in Finance toward a combined concentration in Finance/ITM, Finance/Management or Finance/Marketing after consultation with the School of Business undergraduate advisement personnel.

Students who successfully complete the courses in the Financial Analyst Honors Program and have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.50 will be awarded the Bachelor of Science with Honors in Financial Analysis, and will be recognized formally at the School of Business recognition ceremony in May. Students whose cumulative GPA is below 3.50 will be awarded the Bachelor of Science in Financial Analysis (without honors). 

Major in Digital Forensics

The undergraduate curriculum in Digital Forensics is designed to nurture the development of students who are able to think critically, perform high-level analysis, adapt to changing environments through innovation and exploration, and have a deep understanding of the technical, legal, financial and socio-psychological influences that are related to the practice of digital forensics and investigation of cyber-crime.

The curriculum is structured with four components: foundational principles, core competencies, concentration, and capstone. The first two components are designed to integrate the dissemination of fundamental principles with the cultivation of the critical skill set necessary for advance undergraduate coursework and interdisciplinary research. The remaining two components expand on these foundational skills to develop the topical expertise, technical depth, and independent analytic abilities that are essential to a well-rounded undergraduate educational experience.

This program will provide students with foundational technology skills in the areas of communications and networking, computer hardware, software development and database design, information security and the law. It will build core competencies in the area of data preservation, and examination and discovery in multiple areas including information security, criminal investigations, accounting and finance. The program culminates with capstone courses that consolidate the student learning in context of real problems. Overall, the program offers an academically rigorous preparation for students intending to pursue careers in digital forensics related fields as well as to pursue graduate education in the area of information security, digital forensics, and data analytics and law.

Admission Requirements

Incoming freshmen who indicate an interest in the Digital Forensics major and meet eligibility criteria (a high school grade point average of 89 in conjunction with an SAT score of 1200 (1600 scale)/ACT score of 25) will be offered Direct Admission status. To maintain enrollment in the major, at the completion of 56 credits, these students must also have completed with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00 the following seven courses (A SOC 115, R CRJ 281 or A MAT 108, B ACC 211, B FOR 100, B FOR 201, B FOR 202, and B FOR 203).

Students not admitted as Direct Admission may apply for the major at the time of completion of 56 credits. Eligibility criteria at that time include a cumulative GPA of 3.25 in addition to completion of the same seven courses, with a minimum cumulative GPA 0f 3.00 (A SOC 115, R CRJ 281 or A MAT 108, B ACC 211, B FOR 100, B FOR 201, B FOR 202, and B FOR 203). Transfer student designated courses may differ according to articulation agreements, but cumulative GPA from the transfer institution must be a 3.25.

Requirements for the B.S. in Digital Forensics

The B.S. program in Digital Forensics requires the completion of the following courses (69 credits) clustered in four components:

  1. Foundational Principles courses (24 credits)
    A PSY 101 Introduction to Psychology
    A SOC 115 Introduction to Sociology
    B ACC 211 Financial Accounting
    B FOR 100 Introduction to Information Systems
    B ITM 215 Information Technologies for Business
    R CRJ 201 Introduction to the Criminal Justice Process
    R CRJ 203 Criminology
    R CRJ 281 or A MAT 108 Elementary Statistics
  2. Core Competencies courses (16 credits)
    R CRJ 202 Introduction to Law and Criminal Justice
    B FOR 203 Networking: Introduction to Data Communications
    B FOR 204 Fundamentals Information and Cybersecurity
    B FOR 300 Databases for Digital Forensics
    B ACC 400 Forensic Accounting and Fraud Detection
  3. Concentration courses (21 credits)
    B FOR 201 Introduction to Digital Forensics
    B FOR 202 Cyber Crime Investigations
    B FOR 301 Computer Forensics I
    B FOR 302 eDiscovery Forensics
    B FOR 303 Computer Forensics II
    B FOR 304 Network and Mobile Forensics
    B ACC 401 Forensic Accounting Investigative Techniques
  4. Capstone courses (8 credits)
    B FOR 401W Advanced Digital Forensics
    B FOR 402 Digital Forensics Moot Court
  

Courses in Accounting

B ACC 211 Financial Accounting (3)
A thorough introduction to the basic financial statements including the balance sheet, income statement, and statement of cash flows, with a focus on accounting information that is available to individuals outside an organization. The course provides an introduction to the concepts, terminology and principles of financial accounting. Students learn about accounting as an information development and communication function that supports economic decision-making. The course enables students to analyze financial statements; derive information for personal and organizational decisions from financial statements; and better understand business entities. Only one version of B ACC 211 may be taken for credit. Not open to freshmen. Intended accounting and business majors should enroll in B ACC 211 in the first semester of their sophomore year. Offered fall semester only.

T ACC 211 Advanced Introduction to Financial Accounting (3)
T ACC 211 is the Honors College version of B ACC 211; only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): open to Honors College students only.

B ACC 222 Cost Accounting Systems for Managerial Decisions (3)
This course will provide an introduction to management accounting. Emphasis will be on how managers use externally reported and internal financial information in the decision making process. Topics include product costing, activity based costing, variable costing, job order costing, budgeting, cost-volume-profit relationships, and performance measurements and evaluation. Prerequisite(s): B ACC 211. Offered spring semester only.

T ACC 251 Fraud Examination (3)
This course will cover fraud schemes as well as the principles and methodology of fraud detection and deterrence. This includes such topics as the fraud environment, cash and non-cash asset misappropriations, corruption, accounting principles and fraud, fraudulent financial statements, the anatomy of a fraud investigation, interviewing witnesses, documentation of the fraud examination and global/cultural factors. Emphasis will be placed on the process of conducting a fraud examination in accordance with procedures that ensure proper evidence gathering and preservation and the process of communicating the results of an investigation in appropriate forensic report form. Prerequisite(s): open to Honors College students only.

B ACC 311 Financial Accounting Theory I (3)
The first of a two-course sequence in intermediate-level financial accounting, which provides in-depth understanding of US Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. Topical coverage includes an introduction to basic accounting theory, study of the accounting cycle, conceptual framework of accounting, valuation of balance sheet accounts, recognition of revenue and matching expenses, and the reporting of the financial condition, operating results, and cash flows of an entity. This course builds on the framework provided by introductory courses in financial accounting and enables students to develop the ability to prepare, analyze and interpret corporate financial statements. Prerequisite(s): B ACC 211.

B ACC 312 Financial Accounting Theory II (3)
Continues the in-depth examination (begun in B ACC 311) of the US Generally Accepted Accounting Principles guiding the preparation of corporate financial statements. The topics addressed include special topics in accounting for Stockholder's Equity, the calculation and disclosure of earnings per share, investments, revenue recognition issues, accounting for income taxes, pensions, leases, and the accounting for and disclosure of accounting changes. Prerequisite(s): B ACC 311.

B ACC 313 Financial Statement Analysis (3)
Intensive course in the analysis of financial statements. Topics include, but are not limited to, revenue and expense recognition, the validity of various measures of profit, footnote disclosures, pro forma financial statements, and valuation of balance sheet components. A study of ratio analysis considers the impact of different accounting conventions. Emphasis is on the relevance of financial statements for key stakeholders. Prerequisite(s): B ACC 211 and B ACC 222 and open only to students whose concentration is Financial Analysis. Not open to students with credit in B ACC 311 and/or B ACC 312.

B ACC 381 Accounting Information Systems (3)
Analyzing, designing, utilizing, and evaluating computer-based and non-computer-based financial information systems. Topics include and combine accounting, computers, management and business ethics, internal controls, information technology in accounting developments, and the systems approach to meeting business information needs and requirements. Prerequisite(s): B ACC 222 and B ITM 215, or equivalent. Offered fall semester only.

B ACC 400 Forensic Accounting and Fraud Detection (3)
This course provides an overview of occupational fraud including misappropriation of assets, financial statement fraud and corruption as well as other forensic accounting engagements such as tax fraud and matrimonial disputes. The course will explore the characteristics of specific fraud schemes along with the characteristics of those who perpetrate them (according to the Annual Report to the Nations compiled by the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners). Students will acquire an understanding of the generally accepted accounting principles violated by the schemes. Students will become versed in the principles of internal control over the financial reporting system including how these principles work to deter financial fraud and ensure compliance with external requirements. Relevant guidance from the professional, regulatory and legal environment will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): B ACC 211. Offered fall semester only.

B ACC 401 Forensic Accounting Investigative Techniques (3)
Students will learn the process and principal techniques for conducting fraud examinations and other forensic investigations as well as why careful attention to them is critical to a successful investigation. Students will learn the role of analytical review procedures in the investigation of financial fraud. Document analysis and the art of effective interviewing during investigations will be explored. Students will learn the proper procedures for evidence handling. Finally students will learn to write a report that succinctly and effectively communicates the completed investigation. Relevant guidance from the professional, regulatory and legal environment will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): B ACC 400. Offered spring semester only.

B ACC 411 Financial Accounting Theory III (3)
Examination of advanced accounting topics including business combinations, consolidations, partnership accounting, foreign currency transaction and translation, segment and interim reporting, and accounting for governmental and nonprofit entities. Emphasizes the official financial accounting pronouncements. Prerequisite(s): B ACC 312.

B ACC 440 Survey of Taxation (3)
This course is a comprehensive introduction to the federal income tax system as it relates to individuals. It provides a conceptual approach to a wide array of tax topics including gross income, deductions and exclusions, gains and losses, depreciation, like-kind exchanges, alternative minimum tax, self-employment tax, and credits. Prerequisite(s): B ACC 211 or 6 credits of principles of accounting.

B ACC 442 Income Tax Accounting II (3)
Theory and practice of taxation as applied to partnership, corporate entities, and fiduciaries. Prerequisite(s): B ACC 441.

B ACC 461 Auditing (3)
Analysis of auditing and its contribution to financial reporting, with primary emphasis on the independent public accounting attest function. Application of audit tools, including flowcharting, statistical sampling, and the audit risk model, integrated with coverage of professional standards, the auditor's legal liability, and the regulatory environment. Prerequisite(s): B ACC 311 or B ACC 313.

B ACC 495 Independent Study in Accounting (3)
Individual study plan in a selected area as approved by the instructor and the department chair in conference with the student. Written and oral progress reports required. May not be repeated for credit. Not useable in the degree program or major. Prerequisite(s): open only to qualified senior accounting students in the School of Business. An application must be filed through the Office of Student Services in BB 201. S/U graded.

  

Courses in Finance/Financial Analysis

T FIN 200 Global Business (3)
This interdisciplinary business course introduces students to today's business environment with special emphasis on globalization of markets and globalization of production. It covers the national differences in political economy, and in business cultures and ethics. It considers recent geopolitical and economic events around the world and how they relate to globalization. Finally, the course examines the impact of globalization on businesses, including international trade, global marketing and global human resources management. Students are exposed to various world-wide institutions and their respective roles: the World Trade Organization, the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, the United Nations and its auxiliary organizations. Does not yield credit toward the major in business administration or accounting or the minor in business. Prerequisite(s): open to Honors College students only.

B FIN 210 Personal Finance (3)
The goal of this course is to develop financial literacy and empower students to make wise financial decisions. The course provides an understanding of the basics of investing in the stock and bond markets, tax planning and tax form preparation, personal budgeting and credit card debt, student loans, and how to build and maintain a credit score. Decisions about what types and amounts of insurance to buy, and tax and estate planning are also examined. As instructional methods, the course uses a combination of textbook and outside readings, lectures by the instructor and other financial planning practitioners, case studies, and spreadsheet exercises. Open to all University at Albany students. Does not yield credit in the majors or minor in the School of Business.

B FIN 236 (= R PAD 236) Institutions and Policy in Business Regulation (3)
This course examines the public regulation of business, surveying the field in general but with special attention to regulatory controls in financial markets. Its subjects include the justifications and critiques of government regulation, ethical considerations in regulatory decisions, international dimensions of regulatory policy and management, and how political, legal, and technological processes shape regulation. Only one version of R PAD 236 may be taken for credit.

B FIN 300 Financial Management (3)
Introductory course that surveys the basic concepts in financial management. Topics covered include financial statement analysis, operating and financial leverage, capital budgeting, cost of capital, bond and stock valuation models, and working capital management. Prerequisite(s): B ACC 211.

B FIN 301 Corporate Financial Policy and Strategy (3)
Continuation of B FIN 300, focusing on various investment and financing decisions of the firm. Topics include financial analysis, risk measurement, capital budgeting, capital structure, and dividend policy decisions made in an environment of uncertainty. Case course supplemented with a text and extensive computer spreadsheet assignments. Prerequisite(s): B FIN 300. Not open to students who are concurrently registered for or who have completed B FIN 400.

B FIN 333 Investment Management (3)
This course covers equity and equity-linked derivative securities, and portfolio management. Examines the institutional environment in which investment decisions are made. Topics include portfolio theory, the behavior of equity securities prices, and various models for the pricing of common stock and equity derivative instruments. Term project requires presentation of securities selection and portfolio management strategy. Extensive computer spreadsheet assignments. Prerequisite(s): B FIN 300 and 301. Not open to students with concurrent enrollment in B FIN 380 or who have successfully completed B FIN 380.

B FIN 375 Money and Capital Markets (3)
This course covers money and capital markets and the analysis of fixed-income securities. Topics include the functions of the Fed and its monetary policy, valuation of bonds, management of interest rate risk, and the pricing of derivatives such as interest rate swaps credit analysis, fixed income portfolio management. The use of computer spreadsheets is emphasized heavily. Prerequisite(s): B FIN 300. Not open to students who are concurrently registered for or who have completed B FIN 410.

B FIN 380 Investment Valuation and Analysis (3)
Intensive course in valuation of equity and derivative securities, and principles of portfolio management. Topics include equity valuation, option pricing, hedging, and speculation methods, creation of investment policy statements, construction of performance benchmarks, and performance attribution methods. Skills such as the use of financial modeling software, teamwork, and oral and written communication are emphasized heavily. Prerequisite(s): B FIN 300 and B ACC 313. Open only to students whose concentration is Financial Analyst Honors. Offered spring semester only.

B FIN 400 Financial Case Problems (3)
Intensive case analyses of and discussions about organizations facing a variety of financial issues, including value maximization, measurement of cost of capital, analysis of capital projects, mergers and acquisitions, and risk management. All of these topics will be covered under the overarching theme of corporate valuation. Skills such as the use of computer spreadsheets, teamwork, and oral and written communication are emphasized heavily. Prerequisite(s): B ACC 313, B FIN 300. Open only to students whose concentration is Financial Analyst Honors. Offered spring semester only.

B FIN 404 Entrepreneurial Finance (3)
The course focuses on valuing and financing young high-growth potential entrepreneurial firms. The course addresses this topic from two perspectives: users (entrepreneurs) and suppliers (venture capitalists and other private equity investors) of capital. This course is divided into three parts. The first part focuses on identifying opportunities and valuing those opportunities by using various techniques. The second part focuses on financing of entrepreneurial firms, such as venture capital, venture lending, angel, and other alternative sources. The last part of the course considers exit strategies including taking the venture public, merging it with another company, or through a leverage buyout. Prerequisite(s): B FIN 300, B FIN 301, B MKT 310, and B BUS 400. Offered fall semester only.

B FIN 410 The Fixed Income Securities Market (3)
Intensive course on the analysis of fixed income securities. Topics include bond pricing, duration, convexity, the term structure of interest rates, corporate, Treasury, and municipal securities, asset-backed securities, credit analysis, and interest rate swaps. Key skills include spreadsheet usage, teamwork, and oral and written communication. Prerequisite(s): B ACC 313 and B FIN 300, and open only to students whose concentration is Financial Analyst Honors. Offered spring semester only.

B FIN 435 (= R PAD 435) Law in Financial Market Regulation (3)
This course examines the rationales and main features of regulatory law in financial markets, focusing on banking, securities, futures, options, and other capital markets. It discusses approaches to regulating investor and customer protection, financial institutions, and market structure. It examines relationships among change in financial markets such as financial innovations and regulatory structure and practice. The course discusses the roles of federal and state regulation, self-regulatory organizations and private associations, and firms within the regulatory system. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): prior coursework in study of regulation and/or finance highly recommended.

B FIN 436 International Financial Management (3)
This course exposes students to the problems faced by financial managers of firms operating in an interconnected global business environment. After covering the basics of international finance theory and institutions, this course focuses on foreign exchange risk management and the valuation of cross-border cash flows. Various hedging practices and elements of working capital management, capital budgeting, and financing aspects are discussed in an international context. Includes lectures and case analyses. Skills such as the use of computer spreadsheets, teamwork, and oral and written communication are emphasized heavily. Prerequisite(s): B FIN 300 and either B FIN 301 or B FIN 400. Offered spring semester only.

B FIN 439 (= R PAD 436) Technology in Financial Market Regulation (3)
The development, operation, and regulation of technological systems shape modern financial markets. These systems are developed and overseen by market centers, clearing organizations, and other market infrastructure organizations, as well as sell-side financial firms, institutional investors and other buy-side participants, corporations, technology providers, and public and private regulators. Market controls, technological development, and regulation shape this system individually and interactively. This course examines the central features of technology in financial markets and how market and regulatory controls and social and behavioral conditions produce and interact with them. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): prior coursework in study of regulation and/or finance highly recommended.

B FIN 470 Special Topics in Finance (3)
Integrates the tools and concepts developed in preceding finance courses. Topics vary by semester and instructor and may include equity and fixed income analysis, derivatives, portfolio management, investment banking, financial case studies, or bank management, among others. Heavy emphasis on computer applications of financial concepts. May be repeated once for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite(s): B FIN 333 and B FIN 375 or B FIN 380 and B FIN 410.

B FIN 485 Derivatives and Risk Management (3)
Intensive examination of risk measurement in organizations and portfolios, and methods for managing those risks. Among the financial instruments examined are option, forward, futures, and swap contracts, including the characteristics of each instrument, market structure, institutional rules, pricing models, and strategies for use in investing and hedging. A variety of learning methods are employed, including lecture and discussion, case study, and computer spreadsheet analyses. Prerequisite(s): B FIN 301, B FIN 333 and B FIN 375 or B FIN 380, B FIN 400 and B FIN 410.

B FIN 490Z Financial Analysis Honors Seminar and Thesis (3)
The first half of the course prepares students for thesis development. Seminars present leading-edge financial topics, review basic research methods, and introduce various financial databases. At semester’s end, students present their completed theses to faculty and alumni on the Albany campus. Skills such as spreadsheet use, teamwork, and oral and written communication are emphasized heavily. Prerequisite(s): B FIN 380, 400 and 410. Open only to students whose concentration is Financial Analyst Honors. Offered fall semester only.

B FIN 494 Introduction to Equity Analysis (1)
Students in the UASBIG student-managed investment fund learn equity research techniques and the use of research tools that may include Bloomberg, FactSet, ValueLine, and EDGAR. Students learn the basics of top-down analysis. Students must become Equity Certified on the Bloomberg Terminal. Prerequisite(s): restricted to University at Albany School of Business Investment Group (UASBIG) members. S/U graded.

B FIN 495 Introduction to Financial Modeling (2)
Using SEC filings and Excel, students in the UASBIG student-managed investment fund model companies' financial statements and produce discounted cash flow and relative valuation estimates. Each student must complete at least one research report and stock recommendation, and pitch it to UASBIG's Advisory Board. Prerequisite(s): successful completion of Bloomberg Terminal Equity Certification. Restricted to University at Albany School of Business Investment Group (UASBIG) members. S/U graded.

B FIN 496 Applied Concepts in Equity Analysis and Financial Modeling (3)
Students in the UASBIG student-managed investment fund apply skills from B FIN 494 and 495, as well as portfolio management and trading concepts. Students learn valuation techniques including EV/EBITDA and Sum-of-Parts analysis, and the modeling of acquisitions and divestitures, and gain experience mentoring junior analysts. Each student must submit at least one professional-quality report and stock recommendation, and demonstrate leadership and assume a mentoring role in UASBIG. Prerequisite(s): B FIN 495. S/U graded.

  

Courses in Information Technology Management

T ITM 200 Strategic Sustainable Systems (3)
To be part of the next wave of global business growth you will need to craft sustainable businesses practices, with an eye to your effect on future generations. In this course we will study the relationships between business activity and the physical environment. First we will ground our discussion in basic concepts of business strategy and policy making. Employing the techniques of systems thinking and simulation, we will learn about the effects of feedback and structure that drive business growth and failure, and experiment with strategies that support economic vitality while reducing negative effects on the global economy in a time of increasingly scarce resources. Open to Honors College students only.

B ITM 210 Information Technology Practicum I (3)
This is a course for School of Business majors, with sophomore status, who are interested in pursuing a career in information technology (IT). Students will be exposed to financial services case studies and will be guided through research and strategy development by professionals. Weekly sessions with client-serving professionals who will mentor students to build and enhance their leadership, consulting, project management, and teamwork skills. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

B ITM 211 IT Consulting Mentorship (3)
This course builds up on the trajectory course, B ITM 210, where students act as IT consultants working with a firm. The students will serve as mentors to and assist students enrolled in B ITM 210. In addition, students will work with the instructional team in reviewing and evaluating student work and presentations as well as participate in weekly calls with the "client." In the process, students will also gain knowledge in the new case topic used for the current class (usually a topic in emerging technology, e.g., Cloud computing, social media, information security risk assessment). Students in this course will interface with the instructor(s) for B ITM 210 in and will interface with firm in development of, research for, and evaluation of cases and case materials. Prerequisite(s): B ITM 210 and permission of instructor.

B ITM 215 Information Technologies for Business (3)
This course focuses on the role of information systems in solving business problems. The topics in the course will include fundamental of information technology (IT), Organizational Strategy using IT, Customer Relationship Management, Supply Chain Management, Elements of e-business, information security, and cyber-ethics. Students will understand the role and importance of IT/IS within organization and will develop business-oriented applications using Microsoft Excel (comprehensive / advanced level) to achieve a solid base for development of IT/IS applications in business, accounting, or other applications. Course is not open to freshmen. Course is offered in both fall and spring semesters.      

B ITM 310 Information Technology Practicum II (3)
This course is for School of Business majors, with junior status, who are interested in pursuing a career in information technology (IT). Students will be exposed to a real business issue, which appears as a written business case. The students will be guided through research and strategy development by corporate managers, professionals, and/or faculty, who will mentor students to build and enhance the students' leadership, consulting, project management, and teamwork skills. The course is designed for 8 to 12 students. Enrollment in the course is by invitation only and an application process is necessary. Not all interested students can be accommodated. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and junior standing in the School of Business.

B ITM 322 Quantitative Analysis for Business Decisions (3)
This course is intended to teach students how to make business decisions under conditions of uncertainty. The course will cover the basics of business statistics, primarily data collection and presentation, and measures of centrality and dispersion. Students will learn about probability and probability distributions, parameter estimation and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite(s): B ITM 215, A MAT 108, and calculus.       

B ITM 330 Improving Business Performance with Information Technologies (3)
This course comprehensively covers databased design and development, including, theory, modeling, normalization, management, and administration. In this class students will use database technologies for developing business applications using relational database tools (e.g. Access, and Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The specific tools used in the course may change over time but the fundamental course of the course will remain the same. The course will also engage students in learning the Structured Query Language (SQL) which the students will use in their application development. This course will help students to understand the importance of databases in an organization and to apply databases to new business problems. The class has a strong hands-on component that will involve extensive use of computers during the class and for homework assignments and projects. Prerequisite(s): A MAT 106 and B ITM 215, A MAT 108 or A ECO 320. Offered in fall, spring, and summer (may not be offered every summer).       

B ITM 331 Business Systems Analysis and Design (3)
This course covers the planning, specification of system requirements, analysis, design, and implementation of computer-based information systems using database concepts previously learned in B ITM 330. This course teaches both the traditional and object-oriented for creating data-driven application prototypes. Experience with system development is gained through several individual and group projects that integrate database technology with prototyping using software packages such as MS Access. May not be taken by students with credit for B ITM 415 completed through spring 2016. Prerequisite(s): B ITM 330. Offered spring and summer (may not be offered every summer).       

B ITM 415Z Data Analytics in Business (3)
This course introduces participants to data mining and predictive analytics in business. It will build competencies in data modeling and predictive analytics. The course covers a number of data visualization and modeling concepts. The course also introduces participants to a software package that permits analysis of large data sets. After completing the course, participants will be able to analyze corporate data sets with modern techniques. The course is pertinent to students with concentrations in information technology management, marketing, and management. Prerequisite(s): B ITM 322.      

B ITM 416 Communications, Networking, and Security (3)
This course provides an introduction to integrative business strategy, practice, and enabling technologies. Topics include telecommunication: concepts, protocols (OSI and TCP/IP), and hardware; computer networks (client-server, LAN, WAN, conducted and wireless Internet); computer security (Security Threats and Vulnerabilities, Network Security, Cryptography, and Privacy), and related emerging technologies. Prerequisite(s): B ITM 330. Offered spring semester only.

B ITM 434 Business Application Implementation (3)
This is a project-based course where students work in teams to develop model-based decision support systems or its elements for clients in the local or regional community. This course is required for ITM majors. For combined ITM majors enrollment is limited. Students should apply to get permission from the instructor. This course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): B ITM 415 or concurrent enrollment. Offered fall and spring semesters (may not be offered every spring).

B ITM 480 Enterprise Application Development and Management (3)
This course teaches students how to plan and implement an online business. The students learn about financial analysis, marketing analysis, and risk analysis and use these to create a business plan for their online business idea. The students then implement their idea by creating a working prototype using a multi-tier (client/server/data) architecture. Students develop and design a database and then connect it to the server creating dynamic web pages. At the middle and end of the semester, the students give a presentation to a review panel, which evaluates their efforts. Based on technical demands of the course, it is required for students to have some knowledge of database development and programming. Prerequisite(s): B FIN 300, B MKT 310, B ITM 330 and B BUS 400. Offered spring semester only.

  

Courses in Law

B LAW 200 Legal Environment of Business (3)
Stresses the basic legal concepts around which our society is structured, their applications in modern business society, legal procedures, terminology, and legal principles in operation. Topics include sources of law, Constitutional law, criminal law, civil lawsuit issues and insurance. Offered spring semester only. 

B LAW 220 Business Law (3)
Legal principles underlying business relations, including contracts, commercial paper, significant articles of the Uniform Commercial Code, and government and business. Accounting majors must complete this course and not B LAW 200.

B LAW 321 Law of Business Organizations (3)
Legal concepts of agency, sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, limited liability companies, and bankruptcy.

B LAW 421 Law of Property (3)
Law of real and personal property, including mortgages and conveyances, landlord and tenant relationships. Prerequisite(s): B LAW 220. Offered fall semester only.

B LAW 422 Trust and Estate Law (3)
Covers presentation of material concerning living and testamentary trusts; analysis of the requirements of a will, including its preparation, execution, and probate; administration of estates of individuals dying with and without wills. Offered spring semester only.

 

  

Courses in Management

B MGT 341 Behavioral Foundations of Management (3)
This survey course provides an overview of research and theory about behavior in organizations. Specific topics may include ethics, decision-making, communication, group processes, power and influence, motivation and job attitudes, conflict and cooperation, organizational politics, leadership, organization structure, organization change and development, and international differences affecting behavior in organizations.

B MGT 430 Management of Human Resources (3)
The course introduces the concepts and techniques of human resources management, with an emphasis on knowledge relevant for practicing managers. Topics include strategic human resource management, human resource information systems, employee recruitment and selection, diversity and multiculturalism, compensation and incentives, performance management, training and development, and legal issues. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite: B MGT 341.

B MGT 450/450Z Managerial Leadership and Decision Making (3)
Builds on concepts in B MGT 341. Review of major concepts and findings in managerial leadership, with a focus on the functions and skills of middle and lower-level managers. Topics may include nature of managerial work, managerial skills and behavior, motivating and influencing people, leading decision groups, participative leadership and delegation, problem solving and crisis management, time management, team building, and transformational leadership. Only one version of B MGT 450 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): B MGT 341. Offered spring semester only.

B MGT 460 Social Entrepreneurship (3)
This course is about using entrepreneurial skills to craft innovative responses to social problems. Entrepreneurs are particularly good at recognizing opportunities, exploring innovative approaches, mobilizing resources, managing risks, and building viable enterprises. These skills are just as valuable in the social sector as they are in business. "Social entrepreneurship" applies to both profit and non-profit firms which have programs designed to create social value. To achieve this purpose, this course covers extensive content materials using the text, lectures, guest visitors, and class discussions; it brings application and relevance through the use of case studies; and it provides personal project presentations at the end of the semester. Open only to School of Business majors. Prerequisite(s): B MGT 341 and B MGT 400. Offered fall semester only. May not be offered in 2015-2016.

B MGT 470 Motivation, Productivity, and Change Management (3)
This course focuses on theory and practice involved with motivation, productivity, and change management in the work environment. Improving employee motivation and productivity is the focus of change management. Topics include major theories on work motivation, practical techniques of change management such as action research and survey-guided feedback, and practical techniques to increase employee involvement and motivation such as incentive plans, employee ownership, and self-managed teams. Prerequisite(s): B MGT 341. Offered fall semester only.

B MGT 471 Human Resource Information System (3)
Focuses on the interface of the Human Resource Management function of organizations with computer technology. Examines the use of computers as tools to analyze and assist in decision regarding the effective utilization of human resources of any organization. Explores specific human resource topics in depth using information technology as a managerial decision tool in area such as strategy, selection, employment discrimination, training, and compensation. Only one version of B MGT 471 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): B MGT 341 and 430. Offered spring semester only.

B MGT 480 Special Topics in Management (3)
Study of selected advanced topics in organizational behavior, human resource management, or strategic management. Topics may include career management, design of organizations, strategic human resource management, managing compensation, and international management. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): B MGT 341 and 430.

B MGT 481W Strategic Management (3)
This capstone course develops an overall management viewpoint and integrates various specialized functions such as Marketing, Finance, Accounting, Management Information Systems, and Human Resource Management. Topics include industry analysis, global competitiveness, international management, strategies for adjusting to the social, political and economic environment, approaches for developing and implementing strategic plans in organizations, managerial values and ethics, and social issues in business. Prerequisite(s): senior standing in the School of Business and permission of the Office of Student Services.

B MGT 483 Strategic Entrepreneurship (3)
The central focus of this course is on developing business initiatives and crafting strategies for sustainable growth. Topics include entrepreneurial innovation; assessing viability of new venture strategies; developing and implementing tactical and strategic plans; and managing for continued growth and profitability. This course will include lectures, presentations by practitioners with distinctive experience and expertise, and a practicum that focuses on developing business concepts and/or solving business problems, marshaling resources, and creating strategic plans for capitalizing on business opportunities. Prerequisite(s): B BUS 400, B FIN 404 and B MKT 440. Offered spring semester only. May not be offered in 2015-2016.

  

Courses in Marketing

T MKT 200 Social Media Marketing (3)
Social media is now widely embraced around the world across several domains, be it social development, medicine, or business. The purpose of this course is to build a disciplined approach to understanding and harnessing social media so you can find some of the answers. Students will be required to keep-up with the latest trends and news in social media marketing. Does not yield credit toward the major in business administration or accounting or the minor in business. Prerequisite(s): admission to the Honors College.

B MKT 310 Marketing Principles (3)
Effective marketing policy is the key determinant of success in business. This course is designed to provide a broad-based foundation to the 4 Ps of marketing: product development, pricing, promotion, and places of distribution. In addition, students are exposed to marketing research, marketing strategy, Internet and global marketing, consumer and organizational behavior, retailing, and market segmentation.

B MKT 312 Marketing Research (3)
Understanding consumers is central to success in marketing. Marketing research is what marketers use in order to understand consumers. This course covers all aspects of marketing research process, including planning, design, collecting data, and analyzing data using SPSS or other statistical analysis software. Prerequisite(s): B MKT 310, B ITM 220, or A MAT 108.

B MKT 351 Consumer Behavior (3)
The goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive understanding of (a) why consumers behave the way they do, (b) what factors influence such behavior, and (c) how consumers make decisions in the marketplace. Understanding consumer behavior serves as the foundation upon which advertising, sales promotion, product, packaging, pricing, distribution, and other aspects of marketing strategy are built. Prerequisite(s): B MKT 310, and B ITM 220 or A MAT108.

B MKT 376 Global/International Marketing (3)
This course extends marketing principles to the global arena. Through active participation and projects, you will learn about the problems of implementing a marketing mix globally and how to evaluate the social, legal, political, and ethical concerns in operating a global enterprise. Prerequisite(s): B MKT 310.

B MKT 411 Marketing Strategy in Globalized Market Environment (3)
This course discusses how marketers develop marketing strategies in a globalized market environment and provides students necessary tools to develop integrated marketing management strategies. Through active class discussions, case studies, and projects, students learn how to evaluate global marketing environment and how to develop conventional and digital strategies applied to segmentation, targeting, positioning, and the marketing mix in a global context. Prerequisite(s): B MKT 310.

B MKT 430/430Z Personal Selling and Sales Management (3)
This course prepares students to enter business in the sales department and advance into management. We cover the selling process, focusing on the concepts and tactics associated with consultative selling, the approach associated with business-to-business transactions. Also, we examine how managers build their organization through effective recruiting, training, and supervising. In-class exercises put concepts like team-building and negotiation into practice. Students learn about the very same practices that they face when entering the job market. Guest speakers and cases bring the topics alive and anchor discussion in the real world. Writing and presentation skills improve through practice and feedback. Prerequisite(s): B MKT 310.

B MKT 432 Advertising: An IMC Perspective (3)
Through projects and active participation in this course, you will learn how people receive and process messages; why some efforts work while others fail; how to integrate your efforts and target an audience through advertising, public relations, direct marketing, and information systems; how to assess communication options systematically and formulate integrated marketing communication plans; and how an integrated marketing communication plan can win and keep customers. Prerequisite(s): B MKT 351.

B MKT 437 Business Marketing (3)
This course provides an introduction to business-to-business marketing and the role played by advancing technology, including IT. Students learn the concepts and strategies behind supply chains, industrial purchasing, electronic business markets, strategic partnerships and networks, and cross-border business marketing. New advances in building business relationships are explored. Classes are action-oriented, involving case discussions, team presentations, and guest speakers. Prerequisite(s): B MKT 310.

B MKT 440 New Venture/Product Development (3)
Peter Drucker, in Innovation and Entrepreneurship, says that successful entrepreneurial businesses must systematically change the values and satisfactions customers obtain from a company's distinctive competencies and resources. In this course we implement this idea and guide students in developing actionable marketing plans for their new ventures and/or products. By the end of the course, students would have a clear understanding of the various issues relating to new venture/product development such as identifying and refining viable ideas and concepts, forecasting demand, business analysis, and designing and implementing successful marketing strategies for new ventures/products. Prerequisite(s): B MKT 310. Offered fall semester only.

B MKT 450 Social Media Marketing (3)
Marketing in social media has changed the dynamics of both B2B and B2C marketing. Today, social media campaigns are everywhere and marketers are actively pursuing social media plans in addition to conventional marketing planning. This course will introduce you to the world of social media marketing, with an emphasis on designing, implementing, and evaluating social media marketing programs. This course is open only to senior Business Administration Majors. Prerequisite(s): B MKT 310 and senior standing in the School Of Business.

B MKT 460 Internet Marketing Strategy (3)
In this course you will learn how to think and plan as a Web marketing manager. You will create an Internet strategy that builds on the strength of existing marketing programs, build a brand on the Web using techniques for Internet marketing strategy, recognize the situations in which a Web strategy will work, and make improvements to functioning sites that are not achieving expected results. Prerequisite(s): open only to senior School of Business majors who are pursuing a combined concentration in marketing. 

B MKT 480/480Z Selected Topics in Marketing (3)
Intensive study of topics in marketing. Topics may include project management, new product development, management of innovation, use of microcomputers for marketing decisions, retailing, and industrial marketing. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Prerequisite(s): open only to senior business administration majors. Permission of School of Business.

  

Special Courses in Business

B BUS 200 Selected Topics in Business (1-3)
This course is devoted to selected topics in business, strategic management, career management, and/or organizational behavior. This course may be repeated for up to 6 credits when topic varies. Course does not yield liberal arts and sciences credit. Not open to freshmen. Prerequisite(s): A PSY 101, A SOC 115, or 3 credits of economics. S/U graded.       

B BUS 250 Business in Society (3)
This course examines economic value systems and structures and their impact on society. Business fundamentals are examined particularly as they relate to the development of American cultural values. The course will also analyze the relationship between literature, philosophy, sociology, psychology and successful business practices. Does not yield credit toward the Accounting or Business Administration majors. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 108, or A PSY 101, or A SOC 115.

B BUS 300 Accounting and Communications (1)
Theory, principles, and practices of effective written communications: correspondence, formal and informal reports, business memos, and letters. This course provides individual assessment with regard to how students might improve their written communications skills to meet the standards required by the accounting profession. Prerequisite(s): junior standing in the accounting major. Offered fall semester only.

B BUS 400 Introduction to Entrepreneurship (3)
This introductory course considers the antecedents and consequences of entrepreneurship. The tools you develop in this course will help you understand how and why a new venture is launched and how to make that effort successful. The class will also provide you with exposure to basic entrepreneurial and business skills in a format that encourages dialogue, develops critical thinking skills, and promotes self-awareness and personal development. You will also learn about the impact of entrepreneurship on the economy and society. By the end of the course, you will be able to critically evaluate opportunities, marshal resources, and understand how to manage a new venture. This is not a course consisting solely of the "nuts and bolts" of how to start your own business. You will also leave this course with a more thorough understanding of some of the key institutions supporting entrepreneurship and specific government initiatives/programs to stimulate entrepreneurial activity. You will also be knowledgeable about the salient issue of technology commercialization at universities, federal labs, and firms, especially the entrepreneurial dimensions of such activities. A key component of this course is spirited, informed class discussion. The quality of the course depends, to a large extent, on your input. If you are prepared to challenge the instructor and your classmates, the class will be a rewarding and enriching learning experience. To facilitate class discussion, short quizzes (in lieu of formal exams) will be given each week on the reading assignments. Prerequisite(s): B FIN 300 and B MKT 310. Offered spring semester only.

B BUS 494 Multi-Cultural Work Environments (1)
This is an independent study course that is open to international students whose internships will be in a country other than that of their citizenship or prior work experience. The goal is to promote an understanding of the cultural assumptions we bring to the work environment and the effects of cultural differences on organizational interactions and productivity. Students may register for the course after obtaining an internship offer and completing the application for the course. International students will obtain and process work authorization forms with the International Students Office. Final grade is dependent on completion of a 10 page paper describing the internship and its relationship to the student's academic study. Can be repeated for credit up to 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): completion of at least 75 credits with a 3.25 cum GPA and a major in the School of Business. S/U graded.

B BUS 495 Independent Study in Business I (1–3)
Individual study plan in a selected area as approved by the instructor and the dean in conference with the student. Written and oral progress reports required. Prerequisite(s): open only to qualified students who have senior status in the School of Business. May not be repeated for credit. May not be used in the concentration. An application must be filed through the Office of Student Services, BB 201. S/U graded.

B BUS 496 Independent Study in Business II (1–3)
Advanced or expanded individual study plan in a selected area as approved by the instructor and the dean in conference with the student. Written and oral progress reports required. Prerequisite(s): B BUS 495. Open only to qualified students who have senior status in the School of Business. May not be repeated for credit. May not be used in the concentration. An application must be filed with the Office of Student Services. BB 201. S/U graded.

B BUS 497 Internship in Business I (1-3)
Internships involving off-campus participation in the work of an agency, institution, or corporate body other than the University, with collateral academic study. Prerequisite(s): contingent on the approval of a University at Albany School of Business full-time instructor willing to supervise the study and evaluate on-site reports of the student’s progress. Approval of the Undergraduate Affairs Committee also required. Minimum cumulative GPA of 3.10. Open only to School of Business majors with a minimum of 75 completed degree credits who have completed the 300 level foundations courses. S/U graded.

B BUS 498 Internship in Business II (1-3)
Internships involving off-campus participation in the work of an agency, institution, or corporate body other than the University, with collateral academic study. Prerequisite(s): contingent on the approval of a University at Albany School of Business full-time instructor willing to supervise the study and evaluate on-site reports of the student’s progress. Approval of the Undergraduate Affairs Committee is also required. Minimum cumulative GPA requirement is 3.10. Open only to School of Business majors with a minimum of 75 completed degree credits. Internship experience must be different from that of B BUS 497. S/U graded.

B BUS 499 Honors Research and Thesis in Business (3)
An intensive reading, research and writing course in a functional area of business. The course culminates with a 40 page, double-spaced honors thesis written under the supervision of a faculty member. Students will also have to present their findings to the faculty and administration. Final written thesis due on the last day of classes. Prerequisite(s): open only to juniors and seniors who have been admitted to the School of Business, have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.50 and who have completed a total of at least 75 degree credits. See the Assistant Dean in BA 313A for more complete details and the application materials. Research must be conducted in the student's concentration or accounting. S/U graded.