School of Education

Office of the Dean

Robert Bangert-Drowns, Dean
Heidi Andrade, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
Alison Olin, Assistant Dean for Personnel and Planning
Christine Smith, Assistant Dean for Professional Studies
(518) 442-4988


Drawing on its rich tradition of excellence, the School of Education’s mission is to enhance learning and human development, in and out of classrooms, and across the life span. The School seeks to advance knowledge about the full spectrum of challenges in learning, development, behavior, and adaptation.

The School of Education brings multidisciplinary expertise to bear on policy and practice about the changing needs of students, professionals, and educational systems, locally, nationally, and across the globe. We view questions of theory, research, practice, and policy as complementary and interrelated, and from this perspective, seek to:

The School of Education offers approximately 40 different Master's, Certificate, and Doctoral degree programs. The school is organized into four departments: Educational Administration and Policy Studies, Educational and Counseling Psychology, Educational Theory and Practice, and Literacy Teaching and Learning.

The School of Education offers an undergraduate major in Human Development and a minor in Educational Studies. Requirements for the major are outlined under the Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology. Requirements for the minor are outlined in the Minors section of this bulletin.

Undergraduate students are advised that to obtain teacher certification at the University at Albany, students must complete a B.A./B.S. with an appropriate academic major and then be accepted into an appropriate M.S. in Education.

The following undergraduate courses offered by the School of Education are considered liberal arts and sciences courses for the purpose of requirements for the B.A. and B.S. degrees: E APS 301, 400, 470; E CPY 360, 462; E EST all courses; E PSY 224, E PSY 250, E PSY 330, E PSY 420, E PSY 481; E RDG 487Z; E SPE 369, 460; E SPY 360; E TAP 403.

All courses in the School of Education are preceded by the prefix letter E.

Pathways Into Education Center (PIE)

Pathways Into Education (PIE) Center is the central office on campus serving undergraduates and prospective students interested in pursuing careers in education as well as graduate students enrolled in degree programs that lead to teacher certification.

The PIE Center:

Contact the PIE Center at:
Heidi Audino, Director
(518) 442-4828
PIECenter@albany.edu

  

School-Wide Courses in Education (E EDU)

E EDU 300 Independent Study (1–3)
Independent study with variable credit. Contingent upon the consent and willingness of instructor(s) to function as adviser(s) and the dean, School of Education, or designate(s). The credits may be apportioned in whole or in part as major credit, second field credit, or elective credit as appropriate and as determined by the student’s major department. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, departmental consent. S/U graded.

  

Department of Educational Administration & Policy Studies

Department of Educational Administration & Policy Studies has as its mission to enhance the understanding and practice of leading educational organizations and policy analysis across all levels of education. The faculty are regionally, nationally, and internationally recognized experts in elementary, secondary, and postsecondary school leadership, as well as educational policy.

http://www.albany.edu/eaps/

  

Courses in Educational Administration and Policy Studies

E APS 120 (formerly E EST 120) Toleration (3)
Interdisciplinary study of the theory, practice, and problems of tolerance. Stressing the historical origins of, the theoretical justifications for, and the sociopolitical conditions conducive to tolerance as well as those factors impeding it.

E APS 300 (formerly E EST 300) Social Foundations of Education (3)
Inquiry into educational policies, purposes, and ideas based upon the resources and insights of the humanities and the social sciences. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing.

E APS 301 (formerly E EST 301) Issues in American Higher Education (3)
Study of the structure and function of American higher education in the light of contemporary problems. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

E APS 400 United States Educational Governance, Policy, and Administration (3)
Historical and current trends in educational governance, policymaking, and administration. Analyses of K-12 and higher education issues at the federal, state, and local levels. Special emphasis on education reform issues specific to New York State.

E APS 456 Introduction to Peer Education (3)
Designed for students to support teaching, tutoring and mentoring of lower-division students in academic courses and support offices at UAlbany. Students assume roles of responsibility and leadership in supporting other students and to demonstrate high standards for academic accomplishment, knowledge of and respect for the University's resources, policies and procedures. Students should have a 3.30 GPA in the relevant academic area or prior course work (unless home department or office specifies otherwise), be in good standing, and must meet other criteria from their home department as deemed appropriate. Students must be endorsed by their home department and must have a peer educator placement in that home department while enrolled in the course. Students will gain experience working with peers in an educative manner and will become familiar with the field of instruction in a higher education setting. May not be taken for credit by students who completed the course under E APS 487. S/U graded.

E APS 457 Advanced Peer Education (3)
Designed for successful Peer Educators to continue to support teaching, tutoring and mentoring of lower-division students in academic courses and support offices at UAlbany. Students assume roles of responsibility and leadership in supporting other students and to demonstrate high standards for academic accomplishment, knowledge of and respect for the University's resources, policies and procedures. Students should have a 3.30 GPA in the relevant academic area or prior course work (unless home department or office specifies otherwise), be in good standing, and must meet other criteria from their home department as deemed appropriate. Students must be endorsed by their home department and must have a peer educator placement in that home department while enrolled in the course. Building upon the skills attained in E APS 456, students will gain experience working with peers in an educative manner and will advance their knowledge of academic instruction in higher education settings. May not be taken for credit by students who completed the courses under E APS 487. S/U graded.

E APS 470 Introduction to Law and Education (3)
Legal rights and responsibilities of professional personnel and students in K–12 American education, with an emphasis on constitutional principles. Topics include: public-private distinction, freedom of speech, free exercise of religion, academic freedom and tenure, and due process and equal protection guarantees.

E APS 487 Institute in Education (1-9)
Special course, not part of the pattern of regular offerings, designed to meet particular nonrecurring needs. May be repeated for credit when content varies.

 

E APS 497 (formerly E EST 497) Independent Study in Educational and Social Thought (3)
Independent reading, study, and research in educational and social thought. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, and consent of department.

  

Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology

Department of Educational & Counseling Psychology is a multidisciplinary endeavor devoted to research, teaching, and service in the use of psychological principles to promote lifelong growth, learning, and development in multiple life roles and contexts. Four disciplines are represented in the department: Counseling Psychology, Educational Psychology & Methodology, School Psychology, and Special Education.

Chair: Kevin Quinn
ED 230
(518) 442-4988

The Counseling Psychology division offers a variety of graduate-level scientist-practitioner preparation programs in Counseling Psychology and Mental Health Counseling.

Division Director: Michael V. Ellis
ED 217
(518) 442-5040
http://www.albany.edu/counseling_psych/

The Educational Psychology & Methodology division has a long history of preparing excellent scholars, teachers, and researchers on the graduate level to advance human learning and development in a variety of settings, with approaches accommodated to the range of human diversity.

Division Director: Joan Newman
ED 236
(518) 442-5055
http://www.albany.edu/educational_psychology/

The School Psychology division prepares school psychologists to integrate psychological theory, research, and established methods of scientific inquiry into effective practice; and to engage in research and evaluation activities that contribute to the science and practice of psychology.

Division Director: Deborah K. Kundert
ED 209
(518) 442-5055
http://www.albany.edu/schoolpsych/

The Special Education division offers full-time and part-time graduate-level programs in Special Education and Inclusion, as well as a combined Special Education/Literacy degree with the Reading Department.

Division Director: Bruce Saddler
ED 231
(518) 442-5078
http://www.albany.edu/special_education/

The Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology offers programs leading to a B.S. in Human Development; an M.S. program in Mental Health Counseling and a Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology; an M.S. in Educational Psychology and Methodology, a certificate of advanced study in Educational Research, and a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology and Methodology; a certificate of advanced study in School Psychology, as well as a Psy.D. in School Psychology; and M.S. degrees in Special Education and Literacy (I), Special Education and Literacy (II), Special Education, Inclusion, and Inclusion and Special Education, as well as a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology with a concentration in Special Education.

Educational and Counseling Psychology Faculty

Professors
David Yun Dai, Ph.D.
Purdue University
Michael V. Ellis, Ph.D.
The Ohio State University
Myrna L. Friedlander, Ph.D.
The Ohio State University
Susan D. Phillips, Ph.D.
Columbia University

Eminent Research Professor
Sigmund Tobias, Ph.D.
Columbia University, Teachers College

Associate Professors
Heidi G. Andrade, Ed.D.
Harvard University
Frank R. Dillon, Ph.D.
University of Missouri-Columbia
Lynn Gelzheiser Ph.D.
Columbia University, Teachers College
Deborah King Kundert, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin
David Miller, Ph.D.
Lehigh University
Joan Newman, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Alex L. Pieterse, Ph.D.
Columbia University, Teachers College
Kevin P. Quinn, Ed.D.
Northern Illinois University
Bruce Saddler, Ph.D.
University of Maryland
Zheng Yan, Ed.D.
Harvard University

Assistant Professors
Kristie Asaro-Saddler, Ph.D.
University at Albany, SUNY
Erin Baker, Ph.D.
Bowling Green State University
Kimberly F. Colvin, Ed.D.
University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Jessica L. Martin, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Lisa M. McAndrew, Ph.D.
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
Mariola Moeyart, Ph.D.
KU Leuven, Belgium
Gabriel Schlomer, Ph.D.
University of Arizona
Hung-Bin Sheu, Ph.D.
University of Maryland
Benjamin Solomon, Ph.D.
University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Visiting Assistant Clinical Professor
Callen Kostelnik, Psy.D.
University at Albany

Instructors and Supervisors
Tammy Ellis Robinson, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Jason B. Gallo, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Matthew LaFave, Ph.D.
University at Albany
M. Dolores Cimini, Ph.D.
University at Albany
New York State Licensed Psychologist

B.S. in Human Development

The fundamental mission of the interdisciplinary Human Development program is to explore the psychological, social, and cultural facets of human development and learning across the life span. Students will learn to critically assess social and cultural frameworks and the ways in which individuals, families, and communities are situated within them. Furthermore, they will be intellectually engaged in high quality, specialized knowledge refined by research and engagement within the community. Within this program diversity will be highly valued; students will explore diversity through issues of equity and social justice while taking into account the effects these issues have on human development. All students will take classes in human development, psychology, education, individual differences, quantitative and qualitative research, and statistics. These courses will stress self-directed learning and provide team-based learning opportunities that foster effective collaboration skills. Students will graduate with strong skills in research methods and be comfortable using data to make professional decisions.

Careers
Students with a degree from the University at Albany in Human Development will possess skills that will prepare them for employment in schools, social services, child-care organizations, criminal justice, health-care agencies, mental health and community development organizations. They will also be prepared to continue their education in a graduate program in business, child and family advocacy, counseling, education, law, psychology, and social work, as well as to pursue one of the current graduate programs offered in the School of Education in Counseling Psychology, Educational Psychology, Mental Health Counseling, School Psychology, and Special Education.

Special Programs or Opportunities
The department offers opportunities for students to participate in internships, research activities, and independent studies specifically geared toward the students’ concentration and supervised by professionals in the field and by department faculty.

Admission

Declaration of the major in Human Development must be made by application to the Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology. The application deadline for current students is the second Tuesday in March.

I. Criteria for Students Admitted as Freshmen to Albany:

Applications will be reviewed by a departmental committee comprised of the departmental Division Director, two faculty chosen on a rotating basis, and the Human Development program coordinator. If qualified applications exceed the number of available spaces, the following criteria will be used sequentially to select students to the program:

II. Criteria for Transfer Students:

Appeals: Students who do not meet the admission criteria due to extenuating circumstances may submit an appeal. Contact the Academic and Administrative Coordinator of the Human Development major for more information about the process.

Students who are admitted into the program may not minor in Educational Studies. Upon admission to the program, students must declare their concentration in the major:

Counseling Psychology Concentration
A concentration in Counseling Psychology within the Human Development major will prepare students for careers in psychological health and welfare. Students will explore diversity through an introduction to a variety of theoretical approaches to counseling. Specifically, the curriculum will provide the students with a foundation in developmental and counseling psychology, with an emphasis on the underlying psychological processes.

Students will be well prepared to continue their education in a graduate program in mental health counseling, college/residential life counseling, counseling psychology, and clinical psychology. A concentration in Counseling Psychology will prepare graduates to pursue careers serving as residential counselors, behavioral specialists, addiction counselors, counselors for at-risk youth, providers of support services for youth with mental or physical disabilities, service providers for children, youth, and families of military personnel, directors of recreational programs, youth group leaders, parent trainers and advisors, human services agency directors, and child life specialists working with children, youth, and families in children's hospitals or pediatric wards.

Educational Psychology Concentration
A concentration in Educational Psychology within the Human Development major will introduce students to research about human learning and development within a variety of settings (e.g., in the home, in peer groups, and in schools) and about approaches to accommodate learners based on the range of human diversity encountered in such settings. Students will learn how to evaluate and utilize research to create better learning environments. The understanding of research methodologies will provide a basic preparation for graduate study in educational, counseling, clinical, or school psychology. In addition, students will be prepared to pursue careers as research assistants, members of program evaluation teams, academic advisors, institutional researchers, and workers in child care and educational settings.

Peer Assistance and Leadership Concentration
The Peer Assistance and Leadership concentration provides a unique opportunity for undergraduate Human Development majors to integrate academic study with community service and student organizational leadership development experiences. Classroom learning and campus agency-based service opportunities within this concentration provide students with access to a course-based, credit-bearing educational experience in which they learn and develop community engagement, intervention and leadership skills through active participation in organized service experiences that meet campus and community needs. Learned skills can be applied to the world of work and graduate study in education as well as a wide range of other fields.

Special Education Concentration
A concentration in Special Education within the Human Development major will provide students with a foundation in atypical human development across the life span and knowledge of a variety of educational interventions for individuals with disabilities. Students will examine educational and life opportunities for children and adults with disabilities, as well as gain knowledge about the laws created to promote equity in access, education, and work for individuals with disabilities. In addition, students will be introduced to specific areas such as inclusion, universal design, instructional and community accommodations, and educational best practices. This concentration is appropriate for students who would like to pursue a career working with individuals with disabilities in community agencies or daycare centers, as teacher assistants for children with disabilities in schools, and/or continue their education in a graduate program leading to teacher certification.

Degree Requirements for the Major in Human Development

General Program B.S.: A minimum of 45 credits, including 30 credits in the core and 15 credits in a concentration.

Core Courses: 30 credits

*All students must complete the Dignity for All Students Act (DASA) training. It is recommended to be completed before the field-based learning experience.

Approved Concentrations: 15 credits

**Students may not take the same course to fulfill multiple requirements in the core and in the concentration.

  

Department of Educational & Counseling Psychology Courses

T CPY 110X Honors Education: History, Theory, & Practice (1)
A course for all incoming first-semester students in The Honors College. Students will be introduced to university life, the roles of students and professors in the University, and working effectively in small groups to promote each other's learning. All first-semester honors students are strongly encouraged to enroll.

T CPY 111 Introduction to Honors Research (1)
A course for all incoming first-year honors students and all second-year honors students admitted during their first year. Students will be introduced to undergraduate honors research through presentations of their honors theses by senior honors students and by presentations by professors who supervise undergraduate honors theses. Prerequisite: first-year student in The Honors College or new second-year student in The Honors College. 

T CPY 112 Exploration of Pathways: Careers and Families (1)
A course for second-year honors students that completes a three-course sequence that began during the first year. Through a series of talks by professionals from several fields, students will gain an understanding of the professional and personal pathways taken by those in various professions. Prerequisites: T CPY 110 & 111. Open only to second-year students in The Honors College.

E CPY 204U/204X Principles of Career and Life Planning (3)
Review of theories of decision-making career development, occupational choice, and job satisfaction. Additional topics: vocational measurement and assessment, evaluation and use of occupational information, and strategies of life-span planning. Some sections restricted to freshmen and sophomores only.

E CPY 301 Methods in Peer Helping I (2)
Introduction to the counseling theories and skills used in a variety of helping roles. Opportunities to develop basic relationships and communication skills. Case studies that examine motivational variables in helping activities. Prerequisite(s): A PSY 101 and permission of instructor.

E CPY 302 Methods in Peer Helping II (2)
Group activities for greater understanding of interpersonal skills. Interpersonal skill development and understanding of relevant theoretical concepts. Optional individual research projects. Prerequisite(s): E CPY 301 and permission of instructor.

E CPY 303 Methods in Peer Helping III (2)
Theories and research concerning young adult development. Practice with both individual and group helping skills. Research projects related to young adult development. Prerequisite(s): E CPY 301, 302, and permission of instructor.

E CPY 311 Helping Skills in Human Services: Sexuality and Young Adults (3)
Introduction to the major theories and research regarding human sexuality and young adults. Opportunities are provided for students to develop helping skills in the area of human sexuality. Prerequisite(s): A PSY 101 and permission of instructor.

E CPY 312 Service Learning: Designing Sexuality Education and Peer Helping Programs for Young Adult (3)
This course, the second in a series of training courses, will continue the training for participation in the Project SHAPE peer education program wherein students will conduct a variety of sexual health and sexuality programs for the University and greater Albany community. Students will expand their knowledge of major concepts and issues in human sexuality, refine their program development and facilitation skills, and enhance peer helping skills through structured discussions and engaged learning experiences. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor. Must be a member of Project SHAPE: Sexual Health and Peer Education program through University Counseling Center. Must have successfully completed E CPY 311.

E CPY 357 Applied Sport Psychology (3)
This course will provide an overview of issues related to applied sport psychology. Topics covered will include enhancing motivation, effective leadership, team cohesion, individual performance enhancement techniques (e.g., imagery and relaxation, cognitive restructuring), and counseling/clinical issues that are especially relevant to athletes (e.g., substance abuse, burnout). Application of sport psychology across human diversity (e.g., gender, race, ethnicity, culture, age) also will be addressed.

E CPY 360 Psychology, Cultural Diversity, & Social Justice (3)
This course will examine several aspects of diversity as it relates to U.S. culture and society. Moreover, the course will examine and explore the psychological effects of various types of oppression (i.e., racism, heterosexism, and classism) as they impinge upon specific communities within the U.S. and individuals within those communities. In addition, this course will include topics related to social justice and advocacy related to the improvement and empowerment of marginalized groups studied. The course will incorporate various sources of knowledge and content to provide a comprehensive perspective on the multiple layers of cultural diversity represented in U.S. culture. These sources include readings, class discussions, video presentations, experiential activities, and guest lecturers.

E CPY 387 Institute (1-9)
A special course, not part of the regular pattern of offerings, designed to meet non-recurring needs. Available for division use and subject to division approval.

E CPY 400 Foundations of Peer Counseling and Peer Education (3)
In this course, students will be introduced to peer counseling and peer educations through classroom presentations, experiential exercises, and participation in a weekly “training shift” at the Middle Earth Peer Assistance Program. The classroom portion of the course will consist of lectures on basic listening and communication skills as well as an introduction to peer counseling and peer education. There will also be classroom sessions on specific topics related to campus issues, such as alcohol and substance abuse, sexual assault, eating disorders, and other topics addressed by peer counselors and peer educators. In addition to participating in the lecture portion of the course, students will be required to complete a weekly three-hour “training shift” in which they will be paired with a peer mentor to practice the skills that are discussed in class. In this way, students will have an opportunity to observe and work with experienced peers in the context of a service agency that is located on campus. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

E CPY 403 Peer Counseling and Peer Education: Theory and Practice I (3)
In this course, which is a companion to A CPY 400 (Foundations of Peer Counseling and Peer Education), students will have the opportunity to practice peer counseling and peer education skills through supervised experiences which will occur on the Middle Earth crisis hotline and/or in the Middle Earth outreach education service. Students will also participate in weekly supervision groups which are facilitated by instructional staff. A primary strength of this course is that learning can take place in the context of a campus service agency, allowing students the opportunity to apply skills which they have learned. Prerequisite(s): E CPY 400 or the equivalent: and permission of the instructor.

E CPY 404 Peer Counseling and Peer Education: Theory and Practice II (3)
In this course, which is a companion to E CPY 400 (Foundations of Peer Counseling and Peer Education), students will have the opportunity to practice peer counseling and peer education skills through supervised experiences which will occur on the Middle Earth crisis hotline and/or in the Middle Earth outreach education service. Students will also participate in weekly supervision groups which are facilitated by instructional staff. A primary strength of this course is that learning can take place in the context of a campus service agency, allowing students the opportunity to apply skills which they have learned. Prerequisite(s): E CPY 400 and 403, or equivalent; and permission of instructor.

E CPY 405 Peer Counseling and Peer Education: Theory and Practice III (3)
In this course, which is a companion to E CPY 400 (Foundations of Peer Counseling and Peer Education), students will have the opportunity to practice peer counseling and peer education skills through supervised experiences which will occur on the Middle Earth crisis hotline and/or in the Middle Earth outreach education service. Students will also participate in weekly supervision groups which are facilitated by instructional staff. A primary strength of this course is that learning can take place in the context of a campus service agency, allowing students the opportunity to apply skills which they have learned. Prerequisite(s): E CPY 400, 403, and 404, or equivalent; and permission of instructor.

E CPY 406 Theory and Practice in Peer Counseling and Education: Peer Supervision (3)
In this course, which is a companion to E CPY 403, 404, and 405 (Peer Counseling and Peer Education: Theory and Practice I, II, and III), students will have the opportunity to practice peer counseling and peer education supervision skills through practical experiences which will occur on the Middle Earth crisis hotline and/or in the Middle Earth outreach education service. Students will also participate in weekly supervision groups facilitated by instructional staff. A primary strength of this course is that learning can take place in the context of a campus service agency, allowing students the opportunity to apply skills which they have learned. Prerequisite(s): E CPY 400, 403, 404, and 405, or equivalent; and permission of instructor.

E CPY 410 Supporting Individual and Community Change (3)
This course provides an overview of the mechanisms involved in promoting health and reducing health risk at the individual and community levels. Students will be exposed to topics related to stress management, mindfulness, bystander intervention, health promotion, and reduction of health risks. The processes and practices that underscore strategic community and system-level change, such as capacity-building, asset mapping, and policy change, will also be addressed. The course will consider interpersonal advocacy, service innovation and utilization, system change and social action as forms of community-level change. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

E CPY 421 Introduction to Counseling Psychology (3)
The history, philosophy, and organization of counseling psychology both as an academic discipline and as a helping profession are explored. Emphasizes understanding of personal, academic, and professional aspects of counseling psychology in the context of modern economic and social influences. For the student considering a career in the helping professions. Prerequisite(s): A PSY 101.

E CPY 462 Psychology of Disability (3)
Study of the psychological aspects of disability. Emphasizes physical disability, but also includes other disabling conditions. Topics include reactions to disability, adjustment to disability, rehabilitation approaches, community resources, and affirmative action policies. Prerequisite(s): A PSY 101 or its equivalent.

E CPY 497 Independent Study (3–6)
Designed to meet needs of undergraduate students who possess interest in counseling or counseling psychology and plan for graduate education. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. S/U graded.

  

Courses in Educational Psychology and Methodology

E PSY 200 Introduction to the Psychological Process of Schooling (3)
Critical analysis of the psychological process of schooling. Interpretive survey of the literature and research in learning, motivation, development, and intelligence and their impact on American education and society. Only one of E PSY 200 and T EPS 200 may be taken for credit.

T EPS 200 Introduction to the Psychological Process of Schooling (3)
The purpose of this course is to provide a basic understanding of theories and research in learning, human development, academic motivation, and intelligence, as well as the ways in which theories about how children grow and learn can be applied to teaching and learning. We will draw a variety of instructional approaches including assigned readings, reflective writing, hands-on activities, class discussions, group projects, and individual papers. Only one of E PSY 200 and T EPS 200 may be taken for credit. Open to Honors College students only.

T EPS 220X Current Issues in Child Development (3)
This course will introduce major themes and current issues in the study of child development. Students will be introduced to the importance of research based knowledge to analyze and investigate these issues. Students will complete weekly readings and regular assignments, and will be required to undertake observational research and present their finds at a poster session at the end of the course. Open to Honors College students only.

E PSY 224 Lifespan Development (3)
Theory and research relating to the typical intellectual, social and emotional development over the lifespan, including the adult years.

E PSY 250 Understanding Research in Human Development (3)
This course will introduce students to the most important types of research in human development and the criteria by which consumers of research can judge if the stated findings are credible.

E PSY 330 Introductory Statistics in Human Development (3)
This course will provide students with an introduction to statistics for the purposes of analyzing human development data, including: (1) understanding fundamental concepts of statistics, including central tendency, variability, sampling distributions, standard error, significance tests, confidence intervals, effect size, and power of tests of significance, and (2) performing t-test, single-subject analysis, simple regression, and repeated measures ANOVA.

E PSY 387 Institute (1-9)
A special course, not part of the regular pattern of offerings, designed to meet non-recurring needs. Available for division use and subject to division approval.

E PSY 390 (formerly E EDU 390) Community Service Projects (1–6)
Special projects involving education-related community activities and supporting study, as approved by the dean or designee of the School of Education. Educational Studies minor students must complete E EDU/ E PSY 390 for a minimum of 3 credits and may repeat the course for a maximum of 6 credits. Registration preference is given to students who have selected Educational Studies as the minor, with seniors having preference over juniors. Prerequisite(s): E PSY 200 or T EPS 200, permission of instructor; must be at least a second semester sophomore. S/U graded.

E PSY 400 Instructional Psychology (3)
Intensive investigation of theories and research in learning and motivation as they apply to classroom instruction. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

E PSY 411 Foundations of Leadership in College and University Student Organizations (3)
In this course, students will be exposed to leadership theory and practice within college and university student organization settings. They will examine and enhance their own leadership skills through structured discussions, team-based activities, and engaged learning experiences facilitated by course instructors. The course will also focus on the role of leadership in promoting strategic change at a broader system level. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

E PSY 420 Child and Adolescent Development (3)
Theory and research in social, emotional, physical, and intellectual development and its application to instruction. Emphasis on the late childhood through middle adolescence. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

E PSY 440 Evaluation (3)
Evaluation considered as a process beginning with the planning stage. Provides experiences to develop competencies (e.g., writing objectives, choosing appropriate means of evaluation, constructing test items, analyzing data). Discussion of related issues (e.g., testing for mastery, uses of standardized tests, accountability, grading practices). Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

E PSY 441 Social Issues in Testing (3)
Social issues related to the use of tests for critical employment, admissions, and competency decisions. Considers legal, ethical, and psychometric aspects of such issues as test bias, open admissions, privacy, and truth-in-testing. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

E PSY 480/480Z Educational Psychology: Independent Study (3–6)
Designed to allow the student to learn how to conduct educational psychological research by participating as an assistant to a faculty member in an ongoing faculty project in areas such as children’s learning, child development, special education, evaluation, etc. Regular meetings with faculty mentor are required. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of instructor. S/U graded.

E PSY 481 Research Project in Human Development (3)
This course will provide students with the opportunity to use various types of research methods for designing and conducting small-scale empirical studies in human development, using small-size newly collected or already existing quantitative and qualitative data. Prerequisites: E PSY 250, E PSY 330, and junior or senior class standing. S/U graded.

  

School Psychology Courses

E SPY 120 The Psychology of Academic and Personal Effectiveness (3)
Examination and application of psychological theory and research in learning, memory, motivation, decision making, behavioral self-control, and young adult development with implications for academic performance and personal effectiveness. Only one of U UNI 100 and E SPY 120 may be taken for credit. Open only to freshmen, and other students by permission of the department.

E SPY 360 Positive Youth Development (3)
An introduction to current theory and research in the field and practices of positive youth development within the context of important societal issues; cultivating environments to promote optimal development and behavior in disadvantaged, trouble youth through strengths and family practices, and healthy alternatives to interpersonal, family, and community violence. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior status.

E SPY 387 Institute (1-9)
A special course, not part of the regular pattern of offerings, designed to meet non-recurring needs.  Available for division use and subject to division approval.

  

Courses in Special Education

T SPE 260 (formerly E SPE 260H) Perspectives on Human Exceptionality (3)
Students will learn about the characteristics of individuals with exceptionalities, how they are identified, and what services are necessary for them to function in both school and society. Students will be exposed to the cultures of disability groups through observations, research, lecture, readings, and videos. Not open to students with credit for E SPE 460. Prerequisite(s): Honors College student or permission of instructor.

E SPE 369 Special Education for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Problems (3)
Presentation of theoretical positions, assessment techniques; planning procedures, and teaching methods relevant to students with emotional and behavioral disorders. Emphasizes current educational practice in the least restrictive environment. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

E SPE 387 Institute (1-9)
A special course, not part of the regular pattern of offerings, designed to meet non-recurring needs. Available for division use and subject to division approval.

E SPE 460 Introduction to Human Exceptionality (3)
Characteristics of individuals whose cognitive, physical, or emotional development differs from typical individuals. Special education history and laws are discussed, as is the process leading to the development of individualized education plans and special education services. Selected strategies for students with special needs are also presented.

E SPE 463 Introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorders (3)
This course will cover the nature and etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Characteristics of children with ASD in the areas of cognition, language, socialization, behavioral, sensory, and academic skills will be discussed. Instructional strategies and research on current evidence-based strategies and their implementation in the school setting will be examined. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing.

  

Department of Educational Theory and Practice

Department of Educational Theory and Practice prepares educational practitioners and researchers with specialties in Language and Literacy, Instructional Design and Technology, Mathematics and Science education, Teaching and Learning, and Curriculum and Instruction.

Chair: Jianwei Zhang
ED 119
(518) 442-4007
jzhang1@albany.edu
http://www.albany.edu/etap/

  

Courses in Educational Theory and Practice

E TAP 201 Exploring Teaching as a Profession (3)
Review and exploration of contemporary education with a major focus on the secondary school. Emphasis on concepts of schooling, changing role of teachers, restructuring schools, and teaching as a career. Examine theories of teaching and learning for the purpose of challenging assumptions about today’s schools and extending expectations concerning tomorrow’s schools.

T TAP 211Z The Theory and Practice of John Dewey (3)
This course is an introduction to the thinking of American philosopher John Dewey. Dewey is considered the "father" of progressive education in this country. We will look at the hope that is embedded in his work, particularly as it pertains to approaches to teaching and learning that are grounded in experience. Open to Honors College students only.

E TAP 212 Teachers' Lives (3)
This course is a case-based examination of teachers’ lives. We will explore and analyze teachers’ lives from the perspective of changes in the struggles, rewards, responsibilities, and realities of teaching with respect to such things as historical era, gender, culture, content area and grade level taught. Goals are to develop an understanding of the realities of the varied lives of teachers; engage in critical thinking and analysis; and gain experience and expertise in examining and synthesizing the cause and effect of change (and stability) in teachers’ lives in general.

E TAP 403 Issues in Urban Education (3)
This course focuses on the social, political, and economic conditions that impact schools serving inner city urban communities in the United States. Although schools in urban communities differ considerably and should not be stereotyped, they all face a number of similar challenges that may be linked to changing urban conditions — as well as challenges that may result from the interplay of diverse stakeholders-administrator, teachers, parents, community/school activists concerned about the academic achievement, retention, and graduation of youth served in urban school environments.

E TAP 404 Teaching in Urban Schools: Strategies for Implementing the New York State Learning Standards (3)
An examination of effective instructional strategies for meeting the New York State Learning Standards in urban schools. The course will review the Learning Standards, demonstrate pertinent strategies that may be appropriate in urban schools, and provide practical experiences in developing lesson plans. Subject area will vary.

E TAP 487 Institute in Education (2–9)
A special program, not part of the pattern of regular offerings, designed to meet particular nonrecurring needs. Available for department use and subject to department approval.

E TAP 497 Independent Study in Teacher Education (2–6)
Independent reading, study, and research in teacher education. Prerequisite(s): senior standing and consent of Department of Educational Theory and Practice.

  

Department of Reading

The research published by the Department of Literacy Teaching and Learning faculty and students has been ranked among the best in the nation. The faculty are committed to preparing masters students and mentoring doctoral students in the critically needed area of literacy studies.

Chair: Virginia J. Goatley
ED 333
(518) 442-5100
http://www.albany.edu/eltl

  

Courses in Literacy Teaching and Learning

E LTL 404 (formerly E RDG 404) Children's Literature (3)
Students read and respond to multiple genres of children’s literature, including nonfiction texts, across both print and electronic platforms. Topics include: supporting and appreciating students’ complex responses to literature; analyzing the symbiotic relationship of words and pictures in visual texts; using technology to promote literary understanding; and meeting the standards by designing literature instruction informed by critical literacy perspectives.

E LTL 406 (formerly E RDG 406) Young Adult Literature (3)
Students read and respond to multiple genres of literature for young adults, including nonfiction texts. Topics include: understanding how adolescents build identities and worldviews through  engagements with literature; supporting and extending students’ responses to literature through dialogic teaching; designing literature instruction to support close readings of complex texts informed by literary theory and  disciplinary knowledge; using technology to promote literary understanding; analyzing the symbiotic relationship between words and pictures in visual, digital, and multigenre texts.

E LTL 410 (formerly E RDG 410) Literacy in Social Contexts (3)
This course examines historical and contemporary aspects of literacy, focusing particularly on the relation between literacy and forms of social and cultural life. Topics include: (1) perspectives on literacy; (2) the role of literacy in society; (3) implications of diversity on literacy development; (4) relationships among diverse communities of practice.

E LTL 487 (formerly E RDG 487) Institute in Education (2-9)
A special program, not part of the pattern of regular offerings, designed to meet particular nonrecurring needs. Available for department use and subject to department approval.

E LTL 490Z (formerly E RDG 490Z) Literate Thinking (3)
This class is designed to strengthen the reading, writing, and critical thinking skills of participants using a variety of challenging texts and rigorous writing exercises. Beginning with a discussion of folk tales and creation myths, the class will move through a variety of texts (including short fiction, novels, poetry, essays, journalism, and film) to examine how “story” addresses and expresses human experience. Throughout the semester the course examines why humans are drawn to narrative and why certain topics/themes appear repeatedly in stories of all cultures and periods. The course will also spend time thinking about the role of language in thinking and how language serves to limit expression.

E LTL 491Z (formerly E RDG 491Z) Reading and Writing the Happier Self (4)
Reading and writing transform the way we think, and how we see ourselves in the world. This writing-intensive class presents a set of cognitive tools and practical skills that will help students refine and enhance their educational goals while examining a broad range of life issues. Relying on texts from psychology, neuroscience, literature and narrative theory, this writing-intensive class will examine patterns of human behavior and thinking that tend to produce lasting fulfillment and deep reward. In addition to classroom work a special two-hour laboratory session, with attendant readings and writing exercises, will be required each week to demonstrate how mindfulness exercises help to reduce stress. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.