College of Arts and Sciences

Dean
Edelgard Wulfert, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)

Associate Dean
John W. Delano, Ph.D. (Distinguished Teaching Professor, Collins Fellow)
 
Assistant Dean for Facilities Management
Elizabeth J. Gaffney

Assistant Dean and Chief Administrative Officer
Steven Galime

Assistant Dean for Academic Programs
Kathleen H. Gersowitz

Assistant Dean for Planning and Tenure/Promotion
Marie Rabideau



The College of Arts and Sciences comprises the students and faculty of 21 departments offering majors and minors, as well as those working in a variety of cooperative interdisciplinary programs. These include the arts, humanistic studies, physical sciences, and social sciences. Study in the Arts and Sciences provides students with a liberal education, including knowledge and skills applicable to further study and to occupations in a great variety of fields.

The presence of research faculty and graduate students in the programs of the College affords undergraduate students the opportunity to study with scholars and researchers working at the cutting edge of their disciplines. Qualified advanced undergraduates, in accordance with University policy, may enroll in appropriate graduate courses.

Fields of study leading to majors in the College are actuarial and mathematical sciences, Africana studies, anthropology, art, art history, atmospheric science, biology, chemistry, Chinese studies, East Asian studies, economics, English, geography, history, human biology, Japanese studies, journalism, Latin American and Caribbean studies, linguistics, mathematics, music, philosophy, physics, psychology, rhetoric and communication, sociology, Spanish, theatre, urban studies and planning, and women’s, gender, and sexuality studies, and U.S. Latino Studies.

In addition, the College is responsible for Faculty-Initiated Interdisciplinary Majors with concentrations in biochemistry and molecular biology, documentary studies, environmental science, globalization studies, Medieval and Renaissance studies, and religious studies. There are opportunities for students to propose Student-Initiated Interdisciplinary Majors, faculty-sponsored and drawing upon two or more fields in the College.

Most major programs also offer a minor. Other minors through the College include bioethics, cognitive science, creative writing, electronics, film studies, French, Hebrew, international studies, Italian, Judaic studies, Korean studies, Latin American and Caribbean Studies, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer studies, medical anthropology, neuroscience, organizational studies, Portuguese, Russian, Russian and Eastern European Studies, statistics, sustainability.

For purposes of degree requirements for the B.A. and B.S. degrees, the following undergraduate courses offered by the College are defined as liberal arts and sciences: all courses except A EAJ 423, A ECO 495, A HEB 450, A MAT 204, A MUS 315, A THR 315.

Courses under the College of Arts and Sciences are preceded by the prefix letter A.

Foreign Language Study Placement Policies
Foreign language placement is based on a student’s current level of competence, as determined by placement procedures developed by the University’s foreign language departments. Regulations covering foreign language placement and credit may be obtained from departmental offices offering the language in question.

The department, through a departmental representative, will assess the active skills in that language and will make a final placement decision for each student no later than the second class meeting of the course being recommended. A student may not earn graduation credit for a course in a language sequence if it is a prerequisite to a course for which graduation credit has already been earned.

Students earning advanced placement credits from high school will be expected to register for the next course in the language sequence. Those earning credit in University in the High School course work must consult with the appropriate department chair for placement in the next course in that language’s sequence.

  

Courses in Arts and Sciences

A CAS 100 Contemporary Issues in Life Sciences (3)
Topics in selected areas of life sciences. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Does not yield credit towards the major or minor in biology. Offered through the University in the High School Program only.

A CAS 109 Intermediate Science Research (2)
Students learn research methodology in the natural and social sciences by accessing scientific databases, by using online bibliographic search techniques, consulting doctoral-level research scholars, developing hypotheses and performing experiments to test them, and by writing research papers and making presentations at scientific symposia. It is expected that the students will have done many of these activities in the prerequisite high school course, and in this course emphasis is placed upon the formulation of hypotheses and initiation of experiments in consultation with mentors. Prerequisite(s): completion of one year of an approved course in science research at the high-school level; permission of instructor. Offered summer session only. Offered through the University in the High School Program only.

A CAS 110 Intermediate Methods of Research (4)
Students learn research methodology in the natural and social sciences by accessing scientific databases by using online bibliographic search techniques, consulting doctoral-level research scholars, developing hypotheses and performing experiments to test them, and writing research papers and making presentations at scientific symposia. It is expected that the students will have done many of these activities in the prerequisite high school course, and in this course emphasis is placed upon performing experiments in consultation with mentors. Students are expected to spend at least three hours per week outside of class. Prerequisite(s): completion of one year of an approved course in science research at the high-school level; permission of instructor; available for year-long course of study only. Offered through the University in the High School Program only.

A CAS 141 Concepts of Race and Culture in the Modern World (3)
This course considers the complex dynamics of global human diversity from the vantage point of the various social sciences. It explores the use of race, nationality, ethnicity, culture, and gender as focal concepts in the critical analysis of human behavior and interaction in the modern world. Cross-cultural and cross-national aspects of these issues are of central concern to the course. Offered through the University in the High School Program only.

A CAS 198 Special Topics in the Humanities (1–4)
Special group studies which provide students and faculty with the opportunity to explore significant themes, issues and problems from a broadly humanistic and interdisciplinary perspective. May be repeated for credit provided the subject matter is not repeated. Offered through the University in the High School Program only.

A CAS 203 Social Sciences and Humanities Research Seminar (3)
In this intensive research and writing-based course, senior University in the High School social sciences and humanities students will move from their roles as consumers of knowledge to new roles as producers of knowledge by researching, writing, and presenting a final project. During the semester, students will ask questions of original sources such as primary archival and web-based documents, analyze the answers, and present the findings. Each phase of creating a research based project and presentation will be guided starting with the choice of topic and moving to the proposal, bibliography, outline, first draft, final draft, and presentation. The instructor of record in a given semester may identify a specific humanities or social science disciplinary focus for that course. Prerequisite(s): successful completion of one or more of the following courses is a prerequisite for enrolling in the history concentration of A CAS 203: A HIS 100, A HIS 101, A HIS 130, A HIS 131, A AFS/A LCS/A WSS 240. Students who have completed other 100 level college courses may be admitted with the permission of the instructor. Offered through the University in the High School Program only.

A CAS 209 Advanced Science Research (2)
Continuation of work undertaken in A CAS 109 or equivalent with emphasis placed upon the completion of experiments in consultation with mentors. Students will consult with their teachers as necessary, but will not meet in a formal classroom period. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of A CAS 109 or completion of two years of an approved science research course at the high school level; permission of instructor; offered summer session only. Offered through the University in the High School Program only.

A CAS 210 Advanced Methods of Research (4)
Continuation of work undertaken in A CAS 110 or equivalent with emphasis placed upon the communication of results. Students are expected to spend at least three hours per week outside of class. Prerequisite(s): satisfactory completion of A CAS 110 or completion of two years of an approved science research course at the high school level; permission of instructor; students must be enrolled throughout an entire academic year to obtain credit. Offered through the University in the High School Program only.

  

Department of Africana Studies

Faculty

Professors 
Michelle Harris, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
Leonard A. Slade, Jr., Ph.D., L.H.D. (Collins Fellow)
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Associate Professors
Marcia E. Sutherland, Ph.D.
Howard University
Oscar Williams, Ph.D. (Department Chair)
The Ohio State University

Assistant Professor
Daphne R. Chandler, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin-Madison        

Visiting Assistant Professor
David Agum, Ph.D.
Temple University

Adjuncts (estimated): 9
Graduate Assistants (estimated): 3


The objective of the department is to provide a multi- and interdisciplinary education in African/African American studies and related fields. Students are expected to possess the knowledge and skills necessary to understand the social, political, economic, psychological, and historical consequences of institutional arrangements as they affect the life experiences of African/African American people.

The department offers full programs leading to the B.A. and M.A. degrees. Students may specialize in African studies and African American studies. Sub-areas in African studies are the history, economics, politics, and culture of the following regions: Eastern Africa, Central Africa, West Africa, and Southern Africa. Sub-areas in African American studies include: African American history and culture, urban economic development, central city politics and institutions, African American literature and criticism, and urban planning. Though the major concentrations are Africa and the United States, students may design programs that will enhance their knowledge of other Black cultures; e.g., the Caribbean and Haitian.

Students are prepared for careers in teaching, counseling, state and local social welfare programs, urban planning, administrative program direction, and international relations.

Special Programs and Opportunities
Undergraduate students in the department are provided an opportunity to apply theory through community projects, both within formal courses and other such special programs that may be designed by the department. Students participating in the latter may work directly with New York legislators or legislative committees. For further information contact the Department. Students are also provided an ongoing colloquium series featuring locally and nationally known African and African American scholars. The senior seminar enables students and faculty to explore common research interests.

Degree Requirements for the Major in Africana Studies

General Program B.A: A minimum of 36 credits (at least 12 credits of which must be at the 300 level or above) including A AFS 142, 219, 286 or 287, and 490. The additional department courses, as advised, must include 6 credits at the 200 level and 6 credits at the 300 level or above, and 12 elective credits.

Department of Africana Studies Honors Program

The Honors Program in the Department of Africana Studies is designed to enhance the academic excellence of its majors, to forge closer intellectual relationships between students and the faculty, and to prepare students for graduate studies and for their professional careers.

Admission Requirements:
Minimum Overall GPA: 3.25
Minimum GPA in major: 3.50

To be eligible for a degree with honors, the student must have a cumulative grade-point average in University courses of at least 3.25, with a 3.50 minimum grade-point average in the major. Students may apply for admission to the Honors Program as early as the spring semester of the sophomore year. Applications must be submitted to the Director of the Honors Program. The Director of the Honors Program and the Departmental Honors Committee will review the applications.

Required Courses
Students must complete any two of the following courses in the Department of Africana Studies: A AFS 325 (Introduction to Research Methods); A AFS 345 (The Black Novel); A AFS 375 (Black Popular Culture); A AFS 355Z (Introduction to African and African American Poetry), A AFS 320 (Black Nationalism: Political Perspective in Africa), and A AFS 322 (Developing African Nations). Students must complete A AFS 490 the Senior Seminar for African/African American Studies majors as part of the Honors program.

Required Honors Project
The Director of the Honors Program will assist students in the selection of their faculty advisor for their Honors thesis. Students must submit their written Honors project proposal to their faculty advisor for approval. Students will work on a major research project under the careful supervision of their faculty advisor. Students are expected to engage in a critical and in-depth analysis on their chosen topic. The Honors project should be between 40 and 60 pages in length. Students will begin their Honors thesis in A AFS 490. Students must also take A AFS 498 (Topics in African Studies) or A AFS 499 (Topics in African American Studies) to complete the Honors thesis. The thesis will be graded by the faculty advisor. The Honors thesis must be approved by the Director of the Honors Program and at least one other professor on the Honors Committee. Students will make an oral presentation of their thesis at a departmental seminar. The Honors course credits will be counted toward the 36 credits required for majors in Africana Studies.

Honors students in Africana Studies are required to maintain the minimum grade-point average of 3.50 in the major and at least a 3.25 minimum grade-point average in University courses. The Departmental Honors Committee will review the academic performance of each candidate at the completion of the junior year. Students who fail to meet the Honors program’s academic standards during their senior year will be ineligible for a degree with Honors. Students who have successfully completed the program requirements will be recommended to the department by the Departmental Honors Committee to receive the degree with honors in Africana Studies.

Departmental Contact: Dr. Marcia Sutherland

  

Courses in Africana Studies

A AFS 101 Introduction to Africana Studies (3)
This course will introduce students to the historical foundations of Africana Studies and discuss its relevance to contemporary society. An interdisciplinary approach will be incorporated as History, Philosophy, Literature, Performing Arts, Sociology, Psychology, Religion/Spirituality, and Anthropology are employed to provide students a detailed analysis of people of African descent in the Western Hemisphere.

A AFS 110 The Black Theatre in America (3)
Study of the historic background of Black involvement in the American theatre and of the role and functioning of the Black theatre in contemporary American society.

A AFS 142 African/African American Literature (3)
Survey of Black authors from diverse cultures and an analysis of their relationship to Black thought.

A AFS 150 Life in the Third World (3)
Introduction to cultural variation and fragmentation among third-world developing communities. Some lectures and discussions are led by third-world graduate students. Whenever possible, distinguished visitors from third-world countries are also involved in the course.

A AFS 209 (= A MUS 209) Black American Music (3)
An introduction to Black American Music. Study will include music from West Africa as well as musical/social influences throughout American history. Musical styles will include spirituals, gospel, blues, jazz and classical. Only one version of A AFS 209 may be taken for credit.

A AFS 213 History of Civil Rights Movement (3)
This course is designed to introduce the student to the historical development and maturation of the movement for civil rights in the United States. It will examine the development of resistance movements and the philosophies of those involved within the movements during the antebellum, post Civil War and contemporary times.

A AFS 219/219Z Introduction to African/African American History (3)
Survey of the cultural and historical background of African Americans from their African heritage to their present role in American society. Only one version of A AFS 219 may be taken for credit.

A AFS 220/220Z Black and White in America (3)
In America Blacks and Whites have been organically connected by the space of national geography and centuries of time. With current events an ever-present concern, this course explores the cultural significance and the social meaning of the long and ever-changing relations between black and white Americans and its import for the national welfare. Only one version of A AFS 220 may be taken for credit.

A AFS 221 The Economic Structure of the Black Community (3)
Analysis of old and contemporary models of Black entrepreneurship and formal economic organization and its effect in the community.

A AFS 224 Cities as People (3)
Survey of the human aspects of the urban environment, historically and in practical terms today, with an emphasis upon the central city’s opportunity for field research in urban life.

A AFS 240/240Z (= A LCS 240/240Z & A WSS 240/240Z) Classism, Racism and Sexism: Issues (3)
Analyzes the connections between and among classism, racism and sexism, their mutually reinforcing nature, and the tensions arising from their interrelations. Particular attention will be given to the ideological and personal aspects of these phenomena, as well as to their institutional guises in American society. Only one version of A AFS 240 may be taken for credit.

A AFS 269 (= A ANT 269 & A LCS 269) The Caribbean: Peoples, History, and Culture (3)
This course introduces students to significant aspects of Anglophone Caribbean culture and history in the context of this region of the globe, the wider Caribbean, functioning as the crossroads of the world. Colonial conquest forced and forged the intersection of Europe, Asia, and Africa in the Caribbean so that while it is not large in terms of geographical area or total population, it resonates with global significance as a crucible of cultural hybridity and as a nurturing space of modernity. Only one version may be taken for credit.

A AFS 270 (= A GOG 270) Geography of Africa (3)
Geographic analysis of the continent of Africa. The diversity of the African continent is stressed by examining its physical environment; resources; social, cultural, economic and political systems. Emphasizes the demographic as well as spatial planning aspects of geography. Only one version of A AFS 270 may be taken for credit.

A AFS 286 (= A HIS 286) African Civilizations (3)
Africa from prehistoric times to 1800 with emphasis on sub-Saharan Africa, the development of indigenous states and their response to Western and Eastern contacts. Only one version of A AFS 286 may be taken for credit.

A AFS 287 (= A HIS 287) Africa in the Modern World (3)
Africa since 1800: exploration, the end of the slave trade, the development of interior states, European partition, the colonial period, and the rise of independent Africa. Only one version of A AFS 287 may be taken for credit.

A AFS 311 History of Slavery in the Western Hemisphere (3)
The institution of slavery and its effects in the Western Hemisphere, its origins, bases of continuance, and contemporary residuals. Prerequisite(s): A HIS 100 and 101.

A AFS 320 Black Nationalism: Political Perspective in Africa (3)
Examination of selected freedom movements in Black Africa with a focus upon one-party politics and the continuing tensions between socialism and democracy. Prerequisite(s): A AFS 219.

A AFS 322 Developing African Nations (3)
Systems analysis of the contemporary social, political, cultural, and economic institutions crucial to the economic maturation of developing African nations. Prerequisite(s): A AFS 219; A AFS 286 and 287 recommended.

A AFS 325 Introduction to Research Methods (3)
An introduction to paradigms, theories and models on research and the Black community. Emphasis will be placed on methodological concerns of validity, reliability, instrument development, data collection, data analysis and reporting of research outcomes. The ethics of research on people of African descent will be discussed.

A AFS 331 The African/African American Family (3)
In-depth study of the African/African American family as an institution, the dynamics of intra-family relations and the effects of social institutions on Black family life. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A AFS 333 The Black Community: Continuity & Change (3)
Overview of the socio-historic factors which impact upon the current conditions of the African American community. Prerequisite(s): A AFS 219 or permission of instructor.

A AFS 340 The Black Essay (3)
Essays written by Black American writers in the 19th and 20th centuries. Prerequisite(s): A AFS 142.

A AFS 341 African/African American Religion (3)
Analysis of the relationship of the religion of Black people to Black culture. Prerequisite(s): A AFS 219.

A AFS 342 Sub-Saharan Africa: Peoples and Cultures (3)
Culture areas of Africa south of the Sahara. Historical and geographic background studies of selected societies. Culture change and contact during the colonial and postcolonial periods. Prerequisite(s): A AFS 286.

A AFS 345 The Black Novel: Black Perspectives (3)
Systematic study of the novel written by Black Americans from the Harlem Renaissance to the present. The novels studied express the cultural, political, and socio-historical consciousness of the writers to demonstrate their awareness of the struggle of Black people. Prerequisite(s): A AFS 142.

A AFS 355Z Introduction to African and African American Poetry (3)
Intensive study of poetry drawn from the black experience. Emphasis on aesthetic forms, meanings, tone, diction, imagery, symbol, sentences, rhythm, rhyme, allusion, etc. Common characteristics of black poetry will also be discussed.

A AFS 370 The Psychology of the Black Experience (3)
In-depth examination of the extant psychological literature on blacks. Analyzes varying themes, theories, perspectives, and research that relate to the psychology of blacks. Focuses on the contemporary work of black behavioral scientists involved in the quest for scholarly self-determination and for redefinition of the psychological fabric of the black experience. Selected topics are identity, personality, motivation, achievement, and mental health. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

A AFS 375 Black Popular Culture (3)
The course explores the historical and contemporary constructions of “blackness” within the popular realms of film, television, and popular music and the relationship of those constructs to the realities of African American life and culture.

A AFS 386/386Z (= A HIS 386/386Z) Race and Conflict in South Africa (3)
Study of the historical origins and development of racial conflict in South Africa with a concentration on economic, political, social and religious change in the 20th century. Topics will include changing state structures and ideologies, the impact of industrialization, transformations of rural and urban life, African religious movements, political and religious connections with Black Americans, gender relations, and changing forms of popular resistance against white domination. Only one version of A AFS 386 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): 3 credits of A AFS or A HIS course work, or junior or senior standing.

A AFS 393/393Z Topics in African History (1-4)
Specific topics to be examined will be announced during advance registration. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing or 3 credits in history.

A AFS 400 The Law and African-America (3)
The central city as a center of dominance, inner city legal problems as an aspect of social control. Students examine selected central city agencies related to law enforcement. Alternate possibilities for reform and improvement are explored. Term project required.

A AFS 401 Seminar in African American History I (3)
This course is an undergraduate seminar of African American History from the American Colonial period to the Civil War. Various historical themes will be reviewed, and students will have an opportunity to explore research topics related to the following: The Transatlantic Slave and Domestic Trades, Colonial and Antebellum slavery, African Americans and the Revolutionary War, Free Black Societies, Black Abolitionists, African Americans and the Civil War. Prerequisite(s): A AFS 219.

A AFS 402 Seminar in African American History II (3)
This course is an undergraduate seminar of African American History from 1865 to the present. Various historical themes will be reviewed, and students will have an opportunity to explore research topics related to the following: Reconstruction, The Age of Jim Crow, Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois, the Great Migration, the Harlem Renaissance, The Great Depression and New Deal era, World Wars I and II, The Civil Rights Movement, the Black Power movement, and contemporary African American History and Culture. Prerequisite(s): A AFS 219.

A AFS 416 Contemporary Black Women and Their Fiction (3)
Evaluation of the style, technique, content, and nature of the discourse in which contemporary Black women writers are engaged. Readings include at least one work by Toni Cade Bambara, Gloria Naylor, Toni Morrison, Paule Marshall, Gayle Jones, and Alice Walker. Prerequisite(s): senior standing, at least one literature course, and permission of instructor.

A AFS 430 Black Social and Political Thought in the Americas (3)
Seminar on the social and political ideas and strategies of selected African/African Americans from the late 18th century to the present. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

A AFS 432 The African American Woman: Contemporary Issues (3)
Socio-historic look at the American women of the African diaspora with particular attention to: (1) Black Liberation; (2) feminist movements; (3) sex role socialization; and (4) issues of sexism and racism. Prerequisite(s): A AFS 219, or permission of instructor.

A AFS 435 Blacks and the American Political Process (3)
An examination of the American political process as it impacts upon the Black community in the United States. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

A AFS 446 (= A SPN 446) Literature and Human Rights (3)
A study of selected works of Spanish and Spanish-American literature that deal with the subject of human rights throughout history. Topics to be studies may include such things as social protest, censored texts, women’s writing, the literature of exile, minority portrayals, and slavery. Prerequisite(s): two courses between A SPN 310-350 (excluding A SPN 333) or permission of instructor.

A AFS 451 (= A MUS 451) Jazz, Identity and the Human Spirit (3)
This course will explore issues of identity, spirituality, entrepreneurship, cultural transmission and politics viewed through the lens of the musical tradition called jazz. Topics will include saxophonist John Coltrane's musical-spiritual search, the musical-mythos of bandleader Sun Ra, musician-led organizations and movements with a focus on the Chicago-based Association for the Advancement of Creative Music (AACM), jazz and social protest, ideas about black experimentalist traditions and controversies about the use of electronics in the work of Miles Davis and Herbie Hancock, the cultural roots of jazz and questions about the nature of musical genres and boundaries. The course will include lecture, listening, small group presentations and class discussion. Only one version of A AFS 451 may be taken for credit.

A AFS 490 Senior Seminar for African/African American Studies Majors (3)
An extensive examination of critical issues involving the experiences of Africans and African Americans in historical, cultural, and social contexts. A central theme will be selected for each semester’s work. Students will synthesize and apply knowledge acquired in the major and will discuss their experiences. Attention will also be given to the interrelationships of the values and ideas indigenous to African/African American Studies, with a discussion of these with a senior faculty member. Students will review basic research methodology and will evaluate their experiences in a 20-page research paper. Prerequisite(s): major in the department and completion of 18 credit hours in the major.

A AFS 498 Topics in African Studies (3)
Specific topics to be examined are announced during advance registration. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

A AFS 499/499Z Topics in African American Studies (3)
Specific topics to be examined are announced during advance registration. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

  

Department of Anthropology

Faculty

Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus
Gary H. Gossen, Ph.D.
Harvard University

Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus
Ernest A. Scatton, Ph.D.
Harvard University

Professors Emeriti
Robert M. Carmack, Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles
Peter T. Furst, Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles
Robert W. Jarvenpa, Ph.D.
University of Minnesota
Gary A. Wright, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
Richard G. Wilkinson, Ph.D.
University of Michigan

Professors
Lee S. Bickmore, Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles
Louise Burkhart, Ph.D. (Department Chair)
Yale University
James P. Collins, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley
Timothy B. Gage, Ph.D.
Pennsylvania State University
John S. Justeson, Ph.D.
Stanford University
Walter E. Little, Ph.D.
University of Illinois
Marilyn Masson, Ph.D.
University of Texas, Austin
Lawrence M. Schell, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania

Associate Professors Emeriti/a
George J. Klima, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley
Gail H. Landsman, Ph.D.
Catholic University of America
Stuart Swiny, Ph.D.
University of London
Dwight T. Wallace, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley

Associate Professors
Elise Andaya, Ph.D.
New York University
Jennifer Burrell, Ph.D.
New School for Social Research
Adam Gordon, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin     
Sean M. Rafferty, Ph.D.
Binghamton University
Robert Rosenswig, Ph.D.
Yale University

Assistant Professors
Louis C. Alvarado, Ph.D.
University of New Mexico
Mercedes Fabian, Ph.D.
University of Buffalo
Julia A. Jennings, Ph.D.
Pennsylvania State University
Veronica Perez-Rodriguez
University of Georgia
Christopher B. Wolff
Southern Methodist University

Adjunct Faculty
Angela Commito, Ph.D. Candidate
University of Michigan Kelsey Museum of Archaeology
Robert Feranec, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley
Edward Fitzgerald, Ph.D.
Yale University
Elisa J Gordon, Ph.D.
Case Western Reserve University
John P. Hart, Ph.D.
Northwestern University
Karen Hartgen, M.A.
University at Albany
Robert Kuhn, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Elizabeth Marshall, Ph.D.
University of North Carolina, Charlotte
Carolyn Lee Olsen, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
Carol Raemsch, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Annette Richie, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Christina Rieth, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Alice D. Stark, Ph.D.
Yale University
Daniel D. White, Ph.D.
University at Albany

Adjuncts (estimated): 13
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 16



Anthropology is the study of humankind, of ancient and modern people and their ways of living. From its first establishment as a professional discipline, anthropology has been defined in terms of its holistic, cross-cultural, and evolutionary approaches. By systematically analyzing differences and similarities among human groups over time and space, anthropologists achieve the fullest possible understanding of human nature, human diversity, and the forces that govern change in cultural and biological characteristics.

The Anthropology Department provides undergraduates with a wide variety of courses, field and laboratory experiences, and guided research in each of the four major subfields of the discipline: archaeology, biological (physical) anthropology, ethnology (cultural anthropology), and linguistics.

The department offers two majors: a B.A. in anthropology and B.S. in a combined major/minor in human biology.

Students are offered special opportunities for the study of past and present cultures in Mesoamerica, North America, and elsewhere through the research programs of the anthropology faculty.

The major prepares students for graduate studies in anthropology (the department has M.A. and cognate M.A. programs, and a doctoral program), as well as laying a broad scientific and liberal foundation for entering the professions, arts, or other occupations in the modern world.

Many new career opportunities are developing in addition to traditional anthropological careers in college teaching, museum curation, and public archaeology. For example, the diverse ethnic composition of American society is making cross-cultural awareness a matter of increasing importance for careers in business, law, journalism, medicine, public policy, and primary and secondary education.

The B.A. degree in anthropology also offers excellent preparation for careers in international business, public health, politics, and diplomacy. Moreover, many local, state, federal, and international agencies are seeking personnel who have sensitivity to cultural diversity.

Anthropology also provides a holistic perspective of and systematic training in the impact of human activity and values on the environment. The study of cross-cultural factors affecting the delivery of health care can be important to a career in health services.

Finally, a degree in biological anthropology is a good foundation for graduate work in genetic epidemiology and other specialties within the field of public health.

Special Programs or Opportunities
Programs in archaeological, bio-anthropological, and ethnological fieldwork are available, with the Northeast and Mesoamerica being the most frequent locations. The archaeology program provides intensive training and/or research opportunities through research programs in Mexico, Belize, Costa Rica, and New York State. Laboratory research experience, both in formal courses and as independent projects, is available in archaeology and biological anthropology.

Degree Requirements for the Major in Anthropology

General Program B.A.: A minimum of 36 credits in anthropology including A ANT 104, 108, 110, 220, and 499. Of the 21 additional credits in anthropology, no more than 6 may be at the 100 level and at least 12 must be at the 300 level or above.

Honors Program

Outstanding anthropology students are encouraged to consider the department’s honors program, which is designed to give them the opportunity to work closely with members of the faculty on research and writing projects. Declared majors in anthropology are eligible to apply, provided that they have completed 12 or more credits in the department with a grade point average in the major of at least 3.50. They must also have an overall grade point average of at least 3.25. To participate in the program, students should contact their adviser during their junior year or at the beginning of their senior year. Students should plan their course work in consultation with their faculty adviser.

Students in the honors program must fulfill the requirements for the major plus the following requirements:

1. Among the 36 credits of course work in anthropology required for the major, students in the honors program must complete at least one course at the 300 or 400 level in each of three different subdisciplines (archaeology, cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, linguistics), for a total of 9 credits:

Biological Anthropology: 310, 311, 312, 319, 414, 416, 418, 419.
Linguistics: 321, 322, 325, 421, 422, 423, 424, 425, 434.
Archaeology: 330, 331, 332, 333, 334, 335, 338, 339, 430, 431, 433, 435, 438.
Ethnology: 340, 341, 343, 351, 355, 360, 361, 363, 364, 365, 372, 381, 390, 450, 480.

2. Students must write an honors thesis based upon original research under the direction of an anthropology faculty member. Any anthropology faculty member knowledgeable in your topic may supervise a thesis project. A written proposal for the intended project must be formally approved by that faculty member and the departmental Undergraduate Affairs Committee during the semester prior to the semester in which the thesis is completed. Students will enroll in A ANT 482 and 483, “Senior Honors Thesis Seminar,” during the fall and spring of their senior year. The 6 credits from these courses can be counted toward the 36 credits required for the Anthropology major.

3. Research skill: Students will complete 6 credits of coursework in a research skill appropriate for anthropological research. Examples include, but are not limited to, foreign languages, statistics or other quantitative courses, and anthropological methods courses. The research skill courses must be approved by the Undergraduate Affairs Committee.

To graduate with “honors in anthropology,” students must achieve an overall grade point average of 3.25 and a minimum grade point average of 3.50 in the major, in addition to the above requirements.

Degree requirements for the major in Human Biology are listed in the Human Biology Program section of this bulletin.

  

Courses in Anthropology

A ANT 100 Culture, Society, and Biology (3)
Introduction to the issue of human diversity, the course poses the question of what it means to be human. Through study of biological anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, and ethnology, students will explore the range of diversity within our shared humanity, and seek explanations that might account for it.

A ANT 104 Archaeology (3)
Introduction to the methods used by archaeologists to study ancient sites and artifacts. Topics include archaeological fieldwork, laboratory analysis, dating, interpretation of artifacts, and the reconstruction of past cultural patterns. Examples include studies of ancient and recent societies. Two lectures, one laboratory period per week.

A ANT 108/108Z Cultural Anthropology (3)
Survey of the theory, methods, and goals of cultural anthropology, emphasizing the nature of culture and the varied forms in which it is expressed among the peoples of the world. Two lectures, one discussion period per week. Only one version of A ANT 108 may be taken for credit.

A ANT 110 Introduction to Human Evolution (3)
Introduction to human evolution. This course spans the human fossil record from “Lucy” to Cro-Magnon. Topics include our primate past and the evolution of upright walking. The steady increase in our ancestors’ brain size is explored along with the cultural correlates of biological evolution such as stone tools, language origins and cave art.

A ANT 111 Introduction to the Primates (3)
Survey of the basic morphology and behavior of nonhuman primates. Prosimian and anthropoid primates are studied in terms of their comparative morphology and behavior, with reference to these same features among humans.

A ANT 119 The City and Human Health (3)
Survey of the history of health and disease from the earliest humans before the development of settlements to contemporary populations living in industrialized cities. Emphasizes the role of culture and behavior in disease.

A ANT 124Z Lost Languages and Ancient Scripts (4)
This course traces the origin and evolution of writing systems from their earliest precursors to the modern world. It is organized around a series of puzzles that guide participants through the processes of discovery and decipherment that led to our current understanding of writing systems. About half of the course is devoted to small-group workshops in which participants receive hands-on experience working together on problems in decipherment. The broader goal of the course is to learn how to do problem solving generally, using specific procedures and ways of thinking that can be applied in any discipline.

T ANT 124Z Lost Languages and Ancient Scripts (4)
T ANT 124Z is the Honors College version of A ANT 124Z; only one version may be taken for credit.

T ANT 125Z The Design of Language (3)
Constructed languages have played a prominent role in recent popular culture. Elvish, for example, is a language spoken by immortal elves in The Lord of the Rings. Klingon is spoken by humanoid aliens from another planet in Star Trek. Both languages attempt to imagine what the communication system of another intelligent species might be like. But in order to construct a credible fictional language, however, we have to think carefully about the nature of human language. This course asks which features of human language would be necessary components of any intelligent communication system and which features are contingent on the accidents of human biology. Open to Honors College students only.

A ANT 131 Ancient Peoples of the World (3)
Ancient cultures from around the world will be presented and analyzed from the available archaeological data. The gradual development of civilization in both the Old and New Worlds will be the focus of the course.

A ANT 133 Ancient History of the Near East and the Aegean (3)
An examination of key ancient Near Eastern civilizations in Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Syro-Palestine, and Turkey and the influence they exerted on the Minoan the Mycenaean civilizations. This is followed by the rise of Greece, the development of Athenian democracy, the decline of Greece leading to Macedonian domination, the conquests of Alexander the Great and the cosmopolitan Hellenistic world. Only one version of A ANT 133 may be taken for credit.

A ANT 140/140Z Anthropological Survey of World Cultures (3)
In-depth survey of selected ancient, historical, and modern world cultures. Major themes include production of goods and services, authority systems, legal processes, and religious and ritual life. Only one version of A ANT 140 may be taken for credit.

T ANT 141 Human Rights and Wrongs: Anthropological Explorations (3)
This course is designed to provide an overview of human rights and anthropology from theoretical and historical points of view and from the vantage point of engagement and practice. Using a critical approach, we will move away from the notion of a set category or monolithic legal structure toward an understanding of a flexible and elastic set of conceptual frameworks used to accomplish transitions, make claims and gain access to resources. In doing so, we will consider the increasing transnationalization of rights discourse and the growing terrain in which claims, legal and otherwise, are made through it. A series of international and national case studies will be examined. Open to Honors College students only.

A ANT 146/146Z (= A LCS 150/150Z) Puerto Rico: People, History, and Culture (3)
Survey of the Puerto Rican people, history, and culture on the island from the pre-Hispanic era to the present. Special emphasis on the change of sovereignty in 1898, the national question, migration, race, class, and culture. Only one version may be taken for credit.

A ANT 160 Symbol and Human Nature (3)
Introduction to ideas in the social sciences and humanities pertaining to the central place of symbolic behavior in human evolution, human nature, and contemporary human communities. Comparative perspective, including both Western and non-Western materials. Opportunity for fieldwork in the local community.

A ANT 172 Community and Self (3)
What is the “self”? Individual and social diversity are considered cross-culturally, in conjunction with personal identity, class, nationality, and ethnicity. Implications for the students’ own lives are discussed, as well as questions of freedom and authority in America.

A ANT 175 (= A REL 175) Anthropology and Folklore (3)
Introduction to the study of folklore as an aspect of culture, symbolically expressing people’s identity, beliefs and values. The focus is on oral text traditions—myths, folktales, and legends. Topics in folk custom and ritual, folk music and folk art are also included. Includes folklore from Western and non-Western cultures. Only one version may be taken for credit.

A ANT 189Z Writing in Anthropology (1)
Students who are concurrently registered in any 100 or 200 level anthropology course, may with permission of the instructor of that course, enroll in A ANT 189Z and fulfill a writing intensive version of that other course. The writing intensive version will involve: 1) a body of written work beyond that normally required by the companion course, 2) opportunities for students to receive assistance in progress, and 3) an opportunity for students to revise some pieces.

A ANT 197 Special Topics in Anthropology (1–4)
Study of a selected topic in anthropology. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Consult class schedule for specific topic.

A ANT 201 Critical Thinking and Skepticism in Anthropology (3)
How many people believe most everything they are told, or everything that they read? How can we tell the difference between statements that are based on fact, and those based only on opinion, ideology, error, or falsehood? Why should we care in the first place? This class will help you answer these questions, and hopefully raise many more. We will cover the ways in which your own brain and senses can trick you. We will cover the common mistakes made in reasoning, "logical fallacies" that can lead even the most critical of thinkers to false conclusions. We will cover several of the most common types of false information that people encounter today, such as psychics, astrology, or complementary and alternative medicine, and will explore why these are problematic. Our focus throughout will be on identifying current, real world examples of "uncritical thinking" in popular and news media. Hopefully at the end of the course, we will all be better consumers of knowledge.

T ANT 201 Critical Thinking and Skepticism (3)
T ANT 201 is the Honors College version of A ANT 201; only one version may be taken for credit.

A ANT 211 (formerly A ANT 411) Human Population Biology (3)
Biological variation in human populations, with emphasis on genetics, adaptability, demography and related aspects of population dynamics. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 110; or A BIO 110; or A BIO 120 recommended.

A ANT 220 (= A ENG 217 & A LIN 220) Introduction to Linguistics (3)
Introduction to the study of language, including examination of the characteristics and structural principles of natural language. After exploring the basic characteristics of sound, word formation and sentence structure, these principles are applied to such topics as: language variation, language change, psycholinguistics, pragmatics, and animal communication. Only one version may be taken for credit.

A ANT 233 (= A LCS 233) Aztecs, Incas, and Mayas (3)
Introductory survey of the archaeology and ethnohistory of the three best-known indigenous civilizations of the New World. Each is presented in terms of prehistoric background and evolution, social organization, politics and economics, religion and art. Consideration is given to the Spanish conquest of these three groups and to their modern legacies. Only one version may be taken for credit.

T ANT 233 (= T LCS 233) Aztecs, Incas, and Mayas (3)
T ANT 233 is the Honors College version of A ANT 233; only one version may be taken for credit.

A ANT 236 American Indian Archaeology (3)
Introductory survey of the prehistory of North America and Mesoamerica. Emphasis on the prehistoric developments in the Eastern Woodlands, Plains, Southwest, Mexico, and the Arctic. An introduction to current theoretical issues as applied in these culture areas.

A ANT 240 The North American Indian (3)
The nature and distribution of North American Indian cultures from the pre-Columbian period to the present. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 100 or 108.

A ANT 268 (= A LCS 268) Ethnology of Pre-Columbian Art (3)
Survey of the art and architecture of the pre-Columbian Mesoamerican civilizations, from the origins of the Olmec civilization (c. 1500 B.C.) through the native art produced under Spanish colonial rule in the 16th century. The objects are viewed in relation to their cultural and historical context. Issues of collection and exhibition are also discussed. Only one version may be taken for credit.

A ANT 269 (= A AFS 269 & A LCS 269) The Caribbean: Peoples, History and Culture (3)
This course introduces students to significant aspects of Anglophone Caribbean culture and history in the context of this region of the globe, the wider Caribbean, functioning as the crossroads of the world. Colonial conquest forced and forged the intersection of Europe, Asia, and Africa in the Caribbean so that while it is not large in terms of geographical area or total population, it resonates with global significance as a crucible of cultural hybridity and as a nurturing space of modernity. Only one version may be taken for credit.

T ANT 272 Global Latin American Cities: Transnational Politics and Space (3)
What are contemporary cities and how do we understand them in the contexts of globalization and transnationalism? How do anthropologists study such cities? In order to address these basic questions, this course is organized around a set of films and important theoretical concepts that have been debated in anthropology, urban studies, geography, sociology and other disciplines. Being an anthropology class, however, it will emphasize an anthropological perspective. The ethnographic readings and films presented in the class will primarily focus on Latin American topics. While this will give the class ethnographic focus, we will think about cities, urban life, and cosmopolitanisms from outside of Latin America. The films and readings on urban Latin America will serve as bases for cross-cultural analysis. It is expected that students taking this course will have already taken a course in anthropology, sociology, political science or geography. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A ANT 304 Human Biomechanics (3)
This course explores how the human body moves with the goal of providing a strong foundation for future training and clinical practice. The first part of the course will cover fundamental concepts and terminology, basic joint mechanics, muscle physiology, and applied biomechanics. The rest of the class will focus on the regional biomechanics and evolution of the human upper extremity, axial skeleton, and lower extremity. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 110 and A ANT 211. Prerequisite or corequisite(s): A ANT 316.

A ANT 305 Archaeological Graphic Documentation (3)
This course teaches how to graphically record a typical range of archaeological artifacts, including ground and chipped stone tools, pottery, metal and clay figurines from UAlbany's New and Old World collections. Emphasis will be placed on the professional standards of artifact illustration for publication in journals and monographs. Students will learn how to scan, reduce and position individual drawings in order to produce a publishable end product. Only one version of A ANT 305 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A ANT 309 Human Population History (3)
Birth, marriage, migration, and death — some of the most basic events in people's lives — are closely linked to larger economic and social phenomena. An understanding of these events can shed light on the economic and social world inhabited by people in the past and how these contexts interact to shape human populations and individual behavior. In this course, students will be introduced to the sources and methods used by historical demographers to reconstruct, measure, and compare past populations. In addition, the course will cover a broad range of problems in historical demography, including mortality crises, fertility control, the modern rise in population, and the influence of economic and social institutions on demographic change. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 110 and A ANT 211.

A ANT 310 Human Paleontology (3)
Examination of the human fossil record and of the major theories dealing with fossil record. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 110.

A ANT 311 Human Osteology (3)
This course is an intensive study of the anatomy of the human skeleton. This course will cover bone histology, growth and development of bones, common pathological conditions, the determination of age and sex from skeletal material, and the identification of whole and fragmented bones in archaeological and forensic contexts. This course will include a laboratory component to provide students with the opportunity to examine the material discussed in class. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

A ANT 312 (= A BIO 318; formerly A ANT 412/A BIO 419) Human Population Genetics (3)
Population genetics theory is the foundation of evolutionary biology and contributes heavily to modern ideas in ecology, systematics, and agriculture. This course is an introduction to that theory with special emphasis on evolution. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 211 or A BIO 205 or 212.

A ANT 314 Forensic Anthropology (3)
This course teaches the application of methods from biological anthropology and archaeology to the recovery and analysis of skeletonized human remains. The primary focus of this course is the application of these methods to investigations of unexplained deaths, including homicides, genocides, and mass disasters. Students will learn how to determine age at death, sex, ancestral affiliations, and stature from skeletal remains, and how to identify evidence of trauma and disease. Other topics include forensic botany, forensic entomology, and DNA fingerprinting. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

A ANT 316 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4)
This course provides an introduction to human anatomy and physiology. These topics refer to the form and function of the human body, and are presented together in an integrated two-semester course sequence. This course focuses on basic concepts in anatomy and physiology, embryology, the peripheral nervous system, respiration, the cardiovascular system, and the musculoskeletal system of the upper limb, thorax and back. The course provides a foundation for students interested in human biology, biological anthropology, medicine, and allied health professions. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 120, A BIO 121, A BIO 201, A BIO 202, A CHM 120, and A CHM 121.

A ANT 317 Exercise Physiology (3)
This course will provide a broad introduction to the field of exercise physiology. Topics covered will include cellular energy metabolism, pulmonary and cardiovascular responses to exercise, muscle physiology, training, nutrition, bode composition, and exercise testing. Students will spend some time in the human performance laboratory where the focus will on be applied exercise physiology and performance testing. Specialized topics include exercise at high altitude, temperature regulation, sports nutrition, exercise performance during the growth and development period, and the relationship of exercise and physical activity to human health and disease. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 120, A BIO 121, A BIO 201, and A BIO 202.

A ANT 318 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4)
This course provides an introduction to human anatomy and physiology. These topics refer to the form and function of the human body, and are presented together in an integrated two-semester course sequence. This course is the second in that sequence, and focuses on the gastro-intestinal tract, digestion, the urogenital, reproductive and endocrine systems, the cranial nerves, the visual, olfactory and auditory systems, and the musculoskeletal system of the lower limb, head and neck. The course provides a foundation for students interested in human biology, biological anthropology, medicine, and allied health professions. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 316.

A ANT 319 Physical Growth and Development (3)
Analysis of the pattern of human growth during the prenatal and postnatal periods and their variation around the world. The course focuses on the influence of social factors, nutrition, alcohol and cigarette use, race/ethnicity, pollution, and features of the physical environment which modify growth patterns. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 211.

A ANT 321 (= A LIN 321) Introduction to Syntax (3)
The human ability to produce and understand an infinite number of different sentences is one of the most remarkable capabilities we have. The study of the structure of sentences is called syntax, and this course is an introduction to syntactic theory. The particular approach we will be pursuing is called generative grammar, the approach to syntax pioneered by linguists such as Noam Chomsky. Chomsky argues that all humans are born with an unconscious knowledge of Universal Grammar, the basis on which the grammars of all languages are built. Through a detailed examination of English sentence structure, we will investigate the connections between English syntax and Universal Grammar. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 220 or permission of instructor.

A ANT 322 (= A LIN 322) Introduction to Phonology (3)
Introduction to the description and analysis of human speech sounds and their organization. Introduction to articulatory phonetics and the International Phonetic Alphabet followed by examination and generative phonological analysis of data from English and a wide range of other languages. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 220 or permission of instructor.

A ANT 325 (= A LIN 325) Sociolinguistics (3)
Introduction to the study of language as a social phenomenon. Includes basic sociolinguistic concepts, interactional sociolinguistics, social dialects, Black English, diglossia, bilingualism, and bilingual education. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 220 or permission of instructor.

A ANT 330 Topics in Archaeology (3)
Survey of a topic in archaeology or regional prehistory for upper division students. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Consult class schedule for specific topic. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 104.

A ANT 331 Early Civilization of the Old World (3)
The development of early complex societies in the Old World, including the origins of agriculture, urbanism, states, and empires. Examines the nature of the archaeological evidence for these developments and its interpretation, employing case studies drawn from the Near East, the Indian Subcontinent, and China. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

A ANT 332 Ethnoarchaeology (3)
Ethnoarchaeology combines the archaeologist’s interest in material culture with the cultural anthropologist’s interest in ongoing behavior. Included are the archaeology of living populations, action archaeology, experimental and replication studies, formation processes, and ethnographic analogy, among other subjects. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 104 or permission of instructor.

A ANT 333/333Z Iroquois Archaeology and Ethnohistory (3)
An intensive survey of the archaeology, history, and ethnology of the Iroquois. Coverage begins with the first appearance of the Iroquois in the region and continues to modern reservation life. Only one version of A ANT 333 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 104.

A ANT 334 The Earliest Cities (3)
Comparative treatment of the earliest urban settlements around the world. Case studies include Mesopotamia, Egypt, Sub-Saharan Africa, China, Southeast Asia, Mesoamerica, and the Andes. Cities are compared in terms of planning, political roles, religious features, economic patterns, and their rise and fall. Also covers archaeological methods for the study of early cities. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 104.

A ANT 335 Introduction to Archaeological Field Techniques (3)
Introduction to data gathering techniques used by archaeologists in the field. Taught prior to A ANT 338 as basic training for students concentrating in archaeology. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 104 or permission of instructor.

A ANT 336 (= A ARH 310) Art and Archaeology of Cyprus I (3)
An examination or the material culture (art, archaeology, and architecture), settlement patterns and changing environmental setting of successive cultures of the east Mediterranean island of Cyprus from the first human occupation to the Roman period (10,000 BCE to 50 BCE) The island’s role as a major point of contact between Near Eastern and Western Mediterranean civilizations will be emphasized. Only one version may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ANT 337 (= A ARH 311) Art and Archaeology of Cyprus II (3) An examination of the material culture (art, archaeology, and architecture) and history of the island of Cyprus from the Roman period through its recently won independence in 1960 and up to the present. Byzantine church painting, Gothic ecclesiastical and military architecture, the Venetian preparations for an Ottoman invasion emphasize the significance of this Christian enclave in the Moslem east under Latin, Venetian, Ottoman, and British colonial rule. Finally, the strategic importance of Cyprus during the Cold War still continues to affect its history. Only one version may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ANT 338/338Z Archaeological Field Research (6)
Directed archaeological excavation of selected sites, including experience in site location, mapping, excavation, preservation, analysis, classification, and interpretation. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 335 or permission of instructor.

A ANT 339 Archaeological Lab Techniques (3)
Survey and practical application of laboratory techniques using materials from the University collections. Emphasis on physical and chemical analysis, classification, and specialized analysis. Only one version of A ANT 339 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 104.

A ANT 340 Topics in Ethnology (3)
Survey of the cultures of one of the major regions of the world. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Consult class schedule for specific topic. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 108.

A ANT 341/341Z (= A LCS 341/341Z) Ethnology of Mesoamerica (3)
Survey of the cultures and history of the native peoples of Mexico and Central America. Beginning with the documents created by and about native peoples around the time of the Spanish invasion, the course follows the experiences of these societies through the colonial period and up to the present. Only one version of A ANT 341 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 100 or 108.

A ANT 343/343Z Native American Literature (3)
Survey of the literature of the native peoples of North America and Mesoamerica, from early colonial times to the present. Readings include oral narratives, songs, autobiography, and contemporary poetry and fiction. Discussion focuses on the use of texts for cultural analysis, Native American literary aesthetics, and the survival of native literary traditions. Only one version of A ANT 343 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

A ANT 351/351Z Ethnicity in North America (3)
Analysis of ethnicity, assimilation and pluralism with regard to one or more North American ethnic group(s). Social, political, economic and symbolic adaptations. Consideration of relative merits of integration and separation in modern society. This course is cross-listed with A JST 351/351Z when Jewish ethnicity and assimilation are a major focus of those courses. This course is cross-listed with A JST 351 and 351Z when Jewish ethnicity and assimilation are a major focus of those courses. Only one version of A ANT 351 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of instructor.

A ANT 354 Culture & Economy in a Globalized World (3)
A central premise of economic anthropology and of this course is to view economics as culture – as a series of social relations and cultural contexts that are embedded in wider histories and larger processes. This course explores and critiques some of the cultural biases and assumptions inherent in such mainstream economic principles as work and leisure, poverty and wealth, gifts and commodities, and money and markets through a series of global case studies of culture, economy and development. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 108.

A ANT 355/355Z Environment, Economy, and Culture (3)
Cross-cultural survey of the systematic relations between environment, behavior and culture. Analysis of production and exchange systems at hunting and gathering, agricultural, and industrial stages of social evolution. Environmental and economic disruption, perception and management in cultural perspective. Only one version of A ANT 355 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 108 or 102 or 104 or permission of instructor.

A ANT 360/360Z Social Anthropology (3)
Comparative study of social systems, tribal, traditional, and modern societies. Deals with economic, kinship, political, and other aspects of social structure. Social systems in functionalist, evolutionary, and dialectic perspectives. Combines in one course kinship, political, economic, and stratificational anthropology. Only one version of A ANT 360 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 108.

A ANT 361/361Z Anthropology and Public Policy (3)
The practical application of anthropological theory and research to policy areas such as economic development, environment, welfare, and mass media. The ethics of applied anthropology. Only one version of A ANT 361 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): 3 credits in anthropology or political science or sociology.

A ANT 363 (= A REL 363) Ethnology of Religion (3)
Topical and theoretical survey of anthropological approaches to understanding human religious expression. Topics include myth, ritual, world view, shamanism, gender, and religious change. Emphasizes the religions of non-literate, non-Western peoples but also includes examples from major world religions and contemporary Western societies. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 100 or 108, or A REL 100.

A ANT 364 Introduction to Cultural Medical Anthropology (3)
Introduction to cultural approaches to medical anthropology. Cross-cultural examination of different views of health, disease, healing and the body, their effect on medical care and maintenance of health of individuals and communities. Also examines the intersection between health, sickness, and social and economic inequalities globally and in the U.S. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 108 or permission of instructor.

A ANT 365 (= A WSS 365) The Anthropology of New Reproductive Technologies (3)
A cross-cultural perspective on how new reproductive technologies (including in vitro fertilization, surrogacy, ultrasound, prenatal screening for disability, sex selection, fetal surgery, and neonatal intensive care) are transforming the experience of procreation and challenging cultural notions of kinship, personhood, and what it means to be human. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): 3 credits in anthropology, philosophy, or women's studies.

A ANT 372/372Z Urban Anthropology (3)
Introduction to urban anthropology. Emphasis on rural-urban migrations, adjustment and assimilation of urban migrants, urban kinship and family structure, poverty culture, rural-urban typologies, and the application of anthropological methods to the study of urban societies. Only one version of A ANT 372 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): one course in anthropology, sociology, political science, or geography.

A ANT 376 (= A GLO 376) Global Ethnography (3)
This course is about globalization and its impact on local communities worldwide. The term globalization will be understood not as a large-scale abstract and deterritorialized process, but one that has impact, consequences, and influence on local communities on a daily basis. The course is titled "Global Ethnography," which means that the class will be reading first-hand accounts of scholars who have documented the effects of globalizations on local communities. Through these accounts students will be learning about the different ways globalization is affecting local communities at social, economic, and cultural levels. The class will also be hearing the voices of local people and understanding globalization from people's perspectives. The readings in this course will enable a better understanding of globalization as it is embedded, manifested, and negotiated by localities as well as its real-life personal, social, and communal repercussions in people's lives. The course will examine different globalizing "agents" in various contexts such as tourism, street vending, language, landscape, consumerism, capitalism, remittance housing, among others. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): at least one course of A ANT 108, A ANT 119, A GOG 102, A GOG/A USP 125, A GLO 103, or A SOC 115, or permission of instructor.

A ANT 381/381Z (= A WSS 381/381Z) Anthropology of Gender (3)
Cross-cultural analysis of gender roles. Focuses on non-Western societies, using data from other societies to better understand the gender system of our own culture. Issues include status of women and men, the meaning of “femaleness” and “maleness”, and women and health care systems. Only one version of A ANT 381 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): one course in anthropology or sociology.

A ANT 389Z Writing in Anthropology (1)
Students who are concurrently registered in any 300 or 400 level anthropology course, may with permission of the instructor of that course, enroll in A ANT 389Z and fulfill a writing intensive version of that other course. The writing intensive version will involve: 1) a body of written work beyond that normally required by the companion course, 2) opportunities for students to receive assistance in progress, and 3) an opportunity for students to revise some pieces.

A ANT 390 Ethnological Theory (3)
Historical survey of theoretical approaches to the study of culture, with emphasis on contemporary trends. Recommended for majors planning graduate work. Content may vary with instructor. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 108.

A ANT 409 Primate Evolutionary Biology (3)
This course addresses the principles and specifics involved in nonhuman primate evolution. The first portion of the class investigates the relationships between ecology, sociality, and phylogeny on the one hand and the diversity of adaptations among living primates on the other. The second portion of the class will apply principles derived from the living primates to understanding the adaptations and evolutionary relationships among fossil primates, and the relationships between extinct and living species. Particular attention will be paid to major research questions relevant to significant periods in primate evolution. Prerequisise(s): A ANT 110.

A ANT 414/414Z (formerly A ANT 313) Demographic Anthropology (3)
Demographic theory as it applies to anthropological populations, with emphases on birth, death and growth rates, population size and dispersion, mating, and migration. Aspects of historical and paleodemography accompany analyses of living populations. Only one version of A ANT 414 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 110 and 211.

A ANT 415 Nutritional Anthropology (3)
This course provides an introduction to the biological, ecological, and social factors influencing diet and nutrition. Basic nutritional physiology and biochemistry are presented in the first part of the course. Later topics include paleonutrition as well as nutritional issues of contemporary human population groups. The core focus is on the concept of energy balance. Time is spent in the metabolic laboratory learning how to measure metabolic energy expenditure and assess nutritional status in humans. Students participate in the collection and analysis of individual and class data on nutritional intake and energy expenditure, with an emphasis on basic techniques of data presentations, analysis, and interpretation. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 211.

A ANT 416 Topics in Human Biology (3)
Selected topics in biological anthropology. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Consult class schedule for specific topic. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 110 and 211.

A ANT 418/418Z Culture, Environment, and Health (3)
Anthropological study of health and disease patterns in human populations with emphasis on human-made influences on the health of contemporary societies. The effects of societal and cultural factors on disease patterns, and the assessment of health status through epidemiological and anthropological methods are explored. Only one version of A ANT 418 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 119.

A ANT 419 Human Evolutionary and Environmental Physiology (3)
This course will focus on human (and animal) adaptation to the environment. We will cover the basic physiology of high altitude, thermoregulation (temperature), water-balance, hyperbaria (deep sea diving), energy production and procurement, and the weightlessness of space (micro-gravity). While the focus is on humans, the course will take a comparative approach, examining how different species have adapted to various environments, including evolutionary, developmental, and homeostatic modes of adaptive response. The course meets twice a week, with class time divided between lecture, student presentation/discussion, and laboratory activities in the SUNY Albany Human Performance Laboratory. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 110 or 120 and 122; and 111 or 121 and 123.

A ANT 421Z (= A LIN 421Z) Advanced Syntax (3)
This course continues the investigation of the relationship between the grammars of particular languages and Universal Grammar. We will examine the syntax of several languages from around the world asking ourselves the following questions: a.) How do the principles that organize the grammars of other languages around the world compare to English? b.) What grammatical properties are true for all languages? We will discuss the answers to these questions in the light of generative grammar. Only one version may be taken for credit. The former A LIN 421 & A ANT 421 do not yield writing intensive credit. Prerequisite(s): A LIN 321 with grade of C or higher.

A ANT 422 (= A LIN 422) Advanced Phonology (3)
Advanced studies in generative phonological theory, with a focus on the analysis of prosodic phenomena such as stress, tone, and accent. Discussion of recent theoretical trends in phonology. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 322 with grade of C or higher.

A ANT 423 Linguistic Structures (3)
Investigation of the structure of a selected language, language family, or language area. Prerequisite(s): a prior course in linguistics or permission of instructor.

A ANT 424 Language and Culture (3)
Study of the nature of the interrelationships that exist between linguistic behavior and other aspects of culture. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 221 or A LIN 220 or permission of instructor.

A ANT 425 (= A LIN 425) Comparative and Historical Linguistics (3)
Language development and change. Language classification, linguistic reconstruction. Only one version of A ANT 425 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 322.

A ANT 430 Archaeological Theory (3)
Advanced theory and method in archaeology, emphasizing topics such as quantitative applications, spatial analysis, cultural processes, systems analysis, the application of dating techniques, and the reconstruction of extinct cultures. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 104.

A ANT 431 Seminar in Social Archaeology (3)
Seminar on selected topics in the archaeological study of past social organization. Topics will vary. Examples include settlement patterns, household organization, economic processes, urbanism, and world systems. Topics will be approached in terms of methods, theories, and comparative analysis. May be repeated for credit.

A ANT 433 Mesoamerican Archaeology (3)
Archaeological study of the ancient peoples and cultures of Mesoamerica from the earliest inhabitants to the Spanish conquest. Coverage is chronological and evolutionary, with application of anthropological models of cultural change. Emphasis on the major transformation such as the origin of agriculture, the rise of cities, and the expansion of states and empires. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 104 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

A ANT 434 Seminar in Mesoamerican Writing Systems (3)
Seminar on selected Mesoamerican writing systems. Focus varies, but Classic Mayan writing is usually emphasized. Topics include the structure and evolution of the scripts; relations between writing and other communication systems; and anthropological research using hieroglyphic evidence. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): course work in Mesoamerican archaeology, ethnology, or linguistics is recommended.

A ANT 435 Archaeological Surveys (3)
Survey of the archaeology of a selected region of the world. Topics vary according to the regional specialty of the professor in charge. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 104.

A ANT 438 Museum Research and Curation (3)
The course emphasizes collections management and research with existing collections, including database management, basic museum methods for anthropologists, and approaches to problems of using data collected by other researchers. Students design and complete projects using existing collections. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 104.

A ANT 441 Paleodemography/Paleopathology (3)
This course is partly an introduction to the conceptual and analytic aspects of paleodemography, a field that uses skeletal samples from archaeological excavations to reconstruct past population dynamics. This course will cover the special problems associated with reconstructing demographic patterns from skeletal samples, such as biases in age estimation methods, preservation biases, and selective mortality. This course is also an intensive study of human disease in past populations and will focus on the identification and interpretation of osteological indicators of health and disease from human skeletal remains. Topics covered include age estimation and sex determination, specific and non-specific skeletal lesions, temporal and spatial variation of disease in humans, the use of radiographs to aid in differential diagnosis of disease, and ancient DNA techniques. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

A ANT 450/450Z Special Topics in Medical Anthropology (3)
Study of a selected topic in medical anthropology. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Consult class schedule for specific topic. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

A ANT 472 (= A LCS 472) Social Movements in Latin America (3)
This class takes an anthropological perspective to discuss contemporary Latin American social movements. It considers why the intensification of social movements throughout the region may follow some traditional forms of resistance and mobilization, but also why it is a response to neoliberal globalization. These new movements seek to define a novel relation to the political realm. Unlike traditional guerrilla movements or electoral expressions of the left, they are not fundamentally organized to seize state power. Yet they have contributed to destabilizing, even, ousting governments. Social movement formation and resistance to neoliberalism are explored. Social movements, such as the indigenous mobilizations in Ecuador, mobilizations against water privatizations and gas pipeline investments in Bolivia, the Zapatista movement in Mexico, landless rural workers in Brazil, Afro-Colombians resisting investors, and the urban worker strikes in Argentina, are covered. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): one course in anthropology, sociology, political science or geography.

A ANT 475 The Folktale (3)
This course examines the folktale in its oral and literary forms, with principal emphasis on the fairy tale or magic tale. Folktales are artistic creations that organize emotional experiences into a story form that has universal appeal, but which varies in accordance with ethnicity, gender, class, and other cultural and social factors. The course traces the folktale's history in Europe, from the earliest publications to the present, and explores different approaches to understanding this narrative form. Course material also includes contemporary oral tale-telling traditions from around the world and retellings of traditional tales in literature and film. Students gain experience in oral tale-telling and tale composition. The course is inter-disciplinary, combining anthropological, folkloristic, and literary approaches. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.

A ANT 480 Introduction to Ethnographic Field Research (3)
Ethnographic fieldwork experience for qualified undergraduates. Study of fieldwork methodology and principles together with actual fieldwork on selected topics under faculty supervision. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of instructor.

A ANT 481 (= A LCS 491) Research Projects (3–6)
Introduction to basic research skills required to answer questions on human behavior, with special emphasis on cross-cultural communication and learning and dynamics of cross-cultural interaction. Specific research projects familiarize students with the basic research methods including data collection, processing, and analysis. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of instructor.

A ANT 482 Honors Seminar In Anthropology (3)
Students in the honors program should enroll in both A ANT 482 and 483 for a total of 6 credits during the fall and spring of their senior year. Students will write an honors thesis under the supervision of a member of the Anthropology Department, present periodic progress reports, and deliver an oral summary of the completed thesis. Prerequisite(s): admission to the Anthropology Department honors program.

A ANT 483 Senior Honors Thesis Seminar (3)
Students in the honors program should enroll in both A ANT 482 and 483 for a total of 6 credits during the fall and spring of their senior year. Students will write an honors thesis under the supervision of a member of the Anthropology Department, present periodic progress reports, and deliver an oral summary of the completed thesis. Prerequisite(s): admission to the Anthropology Department honors program.

A ANT 490 (= A CLA 490) Internship in Archaeological Conservation and Documentation (3–9)
Supervised placement in an agency engaged in conservation and documentation of archaeological artifacts, such as the New York State Museum or State Conservation Laboratory. Provides practical experience and cannot be counted among the 9 elective credits above the 300 level required for Mediterranean archaeology majors. Anthropology majors may use up to 3 credits toward major elective credit. May be taken by majors in Greek and Roman civilization and anthropology only. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. S/U graded.

A ANT 493 Fieldwork in Mesoamerica: An Orientation (1)
General overview of the social and economic contexts of an ethnographic field site in Mesoamerica. Emphasis is on the pragmatics of living in another cultural setting and preparing for a one-month intensive ethnographic research project. Discusses IRB guidelines and the specific ethnographic field project. Specific content of the course varies according to location of ethnographic project and location of that project. Specific content of the course varies according to ethnographic project and location of that project. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. S/U graded.

A ANT 497 Topics in Anthropology (3)
Advanced course on selected topic in anthropology. May focus on geographic or theoretical area. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of instructor.

A ANT 498 Independent Study in Anthropology (1-6)
Independent reading or research on selected topics under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

A ANT 499 Senior Seminar in Anthropology (3)
Seminar on selected topics in anthropology. Open to seniors with permission of instructor. Recommended for majors planning graduate work. May be repeated for credit.

  

Department of Art

Faculty

Professors Emeriti
Roberta M. Bernstein, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
Columbia University  
David Carbone, M.F.A.
Brooklyn College, CUNY
Robert Cartmell, M.F.A. 
University of Iowa 
Mark A. Greenwold, M.F.A.
Indiana University
Arthur G. Lennig, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin
Thom O’Connor, M.F.A.
Cranbrook Academy
John C. Overbeck, Ph.D.
University of Cincinnati
Paul W. Wallace, Ph.D.
Indiana University 

Professors
JoAnne Carson, M.F.A.
University of Chicago
Sarah R. Cohen, Ph.D.
Yale University
Phyllis J. Galembo, M.F.A.
University of Wisconsin
Edward A. Mayer, M.F.A.
University of Wisconsin

Associate Professors 
Amy R. Bloch, Ph.D.
Rutgers University        
Leona Christie, M.F.A.
University of Washington
Rachel Dressler, Ph.D. (Department Chair)
Columbia University
Adam Frelin, M.F.A.
University of California, San Diego 
Daniel Goodwin, M.F.A.
Hunter College
Michael R. Werner, Ph.D.
Stanford University

Assistant Professor
Rakhee Balaram, Ph.D.
Courtauld Institute       

Lecturers
Shira Segal, Ph.D.
Indiana University
Melissa Thorne, M.F.A.
California Institute of the Arts

Sculpture Technician
Roger Bisbing, M.F.A.
Syracuse University

Adjuncts (estimated): 18
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 13



The Department of Art and Art History offers a 36 credit major in art, a departmental art major of 60 credits, and a 36 credit major in art history. In addition students can minor in art or art history. The Department of Art and Art History also houses the Film Studies minor. The foundation of the studio art majors is a core curriculum in drawing, two- and three-dimensional design, and art history; areas of concentration are painting and drawing, sculpture, printmaking, and photography. The major in art history offers a range of courses drawn from offerings in art history within the department, and from other departments and programs in the College of Arts and Sciences, including anthropology and East Asian studies. The University Art Museum offers a wide variety of exhibitions that enhance and extend the offerings of the Department of Art and Art History.

Careers
In addition to the traditional careers in fine art, commercial art, art history and criticism, students who immerse themselves in our art and art history curricula emerge with an understanding of visual literacy at a time when our culture as a whole is becoming increasingly dependent upon visual communication. Career paths include various positions in art museums and galleries, art conservation, the teaching of art and art history, art therapy, furniture design, industrial design, interior design, stage and costume design, graphic design, film production, TV production, medical archaeology and anthropological illustration, and animation.

Degree Requirements for the Major in Art

General Program B.A.: 36 credits, including at least 12 credits at the 300 level or above, to be distributed as follows: 18 credits are core requirements: A ART 105, 110, 115, 144 and A ARH 170 and 171; 18 credits are from electives with an A ART prefix; 3 of these credits may be from any course that applies to the art history major (see below.)

Degree Requirements for the Departmental Major in Art

General Program B.A.: 60 credits including a 30-credit core requirement consisting of A ART 105, 110, 115, 144, 205, 220, 230, 240 or 242, 244, 305, and 491; 12 credits in art history consisting of A ARH 170 and 171 and 6 credits from courses that apply to the art history major (see below); 3 credits in studio art electives; and a 15-credit concentration in either painting and drawing, sculpture, printmaking, or photography.

Admission to Departmental Major in Art
The 60-credit art major is aimed at encouraging students who demonstrate both an unusual degree of accomplishment and potential. In the second semester of their sophomore year, or thereafter, students should submit from 12 to 20 works of art, in a portfolio or sheet of slides, to the Art and Art History Department for review. The portfolio should reflect a student’s intended area of focus: digital media, painting and drawing, photography, printmaking, or sculpture. The portfolio review is intended to give students an opportunity to demonstrate a maturing level of visual culture and the emergence of an artistic voice. Ultimately, an exemplary portfolio will display a high level of visual literacy and technical ability at the service of individual expression. This orientation will lead a student to further study at art school or at graduate school. Portfolios should be submitted to the art department secretary during the seventh week of the semester.

If a student is accepted as a 60-credit art major, the student should seek advisement from the undergraduate adviser and the faculty member they work with most to determine a set of personal goals within their remaining course of study.

Honors Program in the Departmental Major in Art

The Honors Program is designed for the exceptionally talented and committed student of art. Successful completion of the program is excellent preparation for graduate work in the Fine Arts. Studio space for Honors Students is limited. Successful completion of the program earns an Honors Certificate in Art and a nomination for graduating with “Honors in Art” from the University.

Students may present a portfolio for admission to the Honors Program to the Undergraduate Director in the second semester of their junior year or the first semester of their senior year. In order to be eligible for admission to the Honors Program, a student must be accepted as a 60-credit major and have completed at least 12 credits of studio course work. An applicant should have an overall grade point average of 3.25 or higher and a 3.5 or higher in all courses applicable toward the major. Applicants must submit a portfolio of 10 works in their area of concentration. The portfolio must demonstrate visual literacy, technical mastery, creative potential, and the drive and maturity to work independently in order to cultivate a distinctive personal direction. The Honors Committee may waive the entry requirements where appropriate. Decisions of the Honors Committee are final and are not subject to review or appeal.

Students in the Honors Program are required to complete a minimum of 60 credits, meeting all the requirements of the major. In addition, students must complete an Honors Project for 6-12 credits of studio course work and complete A ART 496, the Mentor Tutorial. The Honors Project mentor will be a member of the faculty who regularly works with the student in the student’s area of concentration. Critiques will be conducted during regular course offerings. An overall grade point average of 3.25 or higher and an average of 3.5 or higher in all courses applicable toward the major must be maintained in each semester of the program. Students dismissed from the program cannot be readmitted unless the grades on which dismissal is based were in error and are officially changed.

Degree Requirements for the Major in Art History

The purpose of the major in Art History is to introduce students to the principles and methods of art history, and to encourage their intellectual exploration of art and architecture in historical culture. Advisement and internship supervision are conducted by the Art History faculty.

General Program B.A.: A minimum of 36 credits.

Required core courses (9 credits): A ARH 170, 171; 3 credits from A ARH 450 or 499.
Lower Division Electives (9 credits): A ARH 205-298; A ANT 233/A LCS 233; A CLA 207, 208, 209; A EAC 280.
Upper Division Electives (18 credits): all 300 and 400 level A ARH courses; A ANT 334, 433; A CLA 490; A HIS 303Z.

Honors Program in Art History

The Honors program in Art History allows declared Art History majors who have excelled in at least their first 12 credits of Art History coursework to pursue an advanced program of study and independent research. At the time of entry into the Honors program students must have at least a 3.50 GPA in the Art History major and a 3.25 GPA overall, and they must maintain these levels of achievement throughout the rest of their coursework. Students may request entry into the Honors program from their faculty academic advisor. They will be admitted provided they have the necessary GPA requirements and that they will have enough time left in their academic years to fulfill the Honors requirements.

Degree Requirements for Honors in Art History

Required core courses (9 credits): A ARH 170, 171; 3 credits from A ARH 450 or 499.
Lower Division Electives (9 credits): A ARH 205-298; A ANT 233/A LCS 233; A CLA 207, 208, 209; A EAC 280.
Upper Division Electives (18 credits): all 300 and 400 level A ARH courses; A ANT 334, 433; A CLA 490; A HIS 303Z.
Within their elective coursework, Honors students must take at least one course from each of the following areas:

Within their upper-level elective coursework, Honors students must also take:
A. An additional research seminar (A ARH 499, which can be repeated for credit, or A ARH 450): In this additional research seminar, Honors students must fulfill two out of the following three special research tasks:

B. Two consecutive Independent Study courses (A ARH 497) in their last two semesters, in which they pursue an Honors thesis under the supervision of a faculty member in Art History

Evaluation of Honors students

Halfway through their last semester, Honors students must give an oral presentation on their Honors thesis to the Honors committee, which will be composed of three members of the Art History faculty, as well as the Honors supervisor if he or she is not on the committee. The committee will use an agreed-upon standard of assessment to evaluate the student’s performance, including the following:

The faculty committee’s assessment of the presentation will be factored into the final grade awarded by the faculty member of record who is supervising the Honors thesis. At the presentation the committee will also offer constructive feedback for the student to use in completing his or her thesis.

  

Courses in Art

A ART 105 Beginning Drawing (3)
Drawing encompasses all the visual disciplines; it will be taught as a way of thinking and planning for other fields of creative endeavor. Drawing is a way of seeing, thinking, and feeling through making marks. Students will be exposed to objective drawing techniques with an emphasis on two-dimensional design.

A ART 110 Two-Dimensional Design (3)
The principles of two-dimensional design and composition intended primarily as a preparatory course for all other courses concerned with the two-dimensional approach.

A ART 115 Three-Dimensional Design (3)
A problem-solving introduction to the principles and elements of three-dimensional design. Demonstrations and implementations of equipment, methods and materials encourage students to develop their interpretive and technical facility, while solving problems that deal with form, space, structure, scale and volume. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 144 Fundamentals of Photography and Related Media (3)
Photography and related media have moved to the center of nearly all aspects of artistic practice. In this foundational course, the convergence of photography the related media that inform and are informed by it (including video and digital media) are explored through hands-on projects and readings designed to increase students' aesthetic and technical vocabulary. Students are also introduced to the work of significant contemporary artists who work with photography. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 205 Life Drawing (3)
A studio course for students with one semester of drawing experience. This course offers extended opportunities to draw the human figure. Emphasis will be placed on the underlying conceptual structures of perceptual relationships. Students will be asked to master the description of bodily forms deployed in a coherent pictorial space. Prerequisite(s): A ART 105.

T ART 210 Experiments in Visual Thinking (3)
Experiments in Visual Thinking is an idea-oriented course in which students learn how to think and communicate visually. Through individual and group projects, students will work toward developing an expanded visual vocabulary while learning how to visually convey their ideas and interests. Rather than start a project by determining the discipline to work within (painting, game design, landscape architecture...), we will begin each assignment by exploring a list of interests, issues, and concerns that are both relevant to the student and the contemporary world: the self, the environment, network culture, globalization, just to name a few. Each student will be asked to translate the topic into a visual outcome. Through a continual exchange of technical and conceptual feedback, each student will create a series of finished projects that illustrate their ability to think visually and act upon that thinking.

Class time will be devoted to lectures, class discussions, presentations, demonstrations, work time, and critique. Equally, this course will explore the expanded role of a visually creative person in the 21st century, not only focusing on the traditional role of creator, but also on the contemporary roles of facilitator, manager, and collaborator. Open to Honors College students only.

A ART 220 Beginning Sculpture (3)
The course work involves representing and interpreting the human form in 3-dimensions, developing eye/hand coordination, and understanding the importance of proportions and relationships. Working from the live model, students learn about the characteristics, potentials, and limits of water-based clay (terra-cotta, when fired), the need for and construction of an armature, and the techniques of modeling full-scale and proportional-scale representations of the male/female form. Final project includes a self-portrait exercise and an inventive transformation. Visual presentations and demonstrations supplement students' first-hand experiences. Prerequisite(s): A ART 115 or permission of instructor. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 230 Beginning Painting (3)
An introduction to the language of painting through studio practice. Students will work toward mastering the skills of color mixing as they apply to painting from life. This course stresses the discipline of perceiving the optical effects of light and color in nature and translating them into a pictorial space. Prerequisite(s): A ART 205 or permission of instructor.

A ART 240 Contemporary Etching (3)
In this class, students will be introduced to etching as both a historical and contemporary medium of expression. Projects will explore drawing and printing with line, tone, and texture via the traditional techniques of hard and soft ground etching, drypoint, and aquatint. Additionally, students will learn to integrate digital imaging in the creation of their intaglio prints. Assignments will address issues of representation, abstraction, cultural critique, and personal expression. Prerequisite(s): A ART 105 or permission of instructor. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 241 Silkscreen Printmaking (3)
This studio art course introduces silkscreen printmaking, also known as serigraphy, as a contemporary medium for exploring the “democratic multiple,” and the artistic and cultural legacy of Pop Art and Andy Warhol. Students will use stencils, photo-mechanical exposure, and water-based methods to combine drawing, photography, digital design, color, found images, and collage into complex images. Projects will be printed on paper and other surfaces. Prerequisite(s): A ART 105 or A ART 110 or permission of instructor. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 244 Beginning Photography and Digital Imaging (3)
An introduction to Photography as fine art; covers traditional chemical-based black and white as well as digital techniques and image- making skills. The convergence of traditional photography and digital media is explored through hands-on projects and readings designed to increase students' aesthetic and technical vocabulary. Students are also introduced weekly to the work of significant contemporary artists who work with photography. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 250 Introduction to Digital Imaging (3)
An introduction to the technical and theoretical issues of the computer in the visual arts. The convergence of photography and digital media is explored through hands-on projects and readings designed to increase students’ aesthetic and technical vocabulary. Topics covered include basic scanning and manipulation of photographic imagery through raster-based graphics programs, and fine art digital printmaking, as well as an introduction to web graphics. Prerequisite(s): A ART 244 or one studio art course and permission of instructor. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 282 Introduction to Video Postproduction (3)
An introduction to the technical and theoretical issues of the computer in the visual arts with a focus on digital video. Digital video post-production is explored through hands-on projects and readings designed to increase students’ aesthetic and technical vocabulary. Topics covered include basic non-linear editing with Final Cut Express/Pro, including graphics, titles, effects, importing/exporting, and sound editing. Also covered will be the preparation and creation of DVDs with iDVD and DVD Studio Pro.

A ART 298 Topics in Art (3)
Introductory study of a special topic in fine arts not otherwise covered in the curriculum. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies.

A ART 300 Art and Psychology (3)
This course explores the influence of 20th century psychological thought on the contemporary creative process. We will investigate the works of art and explore creative processes that are directly related to the mapping of the modern psyche. Readings will include writings by both artists and psychologists, including texts by Freud, Lacan, Jung, Breton, Miro, etc. Students will be expected to make class presentations and produce visual projects. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 170, 171 and A ART 205. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ART 305 Intermediate Drawing (3)
A studio course for students with two semesters of drawing experience. This course offers extended opportunities to draw from life combined with an awareness of various pictorial traditions and procedures. The development of a personal direction is strongly encouraged through challenging projects. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ART 205.

A ART 310 Studio Experiments in Visual Thinking (3)
An idea-oriented course designed to help students solve visual and artistic problems through invention and interpretation. Emphasis will be placed on imagination and experimentation with alternative and traditional materials, and students will work toward developing an expanded, personal, visual vocabulary. May be repeated once for credit.

A ART 320 Intermediate Sculpture (3)
An exploration of traditional and nontraditional materials, processes and concepts of sculpture with an emphasis on fabrication, assemblage and installation ideas and actualization of finished sculptural pieces. Prerequisite(s): A ART 115. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 321 Sculpture Fabrication Techniques (3)
A sequence of workshops and demonstrations exploring fabrication, additive processes and assembly techniques used in sculpture. Instruction is given on the materials and techniques used to cut, form and join aluminum, steel, wood and plastics. The student will become conversant with oxy-acetylene and electric welding (stick, MIG and TIG) equipment; woodworking tools, mechanical fasteners and industrial materials. Prerequisite(s): A ART 115 or permission of the instructor. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 322 Sculpture Casting Techniques (3)
A sequence of workshops exploring techniques of learning to make molds in plaster, flexible rubber and classic investment, used in casting ceramic, wax, plaster, concrete, plastic resins, aluminum, bronze and other materials involved in generating sculpture. Prerequisite(s): A ART 115 or permission of the instructor. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 330 Intermediate Painting (3)
A studio course for students with one semester of oil painting experience. This course offers extended opportunities to paint from life combined with an awareness of various pictorial traditions and procedures. The development of a personal direction is strongly encouraged through challenging projects. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ART 205 and 230. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ART 331 Painting in Water-Based Media (3)
A studio course for students with two semesters of drawing experience. An introduction to the language of painting through the use of a variety of water-based media (ink, gouache, watercolor, egg tempera). Students will be asked to master several media-related procedures and develop coherent pictorial constructions. Prerequisite(s): A ART 205.

A ART 335 Color Theory and Pictorial Tradition (3)
In this combined studio/lecture course, students will examine a range of color theories and their application to specific works of art. Emphasis will be on the expressive role of color in various pictorial traditions. Students will be given an extensive vocabulary of color concepts and related studio exercises. Prerequisite(s): A ART 110. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ART 340 Intermediate Etching (3)
A studio course for students with one semester of etching experience. Students will create images on and of paper with more complex intaglio and digital printmaking techniques, including multi-plate color printing. Projects will emphasize individual direction, ambition, research, and personal expression. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ART 240 or permission of instructor. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 341 Concept and Process in Printmaking (3)
Through the media of etching and digital printmaking, students will learn to invent and manipulate image-making systems and tools in order to make art. Conceptual art history and practices will be introduced, including the use of chance operations; the integration of text and image; and printmaking as a documentation of performance art. Studio projects will also explore the nature and potential of printmaking materials and surfaces, and the possibilities of printing on non-traditional substrates. Prerequisite(s): A ART 240, 242, 250, or permission of instructor. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 342 Contemporary Lithography II (3)
A studio course for students with one semester of lithography experience. Students will create images on and of paper, including print-based installations and sculptural prints. Projects will emphasize individual direction, ambition, research, and personal expression. Prerequisite(s): A ART 240 or permission of instructor.

A ART 343 Post-Pop Printmaking (3)
An exploration of the manual tools of printmaking and the digital tools of drawing and design software to create visual appeal through composition, abstraction, pattern, and color. Students will be introduced to social and historical contexts for the graphic arts, as they relate to both the fine arts and cultural resistance movements. Studio projects will emphasize the investigation of the concepts of the artist as shopper, consumer, and as brand creator. Prerequisite(s): A ART 240, 242, 250, or permission of instructor. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 344 Intermediate Photography and Digital Imaging (3)
In-depth investigation of traditional chemical-based black and white as well as digital techniques and image-making skills, with an emphasis on the archival fine-art print. The convergence of traditional photography and digital media is explored through hands-on projects and readings designed to increase students' aesthetic and technical vocabulary. Students are also introduced to the work of significant contemporary artists who work with photography and work with increased independence on the development of their portfolio. Prerequisite(s): A ART 244 or permission of instructor. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 345 The Monotype (3)
Studio experience in most processes in the making of monotypes. Emphasis is on water-based, nontoxic materials. Prerequisite(s): A ART 105 or permission of instructor.

A ART 346 Introductory Film Production (3)
Seeing and thinking in cinematic terms, with an introduction to the process and equipment with which the filmmaker works. Cameras, lenses, film emulsions and editing procedures are studied in the making of short silent films. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260, or A COM 238 and permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ART 347 Non-silver Photography (3)
Exploration of the various methods of applying light-sensitive emulsions to materials (cloth, paper) and printing from them rather than from the traditional silver-based photographic paper. This method enables the student to work in a more painterly printmaking manner. Prerequisite(s): A ART 344. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 348 Color Photography (3)
Utilization of traditional film transparency and negative materials, as well as advanced digital workflow in color photography with emphasis on digital color printing. Students are also introduced to the work of significant contemporary artists who work with color photography. Prerequisite(s): A ART 344 and permission of instructor. A ART 110 recommended. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 349 Artists’ Books/Narrative (3)
Theory, form, and practice of making images in sequence, with an emphasis on the timing and spacing of visual narrative. The structure of the artists’ book will be explored, and will include an introduction to basic hand bookbinding techniques. Projects will involve the creation of editioned multiples and one-of-a-kind hand-made book objects. Prerequisite(s): A ART 240, 242, 250, 348, or permission of instructor.

A ART 350 Intermediate Digital Imaging (3)
An intensive exploration into the uses of the computer in the fine arts. This course builds on concepts introduced in A ART 250. Emphasis is placed on correlating technical concerns with theoretical, conceptual, and aesthetic content. Students are expected to develop a portfolio through challenging projects. Prerequisite(s): A ART 250 and permission of the instructor. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ART 351 Intermediate Screenprinting (3)
This is a studio course for students with one semester of silkscreen printmaking experience. Students will continue to use stencils, photo-mechanical exposure, and water-based methods to combine drawing, photography, digital design, color, found images, and collage into complex images. Projects will be printed on paper and other surfaces. The development of a personal direction is strongly encouraged through the focus on a series of self-directed, portfolio-oriented projects. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ART 241 or permission of instructor. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 381 Advanced Video Postproduction (3)
A continuation of introduction to Video PP, this course focuses on the technical and theoretical issues of the computer in the visual arts with a focus on digital video. Digital video post-production is explored through hands-on projects and readings designed to increase students’ aesthetic and technical vocabulary. Topics covered include advanced non-linear editing techniques with Final Cut Pro with an emphasis on long form narrative videos and effect-based art videos, including techniques like keying and compositing with an introduction to the post-production program After Effects. Prerequisite(s): A ART 282. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ART 382 (= A ARH 369) Experimental Film and Video (3)
This course is an introduction to the elements, structure, and history of experimental film and video art. Experimental film and Video Art share similarities in their fundamental historical development but adopt very different approaches in style, form, and media. This course will follow each development through screenings and discussions relating to film and video beginning in the 1920’s to the present. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260 or 267 or A ART 280. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ART 383 (formerly A ART 280; = A ARH 383) History and Practice of Video Art I (3)
In this course students will be seeing and making video art. Post production techniques in Apple Final Cut Pro and a variety of audio software are covered. Regular screenings and discussions are held to understand the lineage of the media and provide feedback on each other's work. Class time is spent working on assignments, screenings, lectures and discussion. A significant amount of out of class time will be needed to complete projects. May not be taken by students with credit for A ARH 283 or A ART 280. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ART 244, 250 or A ARH 171 or permission of instructor.

A ART 384 (formerly A ART 281; = A ARH 384) History and Practice of Video Art II (3)
Follow-up to History and Practice of Video Art I, this course more thoroughly engages the technical and theoretical issues of the computer in the visual arts with a focus on digital video. Digital video post-production is explored through hands-on projects and readings designed to increase students' aesthetic and technical vocabulary. Topics covered include basic non-linear editing with Apple Final Cut Pro, and various image and sound editing software/hardware. May not be taken by students with credit for A ART 281 or A ARH 268. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ART 383, A ARH 383 or permission of instructor.

A ART 390 Topics in Printmaking (3)
Special projects in print processes ranging from relief printing to color viscosity etching. May be repeated for credit when topic varies (up to 12 credits). Prerequisite(s): A ART 240 or 242. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 405 Advanced Drawing (3)
A studio course for students with two or three semesters of drawing experience. Individual attention is combined with technical and formal criticism in the development of a personal visual idiom. In this course, stress will be placed on how the history of drawing helps to reveal a student’s potential. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ART 305.

A ART 420 Advanced Sculpture (3)
A focus on contemporary concerns and attitudes in three-dimensional work and media requiring an application of concepts and experience learned and acquired in prerequisite courses and through research, which results in finished sculptures. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ART 320 and 321, or permission of instructor. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 421 Topics in Sculpture (3)
Further exploration of sculptural concepts with a focus on individual problems, covering a wide range of media, methods and techniques. An emphasis is on the development, interpretation, realization and presentation of one’s ideas. May be repeated for credit when topic varies (up to 12 credits). Prerequisite(s): A ART 320 and 321, or permission of instructor. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 426 (= A MUS 426 & A THR 426) Music Composition in Electronic Media I (3) 
An introduction to compositional and studio techniques for electronic music composition. Students will gain exposure to digital audio editing and sequencing, basic signal processing, and relevant musical structures. Projects will reflect a variety of aesthetic approaches and disciplines from experimental traditions, sound art, multimedia, and more popular forms. Only one version of A ART 426 can be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A MUS 100 or permission of instructor.

A ART 427 (= A MUS 427 & A THR 427) Music Composition in Electronic Media II (3)
This course is an advanced seminar in sound design, audio art, electronic musical composition, and related fields, with an emphasis on evaluation and discussion of creative studio work produced by students. A continuation of studies initiated in A ART/A MUS/A THR 426, with a focus on advanced techniques and aesthetics. Only one version of A ART 427 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ART/A MUS/A THR 426, or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ART 428 (= A MUS 428 & A THR 428) Sound Design for Film, Theatre, and Media (3)
Studio projects grounded in theory and history of sound and musical composition for multimedia fields, among them film, video, and theater. Students will work on original studio projects in a variety of disciplines. Only one version of A MUS 428 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): at least one of the following: A MUS 426, A ART 426, A THR 426, A ART 282, A ART 383, A DOC 406, A HIS 406, or permission of instructor.

A ART 429 (= A MUS 429 & A THR 429) Seminar in Musical Improvisation II (3)
An introduction to the skills and aesthetics of musical improvisation across multiple musical genres. The course will span the needs and interests of students with both limited and extensive experience with improvisation. Individual and collective improvisational forms will be explored. This course may be repeated twice for credit. Prerequisite(s): A MUS 100 or permission of instructor.

A ART 430 Advanced Painting (3)
A studio course for students with two or three semesters of oil painting experience. Individual attention is combined with technical and formal criticism in the development of a personal visual idiom. In this course, stress will be placed on how the history of painting helps to reveal a student’s potential. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ART 330.

A ART 434 Topics in Drawing (3)
A studio course for students with at least two semesters of drawing experience. In depth study of selected topics in drawing not otherwise covered in the curriculum. Students will be guided through several pictorial models and procedures, seeking both mastery and a pictorial persona. May be repeated for credit when topic varies (up to 12 credits). Prerequisite(s): A ART 205.

A ART 435 Topics in Painting (3)
A studio course for students with two or three semesters of oil painting experience. In-depth study of selected topics in painting not otherwise covered in the curriculum. Students will be guided through a variety of pictorial paradigms, seeking both mastery and a pictorial persona. May be repeated for credit when topic varies (up to 12 credits). Prerequisite(s): A ART 330.

A ART 440 Advanced Printmaking (3)
A studio course for students with at least one 300-level class in etching or digital printmaking. Students will create images on and of paper with more complex etching, digital printmaking, woodcut, or collage processes. Projects will emphasize individual direction, ambition, research, and personal expression. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ART 340 or A ART 341 or A ART 343 or A ART 349, or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ART 444 Advanced Photography and Digital Imaging (3)
Advanced work in fine art photography; covers traditional chemical-based black and white as well as digital techniques and image-making skills, including web, CD-ROM and DVD design. Installation and presentation techniques are investigated in preparation for work beyond graduation. The convergence of traditional photography and digital media is explored through hands-on projects and readings designed to increase students' aesthetic and technical vocabulary. Students are also introduced weekly to the work of significant contemporary artists who work with photography, and are expected to work independently on the development of their portfolio. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ART 344 or permission of instructor. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 445 Advanced Monotype (3)
Continuation of A ART 345. Emphasis will be on individual approaches to ideas and various print techniques. Prerequisite(s): A ART 345.

A ART 446 Topics in Photography (3)
Expansion of camera skills and photographic techniques. Individual interests and abilities play a major role in established course content. May be repeated for credit when topic varies (up to 12 credits). Prerequisite(s): A ART 244 or permission of instructor. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 447 Advanced Film Production (3)
This course builds on filmmaking skills acquired in Introductory Film Production. Students explore cinematic narrative structures, styles of editing, and setting the mise-en-scène. Students will make a fictional work on film or videotape that focuses on their own life experience. Prerequisite(s): A ART 346. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ART 450 Advanced Digital Imaging (3)
An exploration of some of the more sophisticated concepts, processes, and software involved in digital fine art. Students develop self-directed projects that reflect not only a technical proficiency with the media explored, but a thoughtfully developed conceptual thread. Weekly readings in current digital media theory and criticism provide insight into the work of emerging artists, and a wide range of techniques, media, and software are covered, including: advanced 2-D image manipulation, web graphics, and high-resolution fine art printmaking, as well as introductions to interactive multimedia and digital video. Emphasis is placed on finding the most appropriate solutions for each student’s individual project. Prerequisite(s): A ART 250 or permission of instructor. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ART 451 Advanced Screenprinting (3)
This is a studio course for students with at least two semesters of silkscreen printmaking experience. Students will continue to use stencils, photo-mechanical exposure, and water-based methods to combine drawing, photography, digital design, color, found images, and collage into complex images. Projects will be printed on paper and other surfaces. The development of a personal direction is strongly encouraged through the focus on a series of self-directed, portfolio-oriented projects. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ART 351 or permission of instructor.

A ART 481 Video Installation (3)
A studio course on the basics of video installation. Students must have prior knowledge of video art practice and sculpture. The course will survey the development of video as an element in 3D installation through videos, exhibitions, and readings. Students will create small scale video installations as exercises in the course. The course will emphasize the use of public space and existing architecture as backdrop or element in the creation of video installations. The final project will involve a group site-specific installation incorporating a public space in the Albany area. Prerequisite(s): A ART 220, A ART 280, or A ARH 267. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ART 490 Internship in Studio Art (1-6)
Designed for undergraduate students interested in pursuing a career in the arts. Students work with art professionals for one semester. Internships may include assisting the Times Union Photography Department, the Center for Photography at Woodstock, the New York State Museum, and several local galleries, or assisting professional artists. Students complete an academic component consisting of required meetings with the faculty supervisor in the area of focus, and may involve a journal and portfolio. Art majors may use three credits toward course requirements above the 300 level. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Consent for the internship must be obtained in the preceding semester by the submission of a plan of intent and a signed contract with a professional organization or individual artist. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, 2.50 or higher GPA, and permission of instructor.

A ART 491 Senior Studio (3)
As the capstone course for the studio art program, this class is a requirement for all 60-credit studio art departmental majors. It is only offered in the fall semester, and it is to be taken in their senior year. Students are required to create a new body of artwork in their chosen concentration (painting and drawing, photography and related media, printmaking, and sculpture). At the end of the semester each student is expected to exhibit his or her new artwork at an off-campus art venue. Often this results in a group exhibition in which all the students in the class exhibit their artwork together. For this group exhibition, students are required to organize and execute all aspects of the event (staging, lighting, publicity, documentation, refreshments, etc.). Field trips to art institutions in the capital region as well as New York City to look at examples of contemporary artwork and exhibition design will serve as firsthand examples for what they are doing in the classroom. Throughout the semester, students will also learn how to prepare for a career in the arts. Information concerning documenting artwork, disseminating artwork samples, as well as graduate school in art, artist residencies, grants, awards, fellowships, and art-related employment opportunities will be covered in this course. Majors in the 36-credit studio art program will be allowed to enroll in the class if seating is available.  Prerequisite(s): senior 60-credit art major or permission of instructor.

A ART 492 Internship in Art Museum Management and Operation (3–4)
Designed for undergraduate students interested in pursuing a career in Arts Management or the Gallery/Museum administrative field. Projects may include computer database, archival records retrieval and storage, media relations skills, collections management, and exhibition organization and documentation. A final project will be assigned. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): interview by gallery administrative staff and permission of Art Department Chair. S/U graded.

A ART 496 Mentor Tutorial (3)
A tutorial in which readings, discussions, visits to museums and galleries are assigned to build awareness of the relevant traditions supporting an Honors student’s development. This tutorial will also include consultation on graduate school applications and instruction on taking slides of works of art. Prerequisite(s): admission into the departmental Honors Program.

A ART 497 Independent Study (1–4)
Directed studio project in a selected art area. May be repeated with approval of department chair. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of instructor and department chair. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A ART 498 Honors Project I (3-6)
Studio project in a selected area of concentration. Topics and issues vary according to the needs and goals set by the students with their mentors. The goal of this project is to allow students adequate space and opportunity to cultivate a distinctive personal direction and generate a significant body of work to pursue graduate study. Students will attend appropriate MFA critiques. Prerequisite(s): admission into the departmental Honors Program and permission of instructor.

A ART 499 Honors Project II (3-6)
The continuation and completion of a studio project set forth in A ART 498. Upon completion of the project, the student will be required to make an oral defense of the work before the Honors Committee. Successful completion of the program earns an Honors Certificate in Art and a nomination for graduating with “Honors in Art” from the University. Students will attend appropriate MFA critiques. Prerequisite(s): A ART 498.

  

Courses in Art History

A ARH 170 Survey of Art in the Western World I (3)
Survey of art from prehistoric times through the 14th century focusing on architecture, sculpture and painting of the ancient Near East, Egypt, and Europe.

A ARH 171 Survey of Art in the Western World II (3)
Survey of art from the 14th century to the present focusing on painting, sculpture and architecture of Europe and the Americas.

A ARH 205 Myths of the Greek and Roman World in Western Art (3)
A survey of the major myths of ancient Greece and Rome as they were appropriated for visual imagery and thematic subject matter of western art. Particular periods of art studied will vary; these will include arts of antiquity and may also include painting and sculpture of the Renaissance, the early modern and modern eras. Texts to be studied will feature major literary writings of Greece and Rome in translation. May not be taken by students with credit for A CLC 105.

A ARH 207 (= A CLA 207) Egyptian Archaeology (3)
A survey of the remains of ancient Egypt from the earliest times to the Roman Empire. The pyramids, temples, tombs, mummies and works of art will be examined in an attempt to understand the unique character of ancient Egypt. Selections from Egyptian religious and historical texts will be read in translation. Only one version of A ARH 207 may be taken for credit.

A ARH 208 (= A CLA 208) Greek Archaeology (3)
Survey of the prehistoric and historical cultures of ancient Greece, as revealed by archaeology, from the Neolithic to the Hellenistic era, with emphasis on the evolution of pottery style, painting, sculpture and architecture. Only one version of A ARH 208 may be taken for credit.

A ARH 209 (= A CLA 209) Roman Archaeology (3)
Survey of the monuments of ancient Rome and her empire in a cultural and evolutionary context, including major works of sculpture, wall painting and architecture. Roman towns and principles of town planning also studied. Translated selections from Roman literary and historical sources.

A ARH 230 The Art of Medieval Knighthood (3)
The art and culture of medieval European knighthood from its beginnings in mounted soldiers of the eleventh century to its role in elaborate tournaments and jousts of the sixteenth. Attention will be given to the social expression of the knightly class through visual and literary means. Objects of study will include architecture, sculpture, manuscript painting and ivory carvings. Literature will include chivalric epics, romances, and manuals of war. Among the topics to be addressed will be arms and armor, castles and manor houses, the arts of courtly love and the visual spectacle of chivalry.

A ARH 238 (= A FRE 238) Great Classics of French Cinema (3)
An introduction with detailed analyses to a dozen of the most well-known French classic films as contributions to the art of cinema and as reflections of French society at various historical moments. Taught in English. May not be used to fulfill the requirements of the major in French. Only one of version of A ARH/A FRE 238 and A FRE 315 may be taken for credit. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A ARH 240 (formerly A CAS 240) Images and Issues of Diversity in the Visual Arts (3)
This course will examine the visual and performing arts produced in selected subcultures and will consider the ways in which such social identities as race/ethnic identity, socio-economic class, gender and age are represented. The course focuses on the relationship of artists and their work to cultural and critical history, the impact and relevance for modern society, the social conditions under which these artists create, and the effect of these conditions on the themes, content, forms and shape of the reality in their art.

A ARH 241 Introduction to Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture (3)
This course focuses on art and architecture made in Italy during the Renaissance (ca. 1250-1600). Each week, lectures explore one or a few major sites, works, or buildings. The class will discuss how artworks fit into their physical contexts, the influence of patrons, and the social, civic, religious, intellectual, and political significance of art. Lectures also examine artistic exchange between Italy and Northern Europe.

A ARH 250 Art in France from Absolutism to Impressionism (3)
Introduction to art of all mediums produced in France from the consolidation of the country under the Valois and Bourbon kings of the Renaissance and Baroque eras, through the origins of Modernism in 19th century art and culture. The course culminates with an examination of the French Impressionists and the many ways in which their radical new painting styles intersected with French social life and concerns of their era.

T ARH 252 Art of the Enlightenment in France and England (3)
This course examines art produced in Europe during the eighteenth century, a period of rich cultural and intellectual exchange known as the "Enlightenment." We explore the original context, use and significance of the art, as well as the association between artmaking and other forms of cultural inquiry and expression during this era of profound societal change. The art that we examine includes painting, sculpture, graphics and decorative arts, and we address a number of key trends that developed in France and England through a process of influence, exchange and rivalry between these two European powers. These trends include the playful, sensual style known as the Rococo; complex treatments of gender; the fascination with nature and science; and encounters both economic and cultural with people of other parts of the world, notably China, Japan, and Africa. Through the lens of eighteenth-century art students also acquire the fundamental skills of art history research and writing. Open to Honors College students only.

A ARH 260 Introduction to Film Studies (3)
This course offers an introduction to the analysis of cinema as an art form. Students will learn the basic language of film analysis in order to critically understand and interpret the movies as technological, cultural, and artistic products. From mise-en-scène, cinematography, editing, and film sound to narrative structure, alternatives to mainstream narrative fiction film, and contextual analysis, this introductory course provides the foundation for advanced film studies courses and fulfills the General Education requirement for Arts. The aim of this class is to increase students' visual literacy skills and the ability to recognize film language at work in the creation of meaning on screen.

A ARH 261 Independent and Art House Cinema (3)
This introduction to independent, underground, and art house cinema covers a range of visual and narrative alternatives to the films produced by the studio system. By examining cinema as a mode of visual storytelling and personal expression, these films open up the possibility of an alternative authorship that includes the visions and stories of those operating outside the mainstream or beyond storytelling traditions that are limited by genre conventions and economic expectations. From independent cinema and the avant-garde to underground film movements, midnight movies, cult cinema, and film festival favorites, these films raise questions of what cinema is or can be, highlights cinema's relationship to other art forms, and points to the changing dynamics between the industry and independents in both film history and contemporary filmmaking practices.

A ARH 263 American Film Genres (3)
This course will explore traditional American film genres, centering on the manner in which they were developed, and their evolution across the decades. Such elements as script structure, camera placement and movement, acting and directing styles, and color and widescreen processes will be examined. Genres to be explored include musicals, comedies, horror, science fiction, westerns, and melodrama. Subgenres such as the adult western, the screwball comedy, and the social comment film also will be analyzed.

A ARH 264 New American Cinema (3)
During the late 1960s and early 1970s, great social changes were occurring in the United States. These changes were sparked by the emerging youth culture, the progression of the Civil Rights Movement, opposition to the war in Vietnam, and the advent of the modern-era feminist movement. This course will explore the manner in which these changes impacted on the American cinema. Editing styles, camera placement, and camera movement veered from traditional film language; film content reflected youth alienation, the drug culture, and alternative lifestyles and politics.

A ARH 265 History of Photography (3)
A survey of photography from its invention in 1839 to recent trends. Emphasizes why it was developed, the major 19th century documentary and artistic uses, and the extraordinary range of 20th century explorations. An integrated approach tied to parallel social and artistic events.

A ARH 266 Photography 1970 to the Present (3)
A thorough survey of recent photography. Emphasizes fine art photography and the use of photography by artists working in other media, including documentary and photojournalistic work, photography books, mixed media and digital work. The materials for study are drawn from slide lectures, local exhibitions, contemporary criticism, library materials, and the media. No prior photography or art history required.

A ARH 267 International Film Movements (3)
From the French New Wave, Italian Neorealism, German Expressionism, and Soviet Cinema to Dogma 95, Iranian Cinema, Bollywood, and Bangkok Cinema, this course examines various film movements and tendencies that operate alongside and against Hollywood and other international film industries. Film form, content, style, narrative, and meaning will be understood in the context of cultural, economic, and political climates and in relation to other art forms, genres, and movements. International in scope, this course approaches cinema as both an art form and industry that is technologically and politically determined, artistically motivated, and ultimately transformative of the language of cinema as it is practiced by filmmakers in specific contexts and as understood by viewers nationally, internationally, and transnationally.

A ARH 269 The Hollywood Crime Film (3)
Foundational course which explores the particular genre of crime films and its various sub-genres, focusing on films that have been produced by the American motion picture studios from the silent film era through the present. The course provides information about the basics of the Hollywood studio system and spotlights the manner in which this particular genre serves to mirror the changes across the decades in American art, culture, and society. Also discussed are basic film language, narrative conventions, and filmic structure.

A ARH 270 Introduction to Ancient Art: Greek and Roman Mural Painting and Floor Mosaic (3)
A study of two of the primary visual forms, wall paintings and mosaic pavements, which survive from the ancient world will serve to introduce students to the art of the classical civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome. The course consists of a historical survey of the wall and floor decorations produced in the Greek and Roman worlds from the palace civilizations of the Aegean Bronze Age through Classical and Hellenistic Greece to the Roman Empire and early Christianity. Parallel developments in Etruscan art are also included. Style, content and technique in both wall paintings and floor mosaics will be studied in the ancient social and cultural contexts in which the art was created. Both pebble and tessellated mosaic pavements and fresco paintings are examined, as well as ancient literary texts which reveal ancient opinion on the visual arts.

A ARH 280 (= A EAC 280) Chinese Painting (3)
Introduces students to the major works of traditional Chinese painting and analyzes those works to arrive at an understanding of life in traditional China. The major class activity will be viewing, discussing and analyzing slides of Chinese paintings. Only one version of A ARH 280 may be taken for credit.

A ARH 298 Topics in Art History (3)
Introductory study of a special topic in Art History not otherwise covered in the curriculum. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

A ARH 301 (= A CLA 301) Aegean Prehistory (3)
Archaeology of the Aegean area from Paleolithic times to the end of the Bronze Age, with emphasis on Minoan Crete and Mycenaean Greece. Prerequisite(s): A CLA 208. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ARH 302 (= A CLA 302) Villanovans, Etruscans, and Early Romans (3)
Archaeology of the Etruscans and of early Rome in the context of the Iron Age cultures of the Italian peninsula. Prerequisite(s): A CLA 209 or A CLC 134, or junior or senior standing.

A ARH 303 Artistic Encounters in the Early Medieval World (3)
This course examines the art and architecture serving Christian, Jewish, and Muslim communities in Europe and the Middle East from the second through the tenth century of the Common Era. Particular attention will be paid to those objects and monuments which articulate the common values and areas of tension among the adherents of all three religions.

A ARH 310 (= A ANT 336) Art and Archaeology of Cyprus I (3)
An examination or the material culture (art, archaeology, and architecture), settlement patterns and changing environmental setting of successive cultures of the east Mediterranean island of Cyprus from the first human occupation to the Roman period (10,000 B.C.E. to 50 B.C.E.) The island's role as a major point of contact between Near Eastern and Western Mediterranean civilizations will be emphasized. Only one version of A ARH 310 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ARH 311 (= A ANT 337) Art and Archaeology of Cyprus II (3)
An examination of the material culture (art, archaeology, and architecture) and history of the island of Cyprus from the Roman period through its recently won independence in 1960 and up to the present. Byzantine church painting, Gothic ecclesiastical and military architecture, the Venetian preparations for an Ottoman invasion emphasize the significance of this Christian enclave in the Moslem east under Latin, Venetian, Ottoman, and British colonial rule. Finally, the strategic importance of Cyprus during the Cold War still continues to affect its history. Only one version of A ARH 311 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ARH 329 Archaeological Field Research (2-6)
Supervised participation in the excavation of approved Old World prehistoric, classical or medieval sites. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing and permission of the department chair.

A ARH 331 Monks, Monarchs, and Medieval Art: Europe 500-1100 C.E. (3)
An examination of European architecture, painting, sculpture and portable arts from the 6th to the 12th century. Course covers early Germanic and Celtic art, Carolingian and Ottonian periods. French, English, German, Italian Romanesque architecture and sculpture of the pilgrimage route of Santiago, monastic manuscript illumination, mural painting, objects in bronze and precious metals. Only one version of A ARH 331 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 170 or permission of instructor.

A ARH 332 Gothic Art and Architecture (3)
Examines Gothic Art of the 13th and 14th centuries in France and its spread throughout Europe. Includes a study of religious and lay architecture (cathedrals, castles, town halls); cathedral sculpture; stained glass, murals and mosaics; manuscript illumination, painted altarpieces and art of precious metals. Only one version of A ARH 332 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ART 170 or 331, or permission of instructor.

A ARH 341 Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture: 1250-1450 (3)
This course will focus on paintings, sculptures, and architectural structures produced in Italy between 1250 and 1450. We will focus on works produced in major centers like Florence and Milan, as well as those made in smaller cities like Siena and Padua. The course will stress the effects of historical, social, and political contexts on the production of images and structures. Topics to be covered include the influence of the mendicant orders, the effects of the Black Death, patronage, urbanism, the construction and decoration of churches and palaces, the influence of antiquity, courtly art and architecture, the role of gender in art, and the social status of the artist. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 170 or 171, or permission of instructor.

A ARH 342 Italian Renaissance Art and Architecture: 1450-1600 (3)
This course will focus on artistic and architectural monuments created in Italy between 1450 and 1600, a period that saw the development of the High Renaissance and the eventual emergence of the Mannerist style. We will focus on paintings, sculptures, architectural structures, and graphic work produced in major centers, including Florence, Venice, Rome, and Milan. Topics to be covered include the role of the patron, politics and art, the continuing influence of antiquity, sexuality and gender in imagery, and the evolving social position of the artist. Special attention will be paid to papal patronage and, naturally, the influence of the Protestant Reformation and the Counter-Reformation on art in Italy. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 170 or 171, or permission of instructor.

A ARH 343 Northern European Art: 1350-1600 (3)
This course will focus on art created in northern Europe between 1350 and 1600. We will focus on paintings, sculptures, and graphic work produced in France, the Netherlands, and Germany. Topics to be covered include the meaning of realism, symbolism and the use of iconographic analysis, the development of the art market, artistic specialization, the function of images in religious and domestic contexts, the emergence of the self-conscious artist, and sexuality and gender in imagery. Attention will be paid to the influence of antiquity and the Italian Renaissance in the north. We will also examine the influence of the Protestant Reformation on images produced after 1517. Prerequisites: A ARH 170 or 171, or permission of instructor.

A ARH 350 Art in the Courts of 17th Century Europe (3)
A study of the painting, sculpture and architecture produced in Italy, France and Spain during the 17th century. Attention will focus on the religious, political and ceremonial demands of the Catholic Church and the royal courts, as well as on the careers of individual artists such as Bernini, Borromini, Caravaggio, Poussin and Velasquez. Only one version of A ARH 350 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 171 or permission of instructor.

A ARH 351 Netherlandish Painting in the Age of Rembrandt and Rubens (3)
An examination of the painting and graphic art produced in the Netherlands during the 17th century. In addition to studying artistic trends and individual artists such as Rembrandt and Rubens, students will explore the ways in which the art addressed the social needs and concerns of Dutch and Flemish audiences. Only one version of A ARH 351 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 171 or permission of instructor.

A ARH 352 Art of the Enlightenment (3)
This course examines art produced in Europe during the 18th century, a period of rich cultural and intellectual exchange known as the "Enlightenment." It explores the original context, use and significance of the art, as well as the association between artmaking and other forms of cultural inquiry and expression during this era of profound societal change. Only one version of A ARH 352 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 171 or permission of instructor.

A ARH 361 Understanding Screen Studies: Acting, Apparatus, and Audiences (3)
This course explores the history of screen studies in relation to changing technology and the cinematic apparatus, audience and reception studies, the art of acting and directing, and the understanding of cinema as an art form that is culturally located. Students will learn to recognize the semiotics of cinema in the context of film history, theory, criticism, and practice, and to become critical viewers of the art. This course also grapples with screen studies as it is changing in the new digital age, and raises epistemological questions regarding the nature of representation and reception studies. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260.

A ARH 362 Topics in Film: Significant Cinema Directors (3)
This course offers an in-depth look at the work and influences of selected individual directors or groups of filmmakers in the context of auteur theory, film and art history, and cultural studies. Students will exercise formal and contextual analysis in order to better understand the director-as-auteur trope and will also be asked to deconstruct these theories and traditions in order to create new narratives surrounding authorship, genre, and intertextuality in cinema. On the one hand, this course honors the work of particular filmmakers that are undeniably accomplished, while on the other hand also taking into account issues of privilege, collaboration, technological developments, and economic support from the film industry that makes such authorship possible. Directors will thus be celebrated and critiqued with these issues in mind. This course may be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260.

A ARH 363 Art of American Silent Films (3)
Examination of the silent film in America, with an emphasis upon Hollywood. Topics to be addressed include: the studio and star systems; significant personalities; the writing of silent film; technological developments; and the various film genres, such as epics, comedies, and melodramas. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ARH 365 Modern Art I (3)
Survey of the first phase of Modernism, focusing on painting and sculpture in Europe and the USA from circa 1780–1880. Movements covered include Neo-Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, and Impressionism; artists include David, Goya, Manet, Cassatt. Only one version of A ARH 365 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 171 or permission of instructor.

A ARH 366 Modern Art II (3)
Survey of Modern art from circa 1880–1945, focusing on painting and sculpture of Europe and the Americas. Movements covered include Post-impressionism, Cubism, German Expressionism, Dada, Surrealism; artists include Van Gogh, Picasso, Kollwitz, Duchamp, O’Keeffe, Douglas, Kahlo. Only one version of A ARH 366 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 171 or permission of instructor.

A ARH 368 Documentary Cinema: History, Theory, Criticism (3)
This course provides a historical and theoretical introduction to documentary film history and criticism, from early cinema to contemporary documentary filmmaking practices. Students will examine the aesthetics and ethics of representation with a keen attention to issues of visibility, consent, and the power dynamics of authorship, identity politics, and access to the modes of representation. Canonical moments of documentary film history will be explored alongside lesser known examples of documentary works in order to address complex issues of subjectivity, objectivity, and truth as implicated or compromised by the film camera, filmmaker, and film audiences. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260 or permission of the instructor.

A ARH 369 (= A ART 382) Experimental Film and Video (3)
This course is an introduction to the elements, structure, and history of experimental film and video art. Experimental film and video art share similarities in their fundamental historical development but adopt very different approaches in style, form, and media. This course will follow each development through screenings and discussions relating to film and video beginning in the 1920s to the present. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260 or 267 or A ART 280.

A ARH 380 Poetry and Cinema (3)
This course examines the relationship between the visual and the verbal both on screen and on the page, and will ask students to investigate how film and poetry have influenced and responded to one another over time and in the context of their respective literary and cinematic transformations. The aim of this course is to outline the possibilities of lyrical cinema within experimental, animation, documentary, and narrative film, and to point toward the similarities of rhythm, structure, and image that are frequently shared by poetry and cinema. Films, filmmakers, and poets will be studied alongside one another; a significant amount of time will be spent reading and discussing the original poems. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260 and junior or senior standing.

A ARH 383 (formerly A ARH 283; = A ART 383) History and Practice of Video Art I (3)
In this course students will be seeing and making video art. Post production techniques in Apple Final Cut Pro and a variety of audio software are covered. Regular screenings and discussions are held to understand the lineage of the media and provide feedback on each other's work. Class time is spent working on assignments, screenings, lectures and discussion. A significant amount of out of class time will be needed to complete projects. May not be taken by students with credit for A ARH 283 or A ART 280. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ART 244, 250 or A ARH 171 or permission of instructor.

A ARH 384 (formerly A ARH 268; = A ART 384) History and Practice of Video Art II (3)
Follow-up to History and Practice of Video Art I, this course more thoroughly engages the technical and theoretical issues of the computer in the visual arts with a focus on digital video. Digital video post-production is explored through hands-on projects and readings designed to increase students' aesthetic and technical vocabulary. Topics covered include basic non-linear editing with Apple Final Cut Pro, and various image and sound editing software/hardware. May not be taken by students with credit for A ART 281 or A ARH 268. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ART 383, A ARH 383 or permission of instructor.

A ARH 401 Greek Sculpture (3)
Study of selected sculptural monuments from the Archaic, Classical and Hellenistic eras, considered in relation to their historical, intellectual and religious context. Prerequisite(s): A CLA 208. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A ARH 402 Roman Sculpture (3)
Selected monuments representing the historical development of Roman sculpture in its social and religious context from the early Republic to the time of the emperor Constantine. Prerequisite(s): A CLA 208 or 209 or A ARH 170.

A ARH 403 Greek Painting (3)
A survey of ancient Greek painting from the beginnings about 1000 B.C. through the Hellenistic age; primarily painted vases, but also including the limited evidence that exists for wall painting and other forms. Prerequisite(s): A CLA 208. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A ARH 405 Greek Architecture (3)
The development of Greek monumental architecture from the earliest temples through the Hellenistic Age. Prerequisite(s): A CLA 208. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A ARH 406 Roman Architecture and Town Planning (3)
The development of Roman public and private architecture, with emphasis on its urban setting and function, and the evolution of Roman towns in Italy and the Empire from the early Republic to the time of the emperor Constantine. Prerequisite(s): A CLA 208 or 209 or A ARH 170.

A ARH 432 Gothic Painting (3)
Study of the style and technique of stained glass, manuscript illumination, wall and panel painting in the 13th and 14th centuries, with emphasis on France and Italy. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 170 and junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A ARH 442 Art and Change in Northern Europe, 1300-1500 (3)
Research seminar examining selected topics in the art produced in northern Europe from 1300-1500. Special emphasis upon the cultural significance of art in an era that saw dramatic changes in social structures and religious beliefs. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and at least nine credits of upper-level coursework in Art History or Medieval and Renaissance Studies, or permission of instructor

A ARH 450 (= A FRE 460) Art and Society in Early Modern France (3)
Seminar examining selected topics in art and architecture produced in France from the sixteenth through eighteenth centuries. Special emphasis upon the cultural significance of art in an era that saw the rise and fall of monarchical power as well as dramatic changes in understandings of social hierarchy, gender, the natural world, and philosophy. Only one version of A ARH 450 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and at least nine credits of upper-level coursework in Art History or French Studies.

A ARH 460 Special Topics in Cinema (3)
In-depth study of selected topics in film not otherwise covered in the curriculum. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260, junior or senior standing, and two upper level film studies courses.

A ARH 461 (= A WSS 461) Women in Cinema (3)
This course provides an introduction to women in cinema with an emphasis on images of women in film and films directed by women. Drawing upon film history and feminist film theory, this course takes on the construction of femininity and embodiment on screen as well as the role of the camera, the anticipated or implied spectator, and the film industry at large in those representations. Students will also examine alternatives to the traditional visual relationships and gender dynamics emphasized by Hollywood and other film industries, and will become familiar with experimental, animated, and feminist counter-cinema as important instances of visual culture that either transgress or work through issues of gender and the gaze differently. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior status and either A ARH 260 or six credits of A WSS coursework.       

A ARH 462 Research Seminar in Film Studies (3)
Seminar for advanced art history or film studies students on selected topics in film history, criticism, theory, and practice. Topics may range in subject, from experimental and digital cinema to the international film festival. Coursework involves extensive discussion and readings as well as a substantial written or creative project in relation to the specific seminar topic. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260, junior or senior standing, two upper level film studies courses, and Art History major/minor or Film Studies minor, or permission of instructor.       

A ARH 463 Cinematic Space: Art, Architecture, and Landscape in Film (3)
Seminar on landscape in cinema examining the role of setting, set design, art, architecture, and the environment in the creation of cinematic space on screen for both characters and viewers. Examines a wide range of films that feature landscape as a protagonist and undeniable presence within the world of the film, and approaches cinema as a mode of visual storytelling. Incorporates a study of other, closely related art forms such as photography, sculpture, architecture, and dance in order to better understand cinematic space and how film operates to create mood and meaning. Students will apply this approach to their own experiences of spatial mediation and the nature of representation in our lives and in the arts. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 260, junior or senior standing, and 2 upper division film studies courses.

A ARH 466 Art Criticism of the Modern Period (3)
A study of the major European and American critics of 20th century art up to circa 1970. Student essays in criticism of actual artworks will emphasize understanding of historically significant critical perspectives, as well as the development of personal approaches to criticism. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 171; junior or senior standing; permission of instructor.

A ARH 467 Art Criticism of the Post-Modern Period (3)
Investigation of practice and theory of contemporary art criticism. Readings will concentrate on critics and writers from the 1970s to the present. In writing about works of art, students will practice basic critical skills of description, formal analysis, interpretation, and articulation of personal responses. Only one version of A ARH 467 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 171; junior or senior standing; permission of instructor.

A ARH 468 Art Since 1945 (3)
Survey and critical analysis of art from circa 1945 to the present. The course will cover directions in late Modernism and Post-modernism, including Abstract Expressionism, Pop Art, Minimalism, Feminist Art, Graffiti Art and Political Art. Only one version of A ARH 468 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 171 or permission of instructor.

A ARH 475 (= A WSS 475) Women in Art from the Renaissance to Impressionism (3)
Examines representations of women in European and North American art from the Renaissance through Impressionism. Special attention is given to works made by women, and to the problem of how women artists negotiated their position as both subjects and objects of artistic depiction. While women artists faced challenges to their authority on every level - material, theoretical, and ideological - the course explores the inventive ways they reconfigured, or even challenged, traditional expectations. Only one version of A ARH 475 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 171 and junior or senior class standing, or permission of instructor.

A ARH 476 (= A WSS 476) Women in Art from the New Woman to Now (3)
This course examines the ways in which women artists living within diverse historical and cultural contexts gained social agency through visual imagery and material construction. Beginning with the "New Woman" movement around the turn of the 20th century, it examines women's contribution to avant-garde movements in Europe and North America; the feminist art movement of the 1960s and 70s; "post-modern" feminist art which critiqued the very notion of social identity; and women artists' continuing efforts to enrich, question, and challenge the global art world of the 21st century. May not be taken by students with credit for A ARH/A WSS 475 prior to Fall 2014. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior status, 6 credits either in Art History or Women's Gender, and Sexuality Studies.

A ARH 490 Internship in Art History (3)
Supervised placement in an institution devoted to the collection, exhibition and/or conservation of works of art, such as the Albany Institute of History and Art or the State Conservation Laboratory. Provides practical experience in working with original works of art and includes research and writing projects. Art History majors may use 3 credits toward course requirements above the 300 level. May be repeated for credit, with permission of supervising instructor. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 170 and 171. S/U graded.

A ARH 491 Internship in Film Studies (3)
Internship in the study of film or in film production. Students are responsible for finding and securing the internship with an organization or individual, subject to approval by the director of the Film Studies minor. May be repeated for credit. Three credits may be applied to upper level coursework in the Film Studies minor or the Art History major. Prerequisite(s): open only to juniors or seniors with a Film Studies minor or with at least six credits of film studies coursework, and an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. S/U graded.

A ARH 497 Independent Study (1–4)
Directed studio project in a selected art area. May be repeated with approval of department chair. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor and department chair.

A ARH 498 Topics in Art History (3)
In-depth study of selected topics in art history not otherwise covered in the curriculum. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Prerequisite(s): A ARH 170 or A ARH 171 or permission of instructor.

A ARH 499Y Research Seminar in Art History (3)
Seminar focusing upon selected topics in art historical research. Students will study all aspects of research in art history, including the formulation of a topic; establishing the state of research on the topic; preparing an annotated bibliography and scholarly notes; and using library and web-based catalogues, databases, museum archives, image banks, and other research tools. The main focus of the coursework will be an individual research project. The course may be repeated for credit as the topic varies. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and Art History major or minor, or permission of instructor.

  

Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences

Faculty

Professors Emeriti
Ulrich Czapski, Ph.D.
Hamburg University
John W. Delano, Ph.D. (Distinguished Teaching Professor, Collins Fellow)
State University of New York at Stony Brook
Kenneth L. Demerjian, Ph.D. (Ray Falconer Endowed Chair)
Ohio State University
William S. F. Kidd, Ph.D.
Cambridge University 
Winthrop D. Means, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley
John E. Molinari, Ph.D.
Florida State University
Volker A. Mohnen, Ph.D.
University of Munich

Distinguished Professor
Lance F. Bosart, Ph.D.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Professors
Robert Fovell, Ph.D.
University of Illinois 
Everette Joseph, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Daniel Keyser, Ph.D.
Pennsylvania State University
Christopher Thorncroft, Ph.D. (Department Chair)
University of Reading 

Associate Professors Emeriti
George W. Putman, Ph.D.
Pennsylvania State University
Jon T. Scott, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin

Associate Professors
Aiguo Dai, Ph.D.
Columbia University
Vincent P. Idone, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Robert G. Keesee, Ph.D.
University of Colorado
Paul E. Roundy, Ph.D.
Pennsylvania State University
Ryan Torn, Ph.D.
University of Washington, Seattle
Mathias Vuille, Ph.D.
University of Bern, Switzerland
Liming Zhou, Ph.D.
Boston University

Assistant Professors
Kristen Corbosiero, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Andrea L. Lang, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Jiping Liu, Ph.D.
Columbia University
Justin R. Minder, Ph.D.
University of Washington, Seattle
Brian E. J. Rose, Ph.D.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Brian H. Tang, Ph.D.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Oliver Elison Timm, Ph.D.
University of Kiel

Associated Faculty
Craig R. Ferguson, Ph.D. *
Princeton University
David R. Fitzjarrald, Ph.D. *
University of Virginia
Jeffrey M. Freedman, Ph.D. *
University at Albany
Lee C. Harrison, Ph.D. *
University of Washington, Seattle
Roberta M. Johnson, Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles
David Knight, Ph.D.
University of Washington, Seattle
Stephen S. Howe, M.S.
Pennsylvania State University 
Michael G. Landin, M.S.
University at Albany
Ross A. Lazear, M.S.
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Cheng-Hsuan Lu, Ph.D. *
University at Albany
Qilong Min, Ph.D. *
University of Alaska, Fairbanks
Scott D. Miller, Ph.D. *
University of California, Irvine
Richard R. Perez, Ph.D. *
University at Albany
James J. Schwab, Ph.D. *
Harvard University
Kara Sulia, Ph.D. *
Penn State University
Christopher J. Walcek, Ph.D. *
University of California, Los Angeles
Kevin Tyle, M.S.
University at Albany
Junhong (June) Wang, Ph.D.
Columbia University 
Wei-Chyung Wang, D.E.S. *
Columbia University 
Fangqun Yu, Ph.D. *
University of California, Los Angeles

*Primary appointment with the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center as Research Professors.

Adjuncts (estimated): 2
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 15

The Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences offers two undergraduate degrees: a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Atmospheric Science and a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Interdisciplinary Studies with a faculty-initiated concentration in Environmental Science. Both degrees are recognized as particularly challenging and attract students of high caliber who are interested in studying the fundamental processes operating within the atmosphere and broader environment.

  

Program in Atmospheric Science

The Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences and the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center (ASRC) provide the University with the state’s largest program in atmospheric science and meteorology.

The undergraduate program provides a broad background in three fundamental areas of atmospheric science: synoptic (observations and weather forecasting), dynamic (theory and computer modeling), and physical (lightning, cloud physics, atmospheric chemistry). Because the department has a highly active research program in these areas, many opportunities exist for undergraduate research projects and part-time jobs.

The first two years of the program provide basic training in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and introductory atmospheric science. All students are encouraged to take one or two 100-level courses for enjoyment and experience (these count as electives but not as courses for the major). In the junior and senior years, requirements in the fundamental areas of atmospheric science are combined with electives, including advanced courses on atmospheric physics, atmospheric dynamics, weather forecasting, tropical meteorology and hurricanes, solar energy, air pollution, climatology, and computer applications.

Many opportunities exist for students to become involved in department activities. Each semester, numerous students take part in an internship program with the on-campus office of the National Weather Service (NWS), gaining experience with weather forecasting and familiarity with the responsibilities of a NWS meteorologist.

In addition, a weather forecasting competition is held in the department each semester while classes are in session. The forecasting contest, along with concurrent weather discussions led by a faculty member, are open to all undergraduate majors. Undergraduates hired part-time and during the summer through research grants have the chance to work closely with a faculty member while contributing to current meteorological research. The Eastern New York Chapter of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) meets regularly and provides speakers of general interest on a variety of meteorological topics. Through these and other activities, the department offers exciting and varied opportunities to any student curious about the science of the atmosphere around us.

Careers
Graduates obtain employment in weather forecasting, environmental engineering, TV broadcasting, scientific consulting, and other private firms; in university departments and research laboratories; and in federal and state agencies such as the National Weather Service, U.S. Air Force, and NY State Department of Environmental Conservation. Graduate school and the pursuit of an advanced degree is an expected option for our graduates. (The department offers full financial support and a complete tuition waiver to most students accepted into our graduate program.)

Degree Requirements for the Major in Atmospheric Science

General Program B.S.: A minimum of 70 credits for the combined major and minor including: A ATM 209, 210, 211, 315, 316, 317, 320, 321, 350, 418, 419; at least 12 additional credits from A ATM 301 and higher level courses (excluding A ATM 304) and including one of A ATM 311 and 405; A CHM 120 or 130 or T CHM 130; A MAT 111 or 112 or 118 or T MAT 118; A MAT 113 or 119 or T MAT 119; A MAT 214, 311; A PHY 140 or 141 or T PHY 141; A PHY 145; A PHY 150 or 151 or T PHY 151. No more than 6 credits from A ATM 490, 497, 498, or 499 may be applied toward the major requirements; further, a maximum of 3 credits from A ATM 490 will apply.

A solid foundation in physics and mathematics is recommended for all students planning to major in atmospheric science. It is recommended that all students considering this major meet with a representative of the department before each of the freshman and sophomore registration sessions.

Departmental Honors Program

Students who have by the end of their fourth semester attained a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 and a grade point average of at least 3.50 in courses required of the major in atmospheric science may apply to the department chair for the program leading to a B.S. degree with honors in atmospheric science. Applications must be submitted before the end of the first semester of the student’s junior year and must be accompanied by letters of recommendation from at least two faculty members.

To be admitted to the program, a student must have completed two semesters of physics (A PHY 140 or 141 or T PHY 141, A PHY 145, A PHY 150 or 151 or T PHY 151), three semesters of mathematics (A MAT 111 or 112 or 118 or T MAT 118, A MAT 113 or 119 or T MAT 119, A MAT 214), and must be enrolled in or have completed A ATM 316. These requirements may be altered, upon request, for qualified transfer students. At the end of the junior year, the student’s program will be reviewed by the Honors Committee to see if satisfactory progress is being made.

To be eligible for a degree with honors, students must complete a minimum of 82 credits specified as follows: (1) the general program B.S.; (2) any two additional A ATM courses from 301 or higher, excluding A ATM 304; and (3) 6 credits of A ATM 499 taken over at least two semesters culminating in a significant undergraduate thesis and an honors seminar in the student’s final semester. No more than 9 credits from A ATM 490, 497, 498 or 499 may be applied to the major requirements; a maximum of 3 credits from A ATM 490 will apply. One of A ATM 306, 405, 415, or A ENV 450 must be included within the entire set of electives. Students in the program must maintain both a minimum grade point average of 3.25 overall and 3.50 in the major coursework during the junior and senior years.

Upon completion of the requirements, the honors committee will make its recommendation to the faculty to grant the degree with honors in atmospheric science based upon the candidate’s (1) academic record, (2) research project report, (3) honors seminar, and (4) faculty recommendations.

Combined B.S./M.S. Program

The combined B.S./M.S. program in atmospheric science provides an opportunity for students of recognized academic ability and educational maturity to fulfill simultaneously undergraduate and graduate course requirements in their senior year, thereby accelerating progress toward the M.S. degree. A carefully designed program can permit a student to complete the B.S. and M.S. degrees one year sooner than is otherwise possible.

The combined program requires a minimum of 138 credits, of which at least 30 must be graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.S., students must meet all University and college requirements, including the requirements of the undergraduate major described previously, the minimum 60-credit liberal arts and sciences requirement, the general education requirements, and residency requirements. In qualifying for the M.S., students must meet all University and college requirements as outlined in the Graduate Bulletin, including completion of a minimum of 30 graduate credits and any other conditions such as a research seminar, thesis, comprehensive examination, professional experience, and residency requirements. Up to 9 graduate credits may be applied simultaneously to both the B.S. and M.S. programs.

In the summer following the senior year, the student will begin work on his or her graduate research. In preparation for this accelerated research program, the student will be required to take two semesters (6 credits) of A ATM 499, Undergraduate Research, during the junior or senior year. These 6 credits may be counted toward the undergraduate elective requirement from either of the following requirements: (1) from any four additional A ATM courses at the 400 or 500 level as advised or (2) from 6 additional credits in mathematics or sciences as advised.

Students may apply for admission to the combined degree program in atmospheric science at the beginning of their junior year or after the successful completion of 56 credits. A cumulative grade point average of 3.25 or higher and three supportive letters of recommendation from faculty are required for consideration.

  

Program in Environmental Science

Careers
Graduates in the major in Interdisciplinary Studies with a faculty-initiated concentration in Environmental Science will be well qualified for a broad range of positions within the highly interdisciplinary field of environmental science. Consulting firms, industry, federal and state government agencies all require employees with this type of training. The demand for individuals with such a degree is anticipated to remain strong as our society attempts to cope with and address myriad environmental impacts that are occurring on local, regional, national and global scales. Additionally, graduates with this degree are well prepared to consider advanced degrees in the sciences, or other fields such as business administration (M.B.A.) or law (J.D.). 

Degree Requirements: Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies with a faculty-initiated concentration in Environmental Science

General Program B.S.: A minimum of 70-71 credits (depending upon the specialization selected) for the combined major and minor including: A ATM 210, A ATM/A ENV 315, 327, A BIO 120, 121, 201, 202, 330, A CHM 120 or 130 or T CHM 130, A CHM 121 or 131 or T CHM 131, A CHM 124, 125, A ENV 105, 106, 302, 490, A GEO 221, A MAT 111 or 112 or 118 or T MAT 118, A PHY 140 or 141 or T PHY 141; the completion of one of four specializations totaling 21-22 credits.

At the time of major declaration, each student must select one of four specializations: Climate Change, Ecosystems, Geography, or Sustainability Science and Policy. No course may satisfy requirements simultaneously in both the core curriculum (above) and any specialization.

Ecosystems Specialization: 22 credits overall. Required courses (10 credits): A BIO 212, 327, 401. Elective courses (12 credits): A ANT 418, 419, A ATM 301, A BIO 308, 311, 321, 329, 343, 402, 427, A ENV 250, 496, A GOG 496/A USP 456, R POS 266, R PAD 366, H SPH 321, H SPH/H EHS 323, H SPH 332. A maximum of 6 credits may be taken from R PAD 366, R POS 266, H SPH 321.

Climate Change Specialization: 21 credits overall. Required courses (12 credits): A ATM 306, 405, A ENV 415, 450. Elective courses (9 credits): A ATM 301, 304, 307, 335, 413, 414, A ENV 496, A MAT 113, R PAD 366, R POS 266, 399, H SPH 321. A maximum of 6 credits may be taken from R PAD 366, R POS 266, 399, H SPH 321.

Geography Specialization: 22 credits overall. Required courses (10 credits): A GOG/A USP 220, A GOG 290, A GOG 496/A USP 456. Elective courses (12 credits): at least 6 credits from A GOG 304, A GOG/A USP 330, A GOG 344, A GOG/A LCS 354, A GOG/A USP 375, A GOG 414, A GOG/A USP 430, 460, A GOG 484, 485; A ATM 301, 405, A ENV/A GEO 250, A ENV 496. (Selecting A GOG 414, 484, and 485 as electives completes the GIS Certificate.)

Sustainability Science and Policy Specialization: 21 credits overall. Required courses (9 credits): A ATM 304, A ENV/A GEO 250, R POS 399. Elective courses (12 credits): A ANT 418, A ATM 405, 413, A BIO 311, A ENV 496, A GOG/A USP 220, A GOG 344, A GOG/A USP 430, 460, A GOG 496 or A USP 456, R PAD 366, R POS 266, H SPH 321, H SPH/H EHS 323, H SPH 332.

Departmental Honors Program

Students who have by the end of their fourth semester attained a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 and a grade point average of at least 3.50 in courses required of the major in environmental science may apply to the department chair for the program leading to a B.S. degree with honors in environmental science. Applications must be submitted before the end of the first semester of the student’s junior year and must be accompanied by letters of recommendation from at least two faculty members.

To be admitted to the program, a student must have completed A ATM 210, A BIO 120, A CHM 120 or 130 or T CHM 130, A CHM 121 or 131 or T CHM 131, A GEO 221, A PHY 140 or 141 or T PHY 141, and A MAT 111 or 112 or 118 or T MAT 118. These requirements may be altered, upon request, for qualified transfer students. At the end of the junior year, the student’s program will be reviewed by the Honors Committee to see if satisfactory progress is being made.

To be eligible for a degree with honors, students must complete a minimum of 83-84 credits specified as follows: (1) the general program B.S. with one of four specializations; (2) A MAT 113 or 119 or T MAT 119 and an additional elective in the selected specialization at the 300-level or higher; and (3) 6 credits of A ENV 498 taken over at least two semesters culminating in a significant undergraduate thesis and an honors seminar in the student’s final semester. Students in the program must maintain both a minimum grade point average of 3.25 overall and 3.50 in the major coursework during the junior and senior years.

Upon completion of the requirements, the honors committee will make its recommendation to the faculty to grant the degree with honors in environmental science based upon the candidate’s (1) academic record, (2) research project report, (3) honors seminar, and (4) faculty recommendations.

  

Courses in Atmospheric Science

A ATM 100 The Atmosphere (3)
Non-technical survey of the atmosphere; the physical environment of society and its historical development; intentional and unintentional modifications of the environment; cloud types and structure; severe storms; weather forecasting; air pollution; major wind and weather systems. Does not yield credit toward the B.S. in atmospheric science. Three lectures per week.

A ATM 101 The Upper Atmosphere (3)
Elementary survey of the properties and geophysical phenomena of the upper atmosphere; ionosphere, magnetosphere, and interplanetary space, ionospheric and magnetic storms; aurora and airglow; observational techniques including rockets and satellites. Does not yield credit toward the B.S. in atmospheric science. Three lectures per week. Offered fall semester only. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ATM 102 Science and Major Environmental Issues (3)
Study of the role of science in creating, defining, evaluating, and resolving major issues relating to energy production and its use and impact on the physical environments; case studies of such issues as change in climate, air pollution, the fluorocarbon/ozone link, etc. Three lectures per week. Does not yield credit toward the B.S. in atmospheric science. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ATM 103 Introduction to Climate Change (3)
An introduction to the current scientific understanding of Earth's climate, climate change and climate variability; factors that determine climate, climate in the past, and Earth system connections; exposition of scientific observation, theory, and modelling that are used to make scientific predictions of climate outcomes and potential societal choices; examination of climate change impacts at local, regional, and global scales including environmental, societal and economic impacts; consideration of different approaches to deal with climate change, including mitigation and adaptation. Does not yield credit toward the B.S. in atmospheric science.

A ATM 107 The Oceans (3)
Introductory survey of the physical, chemical, geological, and biological processes in the marine environment; promise and problems of the oceans as a natural resource. Does not yield credit toward the B.S. in atmospheric science. Three lectures each week. Offered fall semester only.

T ATM 110 Weather and Climate Issues for the 21st Century (3)
You can't avoid it; everyone experiences the weather and climate in their daily lives! This course will examine the physics that explains weather and climate variability as well as climate change. Topics of discussion will include the nature of weather systems (e.g., fronts and cyclones, hurricanes, tornadoes and thunderstorms, lightning, rain processes, etc.), observations and theory of climate variability and change (including introduction to the climate system, water and energy cycles, the greenhouse effect and anthropogenic climate change) as well as key environmental issues (e.g., pollution, ozone hole, etc.). The science will inform classroom discussions and projects focused on 21st century issues related to weather and climate. Open to Honors College students only.

A ATM 199 Contemporary Issues in Atmospheric Science (1)
Issues from the current literature in selected areas of atmospheric science. Particular areas of study to be announced each term. Intended for students interested in exploring in depth themes covered in large lecture courses. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. S/U graded. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ATM 200 Natural Disasters (3)
Disasters due to natural phenomena such as climate change, hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, tsunami, volcanic eruptions, asteroid/comet impacts, and mass extinctions are examined from an environmental perspective; each type of event will be characterized in terms of its origin, evolution, warning potential, range of significant environmental impacts and possible mitigation strategies; historical case studies will be analyzed; additional student selected topics may include ice storms, blizzards, landslides, avalanches, floods, drought, fire, heat and cold waves. Does not yield credit toward the B.S. in atmospheric science. Three lectures per week.

A ATM 209 Weather Workshop (1)
Applications in weather analysis, including meteorological data decoding (METAR and RAOB), thermodynamic diagrams, cloud types, precipitation and visibility obscurations, and an introduction to meteorological instrumentation. Corequisite(s): A ATM 210. Offered fall semester only.

A ATM 210/210Z Atmospheric Structure, Thermodynamics, and Circulation (3)
Technical survey of the atmosphere with application of elementary physical and mathematical concepts to the horizontal and vertical structure of the atmosphere; planetary, regional and local circulations; weather systems; atmospheric radiation; precipitation physics and thermodynamics. Prerequisite(s): A MAT 111 or A MAT 112 or A MAT 118; A PHY 140 or A PHY 141. A ATM 210Z is writing intensive version of A ATM 210; only one may be taken for credit.

A ATM 211 Weather Analysis and Forecasting (4)
An introduction to the use and interpretation of observed weather data, satellite and radar imagery, and atmospheric soundings; horizontal atmospheric forces and force balances; air masses and fronts; extratropical cyclone development and structure; mid-latitude flow properties; temperature and precipitation forecasting. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 209, 210, or permission of instructor. S/U grading prohibited. Offered spring semester only.

A ATM 297 Independent Study I (1-3)
By advisement only and may be repeated once for credit. S/U graded. Offered fall or spring semesters.

A ATM 300Z Solar Energy (3)
Discussion of solar energy technology, including solar energy measurement and distribution; direct use of the sun’s energy; solar architecture; energy from wind, tides, waves, currents, and salinity gradients; biomass and geothermal energy; energy use, conservation, and other major environmental issues. Prerequisite(s): 6 credits in mathematics including one course in calculus; A PHY 108 or 150 or 151 or T PHY 151; junior or senior standing. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ATM 301 Surface Hydrology and Hydrometeorology (3)
A survey of the water cycle and its interactions with the earth and atmosphere, including the processes of precipitation, evaporation, and stream flow. Water resources and policy issues incorporated where applicable. Not open to students with credit in A ATM 408. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 210. Will next be offered fall 2017.

A ATM 304/304Z Air Quality and Air Pollution Policy (3)
Designed for undergraduate students not pursuing the B.S. in Atmospheric Science. This course deals with scientific, policy, and regulatory issues associated with air quality for the ambient (outdoor) environment and indoor environments. Topics include pollutant sources, transport, transformation and deposition, environmental and human health consequences, air quality and emission standards, basic air pollution monitoring and abatement methods, and legislation and policies in historical perspective. Does not yield upper level credit for the Atmospheric Science degree. Only one version of A ATM 304 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 210; A MAT 111 or A MAT 112 or T MAT 118; A PHY 140 or T PHY 141. Will next be offered fall 2017.

A ATM 305 Global Physical Climatology (3)
The physical basis of climate and climate variability from a coupled atmosphere-ocean perspective. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the causes of regional climate differences and regional climate variability and the role that the global atmosphere and oceans play in the process. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 211. Corequisite(s): A ATM 315, A ATM 316 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ATM 306 Climate Variability and Change (3)
This course will be organized in two parts. Part I will cover seasonal to multi-decadal natural variability of the global climate system; the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO); monsoons, droughts and their causes; variability of high impact weather such as hurricanes; the fundamental physics of the coupled atmosphere-land-ocean system and our ability to predict it. Part II will cover anthropogenic climate change, including an objective assessment of observed trends in the past century and the anthropogenic contribution; theory of climate change linked to increased greenhouse gases; climate change predictions and the IPCC process. Prerequisite(s): A MAT 111 or A MAT 112 or T MAT 118; A ATM 210. Corequisite(s): A ATM 315 or permission of instructor. Offered fall semester only.

A ATM 307/307Z (= A CHM 307/307Z) Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry (3)
Chemical principles and concepts leading to understanding the composition and change in the chemical/atmospheric environment; sources and links of chemical constituents; chemistry of the troposphere and stratosphere; measurement and theory of greenhouse gases; global pollution and ozone depletion. Only one version of A ATM 307 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A MAT 111 or 112 or 118 or T MAT 118; A PHY 105 or 140 or 141 or T PHY 141; A CHM 121 or 131 or T CHM 131. Offered alternate fall semesters.

A ATM 311 Severe and Hazardous Weather and Forecasting (4)
Continuation of ATM 211. Analysis and forecasting of various types and scales of severe weather, including tropical cyclones, thunderstorms and thunderstorm complexes, tornadoes, hail, lightning, lake-effect precipitation, blizzards, and ice storms. Once per week, students lead current and forecast weather discussions. Prerequisites: A ATM 211. Offered fall semester only.

A ATM 315 (= A ENV 315) Environmental Statistics and Computation (4)
This course builds an understanding of natural systems through an introduction to statistical and computational methods used to analyze atmospheric and environmental data. Key goals of the course are to become proficient at drawing conclusions about the behaviors of natural systems using common visualizing methods and statistically analyzing data from observations and dynamical models in a variety of Earth-systems applications. Includes a concise but comprehensive introduction to computation and programming methods suited for students with no background in computer coding via the general-purpose programming language Python. Only one version of A ATM/A ENV 315 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 210, A MAT 111 or 112 or T MAT 118; A MAT 220 recommended.

A ATM 316 Dynamic Meteorology I (3)
Equations and concepts that provide the basis for describing and understanding atmospheric motion systems on planetary and synoptic scales; review of mathematical concepts and tools; kinematics of horizontal flows; fundamental and apparent forces; basic conservation laws; elementary applications of the equations of motion. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 211, A PHY 150 or 151 or T PHY151, A MAT 214. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A MAT 311. Offered fall semester only.

A ATM 317 Dynamic Meteorology II (3)
Application of the governing equations to describe and understand synoptic to planetary scale phenomena, including vertical motion, jet streaks, and the frontal cyclone; introduction to the concepts of vorticity and potential vorticity. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 316. Offered spring semester only.

A ATM 320 Atmospheric Thermodynamics (3)
Equation of state; principles of thermodynamics; water vapor and moist air thermodynamics; changes of phase and latent heat; hydrostatic equilibrium; atmospheric convection; thermodynamic diagrams; atmospheric stability and severe weather events. Corequisite(s): A ATM 316. Offered fall semester only.

A ATM 321Y (formerly A ATM 425Y) Physical Meteorology (4)
Atmospheric physics, including radiation, optics, and visibility; atmospheric electricity; cloud and aerosol physics; acoustics; upper atmospheric processes; radar meteorology. Three lectures and one lab discussion per week. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 320. Offered spring semester only.

A ATM 327 (= A ENV 327) Meteorological and Environmental Measurement (3)
Basic exposition of principles involved in the measurement of primary meteorological and environmental parameters. Topics to be covered include measurement uncertainty and the propagation of errors. Instruments for measuring temperature, pressure, humidity, wind field, solar and terrestrial radiation, precipitation, atmospheric aerosols, soil moisture, water quality, and data logging will be examined. Two lectures and one laboratory or demonstration per week. Only one version of A ENV 327 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 210; A MAT 111 or 112 or T MAT 118; A PHY 140 or 141 or T PHY 141.

A ATM 335 Meteorological Remote Sensing (3)
Satellite remote sensing from UV to microwave including the principles of atmospheric radiative transfer, descriptions of important satellite orbits and sensors, the retrieval of atmospheric variables from active and passive systems, and basic principles of interpretation. Prerequisite(s): A MAT 111 or 112 or 118 and A ATM 210. Offered alternate spring semesters. Will next be offered Spring 2018.

A ATM 350 Meteorological Data Analysis and Visualization (2)
An introduction to the UNIX and Linux operating systems; use of the General Meteorological Package (GEMPAK) to display meteorological information and perform diagnostic calculations; basics and utility of shell scripting; types of meteorological observational datasets and model output grid files. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 211, 316. Offered spring semester only.

A ATM 400 Synoptic Meteorology I (3)
Investigation of multi-scale weather phenomena through application of fundamental thermodynamic and dynamic principles; exploration of the connections between observational and theoretical descriptions of atmospheric motions; use of operational weather prediction models and products for weather forecasting; scientific issues in weather forecasting. Two joint lecture-laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 311, 317, 350. Offered fall semester only.

A ATM 401 Synoptic Meteorology II (3)
Application of advanced fundamental thermodynamic and dynamic concepts to the investigation of multi-scale weather phenomena; exploitation of ensemble and probabilistic forecasting techniques and remote sensing radar and satellite technologies in weather analysis and forecasting; application of fundamental synoptic and mesoscale concepts to a real-time severe weather and heavy precipitation forecasting exercise. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 400, 418. Offered spring semester only.

A ATM 404 Oceans and Climate (3)
The oceans exert an important influence on the Earth's climate, acting as the pacemaker of climate variability and change. This course will provide an introduction to the physical characteristics, dynamics, and feedbacks of ocean water and sea ice that contribute to the formation of ocean circulation, the transport of heat and freshwater, and the regulation of climate; review of climate changes in ocean and sea ice and their impacts through a synthesis of ocean and sea ice observations and modeling. The format of the class will be primarily lectures, but will also involve short presentations by students. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 210 and A MAT 113. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ATM 405 Water and Climate Change (3)
Water is essential for human society and the environment. Global warming and climate change are expected to impact our water supply and the water balance of the natural ecosystem. Potential water shortages due to population growth and climate change are a world-wide environmental issue. Starting with an introduction to the global water cycle and Earth's climate, this course aims to provide students with in-depth understanding of the key roles of water in Earth's climate and how climate change may affect the global water cycle and the freshwater resources. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 210 and A MAT 111 or A MAT 112 or T MAT 118. Offered alternate fall semesters only. Will next be offered Fall 2018.     

A ATM 408 Hydrometeorology (3)
The physical processes governing the continental hydrologic cycle such as water vapor transport, runoff, evapotranspiration, streamflow, sub-surface recharge; land/atmosphere interaction; spatial/temporal variability of hydrologic parameters. Prerequisite(s): A MAT 311. Corequisite(s): A ATM 320. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ATM 409 Atmospheric Precipitation Processes (3)
Fundamentals of atmospheric precipitation processes; atmospheric moisture budget; convective and stratiform precipitation; application of satellite and radar imagery to precipitation analysis and forecasting; mesoscale convective systems; mesoscale precipitation structure in cyclones; flash flood forecasting; quantitative precipitation forecasting exercise. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 316, 320; A MAT 311.

A ATM 413 Weather, Climate Change, and Societal Impacts (3)
Survey of the many ways high impact weather and climate change affect human society. Each topic will cover the science behind different weather or climate phenomena and also explore the economic and/or social ramifications of these phenomena. Possible topics include severe thunderstorms, hurricanes, winter storms, solar flares, anthropogenic climate change, sea level rise, and droughts/floods. Possible ramifications of these topics on society include socioeconomic losses, risk perception, transportation disruption, human history, energy usage/markets, and climate policy. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 210; A ATM 211 or A ENV 250; A MAT 111 or A MAT 112 or T MAT 118. Offered spring semester only.

A ATM 414 Air Pollution Meteorology (3)
Analysis of physical, meteorological, and chemical processes influencing the life-cycle of harmful gaseous and particulate air pollutants. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 210, or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ATM 415 (= A ENV 415) Climate Laboratory (3)
A hands-on course in climate modeling; students will gain an appreciation for what climate models are, their limitations, and how they can be used to study natural phenomena. Topics include the physical laws governing climate and climate change, the hierarchy of model complexity, parameterization versus simulation, using models for prediction versus understanding, application of simple climate models to past and future climates on Earth (including radically different climates of the past such as Snowball Earth), accessing and analyzing results from IPCC models. Students will gain significant computer experience making calculations, analyzing results, and interpreting their significance. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 210, A ATM 315 or A ENV 315 or permission of instructor for students with computer programming experience; A MAT 111 or 112 or T MAT 118. Offered alternate spring semesters. Will next be offered Spring 2018.

A ATM 418 Dynamic Meteorology III (3)
Application of the governing equations to describe and understand mesoscale phenomenon, including flow over topography, organized convection and severe weather, and the atmospheric boundary layer; mathematics and description of the components of numerical weather prediction models. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 317, 320. Offered fall semester only.

A ATM 419 Applications of Numerical Weather Prediction (3)
This is a hands-on course in numerical weather prediction (NWP), with an emphasis on simulating mesoscale weather systems (including thunderstorms, windstorms, and sea/land breezes), model validation, sensitivity (to initialization, resolution and other numerical aspects, and model physics), and how model physical parameterizations work. The principal tool will be the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The overarching goal is to understand how NWP models like WRF work, what their strengths and limitations are, and how and why they may fail. Each student is responsible for producing a final capstone project that utilizes their knowledge and understanding of this class and its direct and indirect prerequisites. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 418. Offered spring semester only.

A ATM 421 Tropical Meteorology (3)
An introduction to the behavior, dynamics, and thermodynamics of the tropical atmosphere, with an emphasis on the interactions between convection and dynamics; tropical energy and moisture balance; tropical convection; monsoons; equatorial waves; the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO); tropical cyclogenesis; tropical cyclone structure and intensity change. Prerequisites: A ATM 316 and 320. Offered alternate spring semesters. Will next be offered Spring 2017.  

A ATM 424 Fundamentals of Atmospheric Electricity (3)
An introduction to the basic electrical processes operating in the atmosphere; fair weather electricity and the global circuit; electrical  properties of clouds and thunderstorms; thunderstorm electrification; the lightning flash; observation and measurement techniques. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 321. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ATM 430 Solar Radiation and Applications (3)
Definition of solar and terrestrial radiation components; basic celestial geometry; introduction to the measurement of solar radiation; principles of solar radiation transfer through the Earth’s atmosphere; study of the interrelationship between solar radiation components; applied solar radiation examples. Prerequisite(s): A MAT 113 or 119 or T MAT 119; A PHY 150 or 151 or T PHY 151. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ATM 450 Computer Applications in Atmospheric Science (3)
Computer programming and numerical methods for solving atmospheric science problems; data handling and storage; examination of currently used programs in atmospheric science research; iterative methods; numerical weather prediction. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 316, 350. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A ATM 480 Special Topics in Atmospheric Science (1-4)
In-depth analysis of a special topic in atmospheric science. May be repeated if topic changes. Corequisite(s): A ATM 316, and permission of instructor.

A ATM 490 Internship in Atmospheric Science (1-3)
Research or operational experience in atmospheric-related activities with local governmental agencies or private industry. No more than 3 credits for A ATM 490 may be applied toward major requirements in atmospheric science. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing in atmospheric science. S/U graded.

A ATM 497 Independent Study II (1-3)
May be repeated once for credit. No more than 6 credits from A ATM 490, 497, 498, and 499 may be applied toward major requirements in atmospheric science. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, and by advisement only. Offered fall or spring semesters.

A ATM 498 Computer Applications in Meteorological Research (3)
Directed individual study of a particular problem in atmospheric science that requires use of the University Computing Center and/or departmental computers. May be repeated once for credit. No more than 6 credits from A ATM 490, 497, 498, and 499 may be applied toward major requirements in atmospheric science. Prerequisite(s): I CSI 201 or permission of instructor. S/U graded.

A ATM 499 Undergraduate Research (3)
Guided research leading to a senior thesis. Oral presentation of results required. May be repeated for credit. No more than 6 credits from A ATM 490, 497, 498, and 499 may be applied toward major requirements in atmospheric science. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, and permission of department chair. S/U graded.

  

Courses in Environmental Science

A ENV 105 (= A GEO 105) Introduction to Environmental Science (3)
Survey of contemporary environmental issues related to health and disease, nuclear waste disposal, water resources, energy use and conservation, land reclamation, global climate change, and industrial pollution. Scientific principles and data needed for gaining an understanding of environmental challenges on local, regional, and global scales will be emphasized. Three lectures per week. Only one version of A ENV 105 may be taken for credit. Offered spring semester only.

A ENV 106 Introduction to Environmental Science Laboratory (1)
This course is a lab that supplements A ENV 105 - Introduction to Environmental Science, and is available for Environmental Science majors only. The course, which is designed to be taken concurrently with A ENV 105, provides students an opportunity to investigate concepts covered in A ENV 105 in greater depth. Topics addressed will include ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles, environmental history, population dynamics, biodiversity, water resources, land use and pollution, global climate change, energy use and conservation, and environmental health and toxicology. Corequisite: A ENV 105. Open only to Environmental Science majors. Offered spring semester only.

A ENV 201 (= A GEO 201 & A GOG 201) Environmental Analysis (3)
Uses laboratory work and local field excursions to give students “hands-on” experience in physical geography and environmental sciences. Focuses on human impacts on the environment and on problems of environmental contamination. Only one version of A ENV 201 may be taken for credit. Offered fall semester only.

A ENV 250 Sustainable Development: Energy and Resources (3)
Examination of energy production using non-renewable (coal, oil, natural gas, uranium) versus renewable resources (hydroelectric, solar, wind, geothermal) relative to present and future environmental and societal impacts. A transition to a more sustainable renewable energy infrastructure presents challenges and opportunities that will be examined in this course. In addition to the traditional energy resources, the course covers the sustainability of other mineral resources that may be important in this transition. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 120 or A CHM 130 or T CHM 130; A MAT 111 or A MAT 112 or T MAT 118; A PHY 140 or T PHY 141.

A ENV 302 Ocean Science (3)
An introduction to ocean science, and the role of the oceans in physical, climatic, chemical, and biological aspects of the Earth system. Description of the properties, dynamics, thermodynamics, and processes of oceans that contribute to the formation of ocean circulations, eddies and waves, the transport of heat and freshwater, and the regulation of weather, climate and marine ecosystems. Topics include interdisciplinary aspects of the oceans, such as El Nino, global warming, the carbon cycle, and energy. Primarily lecture format, but short presentations by students are required. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 210; A CHM 120 or 130 or T 130; A MAT 111 or 112 or 118; A PHY 140 or T PHY 141. Offered fall semester only.

A ENV 315 (= A ATM 315) Environmental Statistics and Computation (4)
This course builds an understanding of natural systems through an introduction to statistical and computational methods used to analyze atmospheric and environmental data. Key goals of the course are to become proficient at drawing conclusions about the behaviors of natural systems using common visualizing methods and statistically analyzing data from observations and dynamical models in a variety of Earth-systems applications. Includes a concise but comprehensive introduction to computation and programming methods suited for students with no background in computer coding via the general-purpose programming language Python. Only one version of A ATM/A ENV 315 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 210, A MAT 111 or 112 or T MAT 118; A MAT 220 recommended.

A ENV 327 (= A ATM 327) Meteorological and Environmental Measurement (3)
Basic exposition of principles involved in the measurement of primary meteorological and environmental parameters. Topics to be covered include measurement uncertainty and the propagation of errors. Instruments for measuring temperature, pressure, humidity, wind field, solar and terrestrial radiation, precipitation, atmospheric aerosols, soil moisture, water quality, and data logging will be examined. Two lectures and one laboratory or demonstration per week. Only one version of A ENV 327 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 210; A MAT 111 or 112 or T MAT 118; A PHY 140 or 141 or T PHY 141.

A ENV 350Y (= A GEO 350Y) Environmental Geochemistry (4)
Contemporary topics are used to develop concepts of geochemical processes operating in Earth’s environmental system. These topics (a) PCBs in the Upper Hudson River, (b) biogeochemical cycles in the global climate system, and (c) geochemical constraints on long-term disposal of high-level, nuclear wastes. 3 hours per week in classroom setting +1 hour per week of oral presentations by students. Only one version of A ENV 350Y may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ENV 250. May not be offered in 2016-2017. 

A ENV 365 Environmental Science Fieldwork Experience (1)
Students will participate in "hands on" fieldwork at one of the department's local environmental science partners (Albany Pine Bush Preserve, the Huyck Preserve and Biological Research Station, the Hollyhock Hollow Sanctuary of Audubon International, or others), depending upon availability. A minimum of 15 hours will be spent in the field carrying out directed activities under supervision of the host institution's staff. Most fieldwork activity will originate from ongoing projects at the host entity, but student initiated projects can be proposed. These should be submitted in consultation with the department course coordinators. The specific nature of the fieldwork undertaken by the student is at the discretion of the host institution. A written final report and oral presentation is required that should summarize the overall fieldwork experience, and, if relevant, the measurements, observations, analysis, and significance of the work. Students are also required to spend time working with department faculty members on developing presentation skills; dates and times for the fieldwork and presentation practice will be arranged on an individual basis. May not be repeated for credit and open only to environmental science majors. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 330; corequisite(s): A ATM/A ENV 315 or 327. S/U graded. Offered each spring, summer, and fall.

A ENV 395Z (= A GEO 395Z) Writing in Environmental or Geological Science (1)
May be taken with any A ENV course at the 300 or 400 level to fulfill a writing intensive version of that course. Students will have an opportunity for assistance during writing and revision of written material with the help of editorial assignments from the instructor. Only one version of A ENV 395Z may be taken for credit. Corequisite(s): any A ENV or A GEO course at the 300 or 400 level. Offered fall and spring semesters.

A ENV 415 (= A ATM 415) Climate Laboratory (3)
A hands-on course in climate modeling; students will gain an appreciation for what climate models are, their limitations, and how they can be used to study natural phenomena. Topics include the physical laws governing climate and climate change, the hierarchy of model complexity, parameterization versus simulation, using models for prediction versus understanding, application of simple climate models to past and future climates on Earth (including radically different climates of the past such as Snowball Earth), accessing and analyzing results from IPCC models. Students will gain significant computer experience making calculations, analyzing results, and interpreting their significance. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 210, A ATM 315 or A ENV 315 or permission of instructor for students with computer programming experience; A MAT 111 or 112 or T MAT 118. Offered alternate spring semesters, will next be offered spring 2018.

A ENV 450 Paleoclimatology (3)
Introduction to the field of Paleoclimatology. Focus will be on the use of sediments and other biological and geological archives to reconstruct environmental, climatic, and oceanographic change over a range of time scales. Lecture will also provide an introduction to the fields of climatology, age dating techniques, climatic environmental proxies (tracers), micropaleontology, and time-series analysis. In addition to lectures, the class will involve review of current scientific studies, class presentations by each student, and a review paper on a relevant topic of choice. Three lectures each week and 2 hours each week of oral presentations by students. Only one version of A ENV 450 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 315 or A ENV 315; A CHM 120 or A CHM 130 or T CHM 130; A MAT 111 or A MAT 112 or T MAT 118. Offered alternate fall semesters. Will next be offered fall 2017.

A ENV 455 (= A GEO 455) Special Topics in Environmental or Geological Science (2-3)
A structured program of reading and seminars leading to an in-depth understanding of a chosen topic in environmental or geological science. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 210, A GEO 221, and permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ENV 480 Special Topics in Environmental Science (1-4)
In-depth analysis of a special topic in environmental science. May be repeated if topic changes. Prerequisite: A ATM 210, and permission of instructor.

A ENV 490 Major Topics in Environmental Science (3)
A required course for environmental science majors in their senior year that brings together students from all four concentrations (Ecosystems, Geography, Climate Change, and Sustainability Science and Policy) to address major topics in environmental science. Formal presentations by faculty, students, and invited speakers will promote discussion and debate from multi-disciplinary perspectives. Prerequisite(s): A ENV/A GEO/A GOG 201, A ENV 250, A ATM 210, A BIO 120, A GEO 221, or permission of instructor. Offered spring semester only.

A ENV 496 Environmental Internships (1-3)
Provides students with practical work experience in environmental science through placements with federal, state, or local government agencies, or private firms. The supervisor’s reference, a mid-internship and a final report are required. Internships are open to qualified juniors and seniors with a GPA of at least 2.50 overall and in the Environmental Science major. A maximum of 3 credits may be applied toward the major. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of department internship coordinator. S/U graded.

A ENV 497 (= A GEO 497) Independent Study (1-3)
Field or laboratory investigation of a chosen environmental or geological problem, including the writing of a research report to be undertaken during the senior year. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. Offered fall or spring semesters.

A ENV 498 Undergraduate Honors Research (3)
Guided research leading to a written thesis. Oral presentation of results required. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of department chair. Offered fall or spring semesters. S/U graded.       

  

Courses in Geological Sciences

A GEO 105 (= A ENV 105) Introduction to Environmental Science (3)
Survey of contemporary environmental issues related to health and disease, nuclear waste disposal, water resources, energy use and conservation, land reclamation, global climate change, and industrial pollution. Scientific principles and data needed for gaining an understanding of environmental challenges on local, regional, and global scales will be emphasized. Three lectures per week. Only one version of A GEO 105 may be taken for credit. Offered spring semester only.

A GEO 110 The Search for Life Beyond Earth (3)
The search for life beyond the Earth is a topic that has engaged many scholars for all of recorded human history. Is life common in the Universe? With NASA’s decision to define one of its strategic goals as the search for the origin and distribution of life in the Universe, scientific progress has been rapid. These investigations involve collaborations among geochemists, astrophysicists, and biochemists. This course will explore how scientists are successfully detecting planets orbiting other stars, determining the environments that led to the origin of life on Earth, and chemical processes and pathways that may have led to the origin of life on Earth and beyond. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

T GEO 110 The Search for Life Beyond Earth (3)
T GEO 110 is the Honors College version of A GEO 110; only one version may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A GEO 111 Discussion Section for A GEO 110 (1)
Development of strategies and concepts associated with the search for life beyond the Earth. Brief weekly writing assignments dealing with the assignments precede each week’s class discussion of the latest scientific discoveries announced by NASA and the European Space Agency. One 90-minute class per week. Corequisite(s): A GEO 110. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A GEO 201 (= A ENV 201 & A GOG 201) Environmental Analysis (3)
Uses laboratory work and local field excursions to give students “hands-on” experience in physical geography and environmental sciences. Focuses on human impacts on the environment and on problems of environmental contamination. Only one version of A GEO 201 may be taken for credit. Offered fall semester only.

A GEO 221 Understanding the Earth (3)
Provides an introduction to geology, with an emphasis on the solid Earth. Topics include the evolution of the solar system and the early Earth; structure of the Earth; plate tectonics and seismic processes; the chemical composition, structure, and physical properties of rock-forming minerals; formation of rocks through igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic processes; geologic age determination and geologic time. The interaction between the solid Earth and other components of the Earth system will be stressed. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 120 or 130 or T CHM 130; or permission of instructor. Offered fall semester only.

A GEO 350Y (= A ENV 350Y) Environmental Geochemistry (4)
Contemporary topics are used to develop concepts of geochemical processes operating in Earth’s environmental system. These topics (a) PCBs in the Upper Hudson River, (b) biogeochemical cycles in the global climate system, and (c) geochemical constraints on long-term disposal of high-level, nuclear wastes. Three hours per week in classroom setting +1 hour per week of oral presentations by students. Only one version of A GEO 350Y may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ENV 250. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A GEO 395Z (= A ENV 395Z) Writing in Environmental or Geological Sciences (1)
May be taken with any A ENV or A GEO course at the 300 or 400 level to fulfill a writing intensive version of that course. Students will have an opportunity for assistance during writing and revision of written material with the help of editorial assignments from the instructor. Corequisite(s): any A ENV or A GEO course at the 300 or 400 level. Offered fall and spring semesters.

A GEO 455 (= A ENV 455) Special Topics in Environmental or Geological Science (2-3)
A structured program of reading and seminars leading to an in-depth understanding of a chosen topic in environmental science or geology. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ATM 210, A GEO 221, and permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A GEO 497 (= A ENV 497) Independent Study (1-3)
Field or laboratory investigation of a chosen environmental or geologic problem, including the writing of a research report to be undertaken during the senior year. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. Offered fall or spring semesters.

  

Department of Biological Sciences

Faculty

Distinguished Professor
Marlene Belfort, Ph.D.
University of California, Irvine

Distinguished Teaching Professor       
John S. Mackiewicz, Ph.D.
Cornell University

Professors 
Paul Agris, Ph.D.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology       
Richard P. Cunningham, Ph.D.
Johns Hopkins University
Daniele Fabris, Ph.D.
University of Padua, Italy
Gary S. Kleppel, Ph.D.
Fordham University
Gregory Lnenicka, Ph.D.
University of Virginia, Charlottesville        
Ben G. Szaro, Ph.D.
John Hopkins University 
Sho-Ya Wang, Ph.D.
SUNY at Stony Brook        
Richard S. Zitomer, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania

Associate Professors 
Thomas B. Caraco, Ph.D.
Syracuse University
Haijun Chen, Ph.D.
Max-Planck Jena, Germany
Melinda Larsen, Ph.D.
Baylor College of Medicine
Pan Li, Ph.D.
University at Buffalo, SUNY
Robert Osuna, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
George Robinson, Ph.D.
University of California, Davis
Hua Shi, Ph.D.
Cornell University
Caro-Beth Stewart, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley
Ing-Nang Wang, Ph.D.
SUNY at Stony Brook

Assistant Professors 
Paolo Forni, Ph.D.
University of Turin, Italy
Gabriele Fuchs, Ph.D.
Witten/Herdecke University, Germany
Cara Pager, Ph.D.
University of Kentucky, Lexington
Prashanth Rangan, Ph.D.
Johns Hopkins University
Morgan Sammons, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University
Annalisa Scimemi, Ph.D.
International School for Advanced Studies SISSA/ISAS, Trieste, Italy
Wendy Turner, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley

Affiliated Faculty
Jeffrey L. Travis, Ph.D.
Dartmouth College

Adjuncts (estimated): 20
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 21


The objective of the department is to provide the undergraduate student with a broad background in the biological sciences and adequate supporting strength in the physical sciences. Accordingly, the B.S. programs listed here are structured around a combined major/minor sequence.

The department also offers programs leading to the M.S. and the Ph.D. in which the graduate student is able to obtain an in-depth professional education in one of several more specialized areas of biological sciences.

The Department of Biological Sciences strongly supports a student’s desire to enhance her/his educational experience by pursuing additional majors and minors. However, once a student has declared her/his major in one of the majors offered by the department (B.A. and B.S. in Biology, B.S. in Interdisciplinary Studies with a faculty-initiated concentration in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, or B.S. in Human Biology), the student may not pursue a second major in another program within the department. Should there be an extenuating circumstance requiring an exception to this policy, the student MUST take at least 24 additional credits for the second major.

Degree requirements for the B.S. in Human Biology are listed in the Human Biology Program section of this bulletin.

Careers
The B.A., which specifies the major only and requires a separate minor sequence outside science and mathematics, is designed with the aims of the liberal or fine arts students in mind and as such is not intended for the professional biologist or teacher. The B.S. programs provide a strong background for further study in either graduate school or the medical field, and prepare the student for secondary school teaching and a variety of careers in biology at the technical level. Graduates with a B.S. degree may find technical-level positions with pharmaceutical companies or as research assistants in grant-related positions. Those who go on to graduate or professional school have a wide array of career opportunities in research, health fields, and business.

Advanced Placement Examinations
Students who have received scores of 5 on Advanced Placement exams in biology shall be allowed credit for A BIO 120 & 121 and for A BIO 201 & 202, required of all majors. Students who have received scores of 3 or 4 on Advanced Placement exams in biology shall be allowed credit in either the natural science general education category or in the general elective category. No credit will apply towards the major or minor in Biology or the Interdisciplinary Studies major with a Biochemistry and Molecular Biology concentration.

Degree Requirements for the Majors in Biology

General Program B. A.: Major sequence consisting of a minimum of 36 credits.

Required courses:
A BIO 120 & 121, 201 & 202Z, 212Y
A CHM 120 or 130, 121 or 131, 124, 125
16 additional credits of biology major electives including two courses which are partially or exclusively laboratory courses:

The minor sequence will consist of a minimum of 18 credits. The student may not have a minor in: Atmospheric Science, Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Electronics, Geology, Mathematics, Physics, or Statistics.

Bachelor of Arts in Biology Requirements:

 A BIO 120 & 121, A BIO 201 & 202Z     8 credits
 A BIO 212Y    4 credits
 Chemistry  8 credits
 Subtotal  20 credits
 Additional credits in biology  16 credits
 Total  36 credits
 Plus nonscience/math minor  18-24 credits

General Program B.S.: Combined major and minor sequence consisting of a minimum of 66 credits.

Required courses:
A BIO 120 & 121, 201 & 202Z, 212Y, 217, 330, 365
A PHY 105 or 140, 106 or 145, 108 or 150, 109 or 155
A MAT 108 & 111 or A MAT 108 & 112, or A MAT 111 & 113, or A MAT 112 & 113
A CHM 120 or 130, 121 or 131, 124, 125, 220, 221, 222, 223

15 additional credits in biology are also required, and must include at least 3 courses which are partially or exclusively laboratory courses.

Graduate courses are open to qualified seniors with appropriate departmental and instructor consent.

Bachelor of Science in Biology Requirements:

 A BIO 120 & 121, A BIO 201 & 202Z   8 credits
 A BIO 212Y    4 credits
 A BIO 217  3 credits
 A BIO 330  3 credits
 A BIO 365  3 credits
 Biology major electives  15 credits
 Chemistry  16 credits
 Mathematics  7-8 credits
 Physics  8 credits
 Total  67-68 credits

Degree Requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies with a faculty-initiated concentration in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

The Biochemistry and Molecular Biology concentration (BCAMB) is an Interdisciplinary Studies major (Biology and Chemistry) designed for students interested in these rapidly developing fields of science. Students with training in these fields can pursue careers as researchers in academic or industrial settings or they can pursue further study in graduate or professional schools. Students must complete 40 graduation credits before application to the program, generally in the spring of the sophomore year.

Admission: Students must obtain the approval of the Program Director before officially declaring this Interdisciplinary Studies major.

General Program B.S.: Combined major and minor sequence consisting of a minimum of 65 credits.
Required courses:
A BIO 120 & 121, 201 & 202Z, 212Y, 365, 366, 367, 425, 426
A CHM 120 or 130, 121 or 131, 124, 125, 220, 221, 222, 223, 350 or 444, 351 or 445
A PHY 140 or 141, 150 or 151
A MAT 111 or 112 or 118, 113 or 119 
An additional laboratory course in Biology or Chemistry at or above the 300 level. Credits in A BIO 399/399Z and 499/499Z or A CHM 425 and 426 may be used to fulfill this laboratory requirement if the student completes at least 4 credits over 2 semesters.

Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies with a faculty-initiated concentration in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology:

 A BIO 120 & 121, A BIO 201 & 202Z   8 credits
 A BIO 212Y    4 credits
 A BIO 425, 426  5 credits
 A BIO 365, 366, 367  8 credits
 A CHM 120 or 130, 121 or 131, 124, 125  8 credits
 A CHM 220, 221, 222, 223  8 credits
 A CHM 444 or 350, 445 or 351  6 credits
 A PHY 140 or 141, 150 or 151  6 credits
 A MAT 111 or 112 or 118, 113 or 119  8 credits
 Additional laboratory and elective credits  4 credits
 Total  65 credits

Honors Program

The honors program is designed for outstanding students in programs leading to the B.S. degree in either Biology or Interdisciplinary Studies with a concentration in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Students may apply for admission to the honors program by submitting a letter of request to the departmental honors committee no later than April 15 of the freshman or sophomore year (for admission for the fall) or November 15 of the sophomore year (for admission in the spring). Junior transfers may apply at the time of their admission to the University. Students found acceptable by the committee must find a research adviser to supervise the independent study leading to an HONORS THESIS.

The requirements for admission include: (1) the candidate must declare the major and have completed (or have in progress at time of application) 12 credits of course work required for the biology major, including A BIO 120 & 121 and A BIO 201 & 202Z; (2) an overall grade point average of 3.50; (3) a grade point average of 3.50 in courses required for the major; and (4) a written recommendation from an adviser, professor or teaching assistant if possible. Primary emphasis will be placed on indications of academic ability and maturity sufficient for applicants to complete with distinction a program involving independent research.

Students in the program are required to complete a minimum of 65 or 66 credits as specified for the respective program for the B.S.  and must include: (1) at least 6 credits of independent study (A BIO 399, 499); the independent study, or honors research project, which will result in an HONORS THESIS; (2) at least 3 credits of course work at the 500 level or higher (not including A BIO 515) in the student’s area of interest; and (3) oral presentation of research at a public seminar.

Students in the program must maintain both a minimum grade point average of 3.50 overall and in biology courses taken to satisfy major requirements during the junior and senior years. The progress of participants in the honors program will be reviewed at the end of the sophomore and junior years by the student’s advisor and the departmental honors committee. Students not meeting academic and independent research standards may be precluded from continuing in the program during their senior year. These students may, of course, continue as Biology majors.

After completion of the requirements above, the departmental honors committee will make its recommendation to the faculty to grant the degree “with honors in biology” based upon (1) overall academic record, (2) performance and accomplishments of the independent study project(s), (3) the quality of the Oral Presentation (4) the evaluations of departmental faculty members who have supervised these activities.

Combined B.S./M.S. Program

The combined B.S./M.S. program in Biology provides an opportunity for students of recognized academic ability and educational maturity to fulfill integrated requirements of undergraduate and master’s degree programs from the beginning of the junior year.

The combined program requires a minimum of 138 credits, of which at least 30 must be graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.S., students must meet all university and college requirements, including the requirements of the undergraduate major described previously, the minimum 60-credit liberal arts and sciences requirement, general education requirements, and residency requirements. In qualifying for the M.S., students must meet all university and college requirements as outlined in the Graduate Bulletin, including completion of a minimum of 30 graduate credits and any other conditions such as a research seminar, thesis, comprehensive examination, professional experience, and residency requirements. Up to 12 graduate credits may be applied simultaneously to both the B.S. and M.S. programs.

An application, which must include the consent from a faculty member to serve as the research advisor, should be made at the completion of the junior year. A minimum grade point average of 3.20 is required as well as three letters of recommendation from faculty. Students accepted into this program must complete at least 3 semesters of ABIO 399/399Z and 499/499Z.

Although the Graduate Record Examinations are not required for this program, students are encouraged to take the examinations in their senior year with the expectation that they will continue graduate studies. The standard graduate application should be submitted to the Office for Graduate Admissions. For further information, please contact the Department Main Office.

Joint Seven-Year Biology/Optometry Program

This combined program sponsored by the State College of Optometry, State University of New York, and the University at Albany, provides students an opportunity to earn a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree in biology and a Doctor of Optometry (O.D.) in seven years. Participating students will matriculate at the University at Albany for three years and begin their optometry studies in year four of the program. Students will be awarded the B.S. degree after completion of their requirements at the end of the fourth year.

At the end of the seventh year and completion of all program requirements, students will be awarded the O.D. degree.

Students interested in making application to this program shall submit the necessary materials to the Pre-Health adviser in the University’s Advisement Services Center by the stated deadline in the middle of the spring semester of the freshman or sophomore year (transfer students are ineligible). Selection will be based on written application materials, academic progress, and a personal interview.

A minimum of a 3.30 grade point average on a scale of 4.0 in undergraduate courses completed at the time of application is required.

Students will complete three years (90 credits) of study at the University at Albany with a major in biology for a B.S. degree. Students attend SUNY-Optometry (New York City, NY) for the fourth year of study (and pay SUNY-Optometry tuition), beginning the first year of the professional program. With the completion of the fourth year of study, the University at Albany will accept as transfer credits 24 credits of biology and 6 credits of physics electives, for a total of 30 credits. Students in this program should take the Optometry Admission Test (OAT) in October or February of the third year at the University at Albany.

A minimum of 90 credits must be taken at the University at Albany. Summer course work completed the first and second year or between the second and third year at the University at Albany is acceptable for this program.

The following courses are required:
A BIO 120 & 121, 201 & 202Z, 212Y, 16 credits of biology electives* (of which 12 credits must be at 300 or 400 level)
A CHM 120 or 130, 122, 121 or 131, 122, 220, 221, 222, 223
A MAT 112, 108
A PHY 105, 106, 108, 109
A PSY 101

In addition to the General Education Program requirements, students are required to enroll in 10 credits of electives.

*The biology electives MUST be 300-400 level courses in biology that are designated as courses that count towards the Biology major. The following courses will not be used as biology electives: A BIO 303, 325, 341, 342, 365, 406, 410, and 411.

  

Courses in Biological Sciences

A BIO 102 General Biological Sciences (3)
Introduction to the major concepts in biology and a survey of the common structures of organisms, including humans, and their functions at the molecular, cellular, organismal and population levels. Emphasis placed on principles of ecology, inheritance, evolution and physiology relevant to human society. May not be taken for credit by students who have credit in A BIO 110, A BIO 120 or A BIO 131, A BIO 111 or A BIO 121 or A BIO 130, or other equivalent introductory courses. Does not yield credit toward the major in biology. Offered through the University in the High School Program only.

A BIO 117 Nutrition (3)
The biological roles of energy, protein, vitamins, and minerals; digestion, absorption, and storage of nutrients, the chemical nature of foods and food processing; assessment of nutritional status; interactions of nutrients and disease; food supplementation and community nutrition. Does not yield credit toward the major in biology.

A BIO 130 (formerly A BIO 121) General Biology II (3)
Formerly A BIO 121. First course in a two semester sequence which offers a comprehensive survey of the structures and functions common to all living systems at the molecular, cellular, organismal, and population levels. This course emphasizes molecular and cell biology, and genetics. May not be taken for credit by students who have credit for A BIO 111 or A BIO 121.

A BIO 131 (formerly A BIO 120) General Biology I (3)
Formerly A BIO 120. Second course in a two semester sequence which offers a comprehensive survey of the structures and functions common to all living systems at the molecular, cellular, organismal, and population levels. This course emphasizes evolutionary principles, ecology, anatomy and physiology. May not be taken for credit by students who have credit for A BIO 110 or A BIO 120. Students must complete A BIO 131 with a C- or better to register for A BIO 212Y or A BIO 217. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 130 or A BIO 121.

A BIO 175 Forensic Science Investigation (3)
An introduction to forensic science and the various methodologies and applications used in today's multi-discipline crime laboratories. Topics will include a brief history of forensic science, introduction to crime laboratory disciplines and quality assurance, crime scene processing, analysis of physical evidence by the crime lab [firearms and tool marks, chemistry (toxicology, controlled substances), trace evidence, biology, patterned evidence, questioned documents, etc.] and presentation of test results in legal procedures. Does not yield credit toward the BS/BA in biology or the interdisciplinary BS in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. This course is designed primarily for undergraduate students with little-to-no science background.

T BIO 176 Genomics & Biotechnology: The Broad Ranging Impact on Mankind (3)
The sequencing of the genomes of a large number of organisms, from bacteria to human, has provided enormous insights into a wide range of human endeavors. Almost no aspect of human knowledge has been untouched by the information being compiled. The information gathered has also driven the development of new technologies designed to explore and exploit the information gathered. The goal of this course will be to familiarize students with the nature of the information that can be gathered from genomics and the benefits derived from the new biotechnologies. Also, simple research problems will be assigned to introduce students to the web based resources and programs used to analyze genomic data. Open to Honors College students only.

A BIO 199 Contemporary Issues in Biological Sciences (1–3)
Issues from the current literature in selected areas of biological sciences. Particular areas of study to be announced each semester. Intended for students interested in exploring in depth themes covered in large lecture classes. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite(s): consult instructor for specific prerequisites. S/U or A-E graded. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A BIO 201 (formerly A BIO 122) Introduction to Biological Investigations I (1)
First course in a two-semester laboratory sequence designed for biology majors. Students will learn the process of scientific investigation, collaborate in designing, conducting and analyzing experiments, develop the ability to communicate in scientific format and gain expertise in a variety of laboratory instrumentation, techniques, skills and procedures. One laboratory period per week. May not be taken by students with credit for A BIO 110 or A BIO 122. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 120 or A BIO 131, A BIO 121 or A BIO 130, and A CHM 120, 121, 124, 125. Offered fall semester only. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A BIO 202Z (formerly A BIO 123Z) Introduction to Biological Investigations II (1)
Second course in a two-semester laboratory sequence designed for biology majors. Students will learn the process of scientific investigation, collaborate in designing, conducting and analyzing experiments, develop the ability to communicate in scientific format and gain expertise in a variety of laboratory instrumentation, techniques, skills and procedures. One laboratory period per week. May not be taken by students with credit for A BIO 111 or 123Z. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 120 or A BIO 131, A BIO 121 or A BIO 130, A BIO 201, and A CHM 120, 121, 124, 125. Offered spring semester only. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A BIO 205 Human Genetics (3)
Survey of human genetics emphasizing the principles and mechanisms of inheritance and including the analysis of the genetic material of humans; the behavior of genes in individuals, families, and populations; and the implications for human behavior and evolution, medicine, and society. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 120 or A BIO 131 and A BIO 121 or A BIO 130 or permission of instructor. Does not yield credit toward the major in biology.

A BIO 212Y Introductory Genetics (4)
Genetics from the classical Mendelian Laws of inheritance to molecular genetics. Topics will include: DNA structure and replication; Mendelian genetics and recombination; population, fungal, somatic cell, and bacterial genetics; gene organization; the genetic code; mechanisms of gene expression and regulation; and applications of genetic technology. Three class periods and one discussion section. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 120 or A BIO 131 and A BIO 121 or A BIO 130, with a grade of C- or better in A BIO 121 or A BIO 131. Students must complete A BIO 212 with a C or better to register for A BIO 365.

A BIO 213 Microbiology in Health and Disease (4)
Course content will include a brief history of microbiology and immunology; microbial structure, metabolism, growth, and genetics. Aspects of microbiology relevant to the health care professional, including disinfection, antimicrobial drugs, epidemiology, and specific human microbial diseases will also be covered. The course includes lectures and laboratory sessions. Does not yield credit toward the major in biology. May not be taken for credit by students with credit for A BIO 314 and A BIO 315. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 120 or A BIO 131, 121 or 130, 201, 202, A CHM 120, 121, 124, 125, or permission of instructor. Offered Summer Sessions only.

A BIO 217 Cell Biology (3)
An introduction to modern cell biology. This course will present the basic organization of eukaryotic cells while stressing their elaborate structural-functional integration. The cells fundamental properties conserved through evolution will be stressed. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 120 or A BIO 131 and A BIO 121 or A BIO 130, with a grade of C- or better in A BIO 121 or A BIO 131. Students must complete A BIO 217 with a C or better to register for A BIO 365.

A BIO 218 Introduction to Plant Biology (3)
An introduction to the great group of organisms that form the basis of our food web and provide us with our oxygen. Topics will include plant origins and evolution, physiology, morphology, and development. Along the way we will consider more general principles of body design and pattern formation, the unfolding of complex form from relatively unstructured beginnings. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 120 or A BIO 131, A BIO 121 or A BIO 130, A BIO 201, A BIO 202Z or permission of instructor.

A BIO 222 Biological Consequences of Global Climate Change (2)
Introduction to the background, predictions, and empirical evidence for biological effects of increases in atmospheric greenhouse gases. Emphasis on regional-scale consequences for terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, including agricultural and urban ecosystems. Lectures, demonstrations, exercises, and discussions based on current science, with focus on NE North America. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 120 or A BIO 131, A BIO 201.

T BIO 222Y Biological Consequences of Global Climate Change (3)
T BIO 222 is the Honors College version of A BIO 222; only one version may be taken for credit.

T BIO 260 Neural Basis of Behavior (3)
An analysis of the neural basis of innate and learned behaviors, as well as the neurological deficits accompanying lesions of different parts of the brain. Emphasis will be placed on sensory processing, reflexive behavior, feature extraction and behavioral triggers, using simple learned behaviors amenable to analysis at the neuronal level, including analysis of membrane electrical activity, chemical synaptic activity and neuromodulation. Feature extraction will be considered as the basis of visual localization and prey (insect) capture in toads and in echo localization and insect capture in bats. Analysis of brain lesions will include both behavior and simultaneous brain imaging to connect the deficits with specific brain regions, and will cover semantic/episodic learning and amnesia, as well as speech/language comprehension. We will also discuss prospects for transplanting brain stem cells to cure diseases caused by cell death of specific neurons. T BIO 260 is the Honors College version of A BIO 460. Only one can be taken for credit. Neuroscience minors can take only one of T BIO 260 and T PSY 214 for credit toward the minor requirements. Open to Honors College students only. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 121.

A BIO 296 Biological Sciences with Laboratory (2-4)
Laboratory training in biological sciences. Yields laboratory credit towards the major in biological sciences. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.

A BIO 298 Contemporary Issues in Biological Sciences, with Laboratory (1-3)
Laboratory classroom training in selected areas of biological sciences. Particular areas of study to be announced each semester. Yields laboratory credit towards the major in biological sciences. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 201 and 202Z; consult with instructor for specific prerequisites. S/U or A-E graded. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A BIO 302Z Cell Biology Laboratory (2)
Introduction to modern techniques in cell biology, including advanced optical microscopy, DNA extraction and analysis, protein electrophoresis and western blotting, cell homogenization and fractionation, and cell culture. These techniques are used to investigate cell motility, membrane structure and permeability, mitochondrial respiration, DNA replication, the cell cycle, and cell adhesion. One laboratory period per week; additional time as required. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 201 and 202Z. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A BIO 217 and 365. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A BIO 303 Developmental Biology (3)
The development of form and function in animals with emphasis on molecular analyses of organismal and cellular events underlying fertilization, early development, morphogenesis and growth. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 212Y.

A BIO 305 Developmental Biology Laboratory (2)
This laboratory course examines the mechanisms of animal and plant development at the molecular and cellular level by modern and classical techniques. Topics include gametogenesis, fertilization, early and later development, cell division and morphogenesis. One laboratory period per week; additional time as required. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 201 and 202Z. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A BIO 303. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A BIO 308 Parasitic Diseases and Human Welfare (3)
Ecological, medical, and social interrelationships of selected parasitic diseases of people and domestic animals in temperate, semi-tropical, and tropical climates; role of wild animals as reservoirs or vectors of parasitic diseases in humans. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A BIO 309 Genetics Laboratory (2)
Laboratory studies that focus on the principles of transmission and molecular genetics of prokaryotes and eukaryotes and the significance of these principles to other aspects of biology. Genetic principles will be demonstrated through the utilization of model organisms such as lambda bacteriophage, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Caenorhabditis elegans. Topics may include classical Mendelian genetics, molecular genetics and genomics, and modern applications of these techniques. One laboratory per week; additional flexible time as required. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 201, A BIO 202 and A BIO 212. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A BIO 311 (= A GOG 310 & U UNI 310) World Food Crisis (3)
Interdisciplinary approach to understanding world food problems through analyses of social, political, economic, nutritional, agricultural, and environmental aspects of world hunger. Faculty from several departments in the sciences, humanities, and social and behavioral sciences present approaches from various disciplines. Does not yield credit toward the major in biology. Only one version of A BIO 311 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A BIO 314 Microbiology (3)
Introduction to the morphology, physiology, structure, genetics, and metabolism of microorganisms, including the roles played by microorganisms in medical, environmental, agricultural, and biotechnological sciences. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 212Y and 365.

A BIO 315 Microbiology Laboratory (2)
Laboratory studies that deal with the culture and study of microorganisms, the dynamics of microbial growth, and the physiological basis of bacterial identification. One laboratory per week; additional flexible time as required. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 201 and 202Z, A BIO 212Y and 365. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A BIO 314. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A BIO 316 Biogeography (3)
Evolutionary ecology of geographic dispersal and range size; ecological niches and local abundance; allometry and population density; speciation and extinction; invasive species; island biogeography, metapopulations; ecological communities under climate change. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 212, and A MAT 111 or A MAT 112. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A BIO 318 (= A ANT 312; formerly A BIO 419/A ANT 412) Human Population Genetics (3)
Population genetics theory is the foundation of evolutionary biology and contributes heavily to modern ideas in ecology, systematics, and agriculture. This course is an introduction to that theory with special emphasis on evolution. Only one of A ANT 312 and A BIO 318 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 211 or A BIO 205 or 212Y. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A BIO 325 Comparative Anatomy of Chordates (4)
Comparative study of embryonic development, functional morphology, adaptive radiation, and evolution of chordates. Three class periods, one laboratory period each week. Not open to freshmen. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 201 and 202Z. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A BIO 201, A BIO 202, and A BIO 212. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A BIO 326 Environmental Microbiology Laboratory (2)
Explores the role of microbes in natural and human-impacted systems through topics such as nutrient cycling, waste degradation, bioremediation, waterborne disease, food safety, and pollution control. Informal lectures and current events discussions may be incorporated into laboratory exercises. One laboratory per week; additional flexible time as required. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 201 and 202Z, A BIO 212Y, and 314. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A BIO 365. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A BIO 327 (formerly A BIO 445) Experimental Ecology (3)
Fundamental ecological concepts are demonstrated with experimental manipulations and comparative assessment techniques. Local ecosystems are studies; the focus is on the effects of land use on ecosystem structure and function. Ecological assessment skills are developed in the field and laboratory. Lectures couple fundamental and applied topics, balancing understanding of ecological principles with realistic environmental problem solving. Students contribute to a report that becomes part of the record for a municipal wetland. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 201 and 202Z.

A BIO 329 Genetics of Human Disease (3)
Four categories of the involvement of human genes in disease will be explored using specific examples to illustrate general phenomena. First, inheritance of diseases caused by single mutant alleles will be discussed. Second, the pre-disposition of specific genotypes to disease will be investigated highlighting the interplay between genes and between the genes and the environment. Third, genetic instabilities that give rise to genetic rearrangements and chromosome loss will be explored. Fourth, the genetic interplay between host and pathogen will be explored with respect to the evolution of protective mechanisms by the host and evasion by the pathogen, and how new pathogens emerge. For each category, multiple cases of specific diseases will be discussed with an emphasis on both the molecular basis of the genetic interactions and the population genetics of disease spread and persistence. The potential of modern genetic techniques to provide diagnosis and treatment of diseases will also be discussed. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 212Y.

A BIO 330 Principles of Ecology and Evolution (3)
Survey of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Course will cover fundamental concepts and current advances in the fields of these two inter-related disciplines. Topics will include population biology, microevolution, macroevolution, community ecology, ecosystem ecology, and animal behavior. Emphasis will be on patterns and processes, and how those are studied. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 212Y. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A BIO 335 Immunology (3)
The structure and function of the antibody molecule and of reactions between antigen and antibody. Also covers cellular interactions in the immune response as well as both the beneficial and harmful consequences of the response. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 212Y. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A BIO 365.

A BIO 336Z Laboratory in Immunology (2)
Modern laboratory techniques will be performed to study the cellular and humoral components of the immune system; immune cells and cell markers, immunoglobulin purification and characterization, antibody and antigen identification assays including immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis, and enzyme-based immunoassays (ELISA). One laboratory per week, plus additional flexible time as required. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 201 and 202Z. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A BIO 335. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A BIO 341 Neurobiology (3)
The structure and function of the nervous system examined at the cellular level. Topics include: organization of nervous systems; morphology and physiology of nerve cells; synaptic transmission; sensory processing; cellular circuitry underlying "simple" behaviors; cellular basis of learning; and the development of neuronal connections. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 120 or A BIO 131, A BIO 121 or A BIO 130.

A BIO 342 Neurophysiology Laboratory (2)
A computer-based laboratory course examining the electrophysiological properties of the nervous system. The course will cover basic principles underlying resting potentials, passive electrical properties, action potentials, synaptic transmission and oscillatory neural networks. Simulation software will be used to model nerve cells and neural networks. Demonstrations of basic electrophysiological techniques will parallel the computer simulations. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 201 and 202Z, and A BIO 341 or permission of instructor. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A BIO 343 Evolutionary Biology and Human Health (3)
This course illustrates the importance and utility of evolutionary perspectives on various topics related to human health. In addition to the "how" questions, this course also introduces the "why" questions. Various evolutionary hypotheses are examined. Arguments for and counter-arguments against each hypothesis are presented to foster understanding of each topic. Selected topics include infectious diseases, pathogen virulence, allergy/asthma, mental health/addiction, genetic disorders, diseases of civilization, sex, pregnancy, and aging. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 212.

A BIO 365 Biological Chemistry I (3)
The chemistry and biochemical interrelationship of carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids; enzyme catalysis and introduction to metabolism. Only one of A CHM 342 and A BIO 365 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 220 and A CHM 221 and a grade of C or better in A BIO 212Y.

A BIO 366 Biological Chemistry II (3)
Control and regulation of metabolic pathways, expression and transmission of genetic information, and a variety of selected current topics. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 365.

A BIO 367 Biochemistry Laboratory (2)
This laboratory course is designed to provide basic training in various procedures used in present day biochemical research. These will include methods for protein purification, enzyme kinetics, peptide sequencing, and fractionation of intracellular components. In addition, biochemical processes such as glucose metabolism and photosynthesis will be studied. One laboratory period each week. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 201 and 202Z. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A BIO 365 or equivalent and permission of instructor. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A BIO 389Z Writing in Biology (1)
Students who are concurrently registered in, or have previously taken, any 300 or 400 level biology course which yields credit toward the major, may with permission of the instructor of that course, enroll in A BIO 389Z and fulfill a writing intensive version of that other course. One additional meeting per week in which writing techniques and experiences are stressed is required. Written work that will be used for credit in A BIO 389Z must be in addition to any writings required for the companion course. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): a companion biology course at the 300 or 400 level. S/U graded. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A BIO 397 Topics in Biology (1-3)
Issues from the current literature in selected areas of biology. Particular areas of study to be announced each semester. Yields credit toward the major in biological sciences. May be repeated for credit, when topic varies. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A BIO 398 Topics in Biology, with Laboratory (1-3)
Issues in selected areas of biology. Particular areas of study to be announced each semester. Yields laboratory credit toward the major in biological sciences. May be repeated for credit, when topic varies. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 201 and 202Z, junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A BIO 399/399Z Supervised Research for Juniors (1–3)
Individual, independent research on selected topics in biology. Critical analysis of selected research papers. Junior majors in the department of biological sciences apply for this course through the prospective research adviser. Students taking two or more semesters of A BIO 399, 399Z, 499, or 499Z will prepare a poster or make an oral presentation at the Departmental Research Symposium. A copy of the final written report of each semester’s work, preferably typewritten in journal format, is kept on permanent file in the department. May be taken either semester. A maximum of 6 credits may be earned in A BIO 399 and 399Z.

A BIO 401 (formerly A BIO 320) Ecology (3)
Natural selection as an organizing principle; single-species population dynamics, geometric-mean growth, density-dependence, chaos in ecology; age structure, selection on life-histories, population projection; models for competition, predation, epidemics, and mutualism; species diversity, abundance models during community development. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 212, A BIO 330, and A MAT 111 or A MAT 112.

A BIO 402 Evolution (3)
The patterns and processes of biological change with time from the origins of life, through major evolutionary innovations, to the development of human culture. Fundamental concepts in biology will be stressed, including information, mutation, selection, random drift, and adaptation. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 212 and A BIO 330.       

A BIO 406 Vertebrate Histology (4)
A laboratory-intensive study of the microanatomy and function of animal cells, tissues and major vertebrate organs, excluding the brain. Practical work with bright-field microscopy and preparation of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, sectioned and stained tissues. Three class periods, one laboratory period each week. Extra time may be needed to complete individual projects. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 201 and 202Z, A BIO 217 or A BIO 303; A BIO 325 and/or 410 recommended but not required. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A BIO 410 Human Physiology (3)
The functions of organ systems and their contributions to the functions of the human body as a whole. Topics to include: nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal systems and energy metabolism and temperature regulation. Two 1 1/2-hour lecture periods each week. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 201 and 202Z. 

A BIO 411Z Human Physiology Laboratory (2)
A mixture of lab experiments and computer simulations in systemic physiology with emphasis on membrane transport and excitability, muscle contraction, cardiovascular regulation, respiration and metabolism, acid-base control, renal system physiology, and sensory physiology. Three hours laboratory and one hour discussion per week, with emphasis on writing of scientific lab reports. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 201 and 202Z. Corequisite(s): A BIO 410.

A BIO 413 Biology of Stem Cells (3)
Stem cells are characterized by the ability to renew themselves through mitotic cell division and the potential to differentiate into a diverse range of specialized cell types. As such they are the focus of considerable interest by the biomedical research community and in the area of regenerative medicine. In addition, derivation from embryonic tissues raises ethical concerns. This lecture course focuses on the biological and genetic characteristics of stem cells that originate from embryonic and adult tissues. Study materials will be drawn from contemporary scientific papers and web based resources. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 212, A BIO 303, and permission of instructor.

A BIO 425 Molecular Biology (3)
Mechanisms of gene expression and regulation will be studied, using examples from bacteria and eukaryotes. Discussion will include experimental approaches to gene cloning and sequencing, analysis of DNA-protein interactions, and structure and function of RNA. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 212Y. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A BIO 365.

A BIO 426 Laboratory in Molecular Biology (2)
Experiments in the modern techniques of recombinant molecular biology will be performed. These may include restriction mapping of plasmids, gene cloning, DNA blotting, DNA sequence analysis, plasmid constructions, and gene expression studies. One laboratory per week, plus additional flexible time as required. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 201 and 202Z, A BIO 212Y. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A BIO 365 and 425. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A BIO 427 Grazing in Terrestrial Ecosystems (4)
Lectures and laboratory exercises are used to elucidate the fundamental principles of grazing, particularly by large herd-forming ungulates, in wild and human-dominated ecosystems. Topics considered include ungulate anatomy, physiology and foraging behavior, as well as the ecological interactions between grazers, the vascular plant and soil microbial communities. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 201 and 202Z, A BIO 320 or 327, or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A BIO 429 Molecular Virology (3)
Viruses are usually associated with damaging and often fatal infections. However without viruses our world would be a very different place. This course will introduce the fundamental principles of virology with an emphasis on the viral replication strategies, virus-cell interactions, pathogenesis, and evolution of viruses; as well strategies applied for control and prevention of infection. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 212 and 217. Prerequisite or corequisite(s): A BIO 365.

A BIO 432 Animal Behavior (3)
Evolutionary ecology of behavior, optimization, game theory; diet selection, foraging under uncertainty; group formation and dissolution; social parasitism, among-individual behavioral diversity; interaction with kin, conflict and cooperation; individual behavior and population dynamics. Completion of course requires submission of three papers. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 212, and A MAT 111 or A MAT 112. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A BIO 435 Methods in Biotechnology (2)
This laboratory course is designed to provide training in modern techniques used in Forensic and Biomedical fields. These will include sequential methods for RT-PCR, PCR product cloning, analysis of recombinant plasmid clones, PCR-based VNTR genotyping, Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism analysis, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence staining. One laboratory period each week. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 201 and 202Z. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A BIO 365 or permission of instructor. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A BIO 441 Molecular Neurobiology (3)
The molecular biology of learning, memory, neural development and neurological disease. The course will relate the structure and function of receptors, second messangers, cytoskeletal proteins, transcription factors and gene structure to their roles in the nervous system. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 365 and either A BIO 341 or A BIO 217.

A BIO 455 Plant Ecology (3)
Current research and theoretical background in the field of plant ecology will be explored. Topics will include population and community dynamics, evolution of life history traits, physiological responses to environmental stresses, plant-animal interactions, and the role of vegetation in ecosystems processes. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 319 or A BIO 320 or permission of instructor.

A BIO 460 Neural Basis of Behavior (3)
An analysis of the neural basis of innate and learned behaviors, as well as the neurological deficits accompanying lesions of different parts of the brain. Emphasis will be placed on sensory processing, reflexive behavior, feature extraction and behavioral triggers, using simple learned behaviors amenable to analysis at the neuronal level, including analysis of membrane electrical activity, chemical synaptic activity and neuromodulation. Feature extraction will be considered as the basis of visual localization and prey (insect) capture in toads and in echo localization and insect capture in bats. Analysis of brain lesions will include both behavior and simultaneous brain imaging to connect the deficits with specific brain regions, and will cover semantic/episodic learning and amnesia, as well as speech/language comprehension. We will also discuss prospects for transplanting brain stem cells to cure diseases caused by cell death of specific neurons. Only one of A BIO 460 and T BIO 260 can be taken for credit. Prerequisite (s): A BIO 341 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

A BIO 490 (= A PSY 490) Topics in Neuroscience (3)
This course is designed as the capstone course for the interdisciplinary Neuroscience Minor. It is expected that Minors will take this course in the fall of their senior year. This course will be team taught by Neuroscience faculty from Biology and Psychology and will cover current topics in neuroscience research, engaging students in the original research literature and providing information about graduate education and careers in neuroscience. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A BIO 499/499Z Supervised Research for Seniors (2-4)
Individual, independent research on selected topics in biology. Critical analysis of selected research papers. Senior majors in the department of biological sciences apply for this course through the prospective research adviser. A copy of the final written report of each semester’s work, preferably typewritten in journal format, is kept on permanent file in the department. May be taken either semester. Students taking two or more semesters of A BIO 399, 399Z, 499, or 499Z will prepare a poster or make an oral presentation at the Departmental Research Symposium. A maximum of 8 credits may be earned in A BIO 499 and 499Z.

  

Department of Chemistry

Faculty

Distinguished Professor
Eric Block, Ph.D. (Carla Rizzo Delray ’42 Professorship)
Harvard University

Distinguished Teaching Professor of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences and Chemistry
John W. Delano, Ph.D.
SUNY at Stony Brook

Professors Emeriti
Robert E. Frost, Ph.D.
Harvard University
Frank M. Hauser, Ph.D.
University of North Carolina
Bernard J. Laurenzi, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania
Eugene Mclaren, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
Washington University
Yash P. Myer, Ph.D.
University of Oregon
Ramaswamy H. Sarma, Ph.D.
Brown University
Lawrence C. Snyder, Ph.D. (O'Leary Professor)
Carnegie Institute of Technology
Andrew J. Yencha, Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles

Emerita Professor of Education and Chemistry
Audrey Champagne, Ph.D.
University of Pittsburgh

Professors
Paul F. Agris, Ph.D.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Evgeny Dikarev, Ph.D.
Moscow State University
Daniele Fabris, Ph.D.
University of Padua, Italy
Igor Lednev, Ph.D.
Moscow Institute of Physics & Technology
Li Niu, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin
Marina Petrukhina, Ph.D.
Moscow State University 
Charles P. Scholes, Ph.D.
Yale University
Alexander Shekhtman, Ph.D.
University at Albany
John T. Welch, Ph.D.
Case Western Reserve University

Associate Professor Emeritus
Lawrence H. Daly, Ph.D.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Associate Professors
Rabi A. Musah, Ph.D.
University of Arkansas
Jayanti Pande, Ph.D.
University at Albany       
Paul J. Toscano, Ph.D.
Johns Hopkins University

Assistant Professors
Alan Chen, Ph.D.
Washington University
Gerd-Uwe Flechsig, Ph.D.
University of Rostock
Jan Halamek, Ph.D.
Masaryk University
Maksim Royzen, Ph.D.
New York University
Jia Sheng, Ph.D.
Georgia State University
Jun Wang, Ph.D.
Purdue University
Ting Wang, Ph.D.
The Ohio State University
Zhang Wang, Ph.D.
Columbia University
Mehmet Yigit, Ph.D.
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Qiang Zhang, Ph.D.
Boston University

Adjuncts (estimated): 1
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 19



The objective of the department is to provide students with a broad, fundamental knowledge of modern theoretical and experimental chemistry enabling graduates to embark immediately on professional careers in chemistry or to continue study at an advanced level toward higher degrees. The general program in chemistry is approved by the Committee on Professional Training of the American Chemical Society.

Careers
Chemistry gives students the tools to think analytically, to solve problems, and to create new materials with unusual properties. A strong foundation in chemistry, coupled with a background in other disciplines such as biology, physics, and even art or business, can lead to the confidence and flexibility to take on challenging jobs after graduation. Career choices may include classic positions in industrial or governmental laboratories as a production, control, or analytical chemist. However, with a background in chemistry, career options are diverse and broad, including the potential to enter graduate and professional schools. Our graduates have secured employment in pharmaceuticals, medicine, petrochemicals, materials science, as well as the cosmetics and aerospace fields. Furthermore, a graduate may choose a career path as a research assistant, technical sales and service representative, secondary school teacher, science writer or editor, forensic or environmental scientist, patent attorney, art restorer, information scientist, toxicologist, or even investment counselor or public relations specialist.

Degree Requirements for the Major in Chemistry

General Program B.A. Combined major and minor sequence consisting of 55 credits: A CHM 120 or 130 or T CHM 130, 121 or 131 or T CHM 131, 124, 125, 220, 221, 222, 223, 226, 227, 352Z, 417, 420, 429, 431, 444, and 3 credits in advanced chemistry; A MAT 111 or 112 or 118; 113 or 119; A PHY 140 or 141, 145, 150 or 151, and 155.

General Program B.S. Within this program, a student has a choice of three tracks: Chemistry Emphasis (67 or 68 credits); Chemical Biology Emphasis (72 credits); Chemistry/Forensic Chemistry Emphasis (72 credits). The specific requirements for individual tracks are outlined below.

Chemistry Emphasis B.S. Combined major and minor sequence consisting of 67 or 68 credits: A CHM 120 or 130 or T CHM 130, 121 or 131 or T CHM 131, 124, 125, 220, 221, 222, 223, 226, 227, 342 or 442, 350, 351, 352Z, 417, 420; 3 or 4 credits in advanced chemistry laboratories from A CHM 344, 426, or 429 and 431; and 3 credits in advanced chemistry in courses other than A CHM 424, 425, 426, 444, or 445; A MAT 111 or 112 or 118, 113 or 119, 214 or 218; A PHY 140 or 141, 145, 150 or 151, 155, 240 or 241.

Chemical Biology Emphasis B.S. Combined major and minor sequence consisting of 72 credits: A CHM 120 or 130 or T CHM 130, 121 or 131 or T CHM 131, 124, 125, 220, 221, 222, 223, 226, 227, 350 or 444, 351 or 445, 352Z, 417, 420, 442, 443, 446; A BIO 120, 121, 201, 202, 212; A MAT 111 or 112 or 118, 113 or 119; A PHY 140 or 141, 145, 150 or 151, 155.

Chemistry/Forensic Chemistry Emphasis B.S. Combined major and minor sequence consisting of 72 credits: A CHM 120 or 130 or T CHM 130, 121 or 131 or T CHM 131, 124, 125, 220, 221, 222, 223, 226, 227, 250, 251, 342 or 442, 350 or 444, 351 or 445, 352Z, 417, 420, 429, 431, 447, 448, 449; A MAT 108, 111 or 112 or 118, 113 or 119; A PHY 140 or 141, 145, 150 or 151, 155.

Honors Program

The honors program in chemistry is designed for outstanding students enrolled in the general program leading to the B.S. degree, Chemistry Emphasis, or Chemical Biology Emphasis, or Forensic Chemistry Emphasis. Students may apply for admission to the honors program by submitting a letter of request to the department chair no later than April 15th of the sophomore year (for admissions in the fall) or November 15th of the junior year (for admission in the spring). Junior transfers may apply at the time of their admission to the University. Primary emphasis will be placed on indications of academic ability and maturity sufficient for applicants to pursue with distinction a program involving independent research.

The minimum requirements for admission include: (1) Completion of A CHM 120 (or 130 or T CHM 130), 121 (or 131 or T CHM 131), 124, 125, 220, 221, 222, 223, 226 and 227 or their equivalents; (2) An overall grade point average of 3.25; (3) A grade point average of 3.50 in chemistry courses required for the major; and (4) Written recommendations from at least three faculty members, one of whom, preferably should be from outside the Department of Chemistry.

Students in the program must maintain both a minimum grade point average of 3.25 overall and of 3.50 in chemistry courses taken to satisfy major requirements during the junior and senior years. The progress of participants in the honors program will be reviewed at the end of junior year by the student’s adviser and the Departmental Undergraduate Committee. Students not meeting academic and independent research standards at that time may be precluded from continuing in the program during their senior year. These students may, of course, continue as majors.

Students may select from the following three emphases or tracks.

After completion of the requirements above, the records of the candidates will be reviewed by the Departmental Undergraduate Committee. After consideration of overall academic record, performance and accomplishments in the research project, the quality of the Honors Seminar and Thesis, and the evaluations of departmental faculty members who have supervised these activities, a recommendation for or against a degree “with honors in chemistry” will be made by the committee to the departmental faulty. The final recommendation will be made by the departmental faculty and transmitted to the departmental chair.

Combined B.S./M.S. Program

The combined B.S./M.S. program in chemistry provides an opportunity for students of recognized academic ability and educational maturity to fulfill integrated requirements of undergraduate and master’s degree programs from the beginning of the junior year. A carefully designed program can permit a student to earn the B.S. and M.S. degrees within nine semesters.

The combined program requires a minimum of 138 credits, of which at least 30 must be graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.S., students must meet all University and college requirements, including the requirements of the undergraduate major described previously, the minimum 60-credit liberal arts and sciences requirement, general education requirements, and residency requirements. In qualifying for the M.S., students must meet all University and college requirements as outlined in the Graduate Bulletin, including completion of a minimum of 30 graduate credits and any other conditions such as a research seminar, thesis, comprehensive examination, professional experience, and residency requirements. Up to 12 graduate credits may be applied simultaneously to both the B.S. and M.S. programs.

The undergraduate requirement of A CHM 420 may be satisfied by A CHM 520A. Likewise, the requirement of 6 credits in advanced chemistry may be satisfied by two 500 level graduate courses.

Students may apply for admission to the combined degree program in chemistry after the successful completion of 56 credits and after the satisfactory completion of A CHM 350 or 444. A cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or higher and three supportive letters of recommendation from faculty are required for consideration.

  

Courses in Chemistry

A CHM 100 Chemistry and Sustainability (3)
The course discusses, from chemistry point of view, air quality, water pollution, green energy, food and drug safety, fitness and health, agro- and household chemicals, and other topics related to sustainable chemistry. The basic concepts of chemistry, such as atomic theory, bonding, chemical reactions, gas laws, molecular structure, and intermolecular forces will also be covered. The course integrates both lectures and lab assignments. Two lectures and one lab period per week. Does not yield credit toward the major or minor in chemistry.

A CHM 101 The Chemistry of Sex, Drugs, and Sports (3)
This is a general education course designed for an audience with a casual interest in scientific matters. This course will focus on topics related to everyday life experiences and activities, such as human behavior, nutrition and medicines/drugs from the chemistry point of view, and the impact of our activities on health, education, law and public policy. We will analyze the social consequences and ethical dimensions of developing technologies. The ultimate goal of this class is to encourage a lifelong interest and learning in scientific issues using chemistry principles and technological developments. Two lectures and one lab period per week. Does not yield credit toward the major or minor in chemistry.

A CHM 105 Chemistry in Our Lives (3)
The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the fundamental principles of chemistry and their applications in everyday life. The course will explore the impact of chemistry on modern life by looking at its role in the environment, medicine, nanotechnology and polymers. Does not yield credit toward the major or minor in chemistry.

A CHM 120 General Chemistry I (3)
Atomic theory, quantitative relationships in chemical change, electronic structure of atoms and chemical periodicity, chemical bonding, and states of matter.

A CHM 121 General Chemistry II (3)
Elementary principles of chemical equilibrium, thermodynamics, and kinetics; electrochemistry; descriptive chemistry of the elements and their compounds. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 120 or 130.

A CHM 124 (formerly A CHM 122A) General Chemistry Laboratory I (1)
Introduction to laboratory techniques, experiments demonstrating chemical principles in General Chemistry I, including stoichiometry, calorimetry, and properties of some elements and compounds. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 120 or 130. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 125 (formerly A CHM 122B) General Chemistry Laboratory II (1)
Application of laboratory techniques, experiments demonstrating chemical principles of General Chemistry II, including solution properties, kinetics, equilibrium, and qualitative analysis of some anions and cations. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 124. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 121 or 131. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 126 (formerly A CHM 123A) Problem Solving: General Chemistry I (1)
Applications of the principles and methods studied in General Chemistry I. Assignments selected from the subject matter of General Chemistry I are aimed at aiding the student to develop a more thorough understanding of the subject. Corequisite(s): A CHM 120. S/U graded.

A CHM 127 (formerly A CHM 123B) Problem Solving: General Chemistry II  (1)
Applications of the principles and methods studied in General Chemistry II. Assignments selected from the subject matter of General Chemistry II are aimed at aiding the student to develop a more thorough understanding of the subject. Corequisite(s): A CHM 121. S/U graded.

A CHM 130 Advanced General Chemistry I (3)
Energy, enthalpy, thermochemistry, quantum mechanics and atomic theory, general concepts of bonding, covalent bonding and orbitals, gases, liquids, and solids. Students will be introduced to faculty research within the Department of Chemistry, as well as interdisciplinary areas. Only one of A CHM 120 and 130 and T CHM 130 may be taken for credit.

T CHM 130 (formerly A CHM 130H) Advanced General Chemistry I (3)
T CHM 130 is the Honors College version of A CHM 130; only one version may be taken for credit.

A CHM 131 Advanced General Chemistry II (3)
Chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, spontaneity, entropy, free energy, electrochemistry, transition metals, coordination chemistry, organic and biochemical molecules. Only one of A CHM 121 and 131 and T CHM 130 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 130 or T CHM 130.  

T CHM 131 (formerly A CHM 131H) Advanced General Chemistry II (3)
T CHM 131 is the Honors College version of A CHM 131; only one version may be taken for credit.

A CHM 133 (formerly A CHM 133A) Problem Solving: Chemical Principles I (1)
Discussions and applications of the principles and methods studied in Chemical Principles. Assignments selected from the subject matter of Chemical Principles are aimed at helping the student develop a more thorough understanding of the subject. Corequisite(s): A CHM 130. S/U graded.

A CHM 134 (formerly A CHM 133B) Problem Solving: Chemical Principles II (1)
Discussions and applications of the principles and methods studied in Chemical Principles. Assignments selected from the subject matter of Chemical Principles are aimed at helping the student develop a more thorough understanding of the subject. Corequisite(s): A CHM 131. S/U graded.

A CHM 143 Pre-Organic Chemistry (1)
The course provides a background and review of those topics necessary for success in organic chemistry. Topics may include bonding, Lewis acid/bases, hybridization, electronegativity, polarizability, 3-D structures, energy profile diagrams, oxidation states, and reaction mechanisms. Carbon containing compounds will be emphasized. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 120. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 121.

A CHM 199 Current Topics in Chemistry (1-3)
Selected topics from the current chemical literature in selected areas of chemistry. Particular areas of study to be announced each semester. Intended for students interested in exploring in depth themes and topics covered in larger lecture courses or topics in addition to those that can be treated in such settings. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A CHM 220 (formerly A CHM 216A) Organic Chemistry I (3)
Structure, synthesis, and reactions of the principal classes of organic compounds, stressing the underlying principles of reaction mechanisms and stereochemistry techniques. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 121 or 131 and 125.

A CHM 221 (formerly A CHM 216B) Organic Chemistry II (3)
Introduction to spectroscopic characteristics or organic compounds; continued classification of “reaction types” exhibited by organic molecules; chemistry of carbonyl compounds; aspects of aromatic chemistry, heterocycles, nitrogen compounds, polymers, and biologically important molecules. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 220.

A CHM 222 (formerly A CHM 217A) Organic Chemistry Laboratory I (1)
Basic techniques of organic chemistry including extraction, crystallization, distillation, and chromatography; physical properties of compounds. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 220. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 223 (formerly A CHM 217B) Organic Chemistry Laboratory II (1)
Application of basic techniques of organic chemistry to the synthesis and qualitative analysis of organic compounds. Applications of IR and NMR spectroscopy. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 222; prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 221. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 226 (formerly A CHM 225) Quantitative Analysis (3)
Theory of quantitative analysis based on modern chemical principles. The theory and practical applications of gravimetric, volumetric, potentiometric and colorimetric analysis. The statistical treatment of experimental data is described. Three lecture periods per week. May not be taken by students with credit for A CHM 225. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 121 or 131 and A CHM 125.

A CHM 227 Quantitative Analysis Lab (1)
Applications of the principles and methods discussed in A CHM 226. Experiments chosen for A CHM 227 aid the student in developing a more detailed understanding of quantitative methods. Specifically, students will perform quantitative experiments in spectroscopy, titration and gravimetric analysis using modern instrumentation. Statistical analysis of data will be performed. One 3.5 hour lab period per week. May not be taken by students with credit for A CHM 225. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 226. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 250 Introduction to Forensic Chemistry (3)
Descriptive discussion of the role of chemistry in modern forensic science. The main emphasis is in chemical methods and techniques used in criminalistics. Lectures only. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 120 and A CHM 121.

A CHM 251 Introduction to Forensic Chemistry Lab (1)
Applications of the principles and methods discussed in A CHM 250. Experiments chosen for A CHM 251 aid students in developing a more detailed understanding of modern forensic methods. Specifically, students will perform experiments in microscopy, questioned documents, glass analysis, TLC, latent prints, spot testing, field testing and crime scene investigation. One 3 hour lab period per week. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 250.

A CHM 307/307Z (= A ATM 307/307Z) Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry (3)
Chemical principles and concepts leading to understanding the composition and change in the chemical/atmospheric environment; sources and sinks of chemical constituents; chemistry of the troposphere and stratosphere; measurement and theory; greenhouse gases; global pollution and ozone depletion. Only one version of A CHM 307 may be taken for credit. Does not yield credit toward the major in chemistry. Prerequisite(s): A MAT 113 or 119; A PHY 150; and A CHM 121 or 131.

A CHM 342 Introduction to Biochemistry (3)
A one semester overview of protein and nucleic acid structural biology, synthesis, and function; with a brief introduction to metabolism, signal transduction, and carbohydrate chemistry. This course is suggested for chemistry majors who will not be taking the two semester Comprehensive Biochemistry sequence (A CHM 442 and 443) as part of their degree curriculum. May not be taken by students with credit for A BIO 365. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 220 and 221.

A CHM 343 Introduction to Biochemistry Laboratory (1)
Experiments illustrating the fundamentals of biochemistry as discussed in A CHM 342. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 222. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 342. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A CHM 344 Bioanalytical Chemistry (3)
The objective of this course is to provide students with a fundamental understanding of biomolecule analysis. Students will learn how to carry out different types of characterization and quantitative determinations, while becoming familiar with general laboratory practices and the operation of common bioanalytical instrumentation. The Lecture part will introduce the principles of common bioanalytical approaches used in biological and clinical settings, which will enable students to understand, carry out, and troubleshoot typical determinations of biopolymers. The lectures will not cover advanced instrumental techniques that are taught in specialized upper-level courses, but will deal instead with separations, spectroscopy, bioassays, and other common biochemical methods. The lectures will stress the chemical and structural aspects of target analytes as the basis for their identification and quantification. Laboratory experiments will provide the hands-on experience necessary to link personal observations with the sometimes dry and impersonal knowledge provided by textbooks and research articles. The selected experiments are aimed at developing observation and interpretation skills that will be honed by using the actual data obtained by the students. Two lectures and one lab meeting per week. Prerequisite(s): A BIO 365 or A CHM 342 or A CHM 442. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 350 Physical Chemistry I (3)
Mathematical description of physicochemical systems and their interpretation in terms of thermodynamics, kinetic theory, reaction rates and statistical mechanics. Atomic and molecular structure from the viewpoint of quantum theory with special emphasis on bonding and spectra. This is the required physical chemistry course for B.S. Chemistry students with emphasis in Chemistry. Only one of A CHM 350 or A CHM 444 may be taken for credit toward the major for B.S. Chemistry with emphasis in Forensic Chemistry or Chemical Biology or B.A. Chemistry. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 221, A MAT 214, and A PHY 150.       

A CHM 351 Physical Chemistry II (3)
A continuation of A CHM 350. The course contains the principles of chemical kinetics, quantum theory and spectroscopy. Topics include the rate laws, systems displaying complex kinetics, enzyme catalysis, atomic structure, molecular structure, microwave, Raman, infrared and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and statistical mechanics. This is the required physical chemistry course for B.S. Chemistry students with emphasis in Chemistry. Only one of A CHM 351 or A CHM 445 may be taken for credit toward the major for B.S. Chemistry with emphasis in Forensic Chemistry or Chemical Biology or B.A. Chemistry. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 350.     

A CHM 352Z Physical Chemistry Lab (3)
The experimental understanding of the basic principles of physical chemistry and development of familiarity with instrumentation. Includes experiments on the electrical properties of solutions, chemical kinetics, spectroscopy, microcalorimetry and computer experiments in molecular orbital theory. The course also includes instruction on searching the chemical literature, data processing, and writing laboratory reports. One lecture and two laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 226 and 227; corequisite(s) or prerequisite(s): A CHM 350 or 444. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 354 Mathematical Methods in Chemistry (2)
The purpose of this course is to clarify and to review the required, practical mathematical underpinnings for upper level chemistry courses that contain elements of thermodynamics, kinetics, quantum mechanics and data analysis. Corequisite(s): A CHM 350. Prerequisite(s): A MAT 214.

A CHM 390 Chemistry Internship (1-4)
Students will have the opportunity to acquire practical, "hands-on" experience in chemistry by participating as an intern in the work of an agency, institution, or corporation other than the University. The student's work will be supervised and evaluated by a designated individual at the internship site. This supervisor will provide an evaluation of the student's work to the University at Albany Department of Chemistry faculty member who is the instructor of record for final assessment and grading. Students majoring in Chemistry may apply to the Department of Chemistry for permission to enroll in this course. Admission to ACHM 390 will be dependent upon the acceptability of the candidate to the Department of Chemistry and to the host institution or agency. Enrollment in the course is limited in number in order to provide substantial individual hands-on training, and therefore, is determined on a competitive basis. May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credits. S/U graded.

A CHM 401 Current Topics in Advanced Chemistry (1-3)
Intensive examination of emerging trends in chemistry from the chemical literature. New information emerging from recent studies will be stressed. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A CHM 411 Computational Chemistry I (3)
Practical applications of quantum chemical calculations for chemical research. Overview of different levels of molecular orbital theory with case studies highlighting selected applications to organic, inorganic, and biophysical chemistry. Evaluation of each technique's strengths and limitations. Prior programming experience is not required. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 351 or A PHY 440, or permission of instructor.

A CHM 412 Computational Chemistry II (3) 
Molecular mechanics as a tool in biochemical and biophysical research. Statistical mechanics of equilibrium systems and enhanced sampling techniques in different thermodynamic ensembles will be reviewed. Strengths and limitations of commonly used methods will be explored. Prior programming experience is not required, but prior exposure to Linux will be helpful. Note that this course may be taken independently of A CHM 411. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 351 or A PHY 440, or A PHY 460, or permission of instructor.

A CHM 417 Advanced Synthesis Laboratory (3)
Experimental investigation of advanced syntheses of organic and inorganic compounds including their separation and analysis. The development of skills and understanding for the application of complex procedures and methods common in current practice. One class period, two laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 223. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 420 Inorganic Chemistry I (3)
Bonding and reactivity in inorganic systems, including metal complexes and covalent molecules. Applications of crystal field theory and introductory molecular orbital theory to coordination compounds, including group theory and symmetry, the spectrochemical series, and substitution mechanisms. Metal carbonyl complexes and an introduction to organometallic compounds and their reactions. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 350 or 444.

A CHM 421 Inorganic Chemistry II (3)
Topics in advanced inorganic chemistry, including organometallic chemistry, catalysis, and bioorganic chemistry. Other selected topics may include solid-state chemistry, supramolecular chemistry, electron-transfer, applications of vibrational and electronic spectroscopies, and the chemistry of the main-group elements. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 420. 

A CHM 422 Organometallic Chemistry (3)
A systematic study of the compounds containing a carbon-metal or carbon-metalloid bond. Emphasis will be placed upon the interaction of metal fragments with organic ligands, the structural types, and chemical reactivity of this class of compounds. Topics will also include the role of organometallic compounds in synthesis, their catalytic behavior, and models of bioinorganic systems. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 221 and A CHM 351 or 445.

A CHM 424 Retrieval and Presentation of Chemical Information (1)
Instruction and practice in modern methods of searching the chemical literature. Students are required to develop their skills in preparing written presentations and speeches. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing. S/U graded.

A CHM 425 Introduction to Undergraduate Research in Chemistry (2)
Original experimental and theoretical research problems. A printed or typewritten final report is required. Laboratory and conference hours to be arranged. May not be repeated for credit. No more than 3 credits of A CHM 425 and/or 426 may be applied toward the advanced course requirement of the chemistry major. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor; prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 424. S/U graded. 

A CHM 426 Undergraduate Research in Chemistry (3)
Original experimental and theoretical research problems. A printed or typewritten final report is required. May be repeated for credit but not more than 3 credits of A CHM 425 and/or 426 may be applied toward the advanced course requirement of the chemistry major. Laboratory and conference hours to be arranged. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of instructor. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 424. S/U graded.

A CHM 427 (formerly A CHM 426T) Honors Undergraduate Research in Chemistry (4)
Original experimental and theoretical research problems in chemistry with the results reported in a written Honors Thesis, as well as a public Department Seminar. S/U graded.

A CHM 428 Forensic Chemistry Research (3)
Original experimental and theoretical research problems. A printed or typewritten final report is required. May be repeated for credit but not more than 6 credits total may be applied toward the advanced elective course requirement of the comprehensive forensics chemistry or honors forensics chemistry emphases. Laboratory and conference hours to be arranged. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of instructor. S/U graded.

A CHM 429 (formerly A CHM 430) Instrumental Analysis (3)
Theoretical principles and chemical applications of selected methods of instrumental analysis. Main emphasis is on modern analytical methods including polarography, conductance, potentiometry, and coulometric methods, gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, atomic absorption as well as absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy. Statistical analysis of data will be discussed. Three lecture periods per week. May not be taken by students with credit for A CHM 430. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 226 and 227; prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 351 or 445 or permission of instructor.

A CHM 431 Instrumental Analysis Lab (1)
Applications of the principles and methods discussed in A CHM 429. Experiments chosen for this course aid students in developing a more detailed understanding of analytical methods. Specifically, students will perform analytical experiments in absorbance, fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy, atomic absorption and gas chromatography using modern instrumentation. Statistical analysis of data will be performed. One 3.5 hour lab period per week. May not be taken by students with credit for A CHM 430. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 429. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 432 Mass Spectrometry at the Chemistry-Biology Interface (3)
The goal of this course is to provide the students not only with basic knowledge of ionization techniques and mass analysis, but also with an understanding of the biochemical tools necessary for sample processing and preparation. Many examples of biomedical applications will be discussed in class to illustrate strategies and experimental design. These examples will also provide an overview of what has been done using mass spectrometry in the life sciences and will offer possible indications of which problems may be within reach. Spectra interpretation skills will be developed through discussion of examples in class and through solution of take home problems. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A CHM 433 Electronics for Scientific Instrumentation (3)
The objective of this course is to provide students with a basic knowledge and a fundamental understanding of electronics as applied to modern research laboratory. Students will learn the basic principles of key electronic components and circuits, with special emphasis on circuit analysis and design. The properties and applications of major components and modules will be studied, including transducers, amplifier, and digitizers. The fundamental elements of TTL and serial interfacing will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A CHM 434 Advanced Separation Science - HPLC (3)
This course aims at providing students with fundamental skills and knowledge in advanced separation science, in particular HPLC. The course will enable students to understand, develop and execute analytical protocols involving recent HPLC methodologies and instrumentation. The lecture will consider all common techniques in liquid chromatography such as gradients, normal and reversed phase, gel permeation, ion exchange, bioaffinity, and chiral columns, as well as RI, UV-vis, fluorescent, luminescent, electrochemical, and MS detection. Students will learn by lectures, class activities, and homework assignments how to plan analytical tasks considering the available HPLC techniques in a modern routine laboratory, as well as how to optimize the conditions in order to obtain sufficient analytical performance parameters in terms of selectivity, detection limit, cost, and analysis time. The lab will introduce the students in reverse phase HPLC using RI and UV-vis detection. Practical examples in the lab section will include food and soil analysis considering analytes and separation problems that can only be addressed by HPLC. Two lecture and one lab meetings per week. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 225 or A CHM 250.

A CHM 435 Advanced Physical Chemistry (3)
This course will develop classical and statistical thermodynamics for solving chemical and molecular problems important in modern chemistry research. The specific topics will be: the mathematical and physical underpinnings of the theory, the models to approximate reality, the discussion of the weaknesses of those approximations, and the application of classical and statistical thermodynamics to modern research problems in all flavors of physical chemistry. Prerequisite(s): two semesters of undergraduate physical chemistry (A CHM 350 and 351) and at least three semesters of calculus (through A MAT 214), or permission of instructor.

A CHM 436 Advanced Organic Chemistry (3)
Organic chemistry at an advanced level, including introduction of theoretical background and application in synthesis. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 351 or 445.

A CHM 437 Organic Synthesis (3)
The course will focus on the total synthesis of complex organic molecules, such as natural products. Synthetic strategies as well as reaction mechanisms of every step will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 221.

A CHM 442 (formerly A CHM 440A) Comprehensive Biochemistry I (3)
Chemical characteristics of living matter, amino acids, polypeptides and proteins, enzyme mechanisms and kinetics; bioenergetics and chemistry of metabolism. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 221 or permission of instructor.

A CHM 443 (formerly A CHM 440B) Comprehensive Biochemistry II (3)
Biosynthesis, storage, and expression of genetic information; electron transport and other transports across membranes, membrane protein structure and function. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 221 or permission of instructor.

A CHM 444 (formerly A CHM 441A) Biophysical Chemistry I (3)
Foundations of the physical principles and their applications to biochemical systems. Topics include first and second laws of thermodynamics, applications of these to chemical reactions and equilibria, and molecular motion and transport phenomena. Does not yield credit toward the major for B.S. Chemistry students with emphasis in Chemistry. Only one of A CHM 350 or A CHM 444 may be taken for credit toward the major for B.S. Chemistry with emphasis in Forensic Chemistry or Chemical Biology or B.A. Chemistry. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 221, A MAT 113 or 119, and A PHY 150.       

A CHM 445 Biophysical Chemistry II (3)
Foundations of the physical principles and their applications to biochemical systems. Topics include transport phenomena and sedimentation and electrophoresis, chemical and biochemical kinetics, chemical quantum mechanics and spectroscopy. Does not yield credit toward the major for B.S. Chemistry students with emphasis in Chemistry. Only one of A CHM 351 or A CHM 445 may be taken for credit toward the major for B.S. Chemistry with emphasis in Forensic Chemistry or Chemical Biology or B.A. Chemistry. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 444.  

A CHM 446 Chemical Biology Laboratory (3)
The lab will provide the basics for protein purification, protein characterization, and DNA manipulation through the use of chromatographic, electrophoretic, and spectroscopic tools of biochemistry and biophysics. One class period, two laboratory periods each week. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 221 and 223; corequisite(s): A CHM 350, 442, and 443. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 447 Advanced Forensic Chemistry (3)
This course focuses on current topics and analytical methods utilized in today's modern forensic laboratories. Forensic Chemistry will include topics such as introduction to criminalistics, ethical dilemmas, computer-assisted data analysis, public speaking on technical and non-technical subjects, as well as courtroom testimony. The course will also include a detailed description of how modern analytical techniques are applied to forensic chemistry. Specifically, gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, DART, headspace chromatography, TLC, liquid-liquid extraction, solid phase extraction, immunoassay and electrochemistry will be applied to the fields of forensic drug chemistry and toxicology. The course includes advanced statistical methods such as chi-square tests, multiple regression and correlation, nonparametric statistics, and analytical variances. Three lecture periods per week. May not be taken by students with credit for A CHM 450 or 451. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 226, 227, 429, and 431 or permission of instructor.

A CHM 448 Advanced Forensic Chemistry Lab I (2)
Applications of the principles and methods discussed in A CHM 447. Experiments chosen for A CHM 448 aid the student in developing a more detailed understanding of quantitative methods. Specifically, students will perform method development in gas chromatography. Students will also perform electrochemical and immunoassay experiments. Statistical analysis of data will be performed. Two 3.5 hour lab periods per week. May not be taken by students with credit for A CHM 450 or 451. Prerequisite(s) or corequisite(s): A CHM 447. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 449 Advanced Forensic Chemistry Lab II (2)
Applications of the principles and methods discussed in A CHM 447 and a continuation of A CHM 448. Experiments chosen for A CHM 449 aid the student in developing a more detailed understanding of quantitative methods as they apply to forensics. Specifically, students will perform method development in solid phase extraction. Students will also perform atomic absorption and GC-MS experiments. This course will culminate in a final project where students will apply what they have learned to independently research a forensic chemistry problem. Statistical analysis of data will be performed. Two 3.5 hour lab periods per week. May not be taken by students with credit for A CHM 450 or 451. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 448. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 455 Forensic Chemistry Internship (1-4)
Students will have the opportunity to acquire practical "hands-on" experience in forensic chemistry by participating as an intern in the work of an agency, institution, or corporation other than the University. The student's work will be supervised and evaluated by a designated individual at the internship site. This supervisor will provide an evaluation of the student's work to the University at Albany faculty member who is the instructor of record for final assessment and grading. Students majoring in chemistry with a forensic chemistry emphasis may apply to the Department of Chemistry for permission to enroll in this course. Admission to the Forensic Chemistry Internship course will be dependent upon the acceptability of the candidate to the Department of Chemistry and the host institution or agency. Among the criteria used by these agencies will be completion of A CHM 447 and 448 and a possible background check of the applicant. Enrollment in the course is limited in number in order to provide substantial individual hands-on training, and therefore is determined on a competitive basis. Application to the program must be made six months in advance of the beginning of the proposed internship. S/U graded. May be repeated once for a maximum of 8 credits.       

A CHM 458 Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry/Pharmacology (3)
Medicinal chemistry is an interdisciplinary course at the interface of chemistry and pharmacy and is involved with designing, synthesizing and developing pharmaceutical drugs. It will include the following topics: molecular modeling, rational drug design, combinatorial chemistry, QSAR, and cheminformatics. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 221, 442.

A CHM 470 Crystallography (3)
The geometry and structure of crystalline solids and methods of importance in their investigation. Internal and external symmetry properties as a consequence of atomic types and bonding possibilities: lattice types and space groups, x-ray diffraction, and optical techniques. This course will include real-time demonstrations and practical crystallographic work, including the opportunity to work on a provided structural experiment or a crystal from an undergraduate research project. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A CHM 471 Theory and Techniques of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry (3)
Introduction to basic theory and general applications of spectroscopic methods in biophysics and biochemistry. Discussion will be based on classical and quantum mechanical approach. Topics include: nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and vibrational spectroscopy; determination of structure by diffraction and scattering techniques. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 350 and 351 or A PHY 450, and permission of instructor.

A CHM 472 Experimental Methods of Organic Structure Determination (3)
Discussion of modern methods of organic structure determination such as multinuclear NMR and 2D-NMR techniques, IR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. Interpretation and correlation of spectral results in order to assign structures of organic, biological, and related molecules. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 221 and 223 and permission of instructor. Course fee applies. Consult the Schedule of Classes.

A CHM 473 Chemical and Enzymatic Kinetics (3)
Empirical and theoretical treatment of reaction rates and reaction mechanisms; experimental techniques. Emphasis on reactions in solutions, complex reactions, enzyme kinetics, homogeneous catalysis (enzymatic and nonenzymatic), and transition state theory. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 351, A MAT 214, A PHY 240, and permission of instructor.

A CHM 474 Physical Organic Chemistry I (3)
Topics in physical organic chemistry including electronic structure, stereochemistry, and conformational analysis. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 221 and consent of instructor.

A CHM 475 Physical Organic Chemistry II (3)
Organic reaction mechanisms with emphasis on the theoretical and experimental tools used in their elucidation. Prerequisite(s): A CHM 221 and consent of instructor.

A CHM 495 Materials Independent Study (3)
Individually selected topic of independent study in materials science (chemistry) culminating in a comprehensive written report. The material covered is to be beyond that offered in any other formal undergraduate course. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of instructor. S/U graded.

A CHM 497 Independent Study (3)
Individual, independent study of selected topics above or beyond those offered in formal undergraduate courses. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing and permission of instructor. S/U graded. 

  

Program in Classics: Greek and Roman Civilization

Faculty

Professors Emeriti
 John C. Overbeck, Ph.D. 
  University of Cincinnati
 Hans A. Pohlsander, Ph.D.
  University of Michigan
 Paul W. Wallace, Ph.D.
  Indiana University

 Associate Professors Emerita/us
 Sylvia Barnard, Ph.D.
  Yale University
 Stuart Swiny, Ph.D., Anthropology Department
  University of London

Adjuncts
 Joan Early, D.A.
  University at Albany
 Daniel Gremmler, D.A.
  University at Albany
 Marvin W. Kushnet, M.D.
  New York University



The Classics Program, housed in the Department of Art and Art History, offers courses in Greek and Roman Civilization (in English), primarily in the disciplines of Mediterranean Archaeology and Art or Classical Literature and Culture. Courses in Latin are periodically offered through the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

  

Courses in Greek and Roman Civilization

No knowledge of a classical language is required for these courses.

A CLA 207 (= A ARH 207) Egyptian Archaeology (3)
A survey of the remains of ancient Egypt from the earliest times to the Roman Empire. The pyramids, temples, tombs, mummies and works of art will be examined in an attempt to understand the unique character of ancient Egypt. Selections from Egyptian religious and historical texts will be read in translation. Only one version of A CLA 207 may be taken for credit.

A CLA 208 (= A ARH 208) Greek Archaeology (3)
Survey of the prehistoric and historical cultures of ancient Greece, as revealed by archaeology, from the Neolithic to the Hellenistic era, with emphasis on the evolution of pottery style, painting, sculpture and architecture. Only one version of A CLA 208 may be taken for credit.

A CLA 209 (= A ARH 209) Roman Archaeology (3)
Survey of the monuments of ancient Rome and her empire in a cultural and evolutionary context, including major works of sculpture, wall painting and architecture. Roman towns and principles of town planning also studied. Translated selections from Roman literary and historical sources.

A CLA 302 (= A ARH 302) Villanovans, Etruscans, and Early Rome (3)
Archaeology of the Etruscans and of early Rome in the context of the Iron Age cultures of the Italian peninsula. Only one version of A CLA 302 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A CLA 209, or A CLC 134, or junior or senior class standing.

A CLA 490 (= A ANT 490) Internship in Archaeological Conservation and Documentation (3–15)
Supervised placement in an agency engaged in conservation and documentation of archaeological artifacts, such as the New York State Museum or State Conservation Laboratory. Provides practical experience and cannot be counted among the 9 elective credits above the 300-level required for Mediterranean archaeology majors. Anthropology majors may use up to 3 credits toward major elective credit. May be taken by majors in Greek and Roman civilization and anthropology only. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. S/U graded.

A CLC 110 Classical Roots: Great Ideas of Greece and Rome (3)
Greek and Roman literature in translation. Considers such topics as human dignity and values, power and pride, the hero, intelligence impaired by appetite, and justice of the gods in such authors as Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Plato, Aristotle, Vergil and selected historians. Prerequisite(s): freshman or sophomore standing.

A CLC 134 History of Ancient Rome (3)
Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic Age, the rise of Rome, the Republic and the Empire.

  

Department of Communication

Faculty

Professors Emeriti
Alan Chartock, Ph.D.
New York University
Kathleen E. Kendall, Ph.D.
Indiana University
Anita Pomerantz, Ph.D.
University of California, Irvine
Robert E. Sanders, Ph.D.
University of Iowa

Professors
Teresa M. Harrison, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
Bowling Green State University
Timothy D. Stephen, Ph.D.
Bowling Green State University

Associate Professors
Annis G. Golden, Ph.D.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Matthew Matsaganis, Ph.D.
University of Southern California

Assistant Professors
Nicolas Bencherki, Ph.D.
Universitè de Montrèal and Sciences Po Paris
Archana Krishnan, Ph.D.
University of Connecticut
Alyssa Morey, Ph.D.
Ohio State University
Alan Zemel, Ph.D.
Temple University

Full-time Lecturers
Michael W. Barberich, Ph.D.
University of Pittsburgh
Barbara Jean Fehr, Ph.D.
University of Delaware    
William G. Husson, Ph.D.
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Adjuncts (estimated): 8
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 6



The department specializes in studies of communication in each of four particular social contexts: first, communication on an individual level, involving interpersonal or intercultural relations; second, communication at the societal level involving large scale audiences, especially in regard to political action and democratic processes; third, communication in organizations business, governmental, or grass roots organizations — whether business, governmental, or grass roots organizations — that affects either the organization's internal processes or external relations; and fourth, health communication, the ways that interaction shapes, and is shaped by, people’s health and institutional aspects of health care. All four of these areas have been significantly affected by new communication technologies, the study of which we incorporate into department course work.

The undergraduate program in Communication has two primary goals. One is to educate students, and expose them to significant writings, about communication processes and media and the critical role they play in the conduct of social life and its quality among individuals, in organizations, and in the larger society.

Our second goal grows out of the first; to help students become able to analyze and improve communication practices in particular settings and instances. This involves developing a basis for judging whether or not specific communication processes are meeting the needs of the people involved. It also involves learning about ways to measure the effectiveness of specific communication practices, and gaining experience analyzing and designing solutions to communication problems.

Studies in the major are organized so that students enrolled in 100- and 200-level courses are exposed to foundational ideas and research findings in the field of Communication, as well as provided with research methods and analytic tools. Students are also required to become more practiced as communicators, either through a public speaking or debate course. Course work at the advanced (300 and 400) level is intended to provide students with in-depth knowledge of current research and theory about interpersonal/intercultural communication, organizational communication or public communication.

Careers in Communication
The program in Communication is intended to help students become knowledgeable about communication processes and their influences on the interpersonal, intercultural, organizational, political, and health aspects of our societies. By focusing on development of analytical and critical skills, the program helps students become able to analyze and effectively participate in, and improve communication practices in diverse settings and instances. Having completed their degree in communication, the students will have a basis for judging whether or not specific communication processes are meeting the needs of the people involved. They will also be able to evaluate the effectiveness of specific communication practices, devise ways of improving them, and provide solutions to communication problems. These competencies have recognized value in the workplace as well as in one's personal life.

Graduates of the Communication program have pursued careers in sales, media relations, marketing, training, commercial production, film, editing, media planning, publishing, journalism, financial advisement, budget analysis, legislative assistance, radio programming, advertising, television production, medical care, insurance, and internal communication in not-for-profit, governmental, and business organizations.

Some have college teaching or advisement positions. Others have gone on to law school, or to work on their master's degree or doctoral degrees in Communication and related fields.

Special Programs and Opportunities
The department provides research opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students, an honors program, and an exceptional internship program. The department also provides a combined B.A./M.A. Program in Communication. We encourage all students to become active members of the local student club of the National Communication Association. We invite outstanding communication majors to be inducted into Lambda Pi Eta, the local chapter of the national honor society for communication.

Although not officially associated with the UAlbany student media, the Communication Department encourages its majors to participate in Albany Student Press, Albany TV and WCDB radio station.

Internship Program
The Communication Internship Practicum, which requires enrollment in both A COM 392 for 9 credits (these credits are general electives and do not apply toward the major or minor) and A COM 393Z for 6 credits, is a full-time internship offered in fall and spring for juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. It includes a weekly seminar meeting, and places students in communication related professional settings including, but not limited to, radio, television, public relations, the state legislature, hospitals, and corporate communication. Students accepted in this internship are not allowed to take any other course work during the semester. Acceptance into the program is competitive.

The part-time Internship in Communication (A COM 390, for 1-3 lower-level credits) is for undergraduate majors and minors who wish to develop on-site experience in one of the communication professions. This part-time internship may be taken in fall, spring, or summer terms. There is no seminar component in this course, and the minimum number of hours at the host agency is proportionately less than the full-time Internship Practicum.

Admission
Admission to the program in Communication is restricted. All students wishing to declare the major must complete an application and be formally admitted by the department. Applications can be made each semester. Applications to the major are accepted on a rolling basis. All students are notified by e-mail regarding admission or denial to the major.

Any matriculated student can apply for admission who has completed the following two courses with grades of C- or higher or S in each (see the section below for the policy on admission of transfer students to the major):

(a) A COM 100, and (b) either a course in statistics (A MAT 108, B ITM 220, A SOC 221, R CRJ 281, or A PSY 210), or a course in formal logic (A PHI 210 or equivalent). Students who apply and are not accepted can reapply in subsequent semesters.

Note: A COM 100 course required for admission to the major must be taken on the Albany campus if the student does not already have credit for it prior to matriculation.

An applicant will be guaranteed admission to the major whose grades in the two entry courses average to B or higher (in A COM 100, and either a statistics or logic course). Grades of S are counted as the equivalent of C for the purposes of this computation.

Applicants whose grades in the two entry courses average between B and C- will be admitted to the major on a space-available basis. Applications in this group are rank ordered each semester on the basis of a Composite Grade Point Average. This Composite Grade Point Average is computed by adding together the student's overall grade point average and the average of the grades in the two entry courses (A COM 100 and a statistics or logic course). Applicants in this group are accepted in descending rank order until all the spaces for new majors that semester are filled. However, no two applicants with the same Composite Grade Point Average will be treated differently: if one is accepted with that average, all others will be accepted with that average even if the total number accepted exceeds the available spaces that semester.

Transfer students who have completed at least 3 credits in Communication courses, and a total of at least 6 credits in courses that count towards the major in Communication, will be admitted to the major automatically if their GPA in all transfer courses that count towards the major is 2.00 or higher. All other transfer students seeking admission to the major will have to meet the admissions requirements for matriculated students after they begin coursework on the Albany campus.

Transfer students admitted to the major who do not have credit for A COM 100 or an approved statistics or logic course upon matriculation are still required to complete those courses with grades of C- or better. Transfer students whose grades in those two courses fall below that minimum are subject to being withdrawn from the major, pending an appeal and departmental review, but will automatically be readmitted if and when they meet the requirement.

Advisement
Majors in the Communication Department are required to seek advisement each semester. Advisement is offered by appointment between the end of the add-drop period and the beginning of the advance registration period. Majors who have been advised during that period are given priority for enrollment for the next semester's Communication classes. For students newly admitted to the major, attendance at an orientation meeting for new majors is required in order to get an advisement appointment.

Advisement is under the direction of the Director of the Undergraduate Program. Advisement each semester is generally conducted by an advising staff composed of graduate assistants. However, undergraduate majors are encouraged to seek out a meeting with a faculty member when they begin their studies in the department to discuss their goals, and devise an overall plan of study supportive of those goals in the Department, in their Minor or Second Major, and in their General Education requirement courses and electives.

Degree Requirements for the Major in Rhetoric and Communication

General Program B.A.: A minimum of 36 credits including: A COM 100; a computing course all minors but business: A CAS 200 or B ITM 215 or I CSI 101 or I CSI 201 or I IST/I INF 100 or I IST/I INF 301; business minors: B ITM 215 only; a statistics course (A MAT 108 or B ITM 220 or A SOC 221 or R CRJ 281 or A PSY 210) or logic (A PHI 210); A COM 265X; one course from either A COM 203 or A COM 212; and 15-18 additional credits in the Department of Communication as advised (of which at least 12 credits must be at the 300-level or above); and 3-6 credits of supporting courses (outside the Department of Communication), as advised, or an additional 3-6 A COM credits at 300-level or above.

A COM 265X is restricted to A-E grading after matriculation at Albany. Course offerings are listed below in groupings according to the following headings:

General Foundation courses offer students an introduction to the practice and social consequences of communication in a variety of settings, and an overview of traditional and contemporary thought on human communication.

Courses in Public and Mass Communication create a basic understanding of the process of communication in the political process, and public life more generally. This includes attention to communication and media issues in political participation, legislative processes, social movements, and election campaigns. This also includes attention to the speaker-audience setting typical of argumentation and persuasion in social and political life.

Courses in Interpersonal Interaction/Cultural Practices provide for a basic understanding of the process of communication in face to face interaction. These include attention to language use and strategy in personal relationships, health care, and work relationships of various kinds. Other courses include attention to cultural differences in face to face and group communication practices, and the role of communication in everyday life.

Courses in Organizational Communication address communication processes within and between organizations that affect their internal operations, development, climate, productivity, and social acceptance. These courses include a concern for the effect of new information technologies on organizational communication.

Applied Studies courses provide an opportunity for students who have achieved a grounding in the appropriate theoretical and research literature of the field, to apply this knowledge in independent projects or internships.

Honors Program

The Honors Program in Communication is designed to provide opportunities for the most talented and motivated students to work closely with each other and with the faculty.

Students may apply for admission at any point during a semester and may reapply if rejected after the close of that semester or thereafter. Decisions of the Honors Committee on admission are final and not subject to review or appeal.

Applications for admission will be approved if the student meets the following criteria: the applicant is a major in the department, with a 3.50 average in the required courses for admission to the major; the applicant has completed at least two full-time semesters of college study at Albany, with an overall average of at least 3.50, or the equivalent in the case of transfer students.

Admission to the program will be on a provisional basis for any student with fewer than 12 credits in Communication. Upon completion of 12 credits, admission will be finalized.

Students in the honors program are required to complete a minimum of 36 credits, meeting all requirements of the major, except for a special requirement among courses at the 300 level or above as follows: instead of 6 credits of electives at the 300 level or above, students in the honors program must complete either an honors project for 6 credits (A COM 499), or a senior honors project for 3 credits (A COM 499) plus 3 credits in a graduate course in Communication (for undergraduate credit) with approval of the undergraduate director.

Students will be put on program probation by the Honors Committee at the end of any semester in which their cumulative average in the major falls below 3.50 or their term average that semester is below 3.30.

Students will be dismissed from the program if they are placed on program probation in two consecutive semesters, or if they receive a grade below B in A COM 499. Students dismissed from the program cannot be readmitted unless the grades on which dismissal is based were in error and are officially changed. After completion of the requirements above, the records of candidates will be reviewed by the Departmental Honors Committee, who shall recommend to the department candidates for the degree with honors in Rhetoric and Communication.

Combined B.A./M.A. Program

The combined B.A./M.A. program in Rhetoric and Communication provides an opportunity for students of recognized academic ability and educational maturity to fulfill integrated requirements of undergraduate and master's degree programs from the beginning of the junior year. The program provides an integrated and focused curriculum in Communication that allows the upper-level student exposure to advanced knowledge in theory and substantive areas and opportunities for participation in research. A carefully designed program can permit a student to earn the B.A. and M.A. degrees within nine semesters.

The combined program requires a minimum of 141 credits, of which at least 33 must be graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.A., students must meet all University and college requirements, including the requirements of the undergraduate major described previously, the minor requirement, the minimum 90-credit liberal arts and sciences requirement, general education requirements, and residency requirements. In qualifying for the M.A., students must meet all University and college requirements as outlined in the Graduate Bulletin, including completion of a minimum of 33 graduate credits and any other conditions such as a research seminar or guided research project, professional experience, and residency requirements. Up to 12 graduate credits may be applied simultaneously to both the B.A. and M.A. programs.

Students who have completed a minimum of 6 credits of course work in Rhetoric and Communication may apply for admission to the combined degree program in Rhetoric and Communication at the beginning of their junior year or after the successful completion of 56 credits. A cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or higher and three supportive letters of recommendation from faculty are required for consideration.

Affiliated Program
The Journalism Program is an affiliated program with the Department of Communication. Please see the Program in Journalism section of this bulletin for further information.

  

Courses in Communication

General Foundation Courses

A COM 100 Human Communication: Language and Social Action (3)
Introduction to human communication in terms of an examination of the communication needs, processes, and results that typically occur in different social settings.

A COM 203 Speech Composition and Presentation (3)
Introduction to the composition and presentation of speeches. Course includes guided practice in topic development, organization, and the oral presentation of various kinds of speeches.

A COM 212 Argumentation and Debate (3)
Study of and practice in the methods of argument. Special emphasis upon skills needed in oral argumentation.

A COM 238 Introduction to Mass Communication (3)
Survey of electronic and print media with emphasis on structural analysis, content analysis, and research.

A COM 265X Introduction to Communication Theory (3)
Approaches to the study of human communication. Consideration of major research findings, methods and conceptualizations in such areas as persuasion, interpersonal communication, group communication, organizational communication, and mass communication. For rhetoric and communication majors completing their major requirements as outlined in this bulletin or subsequent editions, A COM 265X is restricted to A–E grading after matriculation at Albany. Prerequisite(s): A COM 100.

Courses in Public and Mass Communication

A COM 345/345Z Argumentative Methods (3)
Composition and criticism of argumentative discourse stressing the nature of issue, proposition, evidence, and form. Theory of rhetorical and scientific argument is also included. Only one version of A COM 345 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A COM 355/355Z Introduction to Rhetorical Theory (3)
The writings of major theorists, from Aristotle to figures of the 20th century. Only one version of A COM 355 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265 and junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A COM 370 Theories of Mass Media (3)
The theories, research methods, and empirical research findings related to the effects of mass communication on individuals and society. Prerequisite(s): A COM 238 and 265, or permission of instructor.

A COM 372 Persuasion in Media (3)
The purpose of this course is to challenge traditional assumptions about persuasion with the everyday practice of persuasion in our mediated world, and vice versa. At the end of the course the student should have acquired an understanding of effective techniques of persuasion and propaganda, an appreciation for how these are applied in practices such as advertising and public relations campaigns, and an appreciation of the problems of persuasion that challenge contemporary corporations. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265 and junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A COM 374 Radio and the Public Imagination (3)
Radio is an essential component in understanding the shape and texture of contemporary American culture and identity. This course explores the medium of radio, its history and its influence in shaping the ways Americans have imagined themselves through the 20th century and into the 21st century. The course also explores listening and the distinctiveness of radio as a medium of mass communication; the role of radio in creating belief in national identity; the creation of radio audiences; the emergence of broadcast journalism; sports and talk radio as cultural practices; the music industry, commercialism, and corporate influence in radio; and, finally, the persistence of radio despite the emergence of TV and computers. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265 and junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A COM 375 Computer-Mediated Communication (3)
Possibly the most important technological innovation of the latter half of the 20th century, computer-mediated communication is revolutionizing interaction in the global village. This course explores how social life is accomplished in a variety of Internet CMC systems, including threaded email forums, instant messaging, chat rooms, videoconferencing, and World Wide Web pages. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265 or permission of instructor.

A COM 376/376Z Empirical Studies of Persuasion (3)
Empirical approaches to attitude and behavior change brought about by communication. Only one version of A COM 376 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265 or permission of instructor.

A COM 378/378Z Studies in Public Persuasion (3)
Application of the student’s critical skills to the rhetoric of a particular public figure or movement; or to the rhetorical practice of a particular historical period or genre of public persuasion, such as television advertising, propaganda in mass movements, American campaign rhetoric. May be repeated for a total of 15 credits when content varies. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265 and junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A COM 379 Rhetoric and Social Movements (3)
Social movements are unique because, lacking other financial and political resources, they must rely upon rhetoric and persuasion. This course surveys the major approaches for studying the rhetoric of social movements and uses a case study approach to identify, describe, and evaluate the rhetoric of current social movements. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265 and junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A COM 380 Political Campaign Communication (3)
This course examines from both a theoretical and a practical standpoint the planning, execution, and evaluation of campaign communication strategies. It focuses mainly on modern presidential campaigns—the organization, the candidate, the audience, and the media. Forms examined include speeches, debates, television commercials, polling, news stories, and interpersonal contact. This course often has a co-requirement of A COM 297 for 1 credit. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265 and junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A COM 382 Introduction to Political Communication (3)
Course introduces students to fundamental areas of political communication, including campaigns, elected officials, the news media, popular culture, and citizen involvement in the political process. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265 or permission of instructor.

A COM 384 Children, Youth, and Media (3)
This course will examine the uses and effects of media content consumed by children and adolescents. Audience attention to several message domains will be examined, including television programs, movies, music, electronic games, advertising, and the Internet. Economic, political, and cultural influences on the production of child/youth media content also will be considered. Areas investigated will include governmental regulation of children’s media, message design features of educational media content, and the commercialization of youth culture. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265 and junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A COM 386/386Z Persuasion and Film (3)
This course will examine cinema as a vehicle of persuasion. Cinematic themes will be analyzed for their manifest and latent advocacy of various positions and points of view. A variety of films will be critically evaluated, including those that raise issues about race, gender, power, and politics. Contemporary thinking about persuasive message design will be drawn upon to investigate the cinematic presentation of these and other issues. Only one version of A COM 386 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265 and junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A COM 420 Communication and Social Protest (3)
This course provides students with an understanding of the communication strategies and challenges in social protest. By the end of the course, students should understand different goals and forms of activism, communication challenges for each, and issues regarding mainstream and alternative media. Students will also become familiar with specific social movements, and their various communication strategies. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265, and junior or senior standing.

A COM 430/430Z Communication on the Internet (3)
Course applies principles of persuasion to understanding communication on the World Wide Web. Students create a website using an HTML editor to advance an argument, and use persuasion theory to determine quality and credibility of information found online. Only one version of A COM 430 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265 and junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A COM 465 Studies in Communication Theory (3)
Study of a selected topic in communication theory; e.g., nonverbal communication, consistency theory, or mass communication. May be repeated for a total of 15 credits when content varies. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265, and junior or senior standing.

A COM 470 Methods of Communication Research (3)
Intermediate-level study of research strategies, design of experiments, and field methods in human communication. Prerequisite(s): A COM 100 and A COM 265, or permission of instructor. Statistics course recommended. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

Courses in Interpersonal Interaction/Cultural Practices

A COM 201 Interpersonal Communication (3)
Introduction to those aspects of communication which typify interpersonal relationships. Included are experientially acquired insights into, and theoretical considerations of, interpersonal communication.

A COM 340 Health Communication (3)
Students explore the role of communication in the delivery and receipt of health care, especially with respect to physician-patient encounters, organizations in the health care system, and the design and execution of health care campaigns. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265 or permission of instructor.

A COM 367 Theories of Interpersonal Communication (3)
The theories, research methods, and representative research findings related to experimental and observational studies of interpersonal communication. Prerequisite(s): A COM 201 and 265, or permission of instructor.

A COM 371 Theories of Intercultural Communication (3)
Communication between people from different cultures and/or subcultures, including racial and ethnic groups. Focus is upon appropriate theories, concepts, research findings, and practice in intercultural settings. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265, or permission of instructor

A COM 373 Communication Codes (3-6)
The patterns of communication behavior in everyday life. Emphasizes both language and nonlanguage behavior, and the various social contexts in which interaction occurs. Topics include social and cultural rules for structuring messages and the basis for interpreting behaviors. Course includes major components in both theory and research on this topic, including a research paper. Course will be scheduled intensively during the semester to reflect the number of credits to be earned. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265 and junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A COM 465 Studies in Communication Theory (3)
Study of a selected topic in communication theory; e.g., nonverbal communication, consistency theory, or mass communication. May be repeated for a total of 15 credits when content varies. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265, and junior or senior standing.

Courses in Organizational Communication

A COM 204 Group Communication (3)
The theory and practice of small group interaction. Examination of both group dynamics and cognitive processes, as they relate to group deliberation.

T COM 250Z Communication in Organizational Life (3)
This course examines how individuals negotiate their relationships with organizations primarily as employees of organizations, but also as consumers of services offered by organizations. In the context of internal stakeholders, or employees of organizations, the course addresses topics such as organizational assimilation, identification, resistance, and the management of work and personal-life interrelationships, including the impact of new information and communication technologies. We will consider employing organizations as sources of identity, sites for entertainment and socializing, sites for enacting spirituality (broadly defined) and religion, sources of social relationships and support, and substitutes for different aspects of family (e.g., mentor-parents; co-worker spouses). Relationships of external stakeholders to organizations are also considered, focusing on consumers of health care services. Only one of T COM 250Z and A COM 412/412Z can be taken for credit. May not be taken by students with credit for topics courses, “The Individual and the Organization” and “Interacting with Organizations.” Open to Honors College students only. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A COM 298/298Z Studies in Communication Practice (1–3)
Application of theory and research to the development of problem solving and other communication skills. May be repeated for a total of 15 credits when content varies. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A COM 304 Conference and Group Leadership (3)
Advanced study of small group deliberation, with special emphasis upon theories of group leadership as they apply in business and professional group communication settings. Prerequisite(s): A COM 204 and A COM 265, or permission of instructor.

A COM 369 Theories of Organizational Communication (3)
Theoretical models and empirical studies of communication within complex organizations. In-depth case study of one or more organizations. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265, or permission of instructor.

A COM 377 Communication and Technology in Organizations (3)

This course reviews perspectives on technology, communication and work. Students will analyze the introduction and use of technology in organizations and its impact on daily collaboration and interaction practices. They will study the way organizational members negotiate and make sense of technology in their individual and collaborative work. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265 or permission of instructor.

A COM 388 Communication and Global Organizations (3)
Through a series of readings, case studies, and video programs, students in this class investigate what globalization is and how it is transforming organizations across the world. The course is designed to enable students to understand why and how communication is a critical process through which these transformations are taking place. Students will explore, for example, how new communication technologies have led to the emergence of network, virtual, and web organizations, and what the implications of these developments are for both organizations and the individuals that are part of them (e.g., as employees, clients). Moreover, this course aims to highlight those unique and often unexpected ways, in which the processes of globalization, communication, and organization intersect and affect our lives today. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265 and junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A COM 389 Ethnic Media: Producers, Consumers, and Societies (3)
This course explores how media produced by ethnic communities, for ethnic communities affect ongoing negotiations of identity, perceived lines of division between ‘us’ and ‘others,’ and how the production and consumption of ethnic media affects the character of the larger media and societal landscapes. Historical, policy, cultural, organizational, professional, social relations, community, migration, and globalization dimensions of the study of ethnic media will be addressed through readings, individual and group projects, as well as case studies from the U.S., Europe, Australia, and beyond. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265 and junior or senior class standing, or permission of instructor.

A COM 410/410Y Organization Image Building (3)
Students will learn the fundamentals of integrated communication strategies and how they can be applied effectively to present and advance business, organizations, products, and issues. Topics covered include the basics of communication theory; the importance of clearly evaluating and defining organization objectives as the foundation of communication planning activities; how branding decisions affect a communication campaign, etc. Only one version of A COM 410 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265, and junior or senior standing.

A COM 412/412Z Communication, Work and Organization Life (3)
This course examines how individuals negotiate their relationships with organizations – primarily as employees of organizations, but also as consumers of services offered by organizations. Topics include organizational controls, employee identification and resistance, and the management of work and personal-life interrelationships, including the impact of new information and communication technologies. Organizations are considered as sources of identity, sites for entertainment and socializing, sites for enacting spirituality and religion, sources of social relationships and support, and substitutes for different aspects of family (e.g., mentor-parents; co-worker spouses). Only one of T COM 250Z and A COM 412/412Z can be taken for credit. May not be taken by students with credit for topics courses, “The Individual and the Organization” and “Interacting with Organizations.” Prerequisite(s): A COM 265 or permission of instructor.

A COM 415 Persuasion and Public Relations (3)
This course combines the study of theories of persuasive communication with the practice of persuasive communication campaign. Through readings, lectures, and classroom activities, students will become acquainted with the nature of persuasion, and then apply the concepts in practical exercises. The goals are to develop an understanding of the nature of persuasion, theoretical approaches to influence, managing campaigns, measurement and research design in persuasion, free and paid communication modalities, and using mass media in public relations campaigns. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265, and junior or senior standing.

A COM 465 Studies in Communication Theory (3)
Study of a selected topic in communication theory; e.g., nonverbal communication, consistency theory, or mass communication. May be repeated for a total of 15 credits when content varies. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265, and junior or senior standing.

Courses in Applied Studies

A COM 297 Research Practicum (1–3)
Supervised participation in established research projects. Course may be repeated for a total of 6 credits, but only a maximum of 3 credits may be applied toward major requirements. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. S/U graded.

A COM 390 Internship in Communication (1–3)
Supervised participation in rhetorical or communicative practices. May be repeated for a total of 3 credits. This course is meant to provide practical experience and cannot be counted among the 12 additional credits in “A COM” courses at the 300 level required for majors. Open only to majors and minors in their junior or senior years with cumulative averages of at least 2.50. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265, and permission of undergraduate director. S/U graded.

A COM 392 Internship in Operational and Applied Communication Theory (9)
Supervised field placement in an approved setting. Cumulative average of at least 2.50 required. (Open only to rhetoric and communication majors and minors, except with permission of instructor.) Student attends a weekly seminar (A COM 393) and prepares a major project and weekly reports in conjunction with that seminar. Does not satisfy major or minor requirements. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Corequisite(s): A COM 393, and permission of instructor. S/U graded.

A COM 393Z Seminar in Operational and Applied Communication Theory (6)
Advanced applications of rhetoric and communication theory. Participants will complete a major project describing in detail each segment of their work. Each participant will also complete five ten-page analytical papers in addition to a series of weekly seminar papers. (Open only to rhetoric and communication majors and minors, except with permission of instructor.) Yields credit toward rhetoric and communication major or minor. Corequisite(s): A COM 392, and permission of instructor.

A COM 397 Independent Study and Research in Communication (1–3)
Directed reading and conferences on selected topics. May be repeated for a total of 6 credits. Prerequisite(s): A COM 265, and permission of instructor and department chair.

A COM 399Y Oral Discourse and Civic Culture (1)
In this course, students learn to develop oral communication skills needed to participate more effectively in civic culture, including political, organizational, and community contexts. Students practice a variety of discourse skills, which may include group discussion, public speaking, questioning and responding, persuasion, and debate. Students also respond to the contributions that others make as well as reflect on the criteria for evaluating the effectiveness of discourse practices. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A COM 499 Senior Honors Project (3–6)
Design and implementation of an investigation of some clearly defined problem in rhetoric and communication, under faculty supervision. Students may repeat this course once, for a maximum of 6 credits, for those projects requiring two consecutive semesters of study. Prerequisite(s): admission to the honors program in communication; enrollment by permission of the director of undergraduate studies.

  

Program in Documentary Studies

Faculty

Director
Gerald Zahavi, Ph.D., Professor (History, Documentary Studies)
Syracuse University

Special Projects Coordinator
Susan L. McCormick, M.A. Adjunct Faculty (History, Documentary Studies)
University at Albany

Professors
Phyllis Galembo, M.F.A. (Art)
University of Wisconsin at Madison
Teresa M. Harrison, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow) (Communication)
Bowling Green State University

Associate Professors 
Sheila Curran Bernard, M.F.A., (History, Documentary Studies)
Goddard College
Adam Frelin, M.F.A. (Art)
University of California, San Diego 
Robert Gluck, M.H.L., M.S.W., M.F.A. (Music)
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Daniel S. Goodwin, M.F.A. (Art)
Hunter College
Vivien Ng, Ph.D. (Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies)
University of Hawaii 

Visiting Assistant Professor
William Husson, Ph.D. (Communication)
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Faculty Adjuncts
David Becker, B.F.A. (Tisch School of the Arts)
New York University
Katherine Van Acker, B.S. (Journalism)
School of Film and Photography, Montana State University         

Program Associates
Paul A. Miller, B.A. (UAlbany TV); Director of Programming & Production
Roosevelt University
Shira Segal, Ph.D. (Director of Film Studies)
Indiana University


Curriculum

The Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies with a faculty-initiated concentration in Documentary Studies offers students an opportunity to explore diverse approaches to documentary work in video/film, radio, hypermedia/multimedia, photography, and nonfiction writing and print journalism. The curriculum combines a solid grounding in the academic and theoretical literature of documentary media with intensive research and fieldwork, arming students not only with production skills but also the ability to critically analyze media in terms of both content and craft. The minor in Documentary Studies permits interested students to combine a course of study in a traditional major in the sciences, social sciences, or humanities with a sub-concentration in documentary studies. The Honors curriculum allows students to take on a program that is especially intellectually rigorous and that yields a final project more substantial than that required of non-Honors students.

Careers for Majors

An understanding of documentary media in its many forms prepares students to more effectively engage in the media-infused global marketplace as citizens, consumers, educators, scholars, and practitioners. The Documentary Studies concentration prepares students for employment in fields that require research and writing skills, including historical and archival research; the ability to analyze, critique, and produce visual and aural communications, such as for entertainment, education, or advocacy; and a broad understanding of fact-based communication that can be applied in a range of corporate, educational, service, or government settings. The curriculum also prepares students for advanced study in journalism, history, media production, global studies, and education.

Degree Requirements: Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies with a faculty-initiated concentration in Documentary Studies

General Program B.A.: A minimum of 36 credits, distributed in the following way:

Required Core Course
A DOC 251 (= A HIS 251) Introduction to Documentary Studies (3 credits).

Core Theory & History Courses
Two courses, chosen from the following (6 credits). Most of the courses listed below are offered every year.
A DOC 224 (= A HIS 224) Nonfiction Media Storytelling
A DOC 335 (= A HIS 335)  History and Theory of the Documentary Film
A DOC 376 (= A HIS 376)  A Cultural History of American Photography
A DOC 468 (= A JRL 468) Literary Journalism 
A ARH 265 History of Photography
A ARH 266 Photography 1970 to the Present
A ARH 368 The Documentary Film
A COM 370 Theories of Mass Media
A COM 374 Radio and the Public Imagination
A COM 386/386Z Persuasion and Film
A HIS 401  History of American Documentary Media
A JRL 420 Media in the Digital Age

Documentary Studies Fieldwork Seminar
(4 credits. Honors students should also enroll in A DOC 451 for an extra credit.)
A DOC 450 Documentary Studies Seminar and Fieldwork Practicum
A DOC 451 Honors Section for Documentary Studies Seminar and Fieldwork Practicum

Skills Courses
(4 courses, a minimum of 12 credits.)
A ART 344 Intermediate Photography and Digital Imaging (A ART 244 is a prerequisite)
A ART 350  Intermediate Digital Imaging  (A ART 250 is a prerequisite)
A ART 444 Advanced Photography and Digital Imaging (A ART 344 is a prerequisite)
A ART 450 Advanced Digital Imaging (A ART 350 is a prerequisite)
A ART 447 Advanced Film Production (A ART 250 is a prerequisite)
A COM 430 Communication on the Internet
A DOC 308Z (= A JRL 308Z) Narrative Journalism 
A DOC 323 (= A HIS 334) Foundations of Documentary Filmmaking
A DOC 324 (= A JRL 324) Introduction to Documentary Photography
A DOC 330 (= A HIS 330) Foundations of Documentary Web/Hypermedia Production
A DOC 380 (= A JRL 380) Photojournalism
A DOC 394 (= A HIS 394) Workshop in Oral History
A DOC 404 (= A HIS 404)  Readings and Practicum in Aural History and Audio Documentary Production
A DOC 406 (= A HIS 406) Practicum in Historical Documentary Filmmaking
A DOC 407 (= A HIS 407)  Readings and Practicum in Digital History and Hypermedia
A DOC 412Z Readings and Practicum in Nonfiction Media Storytelling
A DOC 442 (= A JRL 442 & A WSS 442) Transmedia Storytelling
A JRL 385Y Broadcast Journalism
A JRL 390 Digital Media Workshop I: Web Publishing
A JRL 392 Digital Media Workshop II: Desk-Top Publishing
A JRL 490Z  Digital Publication
A MUS 426 (= A ART 426 & A THR 426) Music Composition in Electronic Media I (A MUS 100 is a prerequisite)
A MUS 428 (= A ART 428 & A THR 428) Sound Design and Multimedia (A MUS 426 is a prerequisite)

Electives
The remainder of the required 36 credits may be fulfilled by taking any of the below courses. Also, any course which appears above, under “Core Theory & History” or “Skills” courses, and is not be listed below, may also be taken as an elective if not used to fulfill any other of the Program’s major or minor requirements.

Topics Courses (when content is relevant and approved by the Director or Associate Director of the Documentary Studies Program)
A ART 446 Topics in Photography
A COM 378 Studies in Public Persuasion
A COM 465 Studies in Communication Theory
A DOC 390 Topics in Documentary Studies
A JRL 475/475Z Topics in Journalism

Art:
A ART 244 Beginning Photography and Digital Imaging
A ART 250 Introduction to Digital Imaging
A ART 281 (= A ARH 268) History and Practice of Video Art II
A ART 346 Introductory Film Production
A ART 348 Color Photography    

Art History:
A ARH 261 Independent Cinema 

Communication:
A COM 238 Introduction to Mass Communication
A COM 370 Theories of Mass Media   

Documentary Studies/History:
A DOC 224 (= A HIS 224) Nonfiction Media Storytelling
A DOC 499 Special Projects and Internships in Documentary Studies
A HIS 499 Special Projects in History

Journalism:  
A DOC 225 (= A JRL 225) Media Law and Ethics
A DOC 308Z (= A JRL 308Z) Narrative Journalism
A DOC 363 (= A JRL 363) Visual Culture
A DOC 380 (= A JRL 380) Photojournalism
A DOC 468 (= A JRL 468) Literary Journalism
A JRL 230 The Mass Media and War in U.S. History
A JRL 340 Global Perspectives on the News
A JRL 385/385Y Broadcast Journalism
A JRL 390 Digital Media Workshop I: Web Publishing
A JRL 392 Digital Media Workshop II: Desk-Top Publishing
A JRL 490Z Digital Publication

Music:
A MUS 295 Audio Recording Fundamentals
A MUS 325 Analog and Digital: The Culture of Electronic Musical Composition

Additional courses offered intermittently may be very appropriate for documentary work and will be counted towards the major or minor if so determined by the Director or Associate Director of the Documentary Studies Program.

Supporting Topical Academic Courses

Students are strongly encouraged to select minors and supplementary courses supportive of their topical or subject areas of documentary interest. Those students who are attracted to international documentary work should consider history, foreign language, anthropology, globalization, political science, and sociology courses. Those interested in science and technology as a subject area of future documentary work should take science and technology courses supportive of this concentration. Those drawn to biography and humanities topics should look at the offerings of the English and History departments. All students should discuss their topical interests with their advisers and build a substantive base in one or more disciplines.

Degree Requirements: Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies with a faculty-initiated concentration in Documentary Studies - Honors Curriculum

The Honors Curriculum allows students to take on a program that is especially rigorous and that yields a final project more substantial than that required of non-Honors students. Special 1-credit supplementary sections provide students in the Honors Program with deeper, broader, and more challenging opportunities to probe the diverse approaches to documentary production—in this country and abroad. They encourage a high level of student-faculty interaction and the cultivation of an honors community.

Requirements
Students in the Honors Program are required to complete a minimum of 40 credits, meeting the core 36-credit course distribution requirements of the major, plus an additional 4 credits satisfied in the following manner:

A DOC 451 (for 1 credit);

THREE (3) A DOC 400 1-credit tutorials (A DOC 400 may be repeated for credit). A DOC 400 is designed to supplement 300-level and above courses outlined under Documentary Studies “Core Theory & History” or “Electives” courses (listed earlier), and provides Honors students with opportunities for more advanced and challenging work in these courses. The tutorial will permit Honors students to work one-on-one with their instructors and will normally include extra reading, writing, and project assignments.

Maintenance of a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.25. For graduation with an “Honors in Documentary Studies,” students must also have achieved a grade point average of 3.50 or above in the major.

All students enrolled in the Honors Program will take (in addition to the required A DOC 251 and A DOC 450) A DOC 451, Honors Section for Documentary Studies Seminar and Fieldwork Practicum (1 credit). Students in the Honors Curriculum in Documentary Studies will be expected to produce a more substantial final project in A DOC 450 than non-Honors students enrolled in that course. A DOC 451, the supplementary 1-credit course paralleling A DOC 450, will provide them with the opportunity and guidance to expand their projects accordingly.

Honors students must present their final projects at a public seminar.

Honors Curriculum Admission
Majors should discuss admission to the Honors Curriculum with the Documentary Studies Director at any time during their first or second year or at the beginning of their third year. Transfer students should apply upon their admission to the University. The requirements for admission include:

Overall cumulative grade point average of 3.25;

Completion of at least 12 credits required for the Documentary Studies major;

A grade point average of 3.50 in courses required for the Documentary Studies major.

Advisement
The Director of the major in Interdisciplinary Studies with a faculty-initiated concentration in Documentary Studies and of the Documentary Studies minor is the initial and primary adviser for enrolled students. The Director will help students identify faculty members in the participating departments closest to their documentary area(s) of interest for more intensive and focused advisement.  

  

Courses in Documentary Studies

A DOC 224 (= A HIS 224) Nonfiction Media Storytelling (3)
This course explores the use of narrative in books, films, and other works intended to present factual content to the general public. Students will watch, read about, write about, and discuss a range of work, developing tools for analyzing and evaluating nonfiction media in terms of both content and craft. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): restricted to Documentary Studies Program and History Department majors and minors. Others may be admitted space permitting, and with permission from the instructor. This class is recommended for students planning to take A DOC 412.

A DOC 225 (= A JRL 225) Media Law and Ethics (3)
This course examines strategies for making good ethical decisions in newsgathering and writing as well as the laws that pertain to daily journalism and public relations. The course covers the major ethical theories and philosophies and the major legal cases that journalists must know. Emphasis will be on actual cases and hypothetical situations encountered in daily journalism. The course pays special attention to some of the most common dilemmas - libel, free press/fair trial conflicts, anonymous sources, and publishing content that can harm people. Only one version of A DOC 225 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): restricted to Journalism, Documentary Studies, and History majors and minors. Others may be admitted space permitting, and with permission from the instructor.

A DOC 227 (= A HIS 227) Civil Rights: A Documentary Approach (3)
This course looks at the intersection of history and media as it pertains to the American civil rights movement. Focusing on the landmark archival television series Eyes on the Prize and a range of primary and secondary sources (documents, films, music, and more), we will study not only the historical events depicted on screen but also the ways in which these events were documented, archived, and later shaped into public media. Only one version of A DOC 227 may be taken for credit.

A DOC 251/251Z (= A HIS 251/251Z) Introduction to Documentary Studies (3)
This course is divided into 3 major sections. First, we will ask “What is a documentary?” One of the most widely quoted definitions is that of John Grierson who suggests that documentary is the “the creative treatment of actuality.” We will explore that definition, and others, as we lay the groundwork to examine the social, cultural, legal, and ethical considerations inherent in all documentary production. We will then look at specific documentary forms, their history, best examples, notable characteristics, and key practitioners. Finally we will look at some of the major themes in documentary work across forms and genres — in print, photography, film/video, audio, and hypermedia/multimedia. We will also consider how technological innovation has shaped the work of the documentarian over time. As the gateway course for the Documentary Studies major and minor, this course is not only about understanding what others have done in both the recent and distant past, but developing a foundation for future work in the major and minor. Those enrolled in A HIS 251 are expected to bring an historical perspective to their work in the course.

A DOC 294Y (= A HIS 294Y) Field Research in Oral and Visual History: The Hudson River Region (3)
Utilizing the Hudson River region as our laboratory, from the river's source in the Adirondacks to Manhattan Island in the south, this course is intended to be both a theoretical and practical introduction to the use of oral and video history in documentary and historical field research. As a course, it covers a wide territory -- from the gathering of oral/video interviews to explorations of how to utilize them in theatrical plays, radio programs, films, and television documentaries. From in-class discussions of memory, historical distortion, and interview theory, to technical instruction on the use of audio, video, and transcribing equipment, the course is designed to teach students critical and practical skills and to demonstrate the potential of this important research and presentation methodology - and to do it utilizing the communities and vast resources of the Hudson River corridor. A major component of the course will be student-initiated and led interviews with individuals from a variety of walks of life who live along the shores, or work on, the Hudson River. [Please note that in future years, the "Field Research in Oral and Visual History" course will vary in its regional focus]. Only one version of A DOC 294Y may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A DOC 308Z (= A JRL 308Z) Narrative Journalism (3)
Students will explore a variety of journalistic styles, with emphasis on compelling narrative and description, combined with the skillful use of quotes and dialogue. The class features intensive critiques of students' work. A variety of formats will be studied: newspapers, magazines, non-fiction books, and online publications. Readings for the course include works by Janet Malcolm, Barbara Ehrenreich, Ellen Ullman, Mary Karr, Edward Abbey, Edmund Wilson, Michael Herr, and James Baldwin. Students submit weekly writing assignments and a final portfolio of edited work. Only one version of A DOC 308Z may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A JRL 200Z, or permission of instructor.

A DOC 323 (= A HIS 334) Foundations of Documentary Filmmaking (3)
This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of researching, planning, shooting and editing digital video documentaries. When A DOC 323 is taught cross-listed with A HIS 334, the content focus will be history. Restricted to History and Documentary Studies majors and minors; all others by permission of instructor. Recommended for students planning to take A HIS or A DOC 406.

A DOC 324 (= A JRL 324) Introduction to Documentary Photography (3)
From Mathew Brady’s Civil War photographs, to the work of photographers of the U.S. Farm Security Administration in the 1930s, and through the stunning and emotive images of contemporary social, ethnographic, scientific, and war photographers, documentary photography has experienced a long and vigorous development. In this basic introductory hands-on workshop, students will examine the long heritage of documentary photography as well as the practical lessons to be learned from renowned practitioners. The course explores the use of still photographs to record various aspects of social, political, and cultural life and events. Students will develop their visual storytelling skills through a series of research and fieldwork hands-on projects involving the documentation of various aspects of contemporary life. Students should be familiar with the basics of digital camera operation. Only one version of A DOC 324 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): restricted to Documentary Studies Program and Journalism majors and minors. Others may be admitted space permitting, and with permission from the instructor.

A DOC 330 (= A HIS 330) Foundations of Documentary Web/Hypermedia Production (3)
Web-based or digital multimedia documentaries utilize a variety of hypermedia digital elements to construct compelling, interactive, linear and nonlinear "stories" on nonfiction topics. This course will cover the fundamentals of web site and digital multimedia composition through assigned short projects. When A DOC 330 is taught cross-listed with A HIS 330, the content focus will be history. Prerequisite(s): restricted to Documentary Studies and History majors and minors; all others with permission of instructor. Recommended for students planning to take A DOC/A HIS 407.

A DOC 335 (= A HIS 335; formerly A DOC/A HIS 405) History and Theory of the Documentary Film (3)
This course will introduce students to the history, theory, and aesthetics of documentary filmmaking. Beginning with a review and analysis of the general history of the documentary film genre and the varieties of approaches adopted by non-fiction filmmakers, we will begin to systematically unravel the various elements that contribute to the creation of informative, moving, and powerful documentary films – with special emphasis on historically-focused films. We’ll look at the various modes or styles that have evolved in the course of the genre’s development and the various techniques documentarians have utilized to effectively communicate historical ideas in cinematic form. Only one version of A DOC 335 may be taken for credit.

A DOC 363 (= A JRL 363) Visual Culture (3)
The course explores the increasing predominance of visual media in contemporary life. It examines how traditional narrative forms of storytelling are being replaced by visual forms of storytelling in journalism, photojournalism, film, television, the internet, video games, anime, graphic novels, and advertising. Particular emphasis will be paid to the global flow of visual culture and the technologies that facilitate these cultural exchanges. Readings range from Marshall McLuhan and Laura Mulvey to contemporary writers on visual culture. Only one version of A DOC 363 may be taken for credit. May not be taken by students with credit for A JRL/T JRL 220.

A DOC 376/376Z (= A HIS 376/376Z) A Cultural History of American Photography (3-4)
This course is a survey of the history of photography from 1839 until the present, presenting photographs as representative intellectual statements defining and illustrating major movements in American thought and culture. By looking at photographs, reading photographic and aesthetic theory, and drawing parallels from American painting, literature, architecture, and other informational and expressive media, the class will demonstrate the ideas and issues underlying American Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism. Because photographs are tangible, accessible, and have been upheld as an archetypal medium by each of these intellectual movements, the history of photography offers an ideal introduction to abstract ideas and broad intellectual themes. The course will provide students with extensive experience analyzing cultural documents and help them begin to explore underlying theoretical issues in photography. Only one version of A DOC 376 may be taken for credit.

A DOC 380 (= A JRL 380) Photojournalism (3)
Students develop the critical skills for evaluating and the technical skills for producing, editing, and publishing digital photographs in a variety of formats, including traditional newspapers, satellite transmissions from the field, and internet web sites. While developing their aesthetic and technical skills, students will critique each other's photos in a workshop format. Only one version of A DOC 380 may be taken for credit.

A DOC 390 Topics in Documentary Studies (3)
Various topics in documentary studies - including film/video, audio, web/hypermedia, non-fiction narrative writing, and documentary photography - will be examined in this course. Specific topics and instructors will vary and will be announced during advance registration periods. This course may be repeated for credit when content varies.

A DOC 394 (= A HIS 394) Workshop in Oral History (3)
This course offers a broad introduction to the history, theory, and practice of oral history, including the use of oral history in historical research, documentary production, and public history projects. Only one version of A HIS 394 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.

A DOC 400 Honors Tutorial in Documentary Studies (1)
Documentary Studies Honors students enrolled in 300 level courses or above in their concentrations may enroll in A DOC 400 for additional credit of honors work. The Honors Tutorial affords students an opportunity to work one-on-one with their instructors and will include extra reading, writing, and project assignments. May be repeated for credit.

A DOC 404 (= A HIS 404) Readings and Practicum in Aural History and Audio Documentary Production (4)
This course introduces students to (1) the historical study of sound, soundscapes, and sound recordings, (2) aural history composition techniques (especially radio documentaries and features, but also aural essays and museum audio installations), and (3) audio delivery technologies to communicate historical ideas to broad audiences. It includes coverage of textual and archival audio source research, 20th and 21st century historical radio documentary work, analysis of audio documentary forms and nonfiction storytelling techniques, scriptwriting, technical instruction in the art of audio recording and post-production editing and mixing, discussion of audio preservation and restoration techniques, and an introduction to traditional and modern technologies for the transmission and dissemination of documentary and related audio work. Only one version of A DOC 404 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A DOC 406 (= A HIS 406) Practicum in Historical Documentary Filmmaking (4)
This course is a hands-on workshop in historical documentary filmmaking. It will introduce students to the all aspects of historical documentary production—from pre-production planning, research, and writing, to production (filming/videotaping interviews, recording voiceover narration, lighting, filming reenactments), and finally, post-production (editing and mixing actualities, music, narration, interviews, still photographs). The course, in short, is designed to teach students practical, technical skills and is a perfect follow-up to A DOC 335, which examines the history and theory of documentary filmmaking. Only one version of A DOC 406 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A DOC 407 (= A HIS 407) Readings and Practicum in Digital History and Hypermedia (4)
This course introduces students to the practice of history in the digital age. The emergence of the World Wide Web has opened up new avenues for researching, analyzing, and presenting the past–but has also raised new questions about producing quality historical scholarship in this open environment. This course will work on two fronts, looking first at the current state of the field of “digital history,” from issues of narrative and hypertext theory to some of the best (and worst) practices of current historical websites. At the same time, as a central component of the course, students will work in collaboration to build their own well-researched and historically sound web projects. Previous experience with building websites is welcomed but not required. Only one version of A DOC 407 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A DOC 412 Readings & Practicum in Nonfiction Media Storytelling (3)
This is an advanced course that helps students use the tools of good writing to understand, evaluate, and create historical media intended for use in museums, on the Web, and on television, with an emphasis on story and story structure. This is not a production course; works will be researched and written only. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. Completion of A DOC 224 is recommended.

A DOC 442 (= A WSS 442 & A JRL 442) Transmedia Storytelling (3)
Students in this workshop learn how to use a variety of new media tools, including—but not restricted to—digital videos, interactive web pages, and animation software, to create a set of linked stories about a singular historical or newsworthy event. Additionally, students learn to search for, collect, and analyze primary sources—e.g. news stories, first-person accounts, government records, cultural artifacts, ephemera, found footage, etc.—stored in archives, libraries, museums, and online databases. Through the processes of research and reflection, students learn to understand the intersections and consequences of class, gender, race, and nationality. The workshop format enables students to participate fully as active learners and peer teachers. Only one version of A DOC 442 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.

A DOC 450 Documentary Studies Seminar and Fieldwork Practicum (4)
The Documentary Studies Seminar and Fieldwork Practicum is the capstone course for majors and minors in documentary studies. Students are expected to complete a substantial project in any one of five documentary concentrations (radio/audio, video/film, hypermedia/multimedia, photography, and print). Students will work with individual concentration advisers as well as the course instructor; they will receive feedback, as well, from fellow students enrolled in the course. Discussion of selected readings, production techniques, research strategies, and legal and ethical issues, as well as viewings of documentary films/photographs and airings of audio documentaries, will inform and complement in-depth examinations of individual projects. The course will be offered once a year, generally in the spring semester. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A DOC 451 Honors Section for Documentary Studies Seminar and Fieldwork Practicum (1)
The course, for Honors students taking A DOC 450, offers students an opportunity to complete a major project in their area of documentary concentration: radio/audio, video/film, hypermedia/multimedia, photography, and print journalism. This 1 credit Honors course allows Honors students to take on a more ambitious project than normally expected of majors. It culminates in a public presentation of their projects.

A DOC 468 (= A JRL 468) Literary Journalism (3)
This course invites students to read and analyze literary journalism, with attention to its historical context. Readings include works by Daniel Defoe, Charles Dickens, Samuel Clemens, Stephen Cane, Janet Flanner, Lillian Ross, Rebecca West, John Hersey, James Agee, Dorothy Day, Meridel LeSueur, Truman Capote, Joan Didion, Tracy Kidder, and others. While reflecting on the relations between journalism and literary fiction and nonfiction, students will complete bi-weekly assignments. Only one version of A DOC 468 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A JRL 201Z.

A DOC 499 Special Projects and Internships in Documentary Studies (1-4)
This is a course designed for students interested in engaging in documentary fieldwork and production projects through internships with on-campus and off-campus organizations, or on their own with close faculty supervision. Students should already have the specific production skills (e.g. filmmaking, photography, audio recording/editing, hypermedia authoring) necessary for the project or internship they wish to undertake. Typical projects or internships might involve mounting documentary photography exhibits, participating in documentary editing projects (including online, nonfiction journals), designing virtual museums and pod-casting/video-casting websites, or working as production members on film/video or radio projects. Credit load will depend on the level of engagement and time obligations associated with the specific project undertaken by the student. May be repeated for a total of 6 credits. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, a minimum GPA of 2.50, and permission of the instructor. S/U graded.

  

Department of East Asian Studies

Faculty

Professors
Susanna Fessler, Ph.D.
Yale University
James M. Hargett, Ph.D.
Indiana University
Charles M. Hartman, Ph.D.
Indiana University

Associate Professors
Andrew Sangpil Byon, Ph.D. (Department Chair)
University of Hawai’i at Manoa
Fan Pen Chen, Ph.D.
Columbia University
Anthony DeBlasi, Ph.D.
Harvard University

Assistant Professors
John Person, Ph.D.
University of Chicago
Aaron Proffitt, Ph.D.
University of Michigan at Ann Arbor

Lecturers
Michiyo Kaya Wojnovich, M.S.
University at Albany
Shu-Han Yeh, M.A.
National Taiwan Normal University

Affiliated Faculty
Michitake Aso, Ph.D., Department of History
University of Wisconsin at Madison
Cheng Chen, Ph.D., Department of Political Science
University of Pennsylvania
Angie Y. Chung, Ph.D., Department of Sociology
University of California, Los Angeles
Youqin Huang, Ph.D., Department of Geography and Planning
University of California, Los Angeles  
Kwan Koo Yun, Ph.D., Department of Economics
Stanford University

Adjuncts (estimated): 5



The Department of East Asian Studies offers courses in the languages and cultures of the three major civilizations of East Asia: China, Japan and Korea. The department provides instruction in elementary, intermediate and advanced Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. There are also courses taught in English on Chinese, Japanese, and Korean literature, philosophy, religion, history, geography, economics and political science.

Careers
Graduates of the Department traditionally enter careers in teaching, international trade, U.S. government, and the travel industry. The degree is also excellent preparation for professional graduate programs in business administration (M.B.A.), law, librarianship, and Teaching English as a Second Language. The department strongly encourages students interested in East Asian Studies to double-major within a separate department or college. Combinations with particularly strong employment potential are East Asian Studies and economics, business, and political science.

Special Programs or Opportunities
The University maintains exchange programs in China with Beijing University, Beijing Normal University, Fudan University, East China Normal University, and Sichuan University. These programs provide students an opportunity to study Chinese language and selected topics in the humanities and social sciences in China for summers, one semester, or an entire academic year. The university also maintains similar exchange programs with Kansai Gaidai and Tokyo University of Foreign Studies in Japan and with Yonsei University in Seoul, Korea. All departmental majors are strongly encouraged to participate in these exchange programs in order to gain first-hand experience of life in contemporary East Asia.

Degree Requirements

The Department of East Asian Studies offers three concentrations or degree tracks. Each is a separate and distinct course of study leading to the B.A. degree. These are 1) the Major in Chinese Studies, 2) the Major in East Asian Studies, and 3) the Major in Japanese Studies. Students may not double-major in East Asian Studies and Chinese Studies or Japanese Studies. Requirements for these programs are as follows:

Requirements for the Major in Chinese Studies (34 credits)

Requirements for the Major in East Asian Studies (34 credits)

Requirements for the Major in Japanese Studies (34 credits)

Honors Program in the Three East Asian Studies Majors

Students with 3.50 grade point average in one of the department’s majors are eligible for its Honors Program. In addition to completing the regular requirements for the major in Chinese Studies, East Asian Studies, or Japanese Studies, students in the Honors Program complete a further six credits of A EAS 495, Colloquium in East Asian Studies.

At the beginning of the fall semester (preferably of the senior year), students will submit their honors proposals to the faculty. If the faculty approves a proposal, the student will be permitted to enroll in A EAS 495 (3 credits), which consists of directed readings and conferences involving appropriate members of the faculty. The project will be evaluated by the project adviser at the end of the fall semester and if the student is making appropriate progress, they will be permitted to enroll in A EAS 495 (3 credits) again in the spring semester. The project will be formally evaluated by the Department Honors Committee no later than the mid-term point in the second semester of the senior year. The final version of the project must be submitted by the last day of classes during the second semester of the senior year.

  

Courses in Chinese Studies

A EAC 100 Introduction to China (3)
This is a preliminary introduction to China and its culture. It covers contemporary developments and provides important historical background. Students also study some simple Chinese language to facilitate short-term social interaction in China. It does not count for East Asian Studies Department major requirements.

A EAC 101 Elementary Chinese I (5)
An introduction to modern Chinese (Mandarin) with emphasis on speaking, reading and writing. Basic fluency in the spoken language is developed through intensive use and repetition of basic vocabulary and fundamental sentence patterns. Students learn the Pinyin romanization system and the simplified characters used in mainland China. May not be taken by students with any previous knowledge of any Chinese language.

A EAC 102 Elementary Chinese II (5)
Continuation of A EAC 101. Prerequisite(s): A EAC 101.

A EAC 150 China Through Western Eyes (3)
American and European perceptions of China from the 13th century to the present, emphasizing the origin(s) and influence of these Western perspectives. Readings range from the travel journals of Marco Polo to recent reports.

A EAC 160/160V/160X/160Z (= A GOG 160/160V/160X/160Z) China: People and Places (3)
This course provides a systematic introduction of China as an emerging political and economic power in the context of globalization. Main topics include historical evolution, uneven physical and social geography, economic reform, rapid urbanization, population growth and family planning, environmental change, tradition and culture change, and persisting and emerging problems. This course aims to help student better understand China. This course also teaches students how to search, use and evaluate information for their research in an increasingly digital and information-oriented world. Only one version of A GOG/A EAC 160 may be taken for credit.

A EAC 170 China: Its Culture and Heritage (3)
Survey of the essential elements of traditional Chinese civilization and their transformation in the 20th century. Focus is on the development of basic Chinese social, political and aesthetic ideas. Conducted in English; no knowledge of Chinese required.

A EAC 201 Intermediate Chinese I (5)
This course is a continuation of A EAC 102. It develops further the students' overall linguistic command of modern Mandarin Chinese. Students primarily learn simplified characters as used in Mainland China. Prerequisite(s): A EAC 102 or equivalent.

A EAC 202 Intermediate Chinese II (5)
This course is a continuation of A EAC 201. Prerequisite(s): A EAC 201 or equivalent.

A EAC 203 Elementary Chinese for Heritage Learners (5)
This elementary modern Chinese language class is designed specifically for heritage learners; that is, students whose family background and/or previous education have provided them with some Chinese language skills (usually listening and speaking), but whose reading and writing skills may range from the most basic to knowledge of just a few hundred Chinese characters. The goal of this accelerated A EAC 203 class, which in one semester will cover all the material taught in A EAC 101 and 102, is to help heritage learners improve their overall communicative competence in modern Chinese (Mandarin). There are no prerequisites, but this is a class designed specifically for heritage learners who already have some knowledge of modern Chinese. Students with no previous knowledge of the Chinese language should enroll in A EAC 101.

A EAC 204 Intermediate Chinese for Heritage Learners (5)
This intermediate modern Chinese language class is designed specifically for heritage learners; that is, students whose family background and/or previous education has provided them with some Chinese language skills (usually listening and speaking), but whose reading and writing skills are probably limited to only several hundred Chinese characters. The goal of this accelerated A EAC 204 class, which in one semester will cover all the material taught in A EAC 201 and 202, is to help heritage learners improve their overall communicative competence in modern Chinese (Mandarin). Prerequisite(s): A EAC 203 or the equivalent in background knowledge or training.

A EAC 205X Chinese Studies Research and Bibliographic Methods (3)
This course will cover research and bibliographic methods in Chinese Studies. Students will learn how to navigate library catalogs and the Internet with specific emphasis on Chinese databases and resources. Students will also learn how to use reference materials, such as character dictionaries. Only one of A EAC 205X, A EAJ 205X, and A EAS 205X may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): one year or equivalent of Chinese.

A EAC 210 Survey of Classical Chinese Literature in Translation I (3)
An introduction to the major works of Chinese literature from the oracle bones (18th century BC) to poetry and prose writings of the Song dynasty (960-1279).

A EAC 211 Survey of Classical Chinese Literature in Translation II (3)
An introduction to the major works of Chinese literature from the Yüan dynasty (1279-1368) to the Ch’ing period (1644-1911), with emphasis on plays, poems and fiction.

A EAC 212 Modern Chinese Literature in Translation (3)
Survey of prose literature in China from the May Fourth Movement (1919) to the present, including works written after the Cultural Revolution.

T EAC 230 (= T GOG 230) Reform and Resistance in Contemporary China (4)
The course provides a survey of economic and social change in reform-era China (1978-present), beginning with a broad review of the policies that have brought about such a monumental restructuring of the economy. In the later sections of the in-class discussion will focus on the human impacts of the reforms and the extent to which the Chinese people have been constrained in their struggles for a better life and a more just and equitable society. Readings and materials from other media (including contemporary film and literature) will be selected to illustrate some of the ways the Chinese people have been exerting agency in shaping their own fate and resisting the inevitable forces that seem likely to overwhelm them in the new era of free-wheeling capitalism. The classroom discussions will focus on specific case studies of resistance drawn from a variety of sites and a range of contexts in contemporary China, which will be discussed and analyzed in the context of social science theories about the nature of resistance and its outcomes. The course will present ideas and a body of literature that question and critique the dominant 'narrative of success' that currently pervades Western media and academic curricula. Formerly A EAC/A GOG 230H. Only one version of T EAC 230 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): open to Honors College students only.

A EAC 260 (= A GLO 260 & A GOG 260) China in the Global Arena (3)
An introduction to the development of China’s economy and society since the death of Chairman Mao Tse-tung in 1976. Focuses on urbanization, industrialization, export-oriented development, and participation in global trade, finance and politics. Taught in Shanghai, this multidisciplinary course helps students understand the dynamics of China’s rapid economic growth over the last three decades, and how Chinese scholars interpret the nation’s growing importance in the global system. Only one version of A EAC 260 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): taken after, or simultaneously with A EAC 100.

A EAC 280 (= A ARH 280) Chinese Painting (3)
Introduces students to the major works of traditional Chinese painting and analyzes those works to arrive at an understanding of life in traditional China. The major class activity will be viewing, discussing and analyzing slides of Chinese paintings. Only one version of A EAC 280 may be taken for credit.

A EAC 301Y Advanced Chinese I (3)
This course is a continuation of A EAC 202. Equal emphasis is placed on enhanced reading, writing, and oral communication skills. Class is conducted in Mandarin Chinese. Prerequisite(s): A EAC 202 or equivalent.

A EAC 302Y Advanced Chinese II (3)
This course is a continuation of A EAC 301Y. Prerequisite(s): A EAC 301Y or equivalent.

A EAC 308 (= A GLO 308 & A GOG 308) Debating Contemporary China (1)Enables students who have recently studied in China to discuss and debate major contemporary issues: the factors underlying China’s rapid economic growth; the impact of China’s economic growth on society, environment and the global system; the future of China’s political system; the future of China’s population policies; the dynamics of Chinese cities; the situation of Tibet and of ethnic and religious minorities; the future of Taiwan; relations with other Asian neighbors. Only one version of A EAC 308 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): at least 3 credits of Study Abroad coursework in China sometime in the previous year.

A EAC 350 (= A GOG 350) Urban Development in China (3)
Provides a comprehensive understanding of urban development in China. Reviews the history of urban development in China and examines the demographic, social, economic, and cultural dimensions of the urbanization process. Analyzes the emerging urban land and housing markets, and the changing urban landscape.

A EAC 373 (= R POS 373) Government and Politics in the People's Republic of China (3)
Examination of the origins of the Communist movement in China against the backdrop of the decline of dynastic rule and the era of Western imperialism. The implications of ideology, institutions, and individuals for public policy in the People's Republic of China. Only one version of A EAC 373 may be taken for credit.

A EAC 374 (= A HIS 374) Crime and Punishment in Traditional China (3)
This course will examine the distinctive understanding of crime and the law in China from the 7th to the 19th centuries. We will be particularly interested in theories of law during this period, the institutions of the imperial justice system, varieties of crime and punishment, and popular representations of the criminal justice system. Readings will include primary sources such as legal codes, case histories, and crime stories as well as secondary works on Chinese legal history. There are no prerequisites for this course, although some background in Chinese Studies will be helpful. Only one version of A EAC 374 may be taken for credit.

A EAC 379/379Z (= A HIS 379/379Z) History of Premodern China (3)
This course is a survey of China’s historical development from prehistory to the founding of the Ming Dynasty in the 14th century. We will concern ourselves especially with the transformation of Chinese social structure over time, the relations between the state and the social elite, and the relationship between China’s intellectual, political, and social histories. Only one version of A EAC 379 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in East Asian studies or history.

A EAC 380/380Z (= A HIS 380/380Z) History of Modern China (3)
This course is a survey of China's history during the late imperial and modern periods. It begins with the founding of the Ming dynasty in the late 14th century and concludes with the present day. Of particular interest is the interplay of political, social, and intellectual history during this period. Only one version of A EAC 380 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in East Asian studies or history.

A EAC 389 Topics in Chinese Literature, History, and Culture (3)
This course will focus on a selected topic or major work of traditional or modern Chinese literature or history for intensive study. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A EAC 414 (formerly A EAC 310) Classical Chinese I (3)
Introduction to the literary Chinese language and classical Chinese culture through readings of simple texts selected from early classics, including the Chuangtzu and Records of the Grand Historian. Prerequisite(s): A EAC 202 or permission of the instructor.

A EAC 415 (formerly A EAC 311) Classical Chinese II (3)
Continuation of A EAC 414. Prerequisite(s): A EAC 414 or permission of the instructor.

A EAC 420 (formerly A EAC 390) Classical Chinese Poetry (3)
This class surveys Chinese poetry written in traditional verse forms, beginning with works from the Book of Poetry (600 BC) and concluding in the 18th century. Major poets will include Qu Yuan, Du Fu, Li Bo, and Su Shi. The course will begin with the major linguistic and rhetorical elements of Chinese poetry and proceed to introduce elements of traditional Chinese poetics. No knowledge of Chinese is required. All readings and discussions will be in English. Prerequisite(s): any one of the following courses: A EAS 103, T EAS 105, A EAC 170, 210, or 211.

A EAC 423 Practicum in Teaching Chinese (2)
This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of teaching Chinese as a foreign language, designed for those who contemplate a career teaching Chinese at the secondary or college level. Focus is on attaining practical experience through class observation and a supervised classroom practicum. Prerequisite(s): fluency in the reading, writing, and speaking of modern Chinese (Putonghua); permission of the instructor.

A EAC 430 (formerly A EAS 392) Chinese Travel Literature (3)
This course will examine the traditions of travel writing in China. Students will read selections from works representing important aspects of the genre. Half of the semester will focus on China and half on Japan. All readings will be in English; no knowledge of Chinese is required. Prerequisite(s): any one of the following: A EAS 103; A EAC 210, 211, or permission of instructor.

A EAC 432 (= A THR 432; formerly A EAC 396/A THR 323) Readings in Chinese Drama (3)
After introducing the history and aesthetics of the Chinese theater, this course will concentrate on reading and discussing pieces of Yuan Zaju Drama, Ming Chuanqi Opera, Peking/Beijing Opera, and Chinese shadow plays. Knowledge of the Chinese language is not necessary. Only one version of A EAC 432 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): any 200 level course (other than language courses) from either the Department of East Asian Studies or the Theater Department, or permission of the instructor.

A EAC 458 (= A HIS 458) New Orders in Asia (3)
This class examines the international orders in place in Asia from the days of 19th century imperialism to the search for a 21st century post-Cold War order. The focus will be on political, cultural, and economic interactions among the three main East Asian powers: China, Japan, and the US. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

A EAC 470Z (= A GOG 470Z) China After Deng Xiaoping (3)
This course examines some of the issues associated with modernization and economic development in post-Deng Xiaoping China. The course focuses on the era of economic reform associated with Deng, and is particularly concerned with the social, spatial and political ramifications of China’s entry into the global economy. Only one version of A EAC 470Z may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): any of the following: A EAC 160Z or 170, or A GOG 102Z or 220.

A EAC 471 (= A HIS 471; formerly A EAC/A HIS 398) Change in Medieval China (3)
This course focuses on the dramatic change that China underwent between the 8th and the 14th centuries. We will examine this transformation from several historical perspectives: political history, economic history, social history, intellectual history, and cultural history in order to better understand China’s shift from aristocratic to literati society. Only one version of A EAC 471 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A EAS 170, T EAS 105, A EAC 379, A HIS 177, 379, or permission of instructor.

A EAC 497 Independent Study in Chinese (1-6)
Projects in selected areas of Chinese studies, with regular progress reports. Supervised readings of texts in Chinese. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): two 300 level Chinese courses or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

  

Courses in East Asian Studies

A EAS 103 Sources of East Asian Civilizations I (3)
A basic introduction to the primary texts that have contributed to the formative cultural foundations of Chinese and Korean civilizations. Readings will include the Analects of Confucius, the Tao te ching, and the Journey to the West.

A EAS 104 Sources of East Asian Civilizations II (3)
A basic introduction to the primary texts that have contributed to the formative cultural foundations of Korean and Japanese civilizations. Readings will include selections from the Tale of Genji and Basho’s Narrow Road to the Deep North.

T EAS 105 Traditional China and Its Modern Fate (3)
This course introduces the major social, intellectual, and political components of pre-modern China and describes the changes to those components that have occurred in China since the beginning of the 20th century. Formerly A EAS 105H. Open to Honors College students only.  

A EAS 140 Introduction to East Asian Cinema (3)
This course offers an introduction to East Asian cinema, with emphasis on movies produced in China and Japan. Lectures and class discussions will focus on the interpretation of cinematic texts, especially as they relate to cultural dynamics and social change.

A EAS 177/177Z (= A HIS 177/177Z) East Asia: Its Culture and History (3-4)
An introduction to the history and cultures of East Asia (China, Japan, and Korea), their major institutions and their religious and philosophical traditions from ancient times to the present. Only one version of A EAS 177 may be taken for credit.

A EAS 190 Confucianism and the Samurai Ethic (3)
This course will examine primary texts in translation from Confucius’ Analects to 20th century political propaganda in an effort to trace the origins and evolution of the ideas that formed the samurai ethic in Japan. Course taught in English; no knowledge of Chinese or Japanese necessary.

A EAS 220 Chinese and Japanese Calligraphy (3)
Practical instruction in the artistic design and the different styles of written Chinese and Japanese with the traditional implements: brush, rice paper, ink plate and ink bar. Knowledge of Chinese or Japanese is not required.

T EAS 250 China's Confucian Tradition (3)
This course addresses the central philosophical and ethical issues in the Confucian tradition, a main source of East Asian cultural values. The emphasis will be on reading and discussing translations of primary sources, including the Analects of Confucius, the Mencius, excerpts from the other Confucian Classics and Confucianism’s key interpreters in later centuries. Topics addressed will include human nature, the foundations of political life, ethical decision-making, and the Confucian vision of learning. Upon completion of the course, students will have an appreciation of both the richness of the tradition and the challenges it faces in adapting to the modern world. Open to Honors College students only.

A EAS 260 (= A HIS 260) China in Revolution (3)
This course examines China’s four great 20th century revolutions: the 1911 Revolution, the 1949 Communist Revolution, the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, and the reforms of the 1980s and 1990s. Topics include authority and dissent, constituency mobilization, the relationship between urban and rural regions, and the changing nature of ideology in China. Only one version of A EAS 260 may be taken for credit.

A EAS 261 (= A REL 261) Introduction to the Religions of Japan (3)
An introduction to the major religious traditions of Japan, particularly Shinto and Buddhism, this course will cover the major forms of religious expression in Japanese history from the earliest historical records to the so-called New Religions which arose in the 20th century. Discussion will include the philosophical, artistic, social, and political dimensions of religion in Japanese society. Only one version of A EAS 261 may be taken for credit.

A EAS 265 (= A REL 265) Introduction to Buddhism (3)
This course is an introduction to Buddhism, covering its early history in South Asia, its expansion into Central, East, and Southeast Asia, and its recent growth in Europe and the Americas. Students will acquire a foundational knowledge about basic Buddhist doctrines and practices, as well as the diversity of Buddhism as a lived religion. Class content will focus on textual, artistic, philosophical, literary, social, and political expressions of the Buddhist tradition. Only one version of A EAS 265 may be taken for credit.

A EAS 266 (= A REL 266) Buddhism in East Asia (3)
This course is an introduction to the history and development of the Buddhist traditions of East Asia (China, Korea, Japan, Taiwan, Tibet, and Vietnam). Students will acquire a foundational knowledge of early Indian Buddhist doctrines and practices, as well as the pre-Buddhist Chinese religious and philosophical systems Confucianism and Daoism, so as to come to a critical understanding of the emergence of uniquely East Asian form of Buddhism. Class content will focus on textual, artistic, philosophical, literary, social, and political expressions of the Buddhist tradition in premodern and modern East Asia. Only one version of A EAS 266 may be taken for credit.

A EAS 270 (= A WSS 270) Women in East Asian Literature (3)
By examining literary pieces from China and Japan, this course will examine the constraints of patriarchy, vestiges of matriliny, functions served by portrayals of women, and treat questions such as: What can one deduce from early literary sources concerning women and their societies? Why do some people perceive gender related issues certain ways? and Why are women depicted certain ways? Conducted in English; no prior knowledge of the East Asian languages or cultures is required. Only one version of A EAS 270 and A WSS 270 may be taken for credit. 

A EAS 321Y (= A GOG 321Y & A LCS 321Y) Exploring the Multicultural City (3)
This course will explore the human dimensions and implications of ethnic diversity in the United States, focusing on New York City. The course utilizes a variety of methods to introduce students to the multicultural city, beginning in the classroom but ending with fieldwork in a specific New York neighborhood. Only one version of A EAS 321Y may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): one of A GOG 102, 125, 160, 220, or 240.

A EAS 345 (= A REL 345) Ethical Issues in East Asian Thought (3)
This is a discussion course that looks at ethical issues of contemporary significance to the cultures of Asia. Students read contemporary academic discussions of how problems such as suicide, euthanasia, abortion, sexuality, cloning, etc. have been understood historically and in terms of contemporary social morality in India, China, Tibet, and Japan. Only one version of A EAS 345 may be taken for credit.

A EAS 357 (= A REL 357) Zen Buddhism (3)
An introduction to the religious, philosophical, and artistic tradition of Zen Buddhism in China, Korea, and Japan and the West. This course looks at the birth and subsequent historical evolution of the Zen or Ch’an school of Buddhism in East Asia. We will look at the intersection of Buddhist and Chinese presumptions about spirituality that gave rise to this unusual religious form, discussing precisely what is and is not iconoclastic about its tenets. The experience of American Zen communities will also be considered. Only one version of A EAS 357 may be taken for credit.

A EAS 362/362Z (= A ECO 362/362Z) Economies of Japan and Korea (3)
A study of the economic growth of Japan and Korea and of current issues facing these economies. Only one version of A EAS 362 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110 and 111 or permission of instructor.

A EAS 375 (= A HIS 375) Japan-Korea Relations: 1592 to the Present (3)
This course explores Japan-Korea relations from the end of the 16th century to the present day. It proceeds chronologically to chart the evolving diplomatic relationship between the ruling families in Japan and Korea during the early modern period before then turning to examine Japan's colonial domination of Korea starting in the late 19th century and the postcolonial situation that has existed between Japan, North Korea, and South Korea since shortly after the end of World War II. Substantial attention will be placed on exploring issues of national identity, race, and imperialism as they relate to the interconnected histories of Japan and Korea as presented in this course. Only one version of A EAS 375 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A EAJ 170, A EAK 170, A HIS 177 or permission of instructor.

A EAS 389 Topics in East Asian History, Literature, and Culture (3)
This course will focus on a selected topic of traditional or modern East Asian literature, history, religion or culture for intensive study. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A EAS 450 (= A REL 450; formerly A EAS/A REL 393) Readings in Buddhist Texts (3)
This is an advanced course in the study of Buddhism that will focus on the close reading of Buddhist scriptures in English translation. Prerequisite(s): A EAS 265, 266, or permission of instructor.

A EAS 468 (= A HIS 468; formerly A EAS/A HIS 399) Confucius and Confucianism (3)
This course surveys the main texts and themes in the development of the Confucian tradition from its origins in China through its spread in Japan and Korea to its reemergence in contemporary East Asia. The emphasis is on the way that the tradition has responded to social conditions. Particular attention will be paid to the relationship between Confucian intellectuals and political power. The rivalry with other traditions (e.g. Taoism, Buddhism, Marxism, Liberalism, etc.) will also be considered. Only one version of A EAS 468 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A HIS 177, A EAS 103, 170, 190, A EAC 379, or permission of instructor.

A EAS 475 (formerly A EAS 395) The History and Culture of Traditional Tibet (3)
This course surveys the salient aspects of the culture and history of the Tibetan region. Topics of particular interest include the evolution of Tibetan social and political structures, the importance of Tibet’s main religious traditions, and the distinctiveness of its artistic heritage (both visual and literary). Course materials include primary sources in English translation, scholarly works, and visual images. Prerequisite(s): any one of the following: A EAC 170, 379, 380; T EAS 105, A EAS 103, 262, 265, or permission of instructor.

A EAS 478 (formerly A EAS 397) The Silk Road (3)
The course examines the history of various land links between China and India, which are known collectively as “The Silk Road.” Special attention is given to the transmission of ideas (Buddhism), art forms, and commercial goods along this route, especially during the heyday of the Silk Road from about 600 to 1000 AD. The many discoveries made by Western archeologists in Central Asia in the late 19th and early 20th centuries are also considered, as well as issues related to their removal of Silk Road treasures to museums in Europe and around the world. Prerequisite(s): any one of the following: A EAC 170, 210, 211; A EAS 103, T EAS 105.

A EAS 495 Colloquium in East Asian Studies (3)
Directed readings and conferences involving several members of the faculty for students pursuing undergraduate honors in the Department of East Asian Studies. To be offered only when requested by students eligible for the honors program. This course may be repeated once with the approval of the student’s honors project adviser. Prerequisite(s): major in the department; junior or senior standing; acceptance into the Honors Program.

  

Courses in Japanese Studies

A EAJ 101 Elementary Japanese I (5)
Designed for the acquisition of a basic competence in modern standard Japanese in the areas of speaking, reading and writing. Format will be lecture with drill and discussion. Five class hours a week will be enhanced with a one-hour language lab. Not open to students with previous knowledge of the Japanese language.

A EAJ 102 Elementary Japanese II (5)
Continuation of A EAJ 101. Aural comprehension, speaking, reading and writing will be emphasized. The format will be lecture with drill and discussion, and one hour in the language lab. Prerequisite(s): A EAJ 101 or permission of instructor.

A EAJ 170 Japan: Its Culture and Heritage (3)
Survey of the essential elements of traditional Japanese civilization and their transformation in the post-Meiji era and 20th century. Focus on the development of basic Japanese social, political, and aesthetic ideas. Conducted in English; no knowledge of Japanese is required.

A EAJ 201 Intermediate Japanese I (5)
Concentrates on the reading and analysis of language texts. A large amount of time is devoted to the understanding of Japanese grammar and oral practice. The format will be lecture with drill and discussion. Prerequisite(s): A EAJ 102 or permission of instructor.

A EAJ 202 Intermediate Japanese II (5)
Continuation of A EAJ 201. The course will concentrate on the reading and analysis of language texts. A large amount of time is devoted to the understanding of Japanese grammar and oral practice. The format will be lecture with drill and discussion. Prerequisite(s): A EAJ 201 or permission of instructor.

A EAJ 205X Japanese Studies Research and Bibliographic Methods (3)
This course will cover research and bibliographic methods in Japanese Studies. Students will learn how to navigate library catalogs and the Internet with specific emphasis on Japanese databases and resources. Students will also learn how to use reference materials, such as character dictionaries. Only one of A EAJ 205X, A EAC 205X, and A EAS 205X may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): one year or equivalent of Japanese.

A EAJ 210 Survey of Traditional Japanese Literature (3)
This course presents a survey of the major works of traditional Japanese literature from the 9th to the 19th century, including the Tosa Journal, the Pillow Book, and Essays in Idleness. The course is conducted solely in English; knowledge of Japanese is not required.

A EAJ 212/212Z Modern Japanese Literature in Translation (3)
Survey of prose literature in Japan from the Meiji Restoration (1868) to the present. Emphasis is placed on pre-war writers and their quest for modernity. Only one version of A EAJ 212 may be taken for credit.  

A EAJ 278 (= A HIS 278; formerly A EAJ 275) Japanese Pop Culture from Edo to the Present (3)
This course introduces some of the forms of "popular culture" prevalent in Japan from 1600 until the present day, with a strong emphasis on the social, economic and intellectual forces behind these major trends. This course, organized chronologically, offers a look at the many historical developments connected with popular forms of music, theater, film and comics, including the rise of a new urban print culture in the 17th century, the introduction of "Western" art forms such as motion pictures and jazz music in the 1920s, and the steady expansion of both domestic and international markets for Japanese film, music, and comics in the years since 1945. Conducted in English; no knowledge of Japanese is required. Only one version of A EAJ 278 may be taken for credit.

A EAJ 301Y Advanced Japanese I (3)
Acquisition of complex structures through intensive oral/aural and reading/writing practice. Discussion, authentic written materials, videotapes and audiotapes are incorporated. Prerequisite(s): A EAJ 202 or equivalent.

A EAJ 302Y Advanced Japanese II (3)
Acquisition of complex structures through intensive oral/aural and reading/writing practice. Discussion, authentic written materials, videotapes and audiotapes are incorporated. Prerequisite(s): A EAJ 301 or equivalent.

A EAJ 384/384Z (= A HIS 384/384Z) History of Premodern Japan (3)
This course will cover Japanese history from prehistory through 1600. Focus will be on political and economic trends. Only one version of A EAJ 384 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A EAJ 385/385Z (= A HIS 385/385Z) History of Modern Japan (3)
This course is a survey of modern Japanese history. It covers the period from 1600 to the present day. The focus is on the interconnections between political, social, and intellectual history during Japan’s emergence as a world power. Only one version of A EAJ 385 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in East Asian studies or history.

A EAJ 389 Topics in Japanese Literature, History, and Culture (3)
This course will focus on a selected topic or major work of traditional or modern Japanese literature or history for intensive study. May be repeated for credit when content varies.

A EAJ 405 Advanced Japanese Language Proficiency (3)
This course will provide a standard approach to advanced language materials with a particular focus on current usage and dynamic vocabulary. Students will work specifically on the reading and listening comprehension skills required in a Japanese university setting. Class conducted in Japanese and English. Not open to native speakers of Japanese. Prerequisite(s): A EAJ 302 or permission of instructor. S/U graded.

A EAJ 410 Readings in Modern Japanese Literature (3)
This is an advanced course in Japanese language for students who have completed at least three years of college Japanese. The class will read selected passages from major works of modern Japanese literature. Lecture and discussion will be in Japanese. Prerequisite(s): A EAJ 302 or permission of instructor.

A EAJ 411 Readings in Modern Japanese Literature (3)
This is a continuation of A EAJ 410. Class will read selected passages from major works of Japanese literature. Lecture and discussion will be in Japanese. Prerequisite(s): A EAJ 410 or permission of instructor.

A EAJ 423 Practicum in Teaching Japanese (2)
This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of teaching Japanese as a foreign language, designed for those who contemplate a career teaching Japanese at the secondary or college level. Focus is on attaining practical experience through class observation and a supervised classroom practicum. Prerequisite(s): fluency in Japanese; permission of instructor. S/U graded.

A EAJ 435 (formerly A EAJ 396) Meiji Literature in Translation (3)
This course will examine several works of Japanese prose literature (in translation) written during the Meiji Period (1868-1912). The works include an essay, novels, and short stories. Attention will be given to the question of modernity, the nature of the novel, and European influence on Japanese literature. No knowledge of Japanese required. Prerequisite(s): A EAJ 212 or permission of the instructor.

A EAJ 436 (= A HIS 436) Fascism: Japan and Beyond (3)
This course explores the idea of "fascism" as a framework to analyze society. Taking Japan as a point of departure, we will investigate "fascism" in relation to political economy, intellectual production, and mass culture primarily in the Axis powers in the first half of the 20th century. Particular attention will be devoted to the importance of cross-regional interactions in developing ideas of bureaucracy and national mobilization, race and ethnicity, and systems of political participation. Prerequisite(s) A EAJ 385.

A EAJ 437 History of Japanese Thought (3)
This course explores the field of "Japanese Thought" through a broad survey of texts written by (mostly) Japanese intellectuals, primarily in the modern era. A historical approach to these texts will be taken, with an eye towards attempting to understand how different readers in different contexts tried to harness the power of "thought" in effecting change in their society. Prerequisite(s): A EAJ 385 or permission of instructor.

A EAJ 438 (formerly A EAJ 391) World War II: The Japanese View (3)
This course will examine several works of Japanese literature (in translation) written during and after World War II. The works include an essay, novels, short stories, a play, and poetry. Attention will be given to the question of how the Japanese perceived their role in the war, the nature of the war itself, and if these changed with the passing of time. Prerequisites(s): A EAJ 212 or permission of the instructor.

A EAJ 460 (= A REL 460; formerly A EAS/A REL 394) Readings in Japanese Religious Studies (3)
This is an advanced course in the religious traditions of Japan. We will read English translations of religious texts native to the Japanese experience of religion, specifically Buddhist, Shinto, Confucian, and Folk. Prerequisite(s): one of the following: A EAJ 261, A EAS 266, 190, 357, or permission of instructor.

A EAJ 497 Independent Study in Japanese (1-6)
Projects in selected areas of Japanese studies, with regular progress reports; or supervised readings of texts in Japanese. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): A EAJ 302 or permission of instructor.

  

Courses in Korean Studies

A EAK 101 Elementary Korean I (5)
An introduction to modern Korean, with emphasis on speaking, reading and writing. Format will include both lecture and drill sessions. Not open to students with any previous knowledge of the Korean language.

A EAK 102 Elementary Korean II (5)
Continuation of A EAK 101. Prerequisite(s): A EAK 101 or equivalent.

A EAK 170 Korea: Its Culture and Heritage (3)
Survey of the essential elements of traditional Korean civilization, early contacts with the West, and modern development. Focus on the evolution of basic Korean social, political, economic, and aesthetic ideas. Conducted in English; no knowledge of Korean is required.

A EAK 201 Intermediate Korean I (5)
Concentration on reading, writing, and speaking at the intermediate level. Emphasis on vocabulary drills, grammar exercises, and pattern practice. Prerequisite(s): A EAK 102 or equivalent.

A EAK 202 Intermediate Korean II (5)
Continuation of A EAK 201. Enhancement of reading, writing, and speaking skills will be emphasized. Students will also master several Korean proverbs. Prerequisite(s): A EAK 201 or equivalent.

A EAK 301 Advanced Korean I (3)
Acquisition of complex structures through intensive oral/aural and reading/writing practice. Discussion, authentic written materials, videotapes and audiotapes are incorporated. Prerequisite(s): A EAK 202 or equivalent.

A EAK 302 Advanced Korean II (3)
This course is a continuation of A EAK 301. Prerequisite(s): A EAK 301 or equivalent.

A EAK 389 Topics in Korean Literature, History, and Culture (3)
This course will focus on a selected topic or major work of traditional or modern Korean literature or history for intensive study. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A EAK 497 Independent Study in Korean (1-6)
Projects in selected areas of Korean studies, with regular progress reports; or supervised readings of texts in Korean. May be repeated once for credit if content varies. Prerequisite(s): two 300 level Korean courses or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

 

  

Department of Economics

Faculty

Distinguished Professor
Kajal Lahiri, Ph.D.
University of Rochester

Professors Emeriti
Bruce Dieffenbach, Ph.D.
Harvard University
Jack E. Gelfand, Ph.D.
New York University
Terrence W. Kinal, Ph.D.
University of Minnesota
Irene Lurie, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley
Thad W. Mirer, Ph.D.
Yale University
Donald J. Reeb, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
Syracuse University

Professors
Betty C. Daniel, Ph.D. (Department Chair)
University of North Carolina
Michael Jerison, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin
Hamilton Lankford, Ph.D.
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Adrian Masters, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania
Michael J. Sattinger, Ph.D.
Carnegie Mellon University
Hany A. Shawky, Ph.D.
Ohio State University
Kwan Koo Yun, Ph.D.
Stanford University

Associate Professors
Pinka Chatterji, Ph.D.
Johns Hopkins University
Diane M. Dewar, Ph.D.
University at Albany
John B. Jones, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Laurence J. Kranich, Ph.D.
University of Rochester
Gerald Marschke, Ph.D.
University of Chicago
Baris Yörük, Ph.D.
Boston College 
Rui Zhao, Ph. D.
University of Minnesota

Assistant Professors
Chun-Yu Ho, Ph.D.
Boston University
Yue Li, Ph.D.
University of Pittsburgh
Zhongwen Liang, Ph.D.
Texas A & M University
Byoung Gun Park, Ph.D.
Yale University
Huaming Peng, Ph.D.
Yale University

Lecturers
Kenneth Bulko, J.D.
Albany Law School
Ibrahim Gunay, M.A.
Toulouse School of Economics

Adjuncts (estimated): 16
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 3



The major in economics is useful as training for employment in business, government, and nonprofit agencies and as preparation for further study at the graduate level. It is also an excellent undergraduate background for study in professional schools of law, accounting, business administration, public administration, public policy, social work, and others. The department also offers the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in economics.

Careers
Graduates of the undergraduate economics program work as financial analysts, finance and credit officers for insurance companies and banks, economic analysts for corporations, policy and legislative fiscal analysts, and business officers for nonprofit and government organizations, as well as administrators and heads of businesses and government agencies.

Admission
Students may not declare a major in economics until they have completed both A ECO 110 and 111 with grades of C or better. For exceptional circumstances, students who do not meet these requirements may appeal by written petition to the department chair. Appeals received by the first day of classes each semester will be evaluated before the final date for adding semester-length courses.

Transfer students who have not completed both A ECO 110 and 111, or their equivalents, with grades of C or better will not be formally admitted to the major when they enter the University. Transfer students who are not admitted, but who want to major in economics, may declare their intention to major in economics and will be advised by the department as intended majors for one semester. After satisfying the admission criteria, students may be admitted to the major.

Degree Requirements for the Major in Economics

General Program B.A.: a minimum of 36 credits as follows: A ECO 110, 111, 300, 301 and 320; A MAT 101 or A ECO 210, or A MAT 106, or A MAT 111 or 112 or 118; and 18 additional credits in economics at the 300 level or above, one of which must have a suffix of W taken at the University. The courses A ECO 300, 301, and 320 must be taken at the University unless completed elsewhere prior to matriculation.

General Program B.S.: a minimum of 40 credits as follows: A ECO 110, 111, 300, 301, 320, and 420W; A MAT 111 or 112 or 118, A ECO 410 or A MAT 113 or 119; and 15 additional credits in economics at the 300 level or above, including at least 6 additional credits from among A ECO 400-489 or 499Z. The courses A ECO 300, 301, 320, 420W, and at least 6 credits from among A ECO 400-489 or 499Z that fulfill the additional credits requirement above must be taken at the University unless completed elsewhere prior to matriculation.

Honors Program

The honors program is designed to provide capable and motivated students with a greater understanding of economics and to better prepare students for graduate and professional schools.

Students may apply to the honors program after completing any two of A ECO 300, 301, and 320. To be accepted and to complete the program, the student must have an average of at least 3.40 in all courses applicable to the major and 3.25 in all courses taken at the University. Interested students should see the department’s Director of Undergraduate Studies even before completing the required courses, for advice on choosing elective courses and on meeting the other requirements of the honors program.

The honors student must complete all requirements of the B.S. program in economics, including A ECO 499Z (the Senior Honors Research Seminar) as part of the program. In addition, the honors student must submit a senior honors thesis acceptable to the Economics Honors Committee.

A plan for the senior honors thesis normally arises from consultation with faculty concerning a suitable topic and method of inquiry. The student, with advice and consent of the Economics Honors Committee, will choose a faculty adviser who will assist the student in completing the thesis. Work on the thesis may begin in the junior year, but it must be completed while the student is enrolled in A ECO 499Z.

If all requirements stated above are met, the department will recommend that the student be awarded the B.S. degree with honors in economics.

Combined Bachelor's/Master's Program

A combined B.S./M.A. program in economics provides students of recognized academic ability and educational maturity the opportunity to fulfill integrated requirements for the undergraduate and graduate degrees. Also available is a combined program leading to a bachelor's degree (B.A. or B.S.) in Economics and a master's degree in Public Administration (M.P.A.). With careful planning, it is possible to earn both degrees in five years.

To qualify for the bachelor's degree (B.A. or B.S., as approved), students must meet all requirements for the undergraduate major and minor described previously, the minimum credit liberal arts and sciences requirement, the general education requirements, and the residency requirements. To qualify for the master's degree (M.A. or M.P.A.), students must meet all requirements as outlined in the Graduate Bulletin including the completion of required graduate credits and any other conditions such as a research seminar, thesis, comprehensive examination, professional experience, and residence requirements. Up to 12 graduate credits may be applied simultaneously to the bachelor's and master's programs.

Students may be admitted to one of the combined degree programs at the beginning of their junior year, or after the successful completion of 56 credits. A grade point average of at least 3.20 (M.P.A.) and three supportive letters of recommendation from faculty are required. Students interested in learning more about the programs should contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Economics.

  

Courses in Economics

A ECO 110 Principles of Economics I: Microeconomics (3)
Analysis of supply and demand in markets for goods and markets for the factors of production. Study of various market structures, price determination in perfectly competitive and imperfectly competitive markets. May not be taken for credit by students with credit for A ECO 300. Prerequisite(s): plane geometry and intermediate algebra or A MAT 100.

A ECO 111 Principles of Economics II: Macroeconomics (3)
Examination of the institutional structure of an economic system. Analysis of aggregate economic activity, the determinants of the level, stability, and growth of national income, the role of monetary and fiscal policy. May not be taken for credit by students with credit for A ECO 301. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110.

A ECO 130 Developing Economies (3)
An interdisciplinary study of economic disparities among nations. Focus on underdevelopment and poverty, problems in agricultural and industrial development. Population growth and unemployment. Global interdependence and role of the United States. Global issues including debt crisis; privatization and deregulation; relationship with developed countries including the United States. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ECO 202 The American Economy: Its Structure and Institutions (3)
Discussion of the historical development and current structure of the American economy. Using an interdisciplinary approach and without any technical/mathematical tools, major economic issues will be discussed, such as federal budget deficit, unemployment, poverty, family structure, welfare reforms, America in the world economy, immigration, and health reforms. May not be taken for credit by students with credit for A ECO 110 or 111. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ECO 210 Tools of Economics (3)
Introduction to some of the basic mathematical tools used in economics, including the construction and comprehension of simple graphs, as well as some of the economist’s conceptual tools, including marginal analysis, national income analysis, supply and demand. May not be taken for credit by students with credit for A MAT 101, 106, 111, 112, 118, or equivalent. 

A ECO 280/280Z Current Topics in Economics (3)
Examines current topics in economics; topics vary from time to time. Only one version of A ECO 280 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ECO 300 Intermediate Microeconomics (3)
Introduction to price theory, distribution theory, and market structure analysis. Relevance of economic theory in production and consumption decisions. Only one of A ECO 300 or T ECO 300 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110 with grade of C or better; A ECO 111; and A ECO 210 or A MAT 101, or 106, or 111 or 112 or 118.

T ECO 300 Honors Intermediate Microeconomics (3)
This course provides an advanced introduction to intermediate level microeconomics. Topics that will be covered include price theory, distribution theory, and market structure analysis. Relevance of economic theory in production and consumption decisions will also be discussed. Only one of A ECO 300 or T ECO 300 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110 with grade of C or better; A ECO 111; and A ECO 210 or A MAT 101, or 106, or 111 or 112 or 118. Open to Honors College students only.

A ECO 301 Intermediate Macroeconomics (3)
Theoretical and empirical analysis of aggregate output and employment, the average price level, and interest rates. Applications include long-run growth, business cycles, and fiscal and monetary policy. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110; A ECO 111 with grade of C or better; A ECO 210 or A MAT 101, or 106, or 111 or 112 or 118.

A ECO 312/312Z Development of the American Economy (3)
Study of American economic institutions from the early 19th century to the present. Employs statistical methods and both micro and macro theoretical constructs. Only one version of A ECO 312 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110 and 111. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ECO 313/313Z Development of the European Economy (3)
Economic change in modern European societies. Comparative study of the growth of various European countries emphasizing the variables associated with development: population, technology, capital formation, output, resources, and income distribution. Only one version of A ECO 313 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110 and 111. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ECO 314/314Z History of Economic Thought (3)
The evolution of modern economics with emphasis on the contributions of such writers as Smith, Malthus, Ricardo, Mill, Marx, Marshall and Keynes. The turn of events that motivated the construction of the main body of economic knowledge is also examined. Only one version of A ECO 314 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 300.

A ECO 320 Economic Statistics (3)
Statistical techniques in economic analysis. Topics include distribution theory and statistical inference as applied to regression models. Students gain experience in testing economic theories using a computer regression package. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110 and 111; A ECO 210 or A MAT 101, or 106, or 111 or 112 or 118.

A ECO 330/330W Economics of Development (3)
Introduction to the analysis of economic growth and development. Historical, descriptive, and analytical approaches to the problems of fostering economic growth. Consideration of alternative theories of the causes and problems of underdevelopment. Only one version of A ECO 330 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110 and 111.

A ECO 341/341Z (= A SOC 371/371Z) Urban Economics (3)
Analysis of the city-metropolis and the economic forces which condition its growth pattern and allocation of scarce resources. The public sector, especially local government, is examined in its role of solving the problems of inadequate jobs, housing, education, and other services. Only one version of A ECO 341 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110 and 111.

A ECO 350 Money and Banking (3)
The principles of money, commercial banking, and central banking; an elementary consideration of issues of monetary policy and financial markets. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110 and 111.

A ECO 351 (= A MAT 301) Theory of Interest (3)
The basic measures of interest, annuities, sinking funds, amortization schedules, bonds, and installment loans. Recommended as preparation for Actuarial Society exam FM. Only one version of A ECO 351 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A MAT 113.

A ECO 355/355W Public Finance (3)
Introduction to the financial problems of governments: public expenditures, basic kinds of taxes and tax systems, grants-in-aid, public borrowing, debt management, and fiscal policy. Only one version of A ECO 355 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110 and 111.

A ECO 356/356Z State and Local Finance (3)
Problems of financing state and local government within the context of a federal system. Relevance and limits of fiscal theory for state and local government tax and expenditure policy. Only one version of A ECO 356 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110 and 111.

A ECO 360 International Economic Relations (3)
The development of international trade and trade theory since mercantilism; international financial institutions, the foreign exchange market, and the problems of international balance of payments and international liquidity. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110 and 111.

A ECO 361 (= A LCS 361) Development of the Latin American Economy (3)
Economic change in Latin American societies. Comparative study of the growth of various Latin American countries emphasizing the variables associated with development: population, technology, capital information, output, resources and income distribution. Only one version of A ECO 361 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110 and 111.

A ECO 362/362Z (= A EAS 362/362Z) Economies of Japan and Korea (3)
A study of the economic growth of Japan and Korea and of current issues facing these economies. Only one version of A ECO 362 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110 and 111 or permission of instructor.

A ECO 370/370W/370Z Economics of Labor (3)
Study of wage theories and wage structures; wage-cost-price interaction; and wage, supply, and employment relationships. Only one version of A ECO 370 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110 and 111.

A ECO 371/371W The Distribution of Income and Wealth (3)
Theoretical, empirical, and institutional analysis of the distribution of income and wealth, including policies and programs designed to affect these distributions. Only one version of A ECO 371 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110 and 111.

A ECO 380/380Z Contemporary Economic Issues (3)
An introductory discussion of selected economic issues of current importance. The course will focus on different economic problems each term. May be repeated up to 6 credits when content varies. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110 and 111.

A ECO 381 (= H HPM 381 & H SPH 381) Economics of Health Care (3)
Economics concepts are used to explain the nature of demand and supply in the health care field. The behavior of consumers and health care providers is examined from an economic perspective. Areas of market failures and the rationale for government intervention are also described. Only one version of A ECO 381 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 300 or permission of the instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ECO 383/383W Economics of Law (3)
The application of economic concepts such as efficiency, externalities, and trade-offs to the analysis of common law, crime and punishment, product safety laws, and other legal interventions in market and non-market behavior. Only one version of A ECO 383 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 300.

A ECO 385/385Z Environmental Economics (3)
Environmental pollution; social costs; population control; zoning; economics of public health; conservation of endangered species, natural wonders, and artifacts; natural resource exhaustion; and the end of progress hypothesis are examined and analyzed. Only one version of A ECO 385 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110 and 111.

A ECO 398W Discourse in Economics (1)
This course provides undergraduate majors in economics the opportunity to develop and practice the oral communication and writing skills that are needed to participate in debate and discussion and that serve to sharpen their critical thinking and understanding of economics. This course can be taken only while simultaneously enrolled in a designated 300 or 400 level companion course in economics, which will be the focus of the oral and written discourse. A student who withdraws from the companion course, but not from this course, will receive an unsatisfactory grade. Prerequisite(s): declared economics major, concurrent registration in a designated 300 or 400 level economics course, permission of department. S/U graded. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ECO 401 Macroeconomic Modeling, Forecasting, and Policy Analysis (3)
Introduction to the construction and use of econometric macro models, including theoretical specification, statistical estimation and validation; the structure of large-scale macro models; forecasting and policy analysis; critiques of current macroeconomic modeling. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 300, 301, and 320. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ECO 405 Game Theory (3)
Study of the strategic interaction among rational agents. Development of the basic analytical tools of game theory, including simultaneous and sequential move games, games with incomplete information, and alternative equilibrium concepts. Applications in fields such as industrial organization, public economics, international trade, and voting. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 300; A ECO 320 (or B ITM 220 or A MAT 108) or permission of instructor.

A ECO 410 Mathematics for Economists (3)
Techniques of differentiation, integration, differential equations, difference equations, and linear algebra as used in economic analysis. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 300 and 301.

A ECO 420/420W/420Z Applied Econometrics (3)
Application of regression to a problem chosen by the student. Some general discussion of data sources, the derivation of index numbers and other problems that might be encountered in estimating economic relations. Emphasis is on class presentation and analysis of student projects. Only one version of A ECO 420 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 320.

A ECO 427 Computer Applications in Economics (3)
Introduction to computer use and applications in economics, econometrics, and data analysis. Applications may include spreadsheet software such as Excel and statistical software such as SAS. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 320. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ECO 445 International Trade (3)
Theoretical, institutional, and empirical characteristics of trade and capital movements between nations. Review of the pure theories of comparative advantage, gains from trade, commercial policy, and resource transfers. Brief review of modern balance of payments theory and policy question. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 300 and 301.

A ECO 446 International Macroeconomics (3)
The foreign exchange market and international payments are described and analyzed. Emphasis is placed on analyzing the implications of flexible and fixed exchange rate regimes for the stabilization of price levels and employment in small and large countries. Proposals for exchange management and reform of the international monetary system are evaluated. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110, 111, and 301.

A ECO 455/455Z Public Microeconomics (3)
Microeconomic analysis of the role of the public sector in resource allocation within a market economy: theory of market failures, alternative corrective measures for market failures, public choice theory, partial and general equilibrium analyses of major taxes, and welfare-based public investment criteria. Only one version of A ECO 455 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 300 and 355 or permission of instructor.

A ECO 466/466W Financial Economics (3)
Financial markets, efficient-market theory, financial panics, choice under uncertainty, risk aversion, portfolio choice, capital-asset pricing model, futures, options, flow of funds, saving and investment, financing economic development, government debt, international debt, term structure of interest rates, interest rate forecasting. Only one version of A ECO 466 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 301 or 350.

A ECO 471 Advanced Labor Economics (3)
This course provides an up-to-date overview of the labor market. While the benchmark competitive market model is discussed, the main focus is on the mechanisms that prevent the labor market from being competitive. At the micro level, the course addresses wage formation through bargaining and contract analysis. At the macro-level the course addresses wage dispersion and unemployment. The course will incorporate the latest theoretical models on each of the topics covered and discuss their empirical validity. This course will include a term paper which will provide an opportunity to explore some area of the syllabus in more depth. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 300, A ECO 301 and an introductory statistics class (A ECO 320 or equivalent). A prior course in labor economics will be helpful but not required. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ECO 474 Industrial Organization (3)
Relationship between market structure, behavior of the firm, economic performance, and analysis of U.S. antitrust activities. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 300.

A ECO 475 Managerial Economics (3)
Application of economic concepts to the decision making of the firm. Topics may include market and demand analysis, risk and uncertainty, pricing, production, investment decisions, and capital budgeting. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 300 and 320, or permission of instructor.

A ECO 480/480Z Topics in Economics (3)
Detailed analysis of specific topics in economics. Topics may vary from semester to semester. May be repeated up to 6 credits when content varies. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 300, 301, and 320; permission of instructor.

A ECO 495 Economics Practicum (3)
This course provides undergraduate majors in economics the opportunity to work as a teaching aide and facilitator to faculty teaching the introductory courses in economics. Meetings with students enrolled in the introductory course are scheduled weekly. Prerequisite(s): major in economics; a grade of B or higher in A ECO 300 and 301; and permission of instructor. S/U graded. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ECO 496 Economics Internship (3)
Economics Internship requires active participation in economic research outside the University, together with senior standing as an economics major. May be taken only once for credit. Internships are open only to qualified seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Permission of instructor is required. S/U graded.

A ECO 497/497Z Independent Study and Research (3)
Student-initiated research project under faculty guidance. May be repeated for credit up to a total of 6 credits with permission of department. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 300, 301 and 320; a B average or higher in all economic courses attempted.

A ECO 499Z (formerly A ECO 499) Senior Honors Research Seminar (3)
Senior seminar, in which a substantial “senior thesis” is prepared by an honors candidate under the supervision of a faculty adviser. Students present oral and/or written progress reports on their ongoing research and read, discuss, and criticize each other’s work. The former A ECO 499 does not yield writing intensive credit. Prerequisite(s): admission to the honors program and A ECO 420.

  

Department of English

Faculty

Distinguished Professor
Ronald Bosco, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
University of Maryland

Distinguished Teaching Professors
Jeffrey Berman, Ph.D.
Cornell University
Stephen North, D.A. (Collins Fellow)
University at Albany

Distinguished Teaching Professors Emeriti
Judith Fetterley, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
Indiana University
Eugene K. Garber, Ph.D.
University of Iowa

Professors Emeriti
Judith E. Barlow, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
University of Pennsylvania
Donald J. Byrd, Ph.D.
University of Kansas
Frances Colby Allee, Ph.D.
Johns Hopkins University
Robert A. Donovan, Ph.D.
Washington University
Judith E. Johnson, B.A.
Barnard College
Pierre Joris, Ph.D.
Binghamton University
Eugene Mirabelli, Ph.D.
Harvard University
Daniel W. Odell, Ph.D.
Cornell University
Marjorie Pryse, Ph.D.
University of California, Santa Cruz
Harry C. Staley, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania

Professors
Thomas Bass, Ph.D.
University of California, Santa Cruz
Thomas D. Cohen, Ph.D.
Yale University
Randall T. Craig, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Lydia Davis, B.A. (Writer in Residence)
Barnard College
Teresa Ebert, Ph.D.
University of Minnesota
William Kennedy, B.A.
Siena College
Martha T. Rozett, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
University of Michigan
Charles Shepherdson, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University
Lynne Tillman, B.A. (Writer in Residence)
Hunter College

Associate Professors Emeriti

Richard M. Goldman, Ph.D.
Indiana University
Edward M. Jennings, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin
Rudolph L. Nelson, Ph.D.
Brown University       
Frederick E. Silva, Ph.D.
Indiana University
Donald B. Stauffer, Ph.D.
Indiana University

Associate Professors
Richard A. Barney, Ph.D.
University of Virginia
Bret Benjamin, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin
Langdon Brown, Ph.D.
Cornell University
Lana Cable, Ph.D.
Johns Hopkins University
Helen Regueiro Elam, Ph.D.
Brown University
Donald Faulkner, M.Phil
Yale University       
Glyne Griffith, Ph.D. (Department Chair)
University of the West Indies, Mona
Michael Hill, Ph.D.
Stony Brook University
Eric Keenaghan, Ph.D.
Temple University
Kir Kuiken, Ph.D.
University of California, Irvine
James Lilley, Ph.D.
Princeton University
Ineke Murakami, Ph.D.
University of Notre Dame
Helene E. Scheck, Ph.D.
Binghamton University
Edward L. Schwarzschild, Ph.D.
Washington University
Paul Stasi, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley
Laura Wilder, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin
Robert P. Yagelski, Ph.D.
Ohio State University
Carolyn Yalkut, Ph.D.
University of Denver

Visiting Associate Professor
Mary Valentis, Ph.D.
University at Albany

Assistant Professor Emeritus
George S. Hastings, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania

Assistant Professors         
Erica Fretwell, Ph.D.
Duke University
Michael Leong, Ph.D.
Rutgers University
Wendy Roberts, Ph.D.
Northwestern University
Samantha Schalk, Ph.D.
Indiana University
Derek J. Smith, Ph.D.
Northwestern University

Full-Time Lecturer
Jill Hanifan, D.A.
University at Albany

Teaching Assistants (estimated): 20


Curriculum

The curriculum of the Department of English is designed to aid students to write effectively, to read critically, and to acquire a sense of the development of literature written in English and of its relation to society. English majors also have the option of applying for admission to the honors program. Students planning to take the GRE for graduate study in English are strongly urged to include course work in pre-1800 British and American literature. All English majors are strongly encouraged to study at least one foreign language. Students may count up to 3 credits toward their English electives from the list of Approved Courses for English Electives. The Department also offer a minor in English and effective Fall 2016, a minor in Creative Writing. See Minors section of this bulletin for requirements for each program.

Careers for the English Majors

The major in English prepares students for any field of work that requires a broad liberal education with special strength in language, critical analysis, and research. English graduates find careers in theatre and film, government, counseling, broadcasting, public policy and administration, banking, retailing and manufacturing, as well as writing, editing, publishing, teaching, advertising, and public relations. The English major is also excellent preparation for advanced study in such professional graduate programs as law, medicine, librarianship, social welfare, theology, and education.

Degree Requirements for the Major in English (36 credits)

*Students may count 3 credits of approved coursework from other departments from the list below toward the 200 to 400 level requirement.

Additional Requirements
A grade of C or higher in A ENG 210, or permission of instructor, is required in order to register for A ENG 310 and most 400 level courses in English. Completion of A ENG 305V, or permission of instructor, is required for most 400 level courses.
Mentorship: English majors are expected to meet with their faculty mentors, assigned by the English Undergraduate Advisement Office, to discuss academic and career goals at least once prior to the start of senior year.

Honors Program in English

The honors program in English is designed to promote intellectual exchange and community among able English majors and to prepare them to do independent work. Students who successfully complete the program earn an Honors Certificate in English and, if they meet University GPA requirements, are eligible for a nomination to graduate from the University with "Honors in English."

Admission to the honors program is selective, based primarily on the evaluation of a critical writing sample and secondarily on instructor recommendations. Only declared English majors or English double majors are eligible to apply. One normally applies in the spring semester of sophomore year, but students can apply through the spring semester of junior year. Transfer students may apply upon acceptance to the University and declaration of the English major. An applicant is recommended to have a 3.25 cumulative GPA and a 3.50 GPA in the English major. When applying, students should have completed already, or will complete by the end of that semester, 12 credits that count toward the English major, including A ENG 205Z and A ENG 210. A ENG 305V and/or A ENG 310 also are recommended. Those who plan to write a creative thesis should have taken A ENG 302W (or 302Z) and/or A ENG 402Z. Alternately, they should be involved with an on-campus writing community, such as editing a student-run creative writing magazine or interning at a professional literary or cultural magazine sponsored by the English Department or elsewhere at the University. They also are encouraged to submit, in addition to a critical essay, a short creative writing sample.

Faculty members on the departmental Honors Committee review applications and decide on admissions. When appropriate for individual cases, they may waive any of the above entry requirements and recommendations.

While students are registered for the English honors sequence courses, the Honors Director monitors their progress through regular meetings with the students and, during the thesis year, through communications with each student’s project advisor. A student can be disallowed from continuing in the program if the Honors Director and/or the student’s thesis advisor judge his or her performance in A ENG 399Z and/or A ENG 498 to fall short of the program’s expectations. Similarly, if a student’s performance in his or her other English courses suffers, he or she might be dismissed from the program so as to be able to remediate the situation and be better able to graduate successfully. Any student who leaves or is dismissed from the honors program is held responsible for the English major requirements.

The English faculty member supervising the independent project evaluates the honors thesis, usually researched and written during the senior year. A second reader from the English Department or from another academic unit at the University supplies additional guidance and/or feedback about the thesis in the late stages of its development. Conferring with the Honors Director, the project advisor and second reader assign a letter grade (A-E) for A ENG 499 that evaluates the end product of the thesis research, while also considering other variables in the year-long project, such as: the student’s intellectual development, the student’s self-motivated performance in an independent study scenario, the student’s regular and timely consultation with supervisors, and the student’s public presentations or publication of project-related research and writing. Upon students' completion of program requirements, the Honors Committee recommends eligible candidates for a BA degree with “Honors in English.”

Degree Requirements for Honors in English (37 credits)

* The courses must be taken in sequence. If a student is unable to take A ENG 399Z because she or he is accepted to the program in spring of junior year or because she or he studied abroad during that semester, the following option is available: With advisement from the Honors Director and the thesis advisor, during the thesis-writing year an English Honors student can substitute A ENG 399Z with a 500- or 600-level course relevant to his or her project.

** An English Honors student may count 3 credits of approved coursework from other departments specified in the list below toward the 200- to 400-level major elective requirement.

To graduate with “Honors in English” a student must complete the program course sequence (or approved substitutions), as well as conclude his or her undergraduate studies with a minimum grade point average of 3.50 in the English major and a minimum 3.25 cumulative GPA. If one graduates with the distinction of “Honors in English,” and completes the degree requirements specified above, the regular requirements of the English major are waived. If a student does not meet mandated GPA minimums at the time of graduation, he or she is responsible for the usual English major requirements but can count the honors sequence courses toward elective credits in the English major.

Combined B.A./M.A. Program

The combined B.A./M.A. program in English provides an opportunity for students of recognized academic ability and educational maturity to fulfill integrated requirements of the undergraduate and master's degree programs from the beginning of their junior year.

The combined program requires a minimum of 140 credits, of which at least 30 must be graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.A., students must meet all university and college requirements, including the requirements of the undergraduate major described previously, the minor requirements, the minimum 90 credit liberal arts and sciences requirement, the general education requirements, and residency requirements. In qualifying for the M.A., students must meet all university and college requirements as outlined in the Graduate Bulletin, including completion of a minimum of 30 graduate credits and any other conditions such as a research seminar, thesis, comprehensive examination, professional experience, and residency requirements. Up to 12 graduate credits may be applied simultaneously to both the B.A. and M.A. programs.

Students may be admitted to the combined degree program at the beginning of their junior year, or after the successful completion of 56 credits. A cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or higher and three letters of recommendation from faculty are required for consideration. Students will be admitted upon the recommendation of the Graduate Admissions Committee of the department.

Combined B.A./M.A. in English/Liberal Studies Program

The combined B.A./M.A. in English/Liberal Studies provides an opportunity for students of recognized academic ability and educational maturity to fulfill integrated requirements of the undergraduate and master's degree programs from the beginning of their junior year.

The combined B.A./M.A. in English/Liberal Studies program requires a minimum of 140 credits, of which at least 30 must be graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.A., students must meet all university and college requirements, including the requirements of the undergraduate major described previously, the minor requirements, the minimum 90 credit liberal arts and sciences requirement, the general education requirements, and residency requirements. In qualifying for the M.A. in English/Liberal Studies, students must meet all university and college requirements as outlined in the Graduate Bulletin, including a minimum of 30 graduate credits and any other conditions such as a research seminar, thesis, comprehensive examination, and residency requirements. Up to 12 graduate credits may be applied simultaneously to both the B.A. and the M.A. in English/Liberal Studies Programs.

Approved Courses for English Electives

Students may count 3 credits toward their 200 to 400 level English electives from the following list of courses. Prerequisites for individual courses follow in parentheses.

Africana Studies
A AFS 340 The Black Essay
A AFS 345 The Black Novel: Black Perspectives
A AFS 355Z Introduction to African-American Poetry
A AFS 375 Black Popular Culture

Anthropology
A ANT 343 Native American Literature
A ANT 360 Social Anthropology
A ANT 363 Ethnology of Religion
A ANT 381 Anthropology of Gender
A ANT 390 Ethnological Theory

East Asian Studies
A EAC 210 Survey of Chinese Literature in Translation I
A EAC 211 Survey of Chinese Literature in Translation II
A EAC 212 Modern Chinese Literature in Translation
A EAC 420 Classical Chinese Poetry
A EAC 430 Chinese Travel Literature
A EAJ 210 Survey of Traditional Japanese Literature
A EAJ 212 Modern Japanese Literature in Translation
A EAJ 435 Meiji Literature in Translation
A EAS 270 Women in East Asian Literature

Judaic Studies
A JST 360 Bearing Witness: Holocaust Diaries and Memoirs
A JST 373 The Arab in Israeli Literature

Languages, Literatures and Cultures
A FRE 202 French Literature
A FRE 208 Haiti Through Literature and Film
A FRE 238 Great Classics of French Cinema
A FRE 281 French Canada Through Film and Literature
A FRE 315 Introduction to French Cinema (A FRE 241Z)
A FRE 338 French Cinema and Society (junior or senior class standing or permission)
A FRE 415 French Cinema and Society (A FRE 341Z and 340Z)
A FRE 430 Translation (A FRE 341Z and 340Z)
A FRE 481 Francophone Cultures (A FRE 341)
A ITA 313 Throughout the Ages: Gender, Ideas, and Writing in Italy from 1100 to 1900
A ITA 315 Italian Civilization: Etruscans to Galileo
A ITA 316 Contemporary Italy: Unification to Present
A ITA 318 Italian Cinema and Literature
A ITA 441 Women, Men, Love, and Politics of the Italian Renaissance (A ITA 313 or permission)
A RUS 251 Masterpieces of 19th Century Russian Literature
A RUS 252 Masterpieces of 20th Century Russian Literature
A RUS 253 Contemporary Russian Literature
A RUS 280 Soviet and Russian Cinema
A SPN 311 Hispanic Literature Through the Golden Age (A SPN 223)
A SPN 316 Representative Spanish-American Authors (A SPN 223)
A SPN 318 Topics in Hispanic Film (A SPN 223 or permission of instructor)
A SPN 320 20th Century Spanish-American Literature (A SPN 223)
A SPN 325 The Hispanic Short Story (A SPN 223)
A SPN 326 Spanish-American Poetry and Theatre (A SPN 223)
A SPN 333 Hispanic Literature in Translation
A SPN 414 Literature of the Hispanic Caribbean (A SPN 223)
A SPN 418 Hispanic Cinema and Literature (A SPN 223)
A SPN 446 Literature and Human Rights (A SPN 312 and 316)
A SPN 481 The Generation of ’98 (A SPN 312)

Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Latino Studies
A LCS 316 Representative Spanish-American Authors (A SPN 223)
A LCS 318 Introduction to Brazilian Cinema
A LCS 319 20th Century Spanish-American Literature
A LCS 326 Spanish-American Poetry and Theatre       
A LCS 414 Literature of the Hispanic Caribbean
A LCS 415 Los Latinos en EE.UU: Historia, Cultura, y Literatura

Theatre Studies
A THR 224 Contemporary Issues in Modern Drama
A THR 225 American Theatre History
A THR 228 Voices of Diversity in Contemporary American Theatre and Drama
A THR 230 Great Drama on Film and Video
A THR 450 Directing
A THR 456Z Seminar in Dramatic Literature

Women’s Studies
A WSS 202 Introduction to LGBTQ Studies
A WSS 220 Introduction to Feminist Theory
A WSS 240 Classism, Racism, Sexism: Issues
A WSS 270 Women in East Asian Literature
A WSS 281 Women and the Media
A WSS 450 Literature of Feminism: An Interdisciplinary Seminar
A WSS 465 Feminist Theory

  

Courses in English

A ENG 100Z Introduction to Analytical Writing (3)
Introduction to the skills necessary for clear, effective communication of ideas through careful attention to the writing process, critical analysis, and argumentation. The course emphasizes a variety of rhetorical practices. This course does not fulfill the A ENG 110Z or U UNI 110 Writing and Critical Inquiry requirement and is offered to UHS students only.

A ENG 102Z Introduction to Creative Writing (3)
Introductory course in creative writing. Practice in the writing of multiple genres and forms, such as poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, memoir, drama, and other literary forms. Open to freshmen and sophomores only.

A ENG 106 Topics in English Studies (3)
Exploration of a single common theme, form, or mode through a variety of texts with the goal of introducing the study of literature within a specific cultural context. Examples include "Introduction to African-American Literature" or "Introduction to Latino/a Literature." Course objectives include the development of students' abilities to identify important texts and figures within a specific literary context and to analyze key themes and formal innovations within this context. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. This course is intended primarily for the University in the High School Program.

A ENG 110Z Writing and Critical Inquiry in the Humanities (3)
Introduction to the practice and study of writing as the vehicle for academic inquiry in the Humanities at the college level. Students will learn the skills necessary for clear, effective communication of ideas through careful attention to the writing process and the examination of a variety of rhetorical and critical practices. Only one of T UNI 110, U UNI 110, or A ENG 110 may be taken for credit. Must be completed with a grade of C or better or S to meet the Writing and Critical Inquiry or Writing Intensive requirements.

A ENG 121 Reading Literature (3)
Introduction to reading literature, with emphasis on developing critical skills and reading strategies through the study of a variety of genres, themes, historical periods, and national literatures. Recommended for first and second year non-English majors.

A ENG 144 Reading Shakespeare (3)
Introduction to Shakespeare, with emphasis on developing critical skills and reading strategies through detailed study of the plays, from early comedies to later tragedies and romances. No prior knowledge of Shakespeare is required. Recommended for first and second year non-English majors.

T ENG 144 Reading Shakespeare (3)
T ENG 144 is the Honors College version of A ENG 144; only one version may be taken for credit.

A ENG 200 (= A LIN 200) Structure of English Words (3)
Introduction to the structure of English words, including the most common Greek and Latin base forms, and the way in which related words are derived. Students may expect to achieve a significant enrichment in their own vocabulary, while learning about the etymology, semantic change and rules of English word formation.

A ENG 205Z (formerly A ENG 105Z) Introduction to Writing in English Studies (3)
Introduction to the forms and strategies of writing and close reading in English studies. The course emphasizes the relationship between writing and disciplinary context, and such concepts as genre, audience, and evidence. Required of all English majors. Prerequisite(s): open only to declared and intended English majors and to minors.

A ENG 210 Introduction to English Studies (3)
Introduction to the various methods through which literature has typically been read and understood. Through a combination of literary and theoretical texts, this course aims to make students self-reflexive about what they read, how they read and why they read. Required of all English majors. Prerequisite(s): open to declared and intended English majors only.

A ENG 216 (= A LIN 216) Traditional Grammar and Usage (3)
Thorough coverage of traditional grammar and usage with an introduction to the principles of structural and transformational grammar. Brief exploration into recent advances in linguistic thought. Practice in stylistic analysis using such grammatical elements as syntax, voice, subordination, and sentence structure. Only one version of A ENG 216 may be taken for credit.

A ENG 217 (= A ANT 220 & A LIN 220) Introduction to Linguistics (3)
Introduction to the study of language, including examination of the characteristics and structural principles of natural language. After exploring the basic characteristics of sound, word formation and sentence structure, these principles are applied to such topics as: language variation, language change, psycholinguistics, pragmatics, and animal communication. Only one version of A ENG 217 may be taken for credit.

A ENG 222 World Literature (3)
Introduction to classics of world literature exploring national, historical and linguistic boundaries. Texts chosen will introduce students to literary traditions and provide a foundation for English literary studies.

A ENG 223/223Z Short Story (3)
Analysis and interpretation of the short story as it occurs in one or more periods or places. Only one version of A ENG 223 may be taken for credit.

A ENG 224 Satire (3)
Exploration of the mode of satire: the view of the human estate which informs it and the characteristic actions and images by which this view is realized in prose fiction, drama and poetry and in the visual arts. Studies Roman, medieval, 17th and 18th century, modern and contemporary works.

A ENG 226/226W Focus on a Literary Theme, Form, or Mode (3)
Exploration of a single common theme, form, or mode using varied texts to promote fresh inquiry by unexpected juxtapositions of subject matter and ways of treating it. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

T ENG 226/226W Focus on a Literary Theme, Form, or Mode (3)
T ENG 226 is the Honors College version of A ENG 226. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A ENG 240/240T/240V/240Z Rewriting America (3)
Working from a selection of texts that will provide both context and models, students will learn to write about the challenges of living in 21st century America. The course will focus, in particular, on issues of diversity and pluralism including race, class, gender, sexuality, disability and citizenship.

A ENG 242 Science Fiction (3)
The development of science fiction and the issues raised by it. Authors include such writers as Asimov, Clarke, Heinlein, Huxley, and LeGuin.

A ENG 243 Literature and Film (3)
Both films and literary works as outgrowths of their culture. From term to term the course focuses on different periods or themes. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

T ENG 243 Literature and Film (3)
T ENG 243 is the Honors College version of A ENG 243; only one version may be taken for credit.

A ENG 261 American Literary Traditions (3)
Representative works from the Colonial through the Modern period, with attention to necessary historical and intellectual background information as well as reflection upon the concepts of literary history, period and canons.

A ENG 270 Living Literature: Challenges in the 21st Century (3)
Thinking critically about the relationship between the past and the present through literary texts. This course explores the persistence of the past in contemporary literature or the relevance of literary traditions to contemporary challenges.

T ENG 270 Honors Living Literature: Challenges in the 21st Century (3)
T ENG 270 is the Honors College version of A ENG 270; only one version may be taken for credit. Open to Honors College students only.

A ENG 271 Literature & Globalization: Challenges in the 21st Century (3)
Examination of contemporary world literature in the light of the challenges of globalization.

A ENG 272 Media, Technology and Culture: Challenges in the 21st Century (3)
Examination of how technology and media shape our experiences in the 21st century, through analysis of a range of texts including film, television and digital media alongside more traditional literary materials.

A ENG 291 British Literary Traditions I: From the Anglo-Saxon Period through Milton (3)
Representative works from the Anglo-Saxon period through the 17th century, with attention to necessary historical and intellectual background information as well as reflection upon the concepts of literary history, period and canons.

A ENG 292 British Literary Traditions II: The Restoration through the Modern Period (3)
Representative works from the Restoration through the Modern period, with attention to necessary historical and intellectual background information as well as reflection upon the concepts of literary history, period and canons.

A ENG 295/295Z Classics of Western Literature (3)
Introduction to classics of western literature from Antiquity through the Renaissance, with attention to necessary historical and intellectual background information.

T ENG 295 Classics of Western Literature (3)
T ENG 295 is the Honors College version of A ENG 295; only one version may be taken for credit.

A ENG 297 Postcolonial Literary Traditions (3)
Representative works of the formerly colonized world, with attention to necessary historical and intellectual background information. Works to be chosen from at least three regions beyond Europe.

A ENG 300W Expository Writing (3)
For experienced writers who wish to work on such skills as style, organization, logic, and tone. Practice in a variety of forms: editorials, letters, travel accounts, film reviews, position papers, and autobiographical narrative. Classes devoted to discussions of the composing process and to critiques of student essays. Prerequisite(s) restricted to junior and senior English minors and non-majors.

A ENG 302W/302Z Creative Writing (3)
Intermediate course in creative writing, usually focusing on the close study and practice of one or two genres. May be repeated once for credit when genre focus varies.  

A ENG 305V Studies in Writing About Texts (3)
Intensive study of the forms and strategies of writing in English studies. Students will engage with a variety of literary, critical, and theoretical texts. The course emphasizes students’ own analytical writing. Prerequisite(s): C or better in A ENG 205Z. Open to declared English majors only.

A ENG 309Z Professional Writing (3)
Practice in the kinds of writing particularly useful to students in business and in the natural and social sciences. Emphasis on clear, accurate, informative writing about complex subjects. Intended primarily for juniors and seniors.

A ENG 310 Reading and Interpretation in English Studies (3)
A more focused examination of one or more of the critical approaches to literary and cultural study introduced in English 210. Students will gain in-depth exposure to specific critical debates within a particular theoretical tradition, learning to see the critical stakes of different perspectives, and to position their own ideas in relation to this unfolding critical conversation.  Prerequisite(s): C or better in A ENG 210. Open to declared English majors only.

A ENG 311 History of the English Language (3)
A broad tracing of the history, development, and structure of the language from the beginnings to modern English, including foreign influences on English, basic tendencies of the language, grammatical constructs, and regional usages, especially American. Intended primarily for juniors and seniors.

A ENG 315 Introduction to Literary Theory (3)
Survey of the major theorists that have been influential in the field of English Studies.

A ENG 330 Literature of the Middle Ages (3)
Students will examine a number of representative works of the Middle Ages, read in translation. Additional readings in, for example, the classics and religious literature will help to situate each work in time and place. Intended primarily for juniors and seniors. Cannot be taken by students who have received credit for A ENG 421.

A ENG 331 Literature of the Earlier Renaissance (3)
Examination of the various forms that developed and flourished in England during the 16th century: prose, narrative and lyric poetry, and drama (exclusive of Shakespeare). Attention to classical and continental influences, the historical background, the legitimation English, and the power of individual texts. Major figures may include More, Wyatt and Surrey, Sidney, Marlowe, Spenser, and Jonson.

A ENG 332 Literature of Later Renaissance (3)
The poetry, prose, and drama of England from 1600 to 1660 (exclusive of Milton). Major figures may include Bacon, Donne, Hobbes, Herbert, Marvell, and Webster. Attention to political issues intellectual issues and religion as they bear upon the poetry of wit, the prose of conviction, and the drama of power and intrigue. Intended primarily for juniors and seniors.

A ENG 333 Literature of the Restoration and the 18th Century Enlightenment (3)
In poetry, the range and variety achieved within the ordered, urbane, civil style of Dryden and Pope and the later development of the innovative, exploratory style of Gray, Collins, and Cowper. In prose, the achievement of Swift, Addison and Steele, and its extension in Johnson, Goldsmith, Gibbon, and Burke. Intended primarily for juniors and seniors.

A ENG 334 19th Century British Literature (3)
Examination of the texts in the British literary tradition, read in their relations to literary movements and broader cultural issues and movements, possibly in conjunction with non-canonical texts of the time period. Topics to be discussed may include: the literature of the earlier 19th and late 18th centuries in relation to a continuing culture of Romanticism; the literature of the mid and later 19th century in relation to cultures of Modernism; and the literature of Empire. Cannot be taken by students who have received credit for either A ENG 426 or 427.

A ENG 335 Literature in English after 1900 (3)
Examination of British Literature in the 20th century. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: the development of literary genres and themes; modernism and post-modernism; colonial and post-colonial literature. Cannot be taken by students who have received credit for A ENG 371 or 428.

A ENG 336 American Literature to 1800 (3)
Examination of American literature of the colonial and federal periods. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: the development of literary genres and themes; formations of national identity; theological and political contexts. Cannot be taken by students who have received credit for A ENG 432.

A ENG 337 19th Century American Literature (3)
Examination of American literature of the 19th century. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: the development of literary genres and themes; romanticism, realism, regionalism, and naturalism; literature in relation to historical and political contexts. Cannot be taken by students who have received credit for A ENG 433 or 434.

A ENG 338 American Literature after 1900 (3)
Examination of American literature of the 20th century. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: the development of literary genres and themes; modernism and post-modernism; literature and identity formation in American culture; American literature in relation to transnational context. Cannot be taken by students who have received credit for A ENG 434 or 435.

A ENG 342 Study of an Author or Authors Before Mid-18th Century (3)
Examination of a single major author in depth (e.g., Chaucer or Milton), or of two or more authors whose works illuminate each other in terms of style, theme, and/or relationship to a particular historical era. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A ENG 343 Study of an Author or Authors After Mid-18th Century (3)
Examination of a single major author in depth, or of two or more authors whose works illuminate each other in terms of style, theme, and/or relationship to a particular historical era. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A ENG 346 Studies in Shakespeare (3)
Examination of Shakespeare’s plays, with emphasis on character, language, theme, form, and structure. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: the early or later works; theatrical modes (e.g., comedy, romance, tragedy, history); performance (e.g., Shakespeare on film or stage); Shakespeare in relation to his contemporaries; Shakespeare's dramatic and non-dramatic poetry. Designed for English and theatre majors and minors. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Replaces A ENG 344/A THR 324 and A ENG 345/A THR 325.

A ENG 350 Contemporary Writers at Work (3)
Rhetoric and poetics as practiced by contemporary writers across a range of genres and media. Particular attention to social, intellectual, and aesthetic contexts out of which such work emerges.

A ENG 351 Studies in Technology, Media, or Performance (3)
Examination of technological, media, or staged phenomena, as well as readings related to these forms. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: place of technology, media, or performance in English studies; forms and/or theories of technology, media, or performance; materiality and meaning; cultural texts. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A ENG 355 Studies in Film (3)
Examination of themes and issues in the history and/or interpretation of American and British film. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: the themes, structures, and/or style of a director or directors; genres of film; theories of film; film and other arts, including literature. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A ENG 356 Studies in Nonfiction Prose (3)
Examination of nonfiction prose as a medium of discourse, ranging from literary criticism, biography, and autobiography to journalism, science, philosophy, and history. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: forms of nonfiction; theories of nonfiction prose; historical development; cultural texts. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A ENG 357 Studies in Drama (3)
Examination of drama, with an emphasis on critical reading of dramatic literature. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: forms of drama; theories of drama; theatrical traditions; problems of production and dramatic interpretation. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A ENG 358 Studies in Poetry (3)
Examination of poetry, with an emphasis on study of poetic forms and modes. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: major developments in themes, language, forms and modes of poetry; poetics; poetry in the arts, including theatre and song. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A ENG 359 Studies in Narrative (3)
Examination of narrative forms with an emphasis upon prose fiction. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: forms of fiction, theories of narrative; narrative in the fine arts, including film; cultural narratives. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A ENG 360Y Tutoring & Writing (3)
This course is primarily designed to train tutors to work in the University’s Writing Center, though those interested in exploring writing instruction, writing processes from brainstorming to revision, or rhetorical concerns of audience and purpose may also find this course of value. We will investigate our own and others’ writing processes, styles, and purposes for writing in various academic disciplines, and the dynamics of giving and receiving useful feedback on writing as well as the role of a Writing Center on campus. Extensive practice and observation of tutorials will be central to the course, as will discussion of these experiences and published theoretical perspectives on the role of the writing tutor. This course is intended for sophomores and juniors who will be eligible to apply for positions as tutors in the University Writing Center upon successful completion of this course. Open to both English majors and non-majors. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A ENG 362 (= A WSS 362) Critical Approaches to Gender and Sexuality in Literature (3)
Examination of the role of Anglophone literary texts from any period(s) in the construction of gender and sexuality, with an emphasis on study of interpretive strategies provided by various critical discourses. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: aesthetic movements; historical problems; cultural texts; political questions. Only one version of A ENG 362 may be taken for credit.

A ENG 366 (= A WSS 366) Critical Approaches to Ethnicity in Literature (3)
Examination of constructions of "race" and/or "ethnicity" as presented in Anglophone literature. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: how markers of nationality are related to issues of sexuality, class, and other cultural-historical ways of accounting for the complex questions that surround identity. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A ENG 367 (= A JST 367) The Jewish Literary Imagination (3)
Readings in literature by modern Jewish writers that addresses themes and issues of importance to modern Jewry. The course may offer either an intensive survey of a broad range of modern Jewish literature in one or more genres, or take a thematic, national, chronological, or generic approach to the subject matter. Only one version of A ENG 367 may be taken for credit.

A ENG 368 (= A WSS 368) Women Writers (3)
Selected works of English and/or American women writers in the context of the literary and cultural conditions confronting them. The course focuses on the development of a female tradition in literature and on the narrative, poetic, and/or dramatic styles of expression, voice, and values of women writers. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A ENG 369 African-American Literature (3)
Selected works of African-American writers in their cultural, literary, and historical contexts. The course focuses on the development of an African-American tradition and on the artistic forms essential to it. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A ENG 372 Transnational Literature (3)
Examination of aesthetic movements, cultural texts, political questions, and historical problems of post-colonial nations and subjects in their transnational contexts. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A ENG 373 Literature of the Americas (3)
Examination of the literatures of the Americas, North and South, including the Caribbean. Topics to be discussed may include, among others: aesthetic movements; local cultural practice; history; identity formation; and politics. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A ENG 374 Cultural Studies (3)
A study of cultural forms and practices in relation to the historical conditions in which they are shaped. The course considers theoretical and the practical dimensions of meaning in a wide range of cultural texts. May be repeated once for credit when content varies.

A ENG 390 Internship in English (3)
Supervised practical apprenticeship of 10-15 hours of work per week in a position requiring the use of skills pertaining to the discipline of English, such as reading and critical analysis, writing, research, tutoring, etc., with an academic component consisting of the internship colloquium. Written work and report required. Selection is competitive and based on early application, recommendations, interviews and placement with an appropriate internship sponsor. Open only to junior or senior English majors and minors with a minimum overall grade point average of 2.50 and a minimum 3.00 average in English. A ENG 390 credits may not be used toward the 18 credits minimum required for the English minor. Prerequisite(s): A ENG 205Z. S/U graded.

A ENG 399Z Honors Seminar (3)
Topics vary with each sequence. The seminars explore special topics in literary history, literary theory, and critical methodology. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A ENG 402Z Advanced Writing Workshop (3)
Advanced course in creative writing, usually devoted to the close study and practice of a single genre. Prerequisite(s): A ENG 302Z and permission of instructor.     

A ENG 410/410Y Topics in Contemporary Literary and Critical Theory (3)
Focused examination of the theoretical questions, presuppositions, and debates pertinent to a specific perspective or issue in contemporary thought and theory. Individual semesters may focus on, among other areas: a particular discourse (e.g., ecocriticism, ideology critique, queer theory, language theory, psychoanalysis, or cultural problem). May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): C or better in A ENG 210, A ENG 305, or permission of instructor.

A ENG 411/411Y Topics in British Literature and Culture (3)
Focused examination of selected topics in the literature and culture of England, including nations formerly under British rule or influence. Individual semesters may focus on, among others: a historical period, genre, or theme; the literature and culture of a particular place or country (such as India, Ireland, the Caribbean); a specific aspect of cultural study. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): C or better in A ENG 210, A ENG 305, or permission of instructor.

A ENG 412/412Y Topics in Film or Drama (3)
Focused examination of specific theme or issue in the history and/or interpretation of Anglophone film and/or drama from any period(s). Individual semesters may focus on, among other areas: the work of a particular author and/or director; historical period, genre, or theme; a particular discourse in film or drama studies (e.g., ideological, aesthetic); relations between film and/or drama and literary and other texts. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): C or better in A ENG 210, A ENG 305, or permission of instructor.

A ENG 413/413Y Topics in American Literature and Culture (3)
Focused examination of the selected topics in the literature and culture of the Americas. Individual semesters may focus on, among other areas: a particular historical period, genre, or theme; literature of a region or group (e.g., African-American, Caribbean, or Latino); interpretive or other theoretical problems in American literacy and cultural study. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): C or better in A ENG 210, A ENG 305, or permission of instructor.

A ENG 416/416Y (= A WSS 416/416Y) Topics in Gender, Sexuality, Race, or Class (3)
Focused examination of topics in the study of gender, sexuality, race and/or class, as they are positioned and defined in Anglophone literary or other texts from any period(s). Individual semesters may focus on, among other areas: a particular historical period, genre, or theme; theories of gender, sexuality, race, and/or class as related to literary or other forms of representation; a particular cultural problem. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): C or better in A ENG 210, A ENG 305, or permission of instructor.

A ENG 419/419Y Topics in Technology, Media, and Performance (3)
Focused examination of a specific theme or issue in the study of technological media or staged phenomena, as well as readings related to these forms. Individual semesters may focus on, among other areas: the machine in culture; artificial intelligence; notions of nature and the body; environmental issues; print media; television; the Internet; popular arts; performance art; ritual; social practices. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): C or better in A ENG 210, A ENG 305, or permission of instructor.

A ENG 449/449Y Topics in Comparative Literatures and Cultures (3)
Focused examination of selected topics in the study of comparative Anglophone literatures and cultures from any period. Individual semesters may focus on, among other areas: comparative study of particular aesthetic movements, cultural texts, political questions, or historical problems. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): C or better in A ENG 210, A ENG 305, or permission of instructor.

A ENG 450/450Y Topics in Writing Studies (3)
Carefully focused study in the history, theory, or practice of rhetoric and/or poetics (e.g., narrative theory; poetic movements; 20th century rhetorical theory). May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): C or better in A ENG 210, A ENG 305, or permission of instructor.

A ENG 460/460Y Topics in Transnational Studies (3)
Focused examination of transnational literature and cultures. Individual semesters may focus on, among other areas: particular aesthetic movement(s), cultural text(s), political question(s), or historical problem(s) of post-colonial nations and subjects in their transnational contexts. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): C or better in A ENG 210, A ENG 305, or permission of instructor.

A ENG 465/465Y Topics in Ethnic Literatures in Cultural Contexts (3)
Focused examination of a particular topic on constructions of "race" and/or "ethnicity" as related to literature or other forms of representation from any period(s). Individual semesters may focus on, among other areas: neglected literary forms and cultural traditions; relations between writing and political struggles; identity studies and developments within interpretive or other theories. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): C or better in A ENG 210, A ENG 305, or permission of instructor.

A ENG 485/485Y Topics in Cultural Studies (3)
Focused examination of particular topic in the study of culture, broadly defined. Individual semesters may focus on, among other areas: postcolonial studies; history of social institutions and knowledge production; study of identity formations; cultural forms; technology and science studies. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): C or better in A ENG 210, A ENG 305, or permission of instructor.

A ENG 488W/488Z Special Topics (1-6)
Note: all 400 level writing workshops may be taught under this rubric. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): C or better in A ENG 210.

A ENG 497 Independent Study and Research in English (1-4)
Senior level course designed to address intellectual needs that have grown out of previous coursework, or subject matter that is not regularly covered under the English department's curriculum. May be taken for a maximum of 8 credits. Prerequisite(s): C or better in A ENG 210 and permission of a faculty member in the department and of the appropriate departmental committee. Reserved for English majors.

A ENG 498 Thesis Seminar I (4)
Independent honors thesis individually formulated and written under the direction of the coordinator. Students writing theses will meet occasionally in colloquia to become acquainted with each other's work in progress. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. S/U graded.

A ENG 499 Thesis Seminar II (3)
Continuation and completion of thesis begun in A ENG 498. The thesis will be reviewed and evaluated by an honors committee. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

  

Department of Geography and Planning

Faculty

Professor Emeritus
Floyd Henderson, Ph.D.
University of Kansas       
Christopher J. Smith, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
Roger Stump, Ph.D.
University of Kansas
John Webb, Ph.D.
University of Minnesota

Associate Professors Emeritus
Gene Bunnell, Ph.D.
London School of Economics
Wayne Heiser, Ph.D.
Northwestern University

Distinguished Service Professor
John S. Pipkin, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
Northwestern University

Professor
Ray Bromley, Ph.D.
Cambridge University

Associate Professors 
Youqin Huang, Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles
Andrei Lapenas, Ph.D.
State Hydrological Institute, Saint Petersburg
Catherine T. Lawson, Ph.D. (Department Chair)
Portland State University
David A. Lewis, Ph.D.
Rutgers University
James E. Mower, Ph.D.
State University of New York at Buffalo

Assistant Professors
Carlos J.L. Balsas, Ph.D.
University of Massachusetts
Alexander Buyantuev, Ph.D.  
Arizona State University
Melissa A. Currie, Ph.D.
The University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Shiguo Jiang, Ph.D.
Ohio State University
Rui Li, Ph.D.
The Pennsylvania State University
Tom P. Narins, Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles

Adjuncts (estimated): 16
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 2.5



The Department of Geography and Planning offers programs leading to the B.A., M.A., and M.R.P. degrees, a combined B.A./M.A. program, and an Undergraduate/Graduate Certificate in Geographic Information Systems and Spatial Analysis. Undergraduate students can major or minor in Geography. The department also offers a B.A. in Urban Studies and Planning, a minor in Urban Studies and Planning, a B.A. in Interdisciplinary Studies with a faculty-initiated concentration Globalization Studies, and a minor in Globalization Studies. Geographers study the characteristics of space, location and place in the broader context of how people interact with both physical and human environments. Geography can be classified as both a natural science and a social science as it examines people and their environment and serves as a bridge between the physical and cultural worlds. Planning is a discipline and professional practice that deals with the form, organization, and orderly development of cities, suburbs, and rural areas. Geographic information systems (GIS), computer mapping, remote sensing, and related technologies are central to the discipline of geography and are indispensable in many areas of professional planning practice. The department also offers a B.A. in Globalization Studies — the newest department offering. Globalization Studies analyzes the growing integration of the world system through trade, migration, financial flows and telecommunications, the impact of human activity on the world environment, and the adaptation of local and ethnic identities to the ongoing globalization process.

Teaching and research in the department emphasize urban, social, physical, political, and cultural geography; historical landscape; city and regional planning; urban design; remote sensing; cartography and geographic information systems; environmental studies; climatology; computer and statistical models; area (regional) studies; urban and regional planning methods; economic development; small town and rural land-use planning. Members of the faculty have strong international links with China, Russia, Australia, and various countries in Africa, Latin America and Western Europe.

Careers
The undergraduate programs provide background suitable for entry into a wide variety of business, educational and government occupations, as well for graduate or professional study in geography, planning, business, public administration, forestry, landscape architecture and other environmentally oriented programs. Career possibilities include: cartographers, remote sensing, and geographic information systems (G.I.S.) specialists; location and market area analysts; urban, regional, economic, and transportation planners; environmental scientists; international development specialists; urban design professionals; industrial and real estate developers; soil scientists; marketing and distribution managers; journalists; and travel and recreation specialists.

Degree Requirements for the Major in Geography

General Program B.A.: a minimum of 36 credits, including:

    Core Courses: 12 credits

    Elective courses: 24 credits 

    Human Geography
A GOG 125 (= A USP 125) The American City
A GOG 160 (= A EAC 160) China: People and Places
A GOG 200 Cultural Geography
A GOG 220 (= A USP 220) Introductory Urban Geography
A GOG 225 (= A GLO 225 & A USP 225) World Cities: Geographies of Globalization
T GOG 230 Reform and Resistance in Contemporary China
T GOG 244 Global Population Debates
A GOG 250 Geography of Latin America
A GOG 270 (= A AFS 270) Geography of Africa
A GOG 307 (= A USP 307) Geospatial Applications of Drones        
A GOG 310 (= A BIO 311 & U UNI 310) World Food Crisis
A GOG 325 (= A GLO/A USP 325) Global Urbanism and Culture
A GOG 344Y World Population
A GOG 350 (= A EAC 350) Urban Development in China
A GOG 364Y (= A GLO 364Y & A USP 364Y) India: Development Debates
A GOG 366 (= A GLO 366) India: Field Study of Development Issues
A GOG 375 (= A USP 375) Methods of Urban Analysis
A GOG 405 Topics in Human Geography
A GOG 440 Political Geography
A GOG 442 Geography of Religion
A GOG 480 (= A USP 480) Advanced Urban Geography
A USP 475 Urban Design

    Environmental Geography
A GOG 201 (= A ENV 201 & A GEO 201) Environmental Analysis
A GOG 304 Climatology
A GOG 307 (= A USP 307) Geospatial Applications of Drones
A GOG 330 (= A USP 330) Principles of Environmental Management
A GOG 404 Topics in Physical Geography
A GOG 424 Landscape Ecology 
A GOG 430 (= A USP 430) Environmental Planning
A GOG 431 Climate Change
A GOG 433Y (= A USP 433) Urban Ecology
A GOG 460 (= A USP 460) People, Place, and Power

    Geographic Information Science
A GOG 290 Introduction to Cartography
A GOG 307 (= A USP 307) Geospatial Applications of Drones
A GOG 360 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
A GOG 406 Topics in Geographic Information Systems
A GOG 414 Computer Mapping
A GOG 417 Geography Internships (3-6 credits)
A GOG 422 GIS for Social Sciences
A GOG 427Y Human Factors in Geographic Information Science
A GOG 479 Fundamentals of Applied Global Positioning Systems (GPS)
A GOG 484 Remote Sensing I
A GOG 485 Remote Sensing II
A GOG 498 (= A USP 457) Advanced Geographic Information Systems

General Education requirement:

Students complete General Education Competencies in the major in Advanced Writing, Critical Thinking, and Information Literacy in the required core courses. To complete the competency in Oral Discourse, students must choose at least one course with “Y” suffix as part of their required elective credits in the major. Courses satisfying the General Education Competency in Oral Discourse are as follows:

A GOG 344Y World Population
A GOG 364Y India: Development Debates
A GOG 427Y Human Factors in Geographic Information Science
A GOG 433Y Urban Ecology

Honors Program

The department’s honors program in geography is intended to recognize the academic excellence of its best students, to give them the opportunity to work more closely with the faculty, and to enhance their understanding of geographical theory and research. Students may apply for admission to the program during their junior year or at the beginning of their senior year. To gain admission, students must have formally declared a major in geography and completed at least 12 credits of course work in the department. In addition, at the time of admission students must have an overall grade point average of at least 3.25, and of 3.50 in geography.

Students must complete a minimum of 42 credits as follows:

The departmental Honors Committee will review each student’s progress at the end of each semester. Upon completion of all honors program requirements with a grade point average of 3.50 in geography and 3.25 overall, students will be recommended by the Honors Committee for graduation with Honors in Geography, and will be honored at the departmental recognition ceremony in May.

Combined B.A./M.A. Program

The combined B.A./M.A. program in geography provides an opportunity for students of recognized academic ability and educational maturity to fulfill integrated requirements of undergraduate and master’s degree programs from the beginning of their junior year. A carefully designed program can permit a student to earn the B.A. and M.A. degrees within nine semesters.

The combined program requires a minimum of 138 credits, of which at least 30 must be graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.A., students must meet all university and college requirements, including the requirements of the undergraduate major described previously, the minor requirement, the minimum 90 credit liberal arts and sciences requirement, the general education requirements, and residency requirements. In qualifying for the M.A., students must meet all university and college requirements as outlined in the Graduate Bulletin, including completion of a minimum of 30 graduate credits and any other conditions such as a research seminar, thesis, comprehensive examination, professional experience, and residency requirements. Up to 12 graduate credits may be applied simultaneously to both the B.A. and M.A. programs.

Students may be admitted to the combined degree program at the beginning of their junior year, or after the successful completion of 56 credits. A cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or higher and three supportive letters of recommendation from faculty are required for consideration. Students will be admitted upon the recommendation of the Graduate Admissions Committee of the department.

Undergraduate Certificate Program in Geographic Information Systems and Spatial Analysis

This certificate program provides undergraduates with professional and technical training in geographic information systems (GIS) and associated techniques of spatial analysis. Geographic information systems are computer-based systems for storage, analysis, and display of spatial data. The disciplines of cartography, remote sensing and computer graphics are closely linked to the study of GIS. In conjunction with GIS, methods of spatial analysis may be used to study a wide range of problems, including resource management, land management for agriculture and forestry, urban planning, land use mapping, market area analysis, urban social analysis and a host of other applications.

The certificate requires 19 credits of undergraduate course work, including A GOG 290, 414, 484, 485, 496, and A MAT 108 (or an approved equivalent).

Bachelor of Arts in Urban Studies and Planning

The B.A. in Urban Studies and Planning is designed for students interested in a liberal arts education focusing on urban and suburban environments; environmental planning; sustainable development policy and practices; as well as urban, community and neighborhood development. The program of study mixes conventional classes with fieldwork and computer-based learning, and it requires considerable awareness of international, multicultural and policy issues. Students with training in urban studies and planning may enter careers in housing and community development, real estate, local and state government, local economic development, or local planning. They can pursue further study in graduate or professional schools to specialize in city and regional planning, public policy, real estate, architecture, or landscape architecture.

 

Planning is a broad function of the public and private sectors directed at guiding urban and regional development, analyzing physical, social, economic, and environmental issues, and preparing policy alternatives. Many planners work in the public sector, evaluating problems and suggesting solutions in the domains of transportation, housing, economic and community development, urban design, neighborhood revitalization, environmental issues, and policy analysis. Others work in the private and nonprofit sectors, serving as consultants, researchers, real estate developers, community development promoters, and specialists in local economic development. The department administers an interdisciplinary undergraduate minor program in urban studies and planning, and offers undergraduate courses in planning. These courses provide students with insights on urban and regional development from a broad, liberal arts viewpoint, as well as providing background and tools for further study and the professional practice of planning.

Degree Requirements for the Major in Urban Studies and Planning

General Program B.A.: a minimum of 36 credits including:

Core courses: 15 credits

Community engagement: 3 credits chosen from A USP 437, 474, 476, 490
Capstone course: 3 credits from A USP 475
Elective courses: 15 credits

  

Courses in Geography

A GOG 101 Introduction to the Physical Environment (3)
Introduction to the three main fields of physical geography (climatology, biogeography, and geomorphology) from an integrated earth systems viewpoint. The major world climate, vegetation, soil and landform regions are treated as process-response systems whose physical patterns and interrelationships, causes, and significance are examined. Includes assessments of the role of human impacts for global and regional change.

A GOG 102/102Z Introduction to Human Geography (3-4)
Introduction to key elements of human geography as a social science, (including population, cultural, economic, and political geography), focusing on the disciplinary themes of place, space and landscape. These themes are applied at a variety of scales, from local to the regional to the global, with particular emphasis with geographical concerns with cross-cultural comparisons among regions and with the relationships of local and regional phenomena to global processes. Only one version of A GOG 102 may be taken for credit.

A GOG 106 (= A USP 106) Introduction to Geospatial Technologies (3)
This course aims to provide students with fundamental concepts related to the major aspects of Geographic Information Science: Geographic Information Systems, Global Positioning Systems, Cartography, and Remote Sensing. It will serve as an entry level course to introduce students who would like to have a broader perspective on GIS-related technologies and practical skills further in their studies or practices regardless of their majors. It also serves the role of preparing students for more specific courses such as Introduction to GIS, Introduction to Remote Sensing, Introduction to Cartography, and Introduction to GPS, and consequently advanced courses in those areas within this department. For students who are not pursuing further geographic information related courses, the techniques introduced in this class such as spatial analysis and map making will be powerful tools for students to apply in their further study or practices in domains such as business administration, social sciences, humanities, as well as emergency preparedness.

A GOG 125 (= A USP 125) The American City (3)
Provides a broad introduction to American urbanism from a geographical-historical perspective, focusing on spatial forms and the built environment, the social and economic processes that produced them, and their contested cultural meanings. Surveys the legacies of industrialization, immigration, planning interventions, and the struggles for rights by minorities and women, and poses questions about our urban future in an age of globalization, information technology, and environmental crisis.

A GOG 160/160V/160X/160Z (= A EAC 160/160V/160X/160Z) China: People and Places (3)
This course provides a systematic introduction of China as an emerging political and economic power in the context of globalization. Main topics include historical evolution, uneven physical and social geography, economic reform, rapid urbanization, population growth and family planning, environmental change, tradition and culture change, and persisting and emerging problems. This course aims to help student better understand China. This course also teaches students how to search, use and evaluate information for their research in an increasingly digital and information-oriented world. Only one version of A GOG/A EAC 160 may be taken for credit.

A GOG 200 Cultural Geography (3)
This course explores key themes in cultural geography through a series of case studies relating to specific places, drawn from different regions of the world and from different time periods. These case studies provide contexts for examining key disciplinary concerns in cultural geography, including but not limited to culture itself, hearths of cultural innovation, processes of spatial diffusion, the creation of distinct spaces by culture groups, the spatial scales of culture, the meanings that groups assign to particular spaces, spatial interaction and cross-influences among cultures, the cultural elements of spatial behavior, territoriality, cultural conflict over space, and the changing meanings of places over time. Prerequisite(s): A GOG 102.

A GOG 201 (= A ENV 201 & A GEO 201) Environmental Analysis (3)
Uses laboratory work and local field excursions to give students “hands-on” experience in physical geography and environmental sciences. Focuses on human impacts on the environment and on problems of environmental contamination. Only one version may be taken for credit. Offered fall semester only. 

A GOG 220 (= A USP 220) Introductory Urban Geography (3)
Introductory survey of findings and theory of urban geography, which deals with the form and function of cities. Major themes include: history of urban form; spatial structure of modern urban systems; and the internal structure of the city, emphasizing social and economic patterns.

A GOG 225/225Z (= A GLO 225/225Z & A USP 225/225Z) World Cities: Geographies of Globalization (3)
This course takes a critical look at globalization and its impacts on cities around the world. Globalization includes an array of economic, cultural, and political forces that are effectively shrinking our world. The first part of the course focuses on the ways transnational movements or 'flows' of trade, finance, people and culture operate in and through a network of linked `global' cities, the top tier of which function as the `command and control' centers at the `core' of the global economy. The second part of the course shifts attention to the global `periphery' and to some of the lower tier cities of the world's urban hierarchy: in Latin America, Africa, and Asia. The concern here will be to examine the local consequences of globalization in two overlapping realms. The first will involve looking for and at evidence of the less salutary effects of globalization forces in these cities: for example, higher levels of social and spatial inequality, deteriorating environmental and health conditions, diminished per-capita share of local resources and infrastructures, and cultural homogenization. The other realm will be an investigation of local activities that occur in response and as resistance to the pervasive forces of globalization. The goal here will be to document and evaluate the effectiveness of some of the local movements and organizations that have struggled for social justice in the face of what they perceive to be oppressive (global) economic and cultural forces. After taking A GOG/A GLO/A USP 225 students will be able to compare cities on the global 'periphery' with each other, as well as with those in the global 'core' to learn about and understand how some aspects of economic and cultural globalization play out and are adapted to `on the ground' and to think critically about how people might effectively organize their thoughts and exercise their rights to the city in the era of globalization. A GOG/A GLO/A USP 225Z are the writing intensive versions of A GOG/A GLO/A USP 225; only one version of A GOG 225 may be taken for credit.

T GOG 230 (= T EAC 230) Reform and Resistance in Contemporary China (4)
The course provides a survey of economic and social change in reform-era China (1978-present), beginning with a broad review of the policies that have brought about such a monumental restructuring of the economy. In the later sections of the in-class discussion will focus on the human impacts of the reforms and the extent to which the Chinese people have been constrained in their struggles for a better life and a more just and equitable society. Readings and materials from other media (including contemporary film and literature) will be selected to illustrate some of the ways the Chinese people have been exerting agency in shaping their own fate and resisting the inevitable forces that seem likely to overwhelm them in the new era of free-wheeling capitalism. The classroom discussions will focus on specific case studies of resistance drawn from a variety of sites and a range of contexts in contemporary China, which will be discussed and analyzed in the context of social science theories about the nature of resistance and its outcomes. The course will present ideas and a body of literature that question and critique the dominant 'narrative of success' that currently pervades Western media and academic curricula. Formerly A EAC/A GOG 230H. Only one version of T GOG 230 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): open to Honors College students only.

A GOG 240 Patterns of American Immigration (3)
This course provides a survey of immigration to the United States, focusing on key characteristics of immigrant groups and their cultures, in relation to both their places of origin and their destinations in this country.

T GOG 244Y Global Population Debates (3)
This course offers an in-depth introduction to the field of demography. Specially, it introduces main demographic concepts, theories and debates, offers an overview of world population pattern and regional variations, examines population processes and structure, and studies the impact of population on development and environment. Through case studies and debates, this course offers diverse demographic perspectives and tools (terminologies, methodologies and theories) to analyze population in both developed and developing countries. After taking this course, students should develop their own demographic perspective to facilitate their understanding of the world. Prerequisite(s): open to Honors College students only.

A GOG 250/250Z (= A LCS 250/250Z) Geography of Latin America (3)
An introduction to the geographical diversity of Latin America, reviewing the Continent’s physical features, natural resources, societies, economies and politics, and relating them to its history and cultural traditions. Particular attention will be given to rural and urban living conditions, social and regional inequalities, population distribution, internal and international migration, and socioeconomic development issues. Only one version of A GOG 250 may be taken for credit.

A GOG 260 (= A EAC 160 & A GLO 260) China in the Global Arena (3)
An introduction to the development of China’s economy and society since the death of Chairman Mao Tse-tung in 1976. Focuses on urbanization, industrialization, export-oriented development, and participation in global trade, finance, and politics. Taught in Shanghai, this multidisciplinary course helps students understand the dynamics of China’s rapid economic growth over the last three decades, and how Chinese scholars interpret the nation’s growing importance in the global system. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): taken after, or simultaneously with A EAC 100.

T GOG 266/266Y (= T GLO 266/266Y) India: Development Debates (3)
T GOG 266 is the Honors College version of A GOG 364; only one version may be taken for credit.

A GOG 270 (= A AFS 270) Geography of Africa (3)
Geographic analysis of the continent of Africa. The diversity of the African continent will be stressed by examining its physical environment, resources, social, cultural, economic, and political systems. Emphasis upon the demographic as well as spatial planning aspects of geography. Only one version of A GOG 270 may be taken for credit.

A GOG 290 Introduction to Cartography (4)
An introductory course in the theory and techniques of map production. Reviews and discusses the elements of cartographic theory including the relationships between human perception and map symbology. Students will produce a series of hand-drafted maps over the duration of the course.

A GOG 293 Use and Interpretation of Aerial Photographs (3)
Interpretation and examination of air photos for geographic investigations. Topics include the development of the evaluation of photo keys, thematic mapping, and analysis of landscape elements.

A GOG 304 Climatology (3)
Survey of the fundamentals of climate system. Particular attention is paid to the explanation rather than the description of atmospheric and oceanic processes. Emphasis is given to the application of concepts of environmental physics to selected natural objects: terrestrial planets, the World Ocean, continents, cities, vegetation, animals, and humans. Energy balance study at different temporal and spatial scales is used as a methodological tool to provide a better understanding of such concepts as the “greenhouse” effect, climate sensitivity, photosynthesis, the metabolism of animals, survival of humans in different climates, etc. Work on the Internet with remote weather stations and climate related resources is a part of the course project. Prerequisite(s): A GOG 101 or A ATM 103, or permission of instructor.

A GOG 307 (= A USP 307) Geospatial Applications of Drones (3)
Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS), or drones, have been developing very fast lately. More such systems will be acquired by government and non-government agencies in the near future. The acquisition of a drone may be an easy thing to do but running and managing the system may prove to be challenging for an ordinary user without prior knowledge in this field. There is quite a large amount of information now available on the UAS. However, most of such information focuses on either the engineering aspect of the aircraft or its army applications. Very little information is available on the geo-spatial utilization of UAS. This course is designed as a guide to UAS. It provides an introduction to the technology and operations made possible by it. In the course students will learn about the history, anatomy, applications, and future trends in UAS. Students will walk through the entire process of running an UAS which includes selection of the platform and payload for aerial mapping, complying with current and anticipated rules for UAS operation, conducting an aerial survey and post-processing the acquired imagery.

A GOG 308 (= A EAC 308 & A GLO 308) Debating Contemporary China (1)
Enables students who have recently studied in China to discuss and debate major contemporary issues: the factors underlying China’s rapid economic growth; the impact of China’s economic growth on society, environment, and the global system; the future of China’s political system; the future of China’s population policies; the dynamics of Chinese cities; the situation of Tibet and of ethnic and religious minorities; the future of Taiwan; relations with other Asian neighbors. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): at least 3 credits of Study Abroad coursework in China sometime in the previous year.

A GOG 310 (= A BIO 311 & U UNI 310) World Food Crisis (3)
Interdisciplinary approach to understanding world food problems through analyses of social, political, economic, nutritional, agricultural, and environmental aspects of world hunger. Faculty from several departments in the sciences, humanities, and social and behavioral sciences present views from various disciplines. Only one version of may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A GOG 321 (= A EAS 321 & A LCS 321) Exploring the Multicultural City (3)
This course will explore the human dimensions and implications of ethnic diversity in the United States, focusing on New York City. The course utilizes a variety of methods to introduce students to the multicultural city, beginning in the classroom but ending with fieldwork in a specific New York neighborhood. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A GOG 102, 120 or 225, 125, 160, 220, or 240.

A GOG 324 (= A USP 324) The City on Computer (3)
An introduction to the use of geographic technology in studying urban features and patterns. The course provides a conceptual bridge between introductory courses in urban geography and specialized courses in geographic techniques. Students will acquire familiarity with relevant software, data sources and methods of analysis through regular computing laboratory assignments. Prerequisite(s): any two of the following: A GOG 125, 220, 225, A USP 201.

A GOG 325 (= A GLO 325 & A USP 325) Global Urbanism and Culture
This course explores contemporary debates on globalization, global urbanism and culture. It covers a series of themes central to cities, planning and public policy. These include among others: the role of culture in fostering multicultural cities, the relationships between urban sustainability and environmental planning, the geography of culture, the creative class, cultural industries, the arts and culture sector, local economies and place identity, cultural policies and urban regeneration programs, local and regional resilience networks, public space, local heritage, sense of belonging, community development, and global futures. Only one version of A GOG 325 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A GOG/A GLO/A USP 225.

A GOG 328 (= A USP 328 & A WSS 328) Gender, Space, and Place (3)
Power relations and categories of social difference are reflected by dramatic inequalities in local environments, and in the quantity and quality of available space. This course examines, through the lenses of feminist geography and planning, how space is invested with social meaning. It discusses how the built environment affects and reflects relations of gender, sexuality, and ethnicity, and considers how these social classifications produce “geographies of difference.” Gender is also related to nationalism, colonialism, “geographic skills,” and feminist research methodologies. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A GOG/A USP 125, A USP 201, or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A GOG 330 (= A USP 330) Principles of Environmental Management (3)
Examines issues and problems arising from the interactions between humans and their physical environment. Explores the degradation of environmental systems resulting from human use and modification, as well as the impact of environmental processes on human systems. The policy options for dealing with environmental issues and problems are investigated. Prerequisite(s): A GOG 101 and either A GOG 201 or A USP 201; or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A GOG 344Y World Population (3)
This course offers an in-depth introduction to the field of demography. Specially, it introduces main demographic concepts, theories and debates, offers an overview of world population pattern and regional variations, examines population processes and structure, and studies the impact of population on development and environment. Through case studies and debates, this course offers diverse demographic perspectives and tools (terminologies, methodologies and theories) to analyze population in both developed and developing countries. After taking this course, students should develop their own demographic perspective to facilitate their understanding of the world.

A GOG 350 (= A EAC 350) Urban Development in China (3)
Provides a comprehensive understanding of urban development in China. Reviews the history of urban development in China and examines the demographic, social, economic, and cultural dimensions of the urbanization process. Analyzes the emerging urban land and housing markets, and the changing urban landscape.

A GOG 354 (= A LCS 354) Environment & Development (3)
A survey of international development issues, focusing on the impact of economic growth, population growth, and increased consumption of natural resources on global and local environments. This course focuses primarily on the poorer countries of the world, and particularly on tropical environments. It discusses issues of deforestation, desertification, and increased vulnerability to man-made and natural hazards. Only one version of A GOG 354 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A GOG 101 or 102, or permission of instructor.

A GOG 356 Geography of the United States (3)
A systematic treatment of the physical, economic, and cultural geography of the United States; selected regional problems of land utilization and of geographic adjustments. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A GOG 360 (= A USP 360) Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3)
This is an introductory course to the world of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The course introduces principles of GIS and their applications in spatial analysis and information management. The course is designed to give students an understanding of cutting-edge geospatial technologies, their capabilities, uses, and limitations. Representative applications for each discipline area are demonstrated in the computer laboratory portion.

A GOG 364Y (= A GLO 364Y & A USP 364Y) (formerly A GOG/A GLO/A USP 266Y) India: Development Debates (3)
Analyzes the 20th and early 21st century development of India as a nation state, discussing the broad range of ideas and policy proposals relating to wealth, poverty, socio-economic development, urbanization, and nation-building. Reviews British colonial policies and attitudes, the ideas of important advocates of Indian Independence, the impact of partition, national self-reliance policies and national planning in the first three decades after Independence, and the more recent economic liberalizations and opening to the global market and transnational investment. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): declared major or minor in Globalization Studies, Geography, Urban Studies & Planning, or minor in International Studies, or permission of instructor.

A GOG 365/365Z Geography of Europe (3)
Overview of the physical and human geography of Europe considered as a whole, followed by a more intensive discussion of selected topics on the Mediterranean countries, the British Isles, France, Germany, and the countries of east-central Europe from Scandinavia to the Balkans. Cultural, political, and economic issues will be emphasized, with analysis of contemporary matters in their historical context. Only one version of A GOG 365 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A GOG 366 (= A GLO 366) India: Field Study of Development Issues (3)
A faculty-led field course requiring a minimum of three weeks full-time study in India. Broadens and deepens the agenda of A GOG/A GLO/A USP 364Y “India: Development Debates”, examining urban and rural development issues in and around three major Indian cities. Each city will be home to the course for one week. Students will study major issues (e.g., the management of urban traffic flows, the organization of small-scale retailing, the redevelopment of poor neighborhoods, and the work of micro-business and social welfare NGO’s) through a combination of direct observation, institutional visits, and conversations with local experts. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and the Center for International Education and Global Strategy.

A GOG 375 (= A USP 375) Methods of Urban Analysis (3)
This class will build a foundation for the lager field of statistical analysis and planning methodologies. Students will develop fundamental skills, such as data collection and presentation, descriptive analysis, and data interpretation. When the course successfully completed, students will be to identify different types of data, accurate present data in table and graphic format, describe and analysis data using statistic tools such as measures of central tendency and dispersion, conduct hypothesis testing, build confidence intervals and use these tools to analyze places. Prerequisite(s): A MAT 108 or equivalent.

A GOG 390 Intermediate Cartography (3)
Techniques of reproduction graphics with emphasis on map planning and construction. Utilization of half-tone, color-key, and other production processes as models of cartographic expression. Prerequisite(s): A GOG 290.

A GOG 404 Topics in Physical Geography (1–4)
In-depth examination of a significant topic in Physical Geography. May be repeated up to 9 credits when content varies. Prerequisite(s): A GOG 101 or permission of instructor.

A GOG 405 Topics in Human Geography (1–4)
In-depth examination of a significant topic in Human Geography. May be repeated up to 9 credits when content varies. Prerequisite(s): A GOG 102 or permission of instructor.

A GOG 406 Topics in Geographic Information Systems (1–4)
In-depth examination of a significant topic in Geographic Information Systems (cartography, GIS, remote sensing, global positioning, etc.) May be repeated up to 9 credits when content varies. Prerequisite(s): A GOG 290 for cartography topics; A GOG 496/A USP 456 for GIS topics; A GOG 385 for remote sensing topics; or permission of instructor.

A GOG 407 Biogeography (3)
The study of the distribution of organisms and adaptations to their environments, both in the past and present. This includes studies of all patterns of geographic variation in nature in species diversity and species distribution. Prerequisite(s): A GOG 101, A BIO 102, or A ENV 105, or equivalent.

A GOG 414 Computer Mapping (3)
Introduces the student to the fundamental techniques and applications of automated map production. Lectures include discussions of algorithm and program development as well as existing software packages. Students will also be introduced to current problems and research in automated map production. Covers a wide range of topics including but not limited to automated drafting, computer generated projections, coordinate systems and transformations, data structures, and discussions of algorithms for specific applications. Prerequisite(s): A GOG 290 or permission of instructor.

A GOG 417 Geography Internships (3–6)
Work in cartography, remote sensing, environmental, or other offices to gain pre-professional experience in applied geography. Carried out under the joint supervision of faculty and the host office. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. S/U graded.

A GOG 422 GIS for Social Sciences (3)
The objective of this course is to apply GIS techniques on social sciences. Specific goals are: (1) to provide students with an understanding of how GIS can be applied in social sciences; (2) to familiarize students with advanced GIS and modeling techniques; (3) to provide students with hands-on experience in working with various data sources through a project related to their own research interest. Applications spread from typical themes in urban and regional analysis (e.g., trade area analysis, regional growth patterns, urban land use and transportation) to issues related to crime and health analyses. It also covers common tasks (e.g., distance and travel time estimation, spatial smoothing and interpolation, accessibility measures) and major issues (e.g., modifiable areal unit problem, rate estimate of rare events in small population, spatial autocorrelation) that are encountered in spatial analysis. Computer exercises with ArcGIS and R are designed to help students gain hands-on experience on the topics presented in lectures. Students are required to present and discuss assigned readings and develop an individual research project that applies geospatial methods in geographical problem solving. Prerequisites: A GOG 496/A PLN456, or equivalent. Students should have some basic GIS and statistical knowledge equivalent to one introductory GIS course and one elementary statistical course.

A GOG 424 Landscape Ecology (3)
Landscape ecology is a highly interdisciplinary field, which has its roots in geography and ecology, and has direct relevance to landscape planning and architecture. It deals explicitly with interactions between spatial pattern and ecological processes, including various human influences. This introduction course covers the basic concepts, principles, and methods of landscape ecology, as well as its important applications in nature conservation, resource management, and landscape design and planning. Prerequisites: a general ecology-focused course at the college level or permission of instructor.

A GOG 427Y (= A USP 427Y) Human Factors in Geographic Information Science (3)
Building on previously learned knowledge and skills of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), the course provides students with a further introduction to cognitive theories, designing principles, and evaluation methods that are related to GIS. As a very important aspect of geographic information science, human factors involving spatial cognition address the acquisition, processing, and utilization of spatial information and the use of them in decision making. The study of human factors not only contributes to a better understanding of the efficiency of geographical information systems but also informs the design and development of cognitively efficient applications. Students will be actively involved in the design of practical sessions that strengthens their understanding of cognitive principles in empirical design and assessments. Prerequisite(s): at least one of A GOG 106, A GOG 290, and A GOG 496 or permission of instructor.

A GOG 430/430Z (= A USP 430/430Z) Environmental Planning (3)
Environmental planning is much more than preservation of pristine land. Through the examination of environmental movements, energy policy, the land use-transportation nexus, environmental justice, and environmental policy formation, at the end of this course, students will be able to: (1) identify how normative bias influences planning and policy choices; (2) describe major conflicts in environmental planning and policy; and (3) understand the relationship of scale and environmental planning/policy options. Only one version of A GOG 430 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A USP 201 or permission of instructor.

A GOG 431 Climatic Change (3)
The evolution of the global climate is explained through the analysis of feedback loops between different components of the climate system; atmosphere, oceans, living organisms, the carbon cycle, volcanic activity and changes in solar luminosity. Emphasis is placed on the study of climate sensitivity to global factors, and application of this knowledge to the forecast of future human-produced climatic changes. Prerequisite(s): A GOG 101 or A ATM 103, or permission of instructor.

A GOG 433Y (= A USP 433Y) Urban Ecology (3)
A major landmark has been crossed in the 21st century when humans became an "urban" species, Homo sapiens "urbanus." Indeed, more than 50% of the world's, and 80% of the U.S. population now resides in cities. The course addresses problems of understanding urban areas from the ecological viewpoint. Central to this understanding is the recognition that humans are organisms, but ones with unique capabilities of modifying the environment on multiple scales. A crucial concept to be introduced is the distinction between ecology in cities and ecology of cities. The former addresses how organisms (including humans) respond to and influence the physical and biological characteristics of cities. The latter studies the role of cities within broader geophysical and ecological processes such as global biogeochemical cycles, local and regional climates, patterns of biodiversity and organism movements, and ecological and social responses to disturbances. This course will look at both of these aspects through a theoretical lens of modern urban ecology. Urban areas are socio-ecological systems, a mosaic of landscapes, in which humans and their activities are a component of, rather than a disturbance imposed on, (urban) ecological systems. The approach taken in this course will be to facilitate students' learning through a combination of lecture, discussion and practical homework exercises. Prerequisites: a general ecology-focused course at the college level or permission of instructor.       

A GOG 440 Political Geography (3)
Examines the spatial character of political processes at the local, national and global scales. Major themes include: territory, identity, and the state; localism, regionalism, and separatism; colonialism and decolonization; geopolitics; and internal and international political conflicts.

A GOG 442Z Geography of Religion (3)
This course provides a detailed examination of the study of religion from the perspectives of human geography, focusing both of geographical insights into religion as a cultural phenomenon and the ways in which the study of religion can provide insights into broader concerns within human geography. Key topics include the development of religious hearths, processes in the diffusion of religion, the role of place in the diversity within and among religious systems, religious efforts to exert cultural territoriality over secular space, and the meanings and uses of sacred space at various scales. The course will emphasize particular case studies, as appropriate. Prerequisite(s): A GOG 102 or permission of instructor.

A GOG 447 (= A GLO 447) Development and Underdevelopment (3)
An analytical survey of “Third World” development theories and the development strategies they inspire. Topics covered include traditional concepts of natural and human resources identification and use, geographic diffusion, modernization, and economic growth, as well as challenges to the prevailing ideas and practices such as dependency, sustainable development, and community empowerment. Only one version of A GOG 447 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A GOG 450 Independent Study in Geography (1-6)
The student will work independently on a directed reading, field survey, or individual research project in geography. A member of the faculty will authorize and advise the project, which will be dimensioned in proportion to the number of credits being taken. The student will submit a final report for assessment. May be repeated up to 6 credits when content varies. Prerequisite(s): 9 credits in Geography, junior or senior class standing, and permission of instructor.

A GOG 460 (= A USP 460) People, Place, and Power (3)
This course will examine the relationships between current energy supplies and alternatives that are renewable and more environmentally sustainable. It begins with defining energy then turns to an analysis of the economic, social, political, and technological factors that determine the potential a carbon free energy future. At the end of this course, students will be able to 1) identify how normative bias influences planning and policy choices; 2) describe major conflicts in energy planning and policy; and 3) understand the differences between physical/technological barriers versus economic/political impediments to sustainable energy planning/policy options.

A GOG 470Z (= A EAC 470Z) China After Deng Xiaoping (3)
This course examines some of the issues associated with modernization and economic development in Post-Deng Xiaoping China. The course focuses on the era of economic reform associated with Deng, and is particularly concerned with the social, spatial, and political ramifications of China’s entry into the global economy. Only one version of A GOG 470Z may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): any of the following: A EAC 170, A GOG 102, 160, or 220.

A GOG 479 Fundamentals of Applied Global Positioning Systems (GPS) (3)
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of global positioning system technology as applied to the geosciences. Topics include background and history, signal structure, resolution, accuracy, data collection techniques, basic geodesy, projections and data, and applications. Field work and lab exercises complement lecture material.

A GOG 480 (= A USP 480) Advanced Urban Geography (3)
Explores some of the theoretical debates and empirical research conducted by geographers and planners interested in the contemporary city. Adopts a political/economy approach to the investigation of social problems currently pervasive in the capitalist city, including: inner city poverty and the underclass, homelessness, gender-related issues, racial segregation, and crime problems. Prerequisite(s): A GOG 102, 210, or 220.

A GOG 484 (formerly A GOG 385) Remote Sensing I (3)
Introduction to the concepts and interdisciplinary applications of remote sensing. The basic principles of theory and practice are presented for earth resource management. Photographic and non-photographic sensors are examined. Visual and digital image analysis techniques are introduced. Students will interpret color infrared, multispectral, and other sensor imagery for a variety of purposes. May not be taken by students with credit for A GOG 385. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A GOG 485 Remote Sensing II (3)
Examination of current concepts and research in digital image analysis with emphasis on multispectral and radar data sets. Students will utilize a variety of data sources including optical and digital imagery, maps, census data, ground surveys, and other GIS data layers in completing an interpretation and analysis of selected geoscience aspects of environmental concern. Methods and importance of accuracy assessment are introduced. Prerequisite(s): A GOG 484 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

A GOG 492 Geography Internship (3)
An internship enabling students to extensively use their geographic knowledge and skill in a professional setting. Students need to provide detailed responsibilities and requirements for the internship for the approval of their advisor, and arrange for the supervisor of their proposed Internship to discuss it with their advisor, before registering for the Capstone Experience. At the end of the internship, students need to submit a report to position their internship experience in the broader context of geographic debates and paradigms, which must be approved by the advisor. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): completion of all required geography core courses and at least two advanced courses in the cluster that it is related to the Capstone Experience, or permission of the advisor. S/U graded.

A GOG 493 Geographic Thought (3)
This is the capstone course of the Geography Major. It offers an historical, integrative view of the origin, development, and content of geography, with emphasis on geography as a university-level discipline in the United States. The class will consider the contributions of prominent figures both as innovators and as creatures of their social and intellectual contexts. The class will be taking an historical view with appropriate emphasis on contemporary questions, and will engage with the philosophical reflection and critique that characterize modern geography. Students will note lasting themes and unities in the discipline across time and across sub disciplines, identify revolutionary changes, examine important debates, and ask what geography's future may be like. Prerequisite(s): A GOG 101, 102, and 106, and junior or senior standing.       

A GOG 496 (= A USP 456) Geographic Information Systems (3)
Introduction to the structure, design, and application of data base management systems designed to accept large volumes of spatial data derived from various sources. The student will learn how to efficiently store, retrieve, manipulate, analyze, and display these data according to a variety of user-defined specifications. Prerequisite(s): familiarity with maps and coordinate systems.

A GOG 498 (= A USP 457) Advanced GIS (3)
Introduces students to ARC/INFO, a geographic information system (GIS) with extensive analytical and cartographic components. Students will use ARC/INFO to compile and analyze data for selected research projects in Geography and Planning. Major topics include data conversion procedures, registration and rectification of digital data, spatial statistical analysis, and cartographic display. Prerequisites: A GOG 496/A USP 456 or equivalent courses.

A GOG 499 Senior Honors Thesis (3)
Preparation of an honors thesis under the direction of a member of the Department of Geography and Planning. The student must submit a formal proposal describing the project, and the final thesis must be approved by both the adviser and the Honor’s Committee. Prerequisite(s): admission to the honors program.

  

Courses in Planning

A USP 106 (= A GOG 106) Introduction to Geospatial Technologies (3)
This course aims to provide students with fundamental concepts related to the major aspects of Geographic Information Science: Geographic Information Systems, Global Positioning Systems, Cartography, and Remote Sensing. It will serve as an entry level course to introduce students who would like to have a broader perspective on GIS-related technologies and practical skills further in their studies or practices regardless of their majors. It also serves the role of preparing students for more specific courses such as Introduction to GIS, Introduction to Remote Sensing, Introduction to Cartography, and Introduction to GPS, and consequently advanced courses in those areas within this department. For students who are not pursuing further geographic information related courses, the techniques introduced in this class such as spatial analysis and map making will be powerful tools for students to apply in their further study or practices in domains such as business administration, social sciences, humanities, as well as emergency preparedness.

A USP 125 (= A GOG 125) The American City (3)
Provides a broad introduction to American urbanism from a geographical-historical perspective, focusing on spatial forms and the built environment, the social and economic processes that produced them, and their contested cultural meanings. Surveys the legacies of industrialization, immigration, planning interventions, and the struggles for rights by minorities and women, and poses questions about our urban future in an age of globalization, information technology, and environmental crisis.

A USP 201 (formerly A PLN 220) Introductory Urban Planning (3)
Introduces the basic concepts and techniques of urban planning and provides an overview of planning history. Covers land use, transportation, environment, urban design, economic development, and social issues. Explores the connections between planning and politics, economic restructuring, social change, and competing ideologies of urban form.

A USP 220 (= A GOG 220) Introductory Urban Geography (3)
Introductory survey of findings and theory of urban  geography, which deals with the form and function of cities. Major themes include: history of urban form; spatial structure of modern urban systems; and the internal structure of the city, emphasizing social and economic patterns.

A USP 225/225Z (= A GOG 225/225Z & A GLO 225/225Z) World Cities: Geographies of Globalization (3)
This course takes a critical look at globalization and its impacts on cities around the world. Globalization includes an array of economic, cultural, and political forces that are effectively shrinking our world. The first part of the course focuses on the ways transnational movements or 'flows' of trade, finance, people and culture operate in and through a network of linked `global' cities, the top tier of which function as the `command and control' centers at the `core' of the global economy. The second part of the course shifts attention to the global `periphery' and to some of the lower tier cities of the world's urban hierarchy: in Latin America, Africa, and Asia. The concern here will be to examine the local consequences of globalization in two overlapping realms. The first will involve looking for and at evidence of the less salutary effects of globalization forces in these cities: for example, higher levels of social and spatial inequality, deteriorating environmental and health conditions, diminished per-capita share of local resources and infrastructures, and cultural homogenization. The other realm will be an investigation of local activities that occur in response and as resistance to the pervasive forces of globalization. The goal here will be to document and evaluate the effectiveness of some of the local movements and organizations that have struggled for social justice in the face of what they perceive to be oppressive (global) economic and cultural forces. After taking A GOG/GLO/USP 225 students will be able to compare cities on the global 'periphery' with each other, as well as with those in the global 'core' to learn about and understand how some aspects of economic and cultural globalization play out and are adapted to `on the ground' and to think critically about how people might effectively organize their thoughts and exercise their rights to the city in the era of globalization. A GOG/A GLO/A USP 225Z are the writing intensive versions of A GOG/A GLO/A USP 225; only one version of A USP 225 may be taken for credit.

A USP 307 (= A GOG 307) Geospatial Applications of Drones (3)
Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS), or drones, have been developing very fast lately. More such systems will be acquired by government and non-government agencies in the near future. The acquisition of a drone may be an easy thing to do but running and managing the system may prove to be challenging for an ordinary user without prior knowledge in this field. There is quite a large amount of information now available on the UAS. However, most of such information focuses on either the engineering aspect of the aircraft or its army applications. Very little information is available on the geo-spatial utilization of UAS. This course is designed as a guide to UAS. It provides an introduction to the technology and operations made possible by it. In the course students will learn about the history, anatomy, applications, and future trends in UAS. Students will walk through the entire process of running an UAS which includes selection of the platform and payload for aerial mapping, complying with current and anticipated rules for UAS operation, conducting an aerial survey and post-processing the acquired imagery.

A USP 315Z (formerly A PLN 315Z) State and Regional Planning (3)
Reviews the theory and practice of state and regional planning in the United States, evaluating a range of contemporary examples. Covers metropolitan regional planning, river basin planning, regional water resource management, state planning and growth management, and environmental impact assessment. Prerequisite(s): A USP 201.

A USP 320 (formerly A PLN 320) International Urban Planning (3)
Provides a general introduction to urban planning as it is practiced in various countries around the world, focusing on North America, Western Europe, and Asia. For each of the countries covered there will be a discussion of the changing context of urbanization and economic development within which contemporary urban planning has emerged. Prerequisite(s): A GOG/A USP 220 or A USP 201, or permission of instructor.

A USP 324 (= A GOG 324) The City on Computer (3)
An introduction to the use of geographic technology  in studying urban features and patterns. The course provides a conceptual bridge between introductory courses in urban geography and specialized courses in geographic techniques. Students will acquire familiarity with relevant software, data sources and methods of analysis through regular computing laboratory assignments. Prerequisite(s): any two of the following: A GOG/A USP 125, 220,  225, A PLN  220, A USP 201.

A USP 325 (= A GOG 325 & A GLO 325) Global Urbanism and Culture (3)
This course explores contemporary debates on globalization, global urbanism and culture. It covers a series of themes central to cities, planning and public policy. These include among others: the role of culture in fostering multicultural cities, the relationships between urban sustainability and environmental planning, the geography of culture, the creative class, cultural industries, the arts and culture sector, local economies and place identity, cultural policies and urban regeneration programs, local and regional resilience networks, public space, local heritage, sense of belonging, community development, and global futures. Only one version of A USP 325 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A USP/A GOG/A GLO 225.

A USP 328 (formerly A PLN 328) (= A GOG 328 & A WSS 328) Gender, Space, and Place (3)
Power relations and categories of social difference are reflected by dramatic inequalities in local environments, and in the quantity and quality of available space. This course examines, through the lenses of feminist geography and planning, how space is invested with social meaning. It discusses how the built environment affects and reflects relations of gender, sexuality and ethnicity, and considers how these social classifications produce “geographies of difference.” Gender is also related to nationalism, colonialism, “geographic skills,” and feminist research methodologies. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A GOG/A USP 125 or A USP 201, or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A USP 330 (formerly A PLN 330Y) (= A GOG 330) Principles of Environmental Management (3)
Examines issues and problems arising from the interactions between humans and their physical environment. Explores the degradation of environmental systems resulting from human use and modification, as well as the impact of environmental processes on human systems. The policy options for dealing with environmental issues and problems are investigated. Only one version of A USP 330Y may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A GOG 101 and either A GOG 201 or A USP 201; or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A USP 360 (= A GOG 360) Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3)
This is an introductory course to the world of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The course introduces principles of GIS and their applications in spatial analysis and information management. The course is designed to give students an understanding of cutting-edge geospatial technologies, their capabilities, uses, and limitations. Representative applications for each discipline area are demonstrated in the computer laboratory portion.

A USP 364Y (= A GLO 364Y & A GOG 364Y) (formerly A USP/A GLO/A GOG 266Y) India: Development Debates (3)
Analyzes the 20th and early 21st century development of India as a nation state, discussing the broad range of ideas and policy proposals relating to wealth, poverty, socio-economic development, urbanization, and nation-building. Reviews British colonial policies and attitudes, the ideas of important advocates of Indian Independence, the impact of partition, national self-reliance policies and national planning in the first three decades after Independence, and the more recent economic liberalizations and opening to the global market and transnational investment. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): declared major or minor in Globalization Studies, Geography, Urban Studies & Planning, or minor in International Studies, or permission of instructor.

A USP 375 (formerly A PLN 375) (= A GOG 375) Methods of Urban Analysis (3)
This class will build a foundation for the larger field of statistical analysis and planning methodologies. Students will develop fundamental skills, such as data collection and presentation, descriptive analysis, and data interpretation. When the course is successfully completed, students will be able to identify different types of data, accurately present data in table and graphic format, describe and analyze data using statistic tools such as measures of central tendency and dispersion, conduct hypothesis testing, build confidence intervals and use these tools to analyze places. Prerequisite(s): A MAT 108 or equivalent.

A USP 420 (formerly A PLN 420) Introduction to Real Estate Development (3)
An introduction to the basics of real estate development as an important element in the physical, economic, and social development of cities. Emphasis is placed on market analysis, proforma development for capital and operating costs, and sources of funds for residential real estate, with a focus on affordable housing. Prerequisite(s): A USP 201 or permission of instructor.

A USP 425 (formerly A PLN 425) Community Development and Neighborhood Planning (3)
Examines the challenges and opportunities of neighborhood and community planning, with an emphasis on older cities and neighborhoods. Assesses the relationship between neighborhood decline and other problems and obstacles faced by urban areas (e.g., concentrated poverty, loss of employment opportunities, discrimination and red-lining, fiscal disparities, etc.) Case studies of neighborhood and community development initiatives in various American cities are examined to explore the causes and consequences of neighborhood decline, and possible strategies for reversing community decline. Prerequisite(s): A GOG/A USP 125 or A USP 201.

A USP 426 (formerly A PLN 426) Community Development and Neighborhood Planning Workshop (1–4)
Provides students an opportunity to obtain “real world” experience assisting a local community or neighborhood group. Students work under supervision on both team and individual projects that address specific needs of communities (e.g. housing, education, public safety, transportation, health) in the Capital District. Prerequisite(s): A USP 425. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A USP 427Y (= A GOG 427Y) Human Factors in Geographic Information Science (3)
Building on previously learned knowledge and skills of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), the course provides students with a further introduction to cognitive theories, designing principles, and evaluation methods that are related to GIS. As a very important aspect of geographic information science, human factors involving spatial cognition address the acquisition, processing, and utilization of spatial information and the use of them in decision making. The study of human factors not only contributes to a better understanding of the efficiency of geographical information systems but also informs the design and development of cognitively efficient applications. Students will be actively involved in the design of practical sessions that strengthens their understanding of cognitive principles in empirical design and assessments. Prerequisite(s): at least one of A GOG 106, A GOG 290, and A GOG 496 or permission of instructor.       

A USP 430/430Z (formerly A PLN 430/430Z) (= A GOG 430/430Z) Environmental Planning (3)
Environmental planning is much more than preservation of pristine land. Through the examination of environmental movements, energy policy, the land use-transportation nexus, environmental justice, and environmental policy formation, at the end of this course, students will be able to: (1) identify how normative bias influences planning and policy choices; (2) describe major conflicts in environmental planning and policy; and (3) understand the relationship of scale and environmental planning/policy options. Only one version of A USP 430 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A USP 201 or permission of instructor.

A USP 432 (formerly A PLN 432) Parks, Preservation and Heritage Planning (3)
Provides an overview of the concepts, laws, political influences, programs, planning methodologies, organizations, and individuals behind the parks, historic preservation, and heritage movements in the U.S. Examines how the preservation and conservation of natural, historic and cultural resources are interrelated and may be used as a means to augment the distinctive character of communities and regions, to foster local pride, and to promote tourism and economic development. Examples of traditional state, local and national parks and historic sites, as well as non-traditional and "inhabited" parks, such as greenways, heritage areas, land trusts, and scenic byways, are studied.

A USP 433Y (= A GOG 433Y) Urban Ecology (3)
A major landmark has been crossed in the 21st century when humans became an "urban" species, Homo sapiens "urbanus." Indeed, more than 50% of the world's, and 80% of the U.S. population now resides in cities. The course addresses problems of understanding urban areas from the ecological viewpoint. Central to this understanding is the recognition that humans are organisms, but ones with unique capabilities of modifying the environment on multiple scales. A crucial concept to be introduced is the distinction between ecology in cities and ecology of cities. The former addresses how organisms (including humans) respond to and influence the physical and biological characteristics of cities. The latter studies the role of cities within broader geophysical and ecological processes such as global biogeochemical cycles, local and regional climates, patterns of biodiversity and organism movements, and ecological and social responses to disturbances. This course will look at both of these aspects through a theoretical lens of modern urban ecology. Urban areas are socio-ecological systems, a mosaic of landscapes, in which humans and their activities are a component of, rather than a disturbance imposed on, (urban) ecological systems. The approach taken in this course will be to facilitate students' learning through a combination of lecture, discussion and practical homework exercises. Prerequisites: a general ecology-focused course at the college level or permission of instructor.       

A USP 436 (formerly A PLN 436) Landscape Planning (3)
Explores the theory and practice of large-scale landscape planning and examines issues of human use, exploitation, and protection of the landscape. Draws from the practice of landscape architecture and community planning and outlines the principles of environmentally-based land-use planning. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, and A USP 201 and A GOG 101, or equivalent courses. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A USP 437 (formerly A PLN 437) Landscape Planning Workshop (3-4)
Creation of a landscape plan for a local or regional agency or nonprofit. Plan will balance protection of the natural and cultural environment with the need for human uses of the landscape including community growth and development. Draws from the practice of landscape architecture and community planning, and includes field research, community consultation, report writing, and mapping. Students serve as team members in the preparation of the plan. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, A USP 201 and A GOG 101, or equivalents, and GIS (A GOG 496/A USP 456 or proficient ArcView or MapInfo user skills). May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A USP 443 (formerly A PLN 443) Transportation History and Policy (3)
This course examines the history of transport systems and policy in the United States. The primary focus is to develop a better understanding of the political and social forces that influence decision-making at the federal, state, and local levels. The role of citizen/stakeholder group interests and participation are examined. Prerequisite(s): A USP 201 or permission of the instructor.

A USP 449 (formerly A PLN 449) Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation Planning (3)
Covers planning, design, implementation, and management of systems of non-motorized transportation, particularly the ‘human-powered’ modes of bicycling and walking. Involves students in the design of bikeways, walkways, intersections and parking facilities, and in the evaluation of alternative transportation technologies. Prerequisite(s): A USP 201 or permission of instructor.

A USP 451 (formerly A PLN 451) Introductory Computer Aided Design (1)
Provides an introduction to Computer Aided Design and Drafting (CADD), enabling students to understand the basic principles of CADD and to use CADD software.

A USP 452 (formerly A PLN 452) CADD in Planning (3)
Applies the concepts and theories underlying Computer Aided Design and Drafting (CADD) to site planning, urban design, and land-use mapping, including 2D concept diagrams, site plan detail and 3D perspectives. Also reviews rendering, 4D applications, visualization, and CADD management.

A USP 456 (formerly A PLN 456) (= A GOG 496) Geographic Information Systems (3)
Introduction to the structure, design, and application of data base management systems designed to accept large volumes of spatial data derived from various sources. The student will learn how to efficiently store, retrieve, manipulate, analyze, and display these data according to a variety of user-defined specifications. Only one version of A USP 456 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): familiarity with maps and coordinate systems.

A USP 457 (= A GOG 498) Advanced GIS (3)
Introduces students to ARC/INFO, a geographic information system (GIS) with extensive analytical and cartographic components. Students will use ARC/INFO to compile and analyze data for selected research projects in Geography and Planning. Major topics include data conversion procedures, registration and rectification of digital data, spatial statistical analysis, and cartographic display. Prerequisites: A GOG 496/A USP 456 or equivalent courses.

A USP 460 (formerly A PLN 460) (= A GOG 460) People, Place, and Power (3)
This course will examine the relationships between current energy supplies and alternatives that are renewable and more environmentally sustainable. It begin with defining energy then turns to an analysis of the economic, social, political, and technological factors that determine the potential a carbon free energy future. At the end of this course, students will be able to 1) identify how normative bias influences planning and policy choices; 2) describe major conflicts in energy planning and policy; and 3) understand the differences between physical/technological barriers versus economic/political impediments to sustainable energy planning/policy options.

A USP 474 (formerly A PLN 474) Site Planning (3)
This course is designed as a workshop for students to be introduced to the practical aspects of site planning – a specific site in the region is studied and plans developed for future new use or renewal of the site. Experience is gained in recording site conditions, use; influence of microclimate, landform; condition of existing building on the site and adjacent to it. The site is analyzed for future potential within the context of existing community policies and regulations. Alternative proposals for future use are drawn up and evaluated for appropriateness, context, and design quality. During the course students will record, photograph, annotate site information, draw up plans to scale, develop a concise planning report incorporating data, analysis, and plan. Team work is encouraged, with small teams organized to develop projects.

A USP 475 (formerly A PLN 475) Urban Design and Public Space (3)
Urban design focuses on "the space between the buildings." Effective treatment of this space in projects and their environs is important for a host of aesthetic, social, and functional reasons, but above all because it is linked to something more abstract and more important: the public realm of civil, political, and social interaction. This course provides a broad theoretical introduction to urban design and public space integrating three perspectives: historical patterns and practices in architecture and planning; findings in the social and behavioral sciences relevant to small urban spaces; and contemporary design criteria and practice. Analytical writing, design proposals, and a field trip are required. This course serves as a capstone for the Urban Studies and Planning Program. Prerequisite(s): A GOG/A USP 125 or A GOG/A USP 220 or A USP 201.

A USP 476 (formerly A PLN 476) Urban Design and Site Planning Workshop (1-4)
Involves students in supervised team projects doing practical urban design and/or site planning work. Through investigation, fieldwork, and discussion, student groups prepare proposals for the design and layout of a specific site or axis. Prerequisite(s): A USP 201.

A USP 480 (= A GOG 480) Advanced Urban Geography (3)
Explores some of the theoretical debates and empirical research conducted by geographers and planners interested in the contemporary city. Adopts a political/economy approach to the investigation of social problems currently  pervasive in the capitalist city, including: inner city poverty and the underclass, homelessness, gender-related issues, racial segregation; and crime problems. Prerequisite(s): A GOG 102 or A GOG 210 or A GOG/A USP 220.

A USP 485 (formerly A PLN 485) Topics in Planning (1-4)
Selected topics in specific sub-fields of planning. Topics will be indicated in the course schedule and in departmental announcements. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): A USP 201, and junior or senior standing.

A USP 490 (formerly A PLN 490) Planning Internship (3)
Provides students with practical work experience in the general field of urban and regional planning. Internship placements are typically with federal, state, or local government agencies, consultancy firms, community development corporations, or private voluntary or political action groups specializing in a specific sub-field relating to planning. Supervisor’s reference and final report required. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite(s): A USP 201 and permission of instructor. S/U graded.

A USP 497 (formerly A PLN 497) Independent Study in Planning (2–4)
Provides an opportunity for students with a strong interest in a specific topic or sub-field in urban and regional planning to do directed reading, independent study or research with faculty supervision. May be repeated once for credit when content varies, but not for more than a total of 6 credit hours. Prerequisite(s): A USP 201, and junior or senior standing.

  

Program in Globalization Studies

Globalization Studies Faculty Advisory Committee

Distinguished Professor
Kajal Lahiri, Ph.D. (Economics)
University of Rochester

Professors
Ray Bromley, Ph.D. (Geography and Planning)
Cambridge University
Walter Little, Ph.D. (Anthropology)
University of Illinois

Associate Professors
Bret Benjamin, Ph.D. (English)
University of Texas at Austin
Anthony DeBlasi, Ph.D. (East Asian Studies)
Harvard University
Joanna Dreby, Ph.D. (Sociology)
City University of New York
Susan M. Gauss, Ph.D. (History)
SUNY at Stony Brook
Kristen Hessler, Ph.D. (Philosophy)
University of Arizona       
Robert L. Miller Jr., Ph.D. (Social Welfare)
Columbia University
Gregory P. Nowell, Ph.D. (Political Science)
Massachusetts Institute of Technology       
Barbara Sutton, Ph.D. (Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies)
University of Oregon
Meredith Weiss, Ph.D. (Political Science)
Yale University

Assistant Professor
Thomas P. Narins, Ph.D. (Geography and Planning)
University of California, Los Angeles

Adjunct Assistant Professor
Puja Sahney, Ph.D. (Program in Writing and Critical Inquiry)
Indiana University, Bloomington



The Globalization Studies Program offers a Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies with a faculty-initiated concentration in Globalization Studies, designed for students seeking a liberal arts education that focuses on major global issues. Students will gain a systematic awareness of the global forces and processes that shape our lives, and they will study and discuss major global issues and problems. A minor in Globalization Studies is also available.

“Globalization” is a relatively new term to describe economic, social, political, cultural, and environmental processes and interactions among peoples and nations around the world. These interactions have been occurring for thousands of years. What is different in the 21st century is the degree, scope, and intensity of interdependence and interconnectedness that the human community is experiencing globally. These interactions are facilitated by dramatic changes in information technologies, the integration of the world economy, and the reconfiguration of many regions and nations.

From upstate New York to the highlands of Ethiopia, from the flourishing urban centers of China to the endangered habitat of the Amazonian rain forest, globalization processes interconnect livelihoods and communities and are restructuring power and social interactions in a myriad of unforeseen and unexpected ways. Through migration, trade, new technologies, global environmental and health problems, the flow of capital, music, viruses, and cultures across borders, human communities are facing new types of challenges, opportunities, and perils.

In order to explore the many ways in which our lives and our future are becoming increasingly interconnected, the major promotes interdisciplinary active learning and introduces innovative forms of teaching, scholarship, and service that focus on transnational links. Concepts of diversity and multiculturalism are examined and applied across the world.

The Interdisciplinary Studies major with a Globalization Studies concentration helps prepare students for a wide range of internationally-related careers in business, non-profits, government, education, the media, international organizations, international development agencies, and the U.S. foreign service. Intercultural skills and knowledge of global issues are crucial to success in many professions. Examples of applications include: the promotion of international trade, investment and tourism; the management of social development programs for international migrants and refugees; research on the social and environmental impacts of major transnational investment projects; and, the design and management of programs to protect local economies, cultures and ecosystems from the negative impacts of globalization.

Students pursuing Globalization Studies are encouraged, though not required, to study abroad as part of their undergraduate education at the University at Albany. Pertinent courses taken during study abroad will be evaluated to determine whether they are appropriate in level and content to be deemed equivalent to courses listed in the Globalization Studies curriculum.

Advisement

The Department of Geography and Planning takes primary responsibility for advising students pursuing this major as well as the minor in Globalization Studies, and one of the Globalization Studies faculty members in that department serves as the Director. All majors must consult the Director at least once per semester. With the agreement of the Globalization Studies Director, other Globalization Studies faculty may also serve as advisors to majors.

Curriculum

The Globalization Studies concentration enables students to take a variety of courses focusing on the comprehensive and multidisciplinary analysis of globalization processes. It prepares students to “think globally” by providing them with an undergraduate education that responds effectively to today’s global interconnectedness and fosters a thorough knowledge and a critical understanding of the social, economic, cultural, political, and environmental forces that are reshaping the lives of peoples and nations around the world.

Degree Requirements: Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies with a faculty-initiated concentration in Globalization Studies

General Program B.A.: a minimum of 36 credits, distributed in the following way:

Core Requirements: 9 credits: A GLO 103 Perspectives on Globalization; A GLO/A GOG/A USP 225 World Cities: Geographies of Globalization; and A GLO 303/R POS 309 Theoretical Perspectives on Globalization (formerly A GLO 203).

Disciplinary Perspectives: 9 credits, 1 course from each of the following 3 areas:

Economic Processes
A ECO 110 Principles of Economics I: Microeconomics
A ECO 111 Principles of Economics II: Macroeconomics
A ECO 130 Developing Economies
R POS 266 International Political Economic Crises

Political, Cultural, and Social Processes
A ANT 108 Cultural Anthropology
A GOG 102 Introduction to Human Geography
A SOC 200 Political Sociology
R POS 102 Comparative and International Politics
R POS 370 International Relations: Theory
R POS 371 International Relations: Practice

Environmental Analysis

A ANT 119 The City and Human Health
A ATM 100 The Atmosphere
A ATM 107 The Oceans
A BIO 230 People and Resources in Ecological Perspective
A GOG 101 Introduction to the Physical Environment

Global Perspectives: 9 upper level credits, with no more than 2 courses from a department, from the following:

A ANT 355 Environment, Economy, and Culture
A ANT 360 Social Anthropology
A ANT 372 Urban Anthropology
A ANT 418 Culture, Environment, and Health
A BIO 320 Ecology
A ECO 330 Economics of Development
A ECO 360 International Economic Relations
A ECO 385 Environmental Economics
A ENG 372 Transnational Literature
A ENG 460 Topics in Transnational Studies
A GLO 305 Topics in Globalization Studies
A GLO 325 (= A GOG/A USP 325) Global Urbanism and Culture
A GLO 376 (= A ANT 376) Global Ethnography
A GLO 402 Globalization Studies Internship
A GLO 447 (= A GOG 447) Development and Underdevelopment
A GOG 304 Climatology
A GOG 344 World Populations       
A LCS 359 Globalization in the Americas
A LCS 374 International Migration and Transnationalism
A LCS 410 Tourism, Culture, and Identities
A PHI 355 Global Justice
A WSS 308 Global Perspectives on Women
A WSS/A LCS 430 Environmental Justice: Racism, Classism, Sexism
H SPH 321 Global Environmental Issues and their Effect on Human Health
R POS 375 International Organization
R POS/R PUB 395 International Political Economy
R POS 474 Politics of International Migration

Regional Foci: 6 credits, 1 course from 2 of the 4 four following major world regions:

Africa
A AFS/A GOG 270 Geography of Africa
A AFS/A HIS 286 African Civilizations
A AFS/A HIS 287 Africa in the Modern World
A AFS 322 Developing African Nations
A AFS/A HIS 386 Race and Conflict in South Africa
A GLO 360 African Perspectives on Globalization
R POS 355 Government and Politics in Sub-Saharan Africa

Asia and the Middle East
A EAC/AHIS 380 History of China II
A EAJ/A HIS 385 History of Japan II
A EAJ 438 World War II: The Japanese View       
A EAS/A WSS 270 Women in East Asian Literature
A ECO/A EAS 362 Economies of Japan and Korea
A GOG/A EAC 160 China in the Post-Utopian Age
A GOG/A GLO/AEAC 260 China in the Global Arena
A GOG/A GLO/A USP 266 India: Development Debates
A GOG/A EAC 350 Urban Development in China
A GOG/AGLO 366 India: Field Study of Development Issues
A GLO 361 Asian & Middle Eastern Perspectives on Globalization
A HIS 378 History of South Asian Civilization II
A HIS 382 History of the Middle East II
A HIS 383 The Arab-Israeli Conflict in Historical Perspective
R POS 367 Politics of the Middle East
R POS/A EAC 373 Government and Politics in the People’s Republic of China
R POS 377 Politics of Southeast Asia

Europe and North America
A AFS 219 Introduction to African/African American History
A AFS 311 History of Slavery in the Western Hemisphere
A ENG 355 Studies in Film
A ENG/A WSS 362 Critical Approaches to Gender and Sexuality in Literature
A ENG/A WSS 366 Critical Approaches to Ethnicity in Literature
A ENG 369 African American Literature
A ENG 374 Cultural Studies
A FRE 218 Contemporary France
A FRE/A ARH 238 Great Classics of French Cinema
A FRE 341 Introduction to Global French Studies
A GLO 362 Euro-American Perspectives on Globalization
A HIS 312 History of American Foreign Policy II
A HIS 345 Europe Since World War II
A HIS 353 History of Eastern Europe II
A ITA 316 Contemporary Italy: From Unification to the Present
A ITA 318 Italian Cinema and Literature
A LCS 201 Latino USA
A LLC 275 European Cinema and Society
A RUS 162 Contemporary Russia
A RUS 252 Masterpieces of 20th Century Russian Literature
A RUS 253 Late Soviet-Period Russian Literature
A RUS 280 Soviet and Russian Cinema
R POS 351 European Politics
R POS 356 Russian Foreign Policy

Latin America and the Caribbean
A ANT 340 Topics In Ethnology (when topic is Social Movements in Latin America)
A ANT/A LCS 341 Ethnology of Mesoamerica
A ECO/A LCS 361 Development of the Latin American Economy
A ENG 373 Literature of the Americas
A FRE 208 Haiti through Film and Literature
A GLO 363 Latin American & Caribbean Perspectives on Globalization
A HIS 367 Contemporary Latin America
A HIS/A LCS/A WSS 451 Gender & Class in Latin American Development
A LCS 203 Afro-Latin America
A LCS/A MUS 216 Music and Society in Latin America: Past and Present
A LCS/A AFS/A ANT 269 The Caribbean: Peoples, History, and Culture
A LCS 315 Film in Contemporary Latin America       
R POS/A LCS 357 Latin American & Caribbean Politics

Capstone Experience: 3 credits     
A GLO 403Z Research Projects in Globalization Studies

Language Requirement: 0-15 credits: In addition to 36 credits of coursework in Globalization Studies, majors are required to elect one of the following options to complete the language requirement:

Option 1: Complete the equivalent of three courses in foreign languages. This may include study abroad language courses. Fulfillment of the General Education Foreign Language requirement will count as one of these three courses. Normally, the three courses taken will all be in one language, but with the permission of the Director of Globalization Studies, an exception may be authorized to enable a student to take one course in one language and two courses in a different language.
Option 2: Pass a proficiency examination, usually conducted by faculty in a foreign language program, demonstrating speaking, reading, and writing proficiency equivalent to two intermediate level semesters of language instruction graded B or better, in one foreign language.

  

Courses in Globalization Studies

A GLO 103 (formerly A CAS 103) Perspectives on Globalization (3)
The course introduces different perspectives from the social sciences, humanities and the natural sciences used in the study of globalization. It encourages discussion and critical thinking while covering questions such as: What is globalization? When did it begin? What are its impacts on society? What are its impacts on the earth, its resources, and the other life forms with which we share it? How can we study it? The course seeks to enhance a student’s ability to (1) recognize and interpret different viewpoints from which globalization processes are currently being studied and debated, (2) identify the many pathways through which globalization is transforming the daily life and conditions of existence of people and communities everywhere, and (3) identify the diverse processes by which globalization is transforming the geo- and bio-spheres in ways that look to threaten the well-being of earth’s human and non-human inhabitants. The multidisciplinary perspectives on globalizing processes presented, cover among other topics, the economic configuration of global production and distribution networks, the changing nature of the state and political power, the dynamic of global cultural flows, along with the emergence of global natural resource constraints and environmental problems. At the same time, it reviews the impact and responses to globalization in workplaces, households and communities from different regions of the world.

A GLO 225/225Z (= A GOG 225/225Z & A USP 225/225Z) World Cities: Geographies of Globalization (3)
This course takes a critical look at globalization and its impacts on cities around the world. Globalization includes an array of economic, cultural, and political forces that are effectively shrinking our world. The first part of the course focuses on the ways transnational movements or 'flows' of trade, finance, people and culture operate in and through a network of linked 'global' cities, the top tier of which function as the 'command and control' centers at the 'core' of the global economy. The second part of the course shifts attention to the global 'periphery' and to some of the lower tier cities of the world's urban hierarchy: in Latin America, Africa, and Asia. The concern here will be to examine the local consequences of globalization in two overlapping realms. The first will involve looking for and at evidence of the less salutary effects of globalization forces in these cities: for example, higher levels of social and spatial inequality, deteriorating environmental and health conditions, diminished per-capita share of local resources and infrastructures, and cultural homogenization. The other realm will be an investigation of local activities that occur in response and as resistance to the pervasive forces of globalization. The goal here will be to document and evaluate the effectiveness of some of the local movements and organizations that have struggled for social justice in the face of what they perceive to be oppressive (global) economic and cultural forces. After taking A GOG/A GLO/A USP 225 students will be able to compare cities on the global 'periphery' with each other, as well as with those in the global 'core' to learn about and understand how some aspects of economic and cultural globalization play out and are adapted to 'on the ground' and to think critically about how people might effectively organize their thoughts and exercise their rights to the city in the era of globalization. A GOG/A GLO/A USP 225Z are the writing intensive versions of A GOG/A GLO/A USP 225; only one version may be taken for credit.

A GLO 260 (= A EAC 260 & A GOG 260) China in the Global Arena (3)
An introduction to the development of China’s economy and society since the death of Chairman Mao Tse-tung in 1976. Focuses on urbanization, industrialization, export-oriented development, and participation in global trade, finance, and politics. Taught in Shanghai, this multidisciplinary course helps students understand the dynamics of China’s rapid economic growth over the last three decades, and how Chinese scholars interpret the nation’s growing importance in the global system. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): taken after, or simultaneously with A EAC 100.

T GLO 266/266Y (= T GOG 266/266Y) India: Development Debates (3)
T GLO 266/266Y is the Honors College version of A GLO 266/266Y; only one version may be taken for credit.

A GLO 303 (formerly A GLO 203) (= R POS 309) Theoretical Perspectives on Globalization (3)
This course takes up the ambitious task of theorizing globalization, one of the defining conceptual rubrics of our current historical moment. Under investigation, then, is not only globalization-its origins, dynamics, characteristics, and consequences-but also theory. What role can intellectual and critical inquiry play in the world today? What is the relationship between generalization and particularity, that is to say between conceptual models that engage in broad forms of periodization, systemic analysis, or abstraction, versus those analytical models that focus on the particular, the local, the historically or geographically specific? What is the relationship between theory and critique? What are the intellectual traditions that inform contemporary thought? And how might a reflective investigation of theory help us to better understand and respond to the globalizing processes and structures that condition the world in which we live? Engaging these questions, the course will review a variety of influential theoretical perspectives that analyze the origins, dynamics, and consequences of globalizing forces. Focusing on key areas of contention and commonality, the course aims to provide students with a complex understanding of the assumptions, contribution, and limitations of current theoretical perspectives on globalization.

A GLO 305 Topics in Globalization Studies (3)
Analysis of a major global theme or issue, studying processes and impacts of globalization. May be repeated for up to six credits when topic varies. Prerequisite(s): A GLO 103 or A GLO/A GOG/A USP 225, or permission of Globalization Studies Director.

A GLO 308 (= A EAC 308 & A GOG 308) Debating Contemporary China (1)
Enables students who have recently studied in China to discuss and debate major contemporary issues: the factors underlying China’s rapid economic growth; the impact of China’s economic growth on society, environment, and the global system; the future of China’s political system; the future of China’s population policies; the dynamics of Chinese cities; the situation of Tibet and of ethnic and religious minorities; the future of Taiwan; relations with other Asian neighbors. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): At least 3 credits of Study Abroad coursework in China sometime in the previous year.

A GLO 325 (= A GOG 325 & A USP 325) Global Urbanism and Culture (3)
This course explores contemporary debates on globalization, global urbanism and culture. It covers a series of themes central to cities, planning and public policy. These include among others: the role of culture in fostering multicultural cities, the relationships between urban sustainability and environmental planning, the geography of culture, the creative class, cultural industries, the arts and culture sector, local economies and place identity, cultural policies and urban regeneration programs, local and regional resilience networks, public space, local heritage, sense of belonging, community development, and global futures. Only one version of A GLO 325 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A GLO/A GOG/A USP 225.

A GLO 360 African Perspectives on Globalization (3)
Analysis of the impact of globalization on Africa, and of ideas developed by African observers of globalization processes. Prerequisite(s): A GLO 103 or A GLO/A GOG/A USP 225, or permission of Globalization Studies Director.

A GLO 361 Asian & Middle Eastern Perspectives on Globalization (3)
Analysis of the impact of globalization on Asia and the Middle East, and of ideas developed by Asian and Middle Eastern observers of globalization processes. Prerequisite(s): A GLO 103 or A GLO/A GOG/A USP 225, or permission of Globalization Studies Director.

A GLO 362 Euro-American Perspectives on Globalization (3)
Analysis of the impact of globalization on Europe and North America, and of ideas developed by European and North American observers of globalization processes. Prerequisite(s): A GLO 103 or A GLO/A GOG/A USP 225, or permission of Globalization Studies Director.

A GLO 363 Latin American and Caribbean Perspectives on Globalization (3)
Analysis of the impact of globalization on Latin America and the Caribbean, and of ideas developed by Latin American and Caribbean observers of globalization processes. Prerequisite(s): A GLO 103 or A GLO/A GOG/A USP 225, or permission of Globalization Studies Director.

A GLO 364Y (= A GOG 364Y & A USP 364Y) (formerly A GLO/A GOG/A USP 266Y) India: Development Debates (3)
Analyzes the 20th and early 21st century development of India as a nation state, discussing the broad range of ideas and policy proposals relating to wealth, poverty, socio-economic development, urbanization, and nation-building. Reviews British colonial policies and attitudes, the ideas of important advocates of Indian Independence, the impact of partition, national self-reliance policies and national planning in the first three decades after Independence, and the more recent economic liberalizations and opening to the global market and transnational investment. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): declared major or minor in Globalization Studies, Geography, Urban Studies & Planning, or minor in International Studies, or permission of instructor.

A GLO 366 (= A GOG 366) India: Field Study of Development Issues (3)
A faculty-led field course requiring a minimum of three weeks full-time study in India. Broadens and deepens the agenda of A GOG/A GLO 266 “India: Development Debates,” examining urban and rural development issues in and around three major Indian cities. Each city will be home to the course for one week. Students will study major issues (e.g., the management of urban traffic flows, the organization of small-scale retailing, the redevelopment of poor neighborhoods, and the work of micro-business and social welfare NGO’s) through a combination of direct observation, institutional visits, and conversations with local experts. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and the Office of International Education.

A GLO 376 (= A ANT 376) Global Ethnography (3)
This course is about globalization and its impact on local communities worldwide. The term globalization will be understood not as a large-scale abstract and deterritorialized process, but one that has impact, consequences, and influence on local communities on a daily basis. The course is titled "Global Ethnography," which means that the class will be reading first-hand accounts of scholars who have documented the effects of globalizations on local communities. Through these accounts students will be learning about the different ways globalization is affecting local communities at social, economic, and cultural levels. The class will also be hearing the voices of local people and understanding globalization from people's perspectives. The readings in this course will enable a better understanding of globalization as it is embedded, manifested, and negotiated by localities as well as its real-life personal, social, and communal repercussions in people's lives. The course will examine different globalizing "agents" in various contexts such as tourism, street vending, language, landscape, consumerism, capitalism, remittance housing, among others. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): at least one course of A ANT 108, A ANT 119, A GOG 102, A GOG/A USP 125, A GLO 103, or A SOC 115, or permission of instructor.

A GLO 402 Globalization Studies Internship (3)
An internship enabling students to experience professional work or community service, focusing on international relations, on the work of international organizations, on environmental, social or economic problems in a foreign country, or on the needs of multicultural and/or immigrant populations in the United States. The placement and report must be approved by the Globalization Studies Director. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): At least two courses from A GLO 103, A GLO/A GOG/A USP 225, and A GLO 303, or permission of Globalization Studies Director. S/U graded.

A GLO 403Z Research Projects in Globalization Studies (3)
An overview and critique of information sources and research methods applied to Globalization Studies. Each student will also select a research topic and prepare an 8-12 page essay in consultation with the Instructor. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, and permission of the Globalization Studies Director.

A GLO 410 International Development Internship (1-6)
An internship enabling students to experience professional work on international development. May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite(s): A GLO 103 and permission of instructor. S/U graded.

A GLO 411 Independent Study in International Development (1-4)
Independent reading or research on selected topics in international development under the direction of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of four credits. Prerequisite(s): A GLO 103 and permission of instructor.

A GLO 447 (= A GOG 447) Development and Underdevelopment (3)
An analytical survey of "Third World" development theories and the development strategies they inspire. Topics covered include traditional concepts of natural and human resources identification and use, geographic diffusion, modernization, and economic growth, as well as challenges to the prevailing ideas and practices such as dependency, sustainable development, and community empowerment. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

  

Department of History

Distinguished Professor
John Monfasani, Ph.D. (Distinguished O’Leary Professor)
Columbia University

Distinguished Teaching Professor
Warren E. Roberts, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow, O'Leary Professor)
University of California, Berkeley

Professors Emeriti
Allen B. Ballard, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
Harvard University
Thomas Barker, Ph.D.
University of Minnesota
Graham J. Barker-Benfield, Ph.D. 
University of California, Los Angeles
Iris Berger, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow, O'Leary Professor)
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Ronald M. Berger, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Robert R. Dykstra, Ph.D.
University of Iowa
June E. Hahner, Ph.D.
Cornell University
Sung Bok Kim, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow, Distinguished Service Professor) 
Michigan State University
Bruce B. Solnick, Ph.D.
New York University
Robert F. Wesser, Ph.D.
University of Rochester
Dan S. White, Ph.D.
Harvard University
Lawrence S. Wittner, Ph.D.
Columbia University
Joseph F. Zacek, Ph.D.
University of Illinois

Professors       
Richard F. Hamm, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
University of Virginia
H. Peter Krosby, Ph.D.
Columbia University     
John F. Schwaller, Ph.D.
Indiana University  
Gerald Zahavi, Ph.D.
Syracuse University

Associate Professors Emeriti
Donald Birn, Ph.D.
Columbia University
Richard H. Kendall, Ph.D.
Yale University
Ivan D. Steen, Ph.D.
New York University
Clara J. Tucker, Ph.D.
Syracuse University
Ann F. Withington, Ph.D.
Yale University

Associate Professors
Sheila Curran Bernard, M.F.A
Goddard College
Carl Bon Tempo, Ph.D.
University of Virginia
Richard S. Fogarty, Ph.D.
University of California, Santa Barbara       
David P. Hochfelder, Ph.D.
Case Western Reserve University
Nadieszda Kizenko, Ph.D. (Department Chair)
Columbia University
Patrick Nold, Phil.D.
Oxford University
Kendra Smith-Howard, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin, Madison        

Assistant Professors
Michitake Aso, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Kori A. Graves, Ph.D.
University of Wisconsin, Madison
Ryan Irwin, Ph.D.
Ohio State University
Maeve Kane, Ph.D.
Cornell University 
Dmitri Korobeinikov, D.Phil., Ph.D. 
Oxford University, Russian Academy of Sciences
Christopher Pastore, Ph.D.
University of New Hampshire

Lecturer
Laura Wittern-Keller, Ph.D.
University at Albany

Affiliated Faculty
Anthony DeBlasi, Ph.D.
Harvard University
Department of East Asian Studies
Phillip B. Eppard, Ph.D.
Brown University
College of Computing and Information

Adjuncts: 18
Teaching Assistants: 15



The objective of the Department is to provide its students with a thorough grounding in the past, seen from both social scientific and humanistic perspectives, and in the nature of history and historical analysis. The Department prepares undergraduates for a variety of career options that rely upon a sound liberal arts education, as well as for graduate study in both academic and professional fields.

To accomplish its objectives, the Department offers programs leading to the B.A., the M.A., the Certificate of Advanced Study in Public History, and the Ph.D. An honors program and a combined B.A./M.A. program are also available to qualified students. In addition, the Department participates in several interdepartmental programs, including Documentary Studies; Africana Studies; Asian Studies; Women’s Studies; Judaic Studies; Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Latino Studies; Medieval and Renaissance Studies; and Russian and East European Studies.

Careers
The study of history prepares students for a variety of career paths, extending from fields such as law and education, to journalism and media ventures, and to business and government service. Faculty are available to consult with students about their career interests.

Special Programs or Opportunities
The department encourages its majors to participate in those international programs relevant to their particular historical interests. For more detailed information, see the section on the Office of International Education. The department also offers its undergraduate students opportunities for internships through A HIS 499.

Degree Requirements for the Major in History

Students majoring in History must complete a minimum of 36 credits in history while fulfilling a concentration in one of the three geographic fields: United States, Europe, or World History. These credits must be distributed as follows:

*Students must take the 9 credits of foundational coursework before taking courses at the 300 level. 

History Honors Program

Each spring semester the Department of History admits qualified students into the honors program in history. The purpose of the honors program is to provide well-qualified students with close contact with faculty and intensive training in historical research and writing.

Students may be admitted to the program in the spring semester of their junior year after formally declaring a major in history. To be admitted, students must have completed 15 credits of course work in history (at least 6 of these credits must be at or above the 300 level and must have been earned at the University at Albany). In addition, students must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 overall and an average in history of 3.50. Interested students should contact the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of History for more information on the application process. Completed applications should be submitted no later than March 1st of the junior year.

Students admitted to the honors program are required to complete a minimum of 36 credits in history, fulfilling all the “Requirements for the Major” listed above. Within the 36 credits, the student must complete the three honors courses: A HIS 495Z, 496Z, and 498. Credits from A HIS 495Z and 498 can be counted toward the concentration most appropriate to the subject of the student’s honors thesis (“United States”, “European”, or “World History”). Credits from A HIS 496Z replace the department’s capstone course, A HIS 489Z, for students who complete the honors program. Students complete the honors courses as follows:

Department faculty members will evaluate the students’ progress at the end of the spring semester senior year. Students will be judged eligible for graduation “with honors in history” based on the quality of their thesis as well as the satisfactory completion of all other curricular requirements with a grade point average of at least a 3.50 in history and 3.25 overall. Students selected to graduate “with honors in history” will be honored formally at the departmental graduation ceremony in May.

Combined B.A./M.A. Program

The combined B.A./M.A. program in history provides an opportunity for students of recognized academic ability and educational maturity to fulfill integrated requirements of undergraduate and master’s degree programs from the beginning of their junior year.

The combined program requires a minimum of 138 credits, of which at least 30 must be graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.A., students must meet all University and college requirements, including the requirements of the major program in history described above, the minor, the minimum 90-credit liberal arts and sciences, General Education, and residency requirements. In qualifying for the M.A., students must meet all University and college requirements as outlined in the Graduate Bulletin, including completion of a minimum of 30 graduate credits and any other conditions, such as a research seminar, thesis, comprehensive examination, other professional experience, and residency requirements. Up to 12 graduate credits may be applied simultaneously to both the B.A. and M.A. programs.

A cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or higher and three supportive letters of recommendation from faculty, one of whom must be from the Department of History, are required for consideration. Students are admitted to the combined program upon the recommendation of the department’s Graduate Committee.

  

Courses in History

Foundation Courses

U.S. History

A HIS 100/100Z American Political & Social History I (3)
Survey of American history from early times to the Civil War, with emphasis on the development of political, constitutional, economic, social, and cultural institutions. Only one version of A HIS 100 may be taken for credit.

A HIS 101/101Z American Political & Social History II (3)
Survey of American history from the Civil War to the present, with emphasis on the development of political, constitutional, economic, social, and cultural institutions. Only one version of A HIS 101 may be taken for credit.

T HIS 199 Go-Getters and Deadbeats: Success and Failure in U.S. History (3)
It is a central assumption of American life that anyone can succeed through a combination of hard work, skill, and a bit of luck. In this course, we will investigate this belief from multiple social positions and cultural perspectives and examine the broader issue of what success and failure reveals about the nature of the American democratic experiment. We will use a wide range of primary and secondary sources, including biographies, fiction, and film. Prerequisite(s): for Honors College students only.

European History

A HIS 130/130Z History of European Civilization I (3)
Survey of the political, economic, social, and cultural history of the West from its origins to the 18th century. Only one version of A HIS 130 may be taken for credit.

A HIS 131/131W/131Z History of European Civilization II (3)
Survey of the political, economic, social, and cultural history of the West from the 18th century to the present. Only one version of A HIS 131 may be taken for credit

World History

A HIS 144 (formerly A HIS 140) Latin America Since the Aztecs (3)
This course will introduce students to the history of Latin America. Covering the great empires of the Aztec, Maya and Inca through the golden age of Spanish colonization to the present, this course will introduce students to the history of the culture, geography, society, politics, and economics of a region that is critical to the United States today. Only one of A HIS 144 and A HIS 140 may be taken for credit.

A HIS 158/158Z The World in the 20th Century (3)
The course explores the tremendous social, political, cultural and economic changes that shaped the world in the 20th century. Course content will emphasize the increasing interdependence between societies and regions and the forces which shaped the lives of people around the globe. The course also examines how the challenges of the 21st century are products of the 20th. Only one version of A HIS 158 may be taken for credit.

T HIS 158/158Z The World in 20th Century (3)
T HIS 158/158Z is the Honors College version of A HIS 158; only one version may be taken for credit.

A HIS 170 (= A LCS 102) Introduction to Caribbean History (3)
An introduction to the history of culture contact in the Caribbean from the pre-Columbian Arawaks and Caribs, through the infusion of European and African cultures, to the emergence of the leadership of the United States in 1898. Special emphasis on the social and economic development of the plantation system, the intercontinental trade system, slavery, and the struggle for abolition and self-determination. Only one version of A HIS 170 may be taken for credit.

A HIS 177/177Z (= A EAS 177/177Z) East Asia: Its Culture and History (3-4)
An introduction to the history and cultures of East Asia (China, Japan, and Korea), their major institutions and their religious and philosophical traditions from ancient times to the present. Only one version of A HIS 177 may be taken for credit.

Concentration in the History of the United States

A HIS 201 History and Future (3)
The 21st century will pose major challenges: human-caused global warming, the peaking of fossil-fuel production, and technological unemployment. At the same time, the 21st century will likely see a continuation of rapid technological change, continued reduction in warfare and violence, and growth in freedom and lifestyle choices. This course explores ways that historians can apply their skills, methods, and insights to address these and other future social issues. Several questions will be investigated, including: How can historians be relevant to today's policy debates? How can historical thinking enhance citizenship? How can we apply historical methods and skills to analyze probably futures and create preferred futures? Prerequisite(s): 3 prior or concurrent credits in History.

A HIS 220/220Y Public Policy in Modern America (3)
This course focuses on the history of four major domestic policies: welfare, civil rights, economic policy, and health policy. Students assess the relevance of history to current political debates and analysis of public policy. Group workshops and debates will enable students to engage in active learning while grappling with these larger questions.

T HIS 220Y Public Policy in Modern America (3)
T HIS 220Y is the Honors College version of A HIS 220Y; only one version may be taken for credit. Open to Honors College students only.

A HIS 221 (= A JST 221) The American Jewish Experience (3)
A general overview of the American Jewish experience. Examines historical developments in such areas of American Jewish life as religious expression, political activity, education, demographics, socio-economics, and secular intellectual and cultural activity. Assesses the impact on American Jewry of immigration from Europe and elsewhere, and such pivotal events as World War I and II, the Holocaust, and the founding of the State of Israel. Addresses the relationship between diverse segments of American Jewry and between Jewish and non-Jewish Americans. Only one version of A HIS 221 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A HIS 224 (= A DOC 224) Nonfiction Media Storytelling (3)
This course explores the use of narrative in books, films, and other works intended to present factual content to the general public. Students will watch, read about, write about, and discuss a range of work, developing tools for analyzing and evaluating nonfiction media in terms of both content and craft. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): restricted to Documentary Studies Program and History Department majors and minors. Others may be admitted space permitting, and with permission from the instructor. This class is recommended for students planning to take A DOC 412.

A HIS 225 (= A JST 225) American Cinema and the Jews (3)
An examination of the history of Hollywood and the Jewish relationship to the American motion picture industry. Investigates a representative sample of films and movies and explores the impact of the fictionalized landscape of the Jewish mind on American culture and values. Only one version of A HIS 225 may be taken for credit.

A HIS 227 (= A DOC 227) Civil Rights: A Documentary Approach (3)
This course looks at the intersection of history and media as it pertains to the American civil rights movement. Focusing on the landmark archival television series Eyes on the Prize and a range of primary and secondary sources (documents, films, music, and more), we will study not only the historical events depicted on screen but also the ways in which these events were documented, archived, and later shaped into public media. Only one version of A HIS 227 may be taken for credit.

A HIS 251/251Z (= A DOC 251/251Z) Introduction to Documentary Studies (3)
This course is divided into 3 major sections. First, we will ask “What is a documentary?” One of the most widely quoted definitions is that of John Grierson who suggests that documentary is the “the creative treatment of actuality.” We will explore that definition, and others, as we lay the groundwork to examine the social, cultural, legal, and ethical considerations inherent in all documentary production. We will then look at specific documentary forms, their history, best examples, notable characteristics, and key practitioners. Finally we will look at some of the major themes in documentary work across forms and genres — in print, photography, film/video, audio, and hypermedia/multimedia. We will also consider how technological innovation has shaped the work of the documentarian over time. As the gateway course for the Documentary Studies major and minor, this course is not only about understanding what others have done in both the recent and distant past, but developing a foundation for future work in the major and minor. Those enrolled in A HIS 251 are expected to bring an historical perspective to their work in the course.

A HIS 259/259X (= A WSS 260/260X) History of Women and Social Change (3)
With an emphasis on the diversity of U.S. women, this course examines the social, historical, and economic forces that have shaped U.S. women’s lives from about 1800-1970 and the contexts within which women have participated in and sometimes led social and political movements. Only one version of A HIS 259 may be taken for credit.

T HIS 259/259X (= T WSS 260/260X) History of Women and Social Change (3)
T HIS 259 is the Honors College version of A HIS 259; only one version may be taken for credit. Open to Honors College students only.

A HIS 261 Getting to Know Albany (3)
Students at the University at Albany have daily contact with the city of Albany, but often know little about it. They drive its streets but don't really see what is there, nor do they learn much about its history. The purpose of this course is to remedy that shortcoming. The course will introduce students to Albany, its history, its architecture, and its neighborhoods. This will be done through class lectures and discussion, reconstruction of the city's past through slides that depict old Albany and walking tours that will expose students to Albany's historic neighborhoods, parks, churches, synagogues, and monumental public buildings. This will include the New York State Capitol (the most costly building in all of 19th century America) and the Empire State Plaza (the most costly, complex of buildings in all of 20th century America). The course will also pay attention to the University of Albany, past and present. It will include examination of previous campuses (there were three), and today's campus, designed by E.D. Stone. Walking tours of the campus will include the imposing and architecturally important complex of buildings that runs along Fuller Road, engines of high-tech growth in upstate New York. Only one version of A HIS 261 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A HIS 266 (= A JST 256 & A REL 256) World Jewry Since the Holocaust (3)
Examines the historical, cultural, societal, and demographic changes in world Jewry since the Holocaust. Investigates the decline of European Jewish communities and the development of the United States and Israel as postwar centers of modern Jewish life. Only one version of A HIS 266 may be taken for credit.

A HIS 276 Technology and Society in America (3)
This course outlines the relationship between technological innovation and social change in the United States from the 17th century to the present. Major questions include: How has technology shaped the contours of American history? Does technology drive history, or does society shape technology? What are the ethical or moral dimensions of technological change? What political controversies or economic conflicts have arisen with the introduction of new technologies? Prerequisite(s): 3 prior or concurrent credits in history.

A HIS 277 Culture and History of Food in the United States (3)
Central to American political, economic, scientific, and social developments, food offers a unique way to trace the history of the nation. Students in this course will investigate changes in techniques and technologies of food and agriculture, analyze policies used to govern foods, and evaluate the ways in which social communities and values have shaped these changes. More largely, students will learn to recognize and examine the causes and consequences of individual and state decisions about food on the economy, ecology, culture, and politics of the United States and the world.

T HIS 277 Culture and History of Food in the United States (3)
T HIS 277 is the Honors College version of A HIS 277; only one version may be taken for credit. Open to Honors College students only.

A HIS 290 Topics in American History (3)
Specific topics to be examined will be announced during advance registration periods. May be repeated for credit when content varies.

A HIS 292 Trials in United States History (3)
This course examines various historic Anglo-American criminal trials. To introduce the discipline of history, trials are explored in their legal and social settings so students can learn the purposes of trials in past cultures. Course topics can include insanity defense, free speech, racism, press coverage, honor, and gender relations.

T HIS 292 Trials in United States History (3)
T HIS 292 is the Honors College version of A HIS 292; only one version may be taken for credit. Open to Honors College students only.

A HIS 294Y (= A DOC 294Y) Field Research in Oral and Visual History: The Hudson River Region (3)
Utilizing the Hudson River region as our laboratory, from the river's source in the Adirondacks to Manhattan Island in the south, this course is intended to be both a theoretical and practical introduction to the use of oral and video history in documentary and historical field research. As a course, it covers a wide territory — from the gathering of oral/video interviews to explorations of how to utilize them in theatrical plays, radio programs, films, and television documentaries. From in-class discussions of memory, historical distortion, and interview theory, to technical instruction on the use of audio, video, and transcribing equipment, the course is designed to teach students critical and practical skills and to demonstrate the potential of this important research and presentation methodology - and to do it utilizing the communities and vast resources of the Hudson River corridor. A major component of the course will be student-initiated and led interviews with individuals from a variety of walks of life who live along the shores, or work on, the Hudson River. [Please note that in future years, the "Field Research in Oral and Visual History" course will vary in its regional focus]. Only one version of A HIS 294Y may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A HIS 295/295Z (= R POS 295/295Z) The Supreme Court and American Constitutional History (3)
This course treats the history of the Constitution through an examination of many of the major arguments made about it before the Supreme Court of the United States. This course allows us to understand the critical role counsel has made in shaping arguments before the Court, the way in which litigants representing competing social demands have pushed the envelope of American constitutionalism, and the means by which the Court's agenda (and American constitutional history) has changed in response to those arguments and the underlying social circumstances that have informed them during the previous two centuries. Only one version of A HIS 295 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

T HIS 295 (= R POS 295) The Supreme Court and American Constitutional History (3)
T HIS 295 is the Honors College version of A HIS 295; only one may be taken for credit.

A HIS 300 The History of American Indians and the United States (3)
A detailed survey of the history of the North American Indians, particularly those now within the territory of the United States, as communities and nations, from the period of first contact to the present. Only one version of A HIS 300 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A HIS 100.

A HIS 303Z American Architecture and the Western Tradition (4)
The various styles of American architecture will be examined in connection with their European antecedents, from Colonial times to the present. One theme of the course will be how styles derived from Europe-Gothic Revival, Romanesque Revival, and so on, take on distinctive American characteristics. Another theme will be the connection between 19th century historicist architecture and the pioneers of modern architecture such as Louis Sullivan and Frank Lloyd Wright. Particular importance will be given to the architecture of Albany, Troy, and Schenectady. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A HIS 305/305Z Colonial America to 1763 (3-4)
Survey of major aspects and events in the colonial period, with particular emphasis on the growth of uniquely American culture and institutions. Only one version of A HIS 305 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 306/306Z The Era of the American Revolution, 1763–1815 (3-4)
Detailed survey of the American Revolution, the making of the Constitution, and the historic experiment in federal-republicanism; the clash of ideas and interests on the rapidly changing domestic and foreign scenes; the search for unity in the new nation. Only one version of A HIS 306 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 307/307Z Nationalism and Reform, 1815–1848 (3-4)
Survey of the growth of nationalism, the emergence of a reform impulse, the age of individualism and egalitarianism, the development of the second American party system, and technological, cultural, and social change. Only one version of A HIS 307 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A HIS 308/308Z Division and Reunion, 1848–1877 (3-4)
Causes of the American Civil War, the war on military and civilian fronts, and Reconstruction and its aftermath. Only one version of A HIS 308 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 309/309Z The Gilded Age, 1877–1900 (3-4)
Detailed survey of the complexity and diversity of the period, emphasizing the impact of industrialization, urbanization, and mass immigration upon politics, diplomacy, agriculture, labor, religion, and thought. Only one version of A HIS 309 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 310/310Z History of Women in the United States (3-4)
A survey of women in the United States from the 17th century to the present, emphasizing women’s changing social, economic, and political positions. Topics will include: work, politics and reform movements, education, sexuality, and family life. This course will also consider how race and ethnicity, region, class, and gender have shaped women’s experience in diverse ways. Only one version of A HIS 310 may be taken for credit.

A HIS 311/311Z History of American Foreign Policy I (3-4)
Historical survey of United States relations with other countries emphasizing the interplay of domestic and international issues and covering the period from the American Revolution to 1920. Only one version of A HIS 311 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 312/312Z History of American Foreign Policy II (3-4)
Historical survey of United States relations with other countries emphasizing the interplay of domestic and international issues and covering the period from 1920 to the present. Only one version of A HIS 312 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 313/313Z Constitutional History of the United States (3-4)
Survey and analysis of the impact of the federal Constitution with its changing interpretations on the political, social, and economic life of the nation. Special emphasis is given to the role of the President and of the Supreme Court in effecting constitutional change. Only one version of A HIS 313 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 314/314Z The Progressive Generation, 1900–1932 (3-4)
Intensive examination of society and politics in the United States in an age of reform and reaction. Special emphasis on important personalities, such as Theodore Roosevelt, Woodrow Wilson, and Herbert Hoover; also consideration of major themes, such as progressivism, World War I, and the business civilization of the 1920s. Only one version of A HIS 314 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 315/315Z Roosevelt to Reagan, 1933–1988 (3-4)
Intensive examination of United States political history from the Great Depression to the 1980’s. Special emphasis on the welfare state, the Cold War, the President and Congress, and the relationship between citizens, public policy, and the political process. Only one version of A HIS 315 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 316/316Z Workers and Work in America, 1600–Present (3-4)
A survey of the transformation of work and workers in America from the years of the first white settlement to the present. Topics will include: indentured servants; artisan work and culture; household production and the revolutionizing role of merchant capitalism; slave labor; industrialization; race, gender, ethnicity and the segmentation of work and workers; the rise of the labor movement; labor radicalism. Only one version of A HIS 316 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 317/317Z History of the American City to 1860 (3-4)
Chronological and topical survey of the American urban scene, with emphasis on the causes and consequences of urban growth, the similarities and differences among various cities, and the attempts to fulfill the needs of an urban environment. This session begins in the colonial period and traces development to the second half of the 19th century. Only one version of A HIS 317 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 318/318Z History of the American City Since 1860 (3-4)
Chronological and topical survey of the American urban scene, with emphasis on the causes and consequences of urban growth, the similarities and differences among various cities, and the attempts to fulfill the needs of an urban environment. This session examines the urban scene from the late 19th century to the present. Only one version of A HIS 318 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 320/320Z The United States in Vietnam - 1965 to 1973 (3-4)
In the years from 1965 to 1973, the United States fought a long, cruel war in Vietnam. This conflict would not only cost 58,000 American live but also tear apart the fabric of American society. Deep wounds, both physical and psychological, were inflicted not only on the American combatants in the war but also on the American people in general. The psychic scars caused by this national trauma are yet to heal and will be with us as a nation into the foreseeable future. This course will examine three essential issues (1) how we got into this most unpopular war? (2) the conduct of the war itself? (3) how the United States finally extricated itself from this foreign policy disaster? Only one version of A HIS 320 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 324/324Z Religion in American Life and Thought (3-4)
The development of religious thought and institutions in this country from colonial Puritanism and Anglicanism to the pluralistic religious/secular American society of today. Emphasis on the relationships among religious thought, religious institutions, and society. Only one version of A HIS 324 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A HIS 325/325Z The Quest for Equality in United States History (3-4)
Examination of social and political movements seeking a more egalitarian social order, including abolitionism, communitarianism, trade unionism, populism, anarchism, socialism, racial egalitarianism, and feminism. Only one version of A HIS 325 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 327/327Z The Roles of Law in American History (3)
This course explores law in the American social and political context, focusing on the use of law by various groups in the American past for different purposes. It is composed of topical units in which students read mostly primary materials (cases, laws, and treatises), as well as monographs, and meet to discuss them. Only one version of A HIS 327 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

A HIS 328/328Z Lawyers in American Life, 1607-Present (3)
This course examines the legal profession, showing how law, through lawyers, has operated in American history. It is interdisciplinary in focus and utilizes a multimedia methodology. Topics to be covered will include: legal education, lawyers as heroes, lawyers as reformers and radicals, development of the business of lawyering, and emergence of women and minority lawyers. Only one version of A HIS 328 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

A HIS 329/329Z American Environmental History (3-4)
This course examines the changing relationship between North Americans and nature from precolonial times to the present. It explores the ways in which environmental factors (e.g. disease, animals) have shaped human history, delineates the effects of human actions on the environment, and traces changing ideas and attitudes towards nature over time. Only one version of A HIS 329 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 330 (= A DOC 330) Foundations of Documentary Web/Hypermedia Production (3)
Web-based or digital multimedia documentaries utilize a variety of hypermedia digital elements to construct compelling, interactive, linear and nonlinear "stories" on nonfiction topics. This course will cover the fundamentals of web site and digital multimedia composition through assigned short projects. When A DOC 330 is taught cross-listed with A HIS 330, the content focus will be history. Prerequisite(s) restricted to Documentary Studies and History majors and minors; all others with permission of instructor. Recommended for students planning to take A DOC/A HIS 407.

A HIS 331/331Z Capitalism in America (3-4)
This course examines the history of capitalism in America from multiple social positions and cultural perspectives, and investigates the relationship between capitalism and the American democratic experiment. We will use a wide range of primary and secondary sources, including biographies, fiction, and film. Only one version of A HIS 331 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 332/332Z Introduction to Public History in the United States (3-4)
This course is aimed at students considering public history careers and it introduces students to the craft of public history. We will examine the relationship between public history, American culture, and popular memory. The ultimate aim of this course is to help you to understand what public historians do and inspire you to become imaginative and effective public historians in the future. Only one version of A HIS 332 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): 3 prior or concurrent credits in History.

A HIS 333/333Z American Identity Since the Civil War (3-4)
This course traces how Americans since the Civil War have answered the question "Who is an American?"  Students will study how American politics, popular culture, immigration policies, freedom and rights movements, and foreign affairs have shaped American nationalism and the idea of an American nation. Only one version of A HIS 333 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 334 (= A DOC 323) Foundations of Documentary Filmmaking (3)
This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of researching, planning, shooting and editing digital video documentaries. When A DOC 323 is taught cross-listed with A HIS 334, the content focus will be history. Restricted to History and Documentary Studies majors and minors; all others by permission of instructor. Recommended for students planning to take A HIS or A DOC 406.

A HIS 335 (= A DOC 335; formerly A HIS/A DOC 405) History and Theory of the Documentary Film (3)
This course will introduce students to the history, theory, and aesthetics of documentary filmmaking. Beginning with a review and analysis of the general history of the documentary film genre and the varieties of approaches adopted by non-fiction filmmakers, we will begin to systematically unravel the various elements that contribute to the creation of informative, moving, and powerful documentary films – with special emphasis on historically-focused films. We’ll look at the various modes or styles that have evolved in the course of the genre’s development and the various techniques documentarians have utilized to effectively communicate historical ideas in cinematic form. Only one version of A HIS 335 may be taken for credit. 

A HIS 356/356Z The World at War, 1939–1945 (3-4)
A comprehensive history of the Second World War. Topics covered include the rise of fascism and the origins of the war; the campaigns on land, at sea, and in the air in the European, Pacific, and North African theaters of war; the pervasiveness of racism; the Holocaust and other atrocities; and the costs and legacies of the war. Only one version of A HIS 356 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 376/376Z (= A DOC 376/376Z) A Cultural History of American Photography (3-4)
This course is a survey of the history of photography from 1839 until the present, presenting photographs as representative intellectual statements defining and illustrating major movements in American thought and culture. By looking at photographs, reading photographic and aesthetic theory, and drawing parallels from American painting, literature, architecture, and other informational and expressive media, the class will demonstrate the ideas and issues underlying American Romanticism, Realism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism. Because photographs are tangible, accessible, and have been upheld as an archetypal medium by each of these intellectual movements, the history of photography offers an ideal introduction to abstract ideas and broad intellectual themes. The course will provide students with extensive experience analyzing cultural documents and help them begin to explore underlying theoretical issues in photography. Only one version of A HIS 376 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A HIS 390/390Z Advanced Topics in American History (1-4)
Specific topics to be examined will be announced during advance registration periods. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor, junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 394 (= A DOC 394) Workshop in Oral History (3)
This course offers a broad introduction to the history, theory, and practice of oral history, including the use of oral history in historical research, documentary production, and public history projects. Only one version of A HIS 394 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.

A HIS 401 History of American Documentary Media (3)
This course surveys a wide variety of American documentary forms, identifying genres as they evolved from the 18th through the 21st centuries – from the epic and ballad forms, through documentary writing, graphic images, photography, film, audio/radio, television, and most recently, hypermedia.

A HIS 404 (= A DOC 404) Readings and Practicum in Aural History and Audio Documentary Production (4)
This course introduces students to (1) the historical study of sound, soundscapes, and sound recordings, (2) aural history composition techniques (especially radio documentaries and features, but also aural essays and museum audio installations), and (3) audio delivery technologies to communicate historical ideas to broad audiences. It includes coverage of textual and archival audio source research, 20th and 21st century historical radio documentary work, analysis of audio documentary forms and non-fiction storytelling techniques, scriptwriting, technical instruction in the art of audio recording and post-production editing and mixing, discussion of audio preservation and restoration techniques, and an introduction to traditional and modern technologies for the transmission and dissemination of documentary and related audio work. Only one version of A HIS 404 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A HIS 406 (= A DOC 406) Practicum in Historical Documentary Filmmaking (4)
This course is a hands-on workshop in historical documentary filmmaking. It will introduce students to the all aspects of historical documentary production—from pre-production planning, research, and writing, to production (filming/videotaping interviews, recording voiceover narration, lighting, filming reenactments), and finally, post-production (editing and mixing actualities, music, narration, interviews, still photographs). The course, in short, is designed to teach students practical, technical skills and is a perfect follow-up to A HIS 335, which examines the history and theory of documentary filmmaking. Only one version of A HIS 406 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A HIS 407 (= A DOC 407) Readings and Practicum in Digital History and Hypermedia (4)
This course introduces students to the practice of history in the digital age. The emergence of the World Wide Web has opened up new avenues for researching, analyzing, and presenting the past–but has also raised new questions about producing quality historical scholarship in this open environment. This course will work on two fronts, looking first at the current state of the field of “digital history,” from issues of narrative and hypertext theory to some of the best (and worst) practices of current historical websites. At the same time, as a central component of the course, students will work in collaboration to build their own well-researched and historically sound web projects. Only one version of A HIS 407 may be taken for credit. Previous experience with building websites is welcomed but not required. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A HIS 424/424Z American Intellectual & Cultural History to 1860 (4)
Key ideas and significant patterns of thought in American life: Puritanism, the American Enlightenment, nationalism, transcendentalism, democracy, and reform. Only one version of A HIS 424 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A HIS 425/425Z American Intellectual History Since 1860 (4)
Key ideas and significant patterns of thought in American life: the impact of economic expansion, Darwinian evolution, pragmatism, war and changing ideologies of liberalism, progressivism, and conservatism. Only one version of A HIS 425 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History. May not be offered in 2016-2017. 

Colloquia, Independent Study, and Projects in United States History
The following colloquia are limited to undergraduate students and may be taken only with the permission of the instructor. Specific topics to be examined in the colloquia will be announced at the time the courses are offered, and students may obtain a list of topics from the Department of History at the time of advance registration. Colloquia may be repeated for credit.

A HIS 478Z Colloquium in U.S. History, 19th Century (4) May not be offered in 2016-2017.
A HIS 479Z Colloquium in U.S. History, 20th Century (4) May not be offered in 2016-2017.
A HIS 480/480Z Colloquium in U.S. History: Topics (3-4) May not be offered in 2016-2017.
A HIS 485/485Z Colloquium in Comparative and Cross-Cultural History (3-4) May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A HIS 492 Undergraduate Group and Individual Research Project (4)
This course is for both History and Documentary Studies majors and minors interested in pursuing a fieldwork/archival research project culminating in 1) a media documentary on a topic that interests them or 2) a research paper based on extensive and intensive primary source research. History students taking the course must select historical projects; Documentary Studies students, for whom this course is a required core course, may select either historical or contemporary topics. Students are expected to complete a substantial research-based documentary project in any one of the following forms: audio, video, hypermedia, still photography (with an "exhibit catalog"), or text. Students will work with the course instructor as well as appropriate on-campus experts; they will receive feedback, as well, from fellow students enrolled in the course. Team projects may also be undertaken, so long as individual responsibilities of participating students are clearly identified. Discussions of selected readings in history and media, media ethics, documentary and contemporary issues, and production techniques will complement the discussions of individual projects. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A HIS 497 Independent Study in History (2-4)
Directed reading and conferences on selected topics in history, or mentored historical research and writing. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and director of undergraduate studies, junior, or senior standing, or 3 credits in history. S/U graded. 

A HIS 498 Honors' Independent Research and Writing (4)
For description, see listing in History Honors Program. S/U graded.

A HIS 499 Special Projects in History (1-3)
Supervised work on projects in coordination with local museums and historical agencies. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and department chair. S/U graded.

Concentration in European History

T HIS 226 (3) Historical Fiction
Historians and fiction writers seldom bring their two disciplines together to determine how they can complement each other. This course will combine history's commitment to the raw material of the past with the fiction writer's skill in shaping a compelling narrative in order to determine how to write about the past in a more convincing manner and how to gather essential facts from past events. Prerequisite(s): open to Honors College students only.

A HIS 235/235Z Early and Medieval Christianity (3)
Survey of the intellectual, ritual, and institutional development of Christianity from the apostles to the later Middle Ages. Only one version of A HIS 235 may be taken for credit.

A HIS 244 (= A JST 244 & A HEB 244) Zionism, Palestine, and Israel in Historical Perspective (3)
A study of 19th century Jewish and European history resulting in the formation of Jewish nationalism. Covers the development of various Zionist ideologies and organizations as well as their challengers within and outside the Jewish community. Examines the history of settlement in Palestine, the founding of the state of Israel, and the country’s subsequent development. Only one version of A HIS 244 may be taken for credit.

A HIS 250 (= A JST 250) The Holocaust in History (3)
Begins with an overview of European Jewish life on the eve of the attempt at its destruction, examines the cultural, social, and intellectual roots of Nazism, and discusses the efforts to isolate and marginalize those marked as “a-socials” in German society. Explores the radicalization of the Nazi program and investigates the variety of ways targeted groups responded to the crisis. Covers a number of survivor accounts and the memorialization and politicization of the Nazi Holocaust in the United States and Israel. Only one version of A HIS 250 may be taken for credit.

A HIS 253 (= A JST 253 & A REL 253) Medieval Jews Among Muslims and Christians (3)
Explores the course of Jewish history from the development of Christianity until the Chmielnicki massacres of 1648. Investigates the experience of Jews between and within the major religious and cultural systems that dominated medieval Europe, Islam and Christianity. The course charts the history of Sephardic and Ashkenazic Jewry, noting the important social, religious, cultural, and political characteristics of each community, as well as their interaction with two great world civilizations. Only one version of A HIS 253 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A HIS 254 (= A JST 254 & A REL 254) The Jews in the Modern World (3)
Beginning with the end of the late Middle Ages and the emergence of the Enlightenment, this class explores how Jewish communities responded to the demands of an ever-expanding modern world. Examines the ways in which Jews and Jewish communities sought to create modern expressions of Judaism and the response of rabbinic Judaism to these challenges. Explores the rise of Hasidism, the aims of “Enlightened” Jewry, nationalism, the creation of secular Jewish cultures, the World Wars, modern antisemitism and the Nazi Holocaust, and the emergence of new Jewish centers in the United States and Israel. Only one version of A HIS 254 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A HIS 256 Women in European History (3)
Survey of the role and position of women in European society from antiquity to the present, concentrating on social, economic, political, and intellectual aspects of women’s lives and on cultural attitudes and ideologies concerning women.

A HIS 263 Art, Music, and History: A Multimedia Approach I (3)
Survey of Western art and music from the Middle Ages to about 1750. Art and music will be used to illuminate history, and history will be used to further an understanding of art and music.

A HIS 264 Art, Music, and History: A Multimedia Approach II (3)
Survey of Western art and music from about 1750 to the present. Art and music will be used to illuminate history, and history will be used to further an understanding of art and music.

A HIS 288 Topics in European History (3)
Specific topics to be examined will be announced during advance registration periods. May be repeated for credit when content varies.

A HIS 298/298Z Crime and Society in Early Modern England (3)
This is a “hands-on” course. After some reading, students will study [online] the records of The Old Bailey 1750-1945, London’s principal criminal court. They will gather and analyze the record of all those crimes the citizenry were accused of, and the punishments they received, and answer this question: Is there any evidence that industrial [modern] society inaugurated a new criminal regime in order to discipline and punish an emergent proletarian class. We will attempt to determine why and how those in power defined crime and were prosecuted those found guilty. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A HIS 336 History of the Early Middle Ages (3)
The history of Western Europe during the early Middle Ages, from ca. 500 to ca. 1050, in all major aspects. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 337/337Z The High Middle Ages (3-4)
The history of Western Europe during the High Middle Ages, ca. 1050 to ca. 1300, in all major aspects. Only one version of A HIS 337 may be taken for credit. Prerequisites(s) junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 338/338Z The Italian Renaissance, 1300–1530 (3-4)
Detailed study of Italian Renaissance culture and society up to about 1530 with special emphasis on humanism and other cultural developments. Only one version of A HIS 338 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 339/339Z Renaissance and Reformation in 16th Century Europe (3-4)
Survey of continental European history in the early modern period with special emphasis on theological and intellectual developments. Only one version of A HIS 339 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 340/340Z The French Revolution and Napoleon (3-4)
A study of the French Revolution, its causes and aftermath in the Napoleonic period. Attention will be given to the social, political and cultural forces from the late 18th century to 1815 as they relate to the French Revolution. Only one version of A HIS 340 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 342/342Z Europe in the Age of Romanticism and Revolution (3-4)
European history in the era between the final defeat of Napoleon and the revolutions of 1848-1849. Emphasis on the political struggle between the forces of conservatism and liberalism, the economic and social changes triggered by industrialization, and the shifts of consciousness and perspective brought on by Romanticism and socialism. Only one version of A HIS 342 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 343/343Z Europe, 1848-1914 (3-4)
Europe in the era of its greatest power and influence; focus on consolidation of the nation state, domestic social conflicts, imperialist expansion, and the origins of World War I. Only one version of A HIS 343 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 344/344Z Europe, 1914-1945 (3-4)
European history during the era of the two World Wars. The origins and course of the First World War; its political, social, and cultural effects on European life throughout the period; the political and economic crises of the interwar period; the rise of fascist and totalitarian regimes and the crisis of liberal democracy; the origins and course of the Second World War and the Holocaust. Only one version of A HIS 344 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3 credits in history.

A HIS 345/345Z Europe Since World War II (3-4)
The impact of World War II and the Cold War. Current social, economic, political and security problems. Only one version of A HIS 345 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 346/346Z History of England I (3-4)
The historical development of English society and government from early times to the 17th century. Only one version of A HIS 346 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 347/347Z History of England II (3-4)
The history of the United Kingdom and of the British Empire and Commonwealth from the 17th century to the present. Only one version of A HIS 347 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 349/349Z History of France Since 1815 (3-4)
A survey of the history of France from 1815 to the Fifth Republic, with attention to the political, social, economic, and cultural developments within France during this period. Only one version of A HIS 349 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 350/350Z Iberia and Latin America to 1810 (3-4)
Iberian backgrounds; the age of exploration and discovery; the conquest and settlement of America by the Spanish and the Portuguese; Iberia and America in the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. Only one version of A HIS 350 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 351/351Z History of Germany (3-4)
Germany since 1806. The wars of national liberation; Bismarck, unification, and the Wilhelminian Reich; World War l; the Weimar Republic; the Third Reich and totalitarianism; the German Federal and German Democratic Republics, post-1990 unity. Only one version of A HIS 351 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 352/352Z History of Eastern Europe I (3-4)
The history, culture, and contemporary affairs of the people of the Baltic, Danubian, and Balkan regions from earliest times to the early 19th century. Only one version of A HIS 352 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A HIS 353/353Z History of Eastern Europe II (3-4)
The history, culture, and contemporary affairs of the people of the Baltic, Danubian, and Balkan regions from the early 19th century to the present. Only one version of A HIS 353 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 354/354Z History of Russia I (3-4)
The evolution of Russia from Kievan origins, Tatar conquests and emergence of Muscovy to the development of the Russian Empire in the 18th and 19th centuries. Only one version of A HIS 354 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 355/355Z History of Russia II (3-4)
Russia from the emancipation of the serfs to the present, including the Revolutions of 1905 and 1917 and the foundations, development and expansion of the Soviet Union. Only one version of A HIS 355 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 356/356Z The World at War, 1939–1945 (3-4)
A political, diplomatic, military, economic, and social history of the Second World War. Among the topics covered will be war and peace plans, the military campaigns in the European, Pacific, and North African theaters of war, the plight of conquered nations, the concentration camps, and the war crimes trials. Only one version of A HIS 356 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 360 (= A JST 360) Bearing Witness: Holocaust Diaries and Memoirs (3)
A study in diaries, autobiographies, and memoirs of Jews written during and after the Nazi Holocaust. Considers the complex historical questions raised by such works, including: What can be learned about the Holocaust through autobiographical writing? To what extent were the authors aware of the scope of the attacks on European Jewry beyond their own immediate experience? What responses were available to Jews during this period? How did the authors make sense of their experiences? What are the merits and limits of autobiographical writing as a historical resource? How do accounts of the period change as authors' chronological proximity to the events increases? In what ways are memoirs of the Holocaust shaped by the events occurring at the time in which they written?

A HIS 365/365Z War, Society, and Culture to 1789 (3-4)
The history of war in the West in its widest social and cultural context, treating equally the profound effects of warfare upon the societies that wage it, and the many ways that particular societies and cultures affect the nature of the wars they wage. Topics include: the origins and nature of organized violence in prehistory; warfare and society in ancient Greece and Rome; the practices and values of war during the Middle Ages; the "military revolution" of the early modern period; and the origins of the profound transformation of war that culminated in the West during the Revolutionary period of the late 18th century. Only one version of A HIS 365 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3 credits in history.

A HIS 366/366Z War, Society, and Culture since 1789 (3-4)
The history of war in the West in its widest social and cultural context, treating equally the profound effects of warfare upon the societies that wage it, and the many ways that particular societies and cultures affect the nature of the wars they wage. Topics include: the transformation of war in Europe by the French Revolution and Napoleon; the nature and effects of European colonial wars and decolonization; the origins and development of total war in the 19th and 20th centuries; the military, political, social, and cultural histories of the two world wars; women, gender, and war; atrocity, war crimes, and the laws of war; the history of post-traumatic stress disorder; soldier and civilian experiences of modern war; nuclear war; and terrorism. Only one version of A HIS 366 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior class standing, or 3 credits in history.

A HIS 368 (= A JST 357) Western European Jewry in Modern Times (3)
A detailed examination of Jewish history in West and Central Europe that highlights the transformation and politicization of Jewish life in the modern era until World War II. Examines the denominalization of Judaism; the Jewish Enlightenment and its opponents; the campaigns for and against emancipation; the role of Jews in European culture, politics, and industry; and the rise of modern antisemitism.

A HIS 391/391Z Advanced Topics in European History (1–4)
Specific topics to be examined will be announced during advance registration. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor; junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 416Z European Economic History (4)
The history of capitalism in Europe from the reintroduction of money in circulation to the post-1970 crisis. Readings and discussions will focus upon industrialization, managerialism, labor agitation, political economy, and the economics of war. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A HIS 454/454Z The Diplomacy of National Power, 1815–1890 (3-4)
Great power relations from the post-Napoleonic search for stability through concert to the victory of nationalism in Italy and Germany and the rise and fall of the Bismarckian alliance system. Only one version of A HIS 454 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

A HIS 455/455Z The Diplomacy of Global Conflict, 1890–1945 (3-4)
Great power relations during the era of the two World Wars, emphasizing underlying forces and rivalries that led to war and attempts to defuse tensions and prevent aggression. Only one version of A HIS 455 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

A HIS 456/456Z The Diplomacy of the Nuclear Age (3-4)
History of international relations since World War II, with emphases on the Cold War and its global impact; the collapse of the Soviet Union and manifestations of American unilateralism; arms control and nuclear proliferation; the end of colonialism and its consequences; ethnic conflicts and terrorism; European economic integration and its problems; the resurgence of Russia; and the rise of China as a global superpower. Only one version of A HIS 456 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

A HIS 460/460Z History of Nationalism (3-4)
The nature and development of nationalism; a study of the meaning of nationalism, nationalist theorists, nationalist leaders, and nationalist movements from the 18th century to the present. Only one version of A HIS 460 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A HIS 463/463Z The Byzantine Empire, 300–1453 (3-4)
Survey of the socioeconomic, ethnic, political, religious, intellectual, and artistic history of Byzantine civilization from late antiquity to the 15th century. Only one version of A HIS 463 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

Colloquia and Independent Study in European History
The following colloquia are limited to undergraduate students and may be taken only with the permission of the instructor. Specific topics to be examined in the colloquia will be announced at the time the courses are offered, and students may obtain a list of topics from the Department of History at the time of advance registration. Colloquia may be repeated for credit.

A HIS 481Z Colloquium in European History (4) May not be offered in 2016-2017.
A HIS 483Z Colloquium in Russian and East European History (4) May not be offered in 2016-2017.
A HIS 485/485Z Colloquium in Comparative and Cross-Cultural History (3-4) May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A HIS 497 Independent Study in History (2–4)
For description, see listing in Concentration in U.S. History. S/U graded.

A HIS 498 Honors' Independent Research and Writing (4)
For description, see listing in History Honors Program. S/U graded.

Concentration in World History

T HIS 226 Historical Fiction (3)
Historians and fiction writers seldom bring their two disciplines together to determine how they can complement each other. This course will combine history's commitment to the raw material of the past with the fiction writer's skill in shaping a compelling narrative in order to determine how to write about the past in a more convincing manner and how to gather essential facts from past events. Prerequisite(s): open to Honors College students only.

A HIS 244 (= A JST 244 & A HEB 244) Zionism, Palestine, and Israel in Historical Perspective (3)
A study of 19th century Jewish and European history resulting in the formation of Jewish nationalism. Covers the development of various Zionist ideologies and organizations as well as their challengers within and outside the Jewish community. Examines the history of settlement in Palestine, the founding of the state of Israel, and the country’s subsequent development. Only one version of A HIS 244 may be taken for credit.

A HIS 252 (= A JST 251) Early Israel and Biblical Civilization (3)
The history and culture of ancient Israel from its beginnings to the Persian Empire. A survey of the Hebrew Bible (in English) as the major source for the study of early Judaic religious and social forms in the context of the Near East. Only one version of A HIS 252 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A HIS 253 (= A JST 253 & A REL 253) Medieval Jews Among Muslims and Christians (3)
Explores the course of Jewish history from the development of Christianity until the Chmielnicki massacres of 1648. Investigates the experience of Jews between and within the major religious and cultural systems that dominated medieval Europe, Islam and Christianity. The course charts the history of Sephardic and Ashkenazic Jewry, noting the important social, religious, cultural, and political characteristics of each community, as well as their interaction with two great world civilizations. Only one version of A HIS 253 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A HIS 260 (= A EAS 260) China in Revolution (3)
This course examines China’s four great 20th century revolutions: the 1911 Revolution, the 1949 Communist Revolution, the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, and the reforms of the 1980s and 1990s. Topics include authority and dissent, constituency mobilization, the relationship between urban and rural regions, and the changing nature of ideology in China. Only one version of A HIS 260 may be taken for credit.

A HIS 266 (= A JST 256 & A REL 256) World Jewry Since the Holocaust (3)
Examines the historical, cultural, societal, and demographic changes in world Jewry since the Holocaust. Investigates the decline of European Jewish communities and the development of the United States and Israel as postwar centers of modern Jewish life. Only one version of A HIS 266 may be taken for credit.

A HIS 268 Introduction to Southeast Asia (3)
Examines the events, people, and places significant to Southeast Asia's past. Topics may include: the rise of traditional states and religions, the role of trade in shaping society and the environment; the effects of colonial empires; transformations in conceptions of the body, the relationship between gender and modernity; the origins of nationalism, communism, and revolution the transformations wrought by World War II and the Cold War; the experience of genocide and terror; and the tensions between democracy and authoritarian rule.

A HIS 275 (= A JST 275) Antisemitism: Historical Exploration & Contemporary Challenges (3)
Explores pre-modern forms of anti-Jewish hatred, the manifestation of antisemitism in the modern period, and several of the current debates on antisemitism. Explores the instrumentalization of antisemitic hatred through several case studies and provides students with the means to assess critically both current antisemitic attacks and contemporary debates about antisemitism. Only one of A HIS 275 and A JST 275 may be taken for credit.

A HIS 278 (= A EAJ 278) Japanese Pop Culture from Edo to the Present (3)
This course introduces some of the forms of "popular culture" prevalent in Japan from 1600 until the present day, with a strong emphasis on the social, economic and intellectual forces behind these major trends. This course, organized chronologically, offers a look at the many historical developments connected with popular forms of music, theater, film and comics, including the rise of a new urban print culture in the 17th century, the introduction of "Western" art forms such as motion pictures and jazz music in the 1920s, and the steady expansion of both domestic and international markets for Japanese film, music and comics in the years since 1945. Conducted in English; no knowledge of Japanese is required. Only one version of A HIS 278 may be taken for credit.

A HIS 286 (= A AFS 286) African Civilizations (3)
Africa from prehistoric times to 1800 with emphasis on sub-Saharan Africa, the development of indigenous states and their response to Western and Eastern contacts. Only one version of A HIS 286 may be taken for credit.

A HIS 287 (= A AFS 287) Africa in the Modern World (3)
Africa since 1800: exploration, the end of the slave trade, the development of interior states, European partition, the colonial period, and the rise of independent Africa. Only one version of A HIS 287 may be taken for credit.

A HIS 289 Topics in World History (3)
Specific topics to be examined will be announced during advance registration periods. May be repeated for credit when content varies.

A HIS 293 History of Women in the Americas (3)
An historical survey of the role of women in the United States, Canada, and Latin America from colonial times to the present with emphasis on social, intellectual, and political developments and feminist movements.

A HIS 297/297Z (= A REL 297/297Z) Religion and Society in History (3)
This course will focus on the role religion has played in societies from antiquity to the present. Our examination will include the anointed kings of ancient Israel, the idealized unity of emperor and patriarch in Byzantium, the universal claims of the Holy Roman Empire, the role of the prophet in Islam, the divinity of the Emperor in China and Japan, the conception of the monarchy in Western and Eastern Europe, the anti-religious rhetoric of European revolutions, the separation of church and state in contemporary secular societies, the current revival of fundamentalism, and the persistence of wars based on religion. Architecture, music, iconography, and rituals will be examined for the information they provide. Only one version of A HIS 297 may be taken for credit.

A HIS 350/350Z Iberia and Latin America to 1810 (3-4)
Iberian backgrounds; the age of exploration and discovery; the conquest and settlement of America by the Spanish and the Portuguese; Iberia and America in the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. Only one version of A HIS 350 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 356/356Z The World at War, 1939–1945 (3-4)
A political, diplomatic, military, economic, and social history of the Second World War. Among the topics covered will be war and peace plans, the military campaigns in the European, Pacific, and North African theaters of war, the plight of conquered nations, the concentration camps, and the war crimes trials. Only one version of A HIS 356 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 367/367Z Contemporary Latin America (3-4)
Survey of Latin American backgrounds followed by study of the social, economic, and political problems of Latin America since World War II. Particular attention to the phenomena of social change, economic nationalism, and revolution. Only one version of A HIS 367 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 369/369W (= A LCS 369) Mexico, Central America, and the West Indies Since 1810 (3-4)
The circum-Caribbean lands and islands in the 19th and 20th centuries; independence; independent nations and colonies; foreign intrusions and interventions; social and economic change; revolutions; comparative Caribbean studies. Only one version of A HIS 369 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 371/371Z (= A LCS 371/371Z) South America Since 1810 (3-4)
The political, economic, social, and cultural evolution of the South American nations from the winning of independence to the present, with emphasis on Argentina, Brazil, and Chile. Among topics studied will be dictatorship, democratic government, economic change, modern revolution, and social trends. Only one version of A HIS 371 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 373/373Z (= A LCS 373/373Z) History of Modern Mexico (3-4)
An in-depth survey of Mexico since Independence, this course emphasizes agrarian change and peasant rebellion; foreign intervention and U.S.-Mexican relations; indigenous and mestizo identities; gender and culture; political stability and economic development; authoritarianism, democratization, and globalization; and Latinos in the U.S. Only one version of A HIS 373 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History or Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

A HIS 374 (= A EAC 374) Crime and Punishment in Traditional China (3)
This course will examine the distinctive understanding of crime and the law in China from the 7th to the 19th centuries. We will be particularly interested in theories of law during this period, the institutions of the imperial justice system, varieties of crime and punishment, and popular representations of the criminal justice system. Readings will include primary sources such as legal codes, case histories, and crime stories as well as secondary works on Chinese legal history. There are no prerequisites for this course, although some background in Chinese Studies will be helpful. Only one version of A HIS 374 may be taken for credit.

A HIS 375 (= A EAS 375) Japan-Korea Relations: 1592 to the Present (3)
This course explores Japan-Korea relations from the end of the 16th century to the present day. It proceeds chronologically to chart the evolving diplomatic relationship between the ruling families in Japan and Korea during the early modern period before then turning to examine Japan's colonial domination of Korea starting in the late 19th century and the postcolonial situation that has existed between Japan, North Korea, and South Korea since shortly after the end of World War II. Substantial attention will be placed on exploring issues of national identity, race, and imperialism as they relate to the interconnected histories of Japan and Korea as presented in this course. Only one version of A HIS 375 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A EAJ 170, A EAK 170, A HIS 177, or permission of instructor.

A HIS 378/378Z History of South Asian Civilization II (3-4)
Study of South Asia from the 18th century, with emphasis on changes brought about by British rule and by modernization; the creation of new nation states. Only one version of A HIS 378 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A HIS 379/379Z (= A EAC 379/379Z) History of Premodern China (3-4)
This course is a survey of China’s historical development from prehistory to the founding of the Ming Dynasty in the fourteenth century. We will concern ourselves especially with the transformation of Chinese social structure over time, the relations between the state and the social elite, and the relationship between China’s intellectual, political, and social histories. Only one version of A HIS 379 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in East Asian Studies or History.

A HIS 380/380Z (= A EAC 380/380Z) History of Modern China (3-4)
This course is a survey of China's history during the late imperial and modern periods. It begins with the founding of the Ming dynasty in the late 14th century and concludes with the present day. Of particular interest is the interplay of political, social, and intellectual history during this period. Only one version of A HIS 380 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in East Asian Studies or History.

A HIS 381/381Z History of the Middle East I (3-4)
Mohammed, Islam as a religion and a way of life; the Umayyad, Abbasid, Byzantine, and Persian empires, and the Ottoman Empire to 1789. Only one version of A HIS 381 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 382/382Z History of the Middle East II (3-4)
The Ottoman Empire in the 19th century; European imperialism in the Middle East; the rise of nationalism; the World Wars; current political, social, and economic problems. Only one version of A HIS 382 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 383/383Z The Arab-Israeli Conflict in Historical Perspective (3-4)
The background and history of the Arab-Israeli conflict. Only one version of A HIS 383 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A HIS 384/384Z (= A EAJ 384/384Z) History of Premodern Japan (3-4)
This course will cover Japanese history from prehistory through 1600. Focus will be on political and economic trends. Only one version of A HIS 384 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A HIS 385/385Z (= A EAJ 385/385Z) History of Modern Japan (3-4)
This course is a survey of modern Japanese history. It covers the period from 1600 to the present day. The focus is on the interconnections between political, social, and intellectual history during Japan’s emergence as a world power. Only one version of A HIS 385 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in East Asian Studies or History.

A HIS 386/386Z (= A AFS 386/386Z) Race and Conflict in South Africa (3-4)
Study of the historical origins and development of racial conflict in South Africa with a concentration on economic, political, social and religious change in the 20th century. Topics will include: changing state structures and ideologies, the impact of industrialization, transformations of rural and urban life, African religious movements, political and religious connections with Black Americans, gender relations, and changing forms of popular resistance against white domination. Only one version of A HIS 386 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in Africana Studies or History.

A HIS 387/387Z (= A REL 387/387Z) Islam in the Middle East: Religion and Culture I (3-4)
Social, political, economic and religious dimensions of Islam from the time of Mohammed through the 18th century with emphasis on the intellectual, cultural, and educational institutions of the Middle East. Among topics discussed will be Sunnism–Shi’ism and the schools of law, social and economic infrastructure, science and education, and reasons for the waning of the Muslim world. Only one version of A HIS 387 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 388/388Z (= A REL 388/388Z) Islam in the Middle East: Religion and Culture II (3-4)
Social, political, economic and religious changes in the Middle East from the 18th century to Ayatollah Khomeini. Among the topics discussed will be the impact of the West on the Middle East, the role of oil in shaping the global economy, nationalist movements, the crisis in the Persian Gulf, and the rise of Islamic Revivalism. Only one version of A HIS 388 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 389/389Z Advanced Topics in Asian History (1-4)
Specific topics to be examined will be announced during advance registration periods. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): at least one course in East Asian Studies or in Asian History, or permission of instructor.

A HIS 392/392Z Advanced Topics in Latin American History (1-4)
Specific topics to be examined will be announced during advance registration. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor, junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 396/396Z Advanced Topics in the Middle East (1–4)
Specific topics to be examined will be announced during advance registration periods. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in History.

A HIS 436 (= A EAJ 436) Fascism: Japan and Beyond (3)
This course explores the idea of "fascism" as a framework to analyze society. Taking Japan as a point of departure, we will investigate "fascism" in relation to political economy, intellectual production, and mass culture primarily in the Axis powers in the first half of the 20th century. Particular attention will be devoted to the importance of cross-regional interactions in developing ideas of bureaucracy and national mobilization, race and ethnicity, and systems of political participation. Prerequisite(s) A EAJ 385.

A HIS 451 (= A LCS 451 & A WSS 451) Gender & Class in Latin American Development (3)
The study of the historical interplay of cultural, ideological, and structural factors affecting women’s lives during the course of Latin America’s experience with modernization and industrialization during the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics covered may include: household work, paid work, migration, growth of female- headed households, women’s political participation, and women’s participation in social movements. Only one version of A HIS 451 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): any course in LACS and/or Women’s Studies and/or History.

A HIS 458/458Z (= A EAC 458/458Z) New Orders in Asia (3-4)
This class examines the international orders in place in Asia from the days of 19th century imperialism to the search for a 21st century post-Cold War order. The focus will be on political, cultural, and economic interactions among the three main East Asian powers: China, Japan, and the U.S. Only one version of A HIS 458 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

A HIS 463/463Z The Byzantine Empire, 300–1453 (3-4)
For description, see listing under Concentration in European History. Only one version of A HIS 463 may be taken for credit.

A HIS 468 (= A EAS 468; formerly A HIS/A EAS 399) Confucius and Confucianism (3)
This course surveys the main texts and themes in the development of the Confucian tradition from its origins in China through its spread in Japan and Korea to its reemergence in contemporary East Asia. The emphasis is on the way that the tradition has responded to social conditions. Particular attention will be paid to the relationship between Confucian intellectuals and political power. The rivalry with other traditions (e.g., Taoism, Buddhism, Marxism, Liberalism, etc.) will also be considered. Only one version of A HIS 468 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A HIS 177, 379, A EAS 103, 170, 190, or permission of instructor.

A HIS 471 (= A EAC 471; formerly A HIS/A EAC 398) Change in Medieval China (3)
This course focuses on the dramatic change that China underwent between the 8th and the 14th centuries. We will examine this transformation from several historical perspectives: political history, economic history, social history, intellectual history, and cultural history in order to better understand China’s shift from aristocratic to literati society. Only one version of A HIS 471 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A HIS 177, 379, or permission of instructor.

A HIS 497 Independent Study in History (2–4)
For description, see listing in Concentration in US History. S/U graded.

A HIS 498 Honors' Independent Research and Writing (4)
For description, see listing in History Honors Program. S/U graded.

Capstone: Senior Research Seminar

A HIS 489Z Senior Research Seminar (3)
The Senior Research Seminar is an integrated, capstone course that is the culmination of the history student's major. It will extend skills that students have established and practiced in their previous history courses, and will include an in-depth exploration of the tools and concepts used by historians. Students will conduct individual research, using primary and secondary sources to produce a substantial body of writing. This course cannot be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): senior standing in the history major.

History Honors Program

A HIS 495Z and 496Z Senior Honors Thesis Seminar (4, 4)
Preparation of a substantial honors thesis under the supervision of a member of the Department of History. Students present periodic progress reports, criticize each other's work, and deliver an oral summary of the completed thesis. Students in the honors program must satisfactorily complete both A HIS 495Z and 496Z. Prerequisite(s): admission to the history honors program. 

A HIS 498 Honors' Independent Research and Writing (4)
Directed reading and conferences about research on selected topics in history related to students' honors thesis research. Replaces A HIS 497Z for honors students. May not be repeated for credit. Prerequisites(s): permission of instructor and director of undergraduate studies, junior or senior standing. Open only to students in the history honors program. S/U graded.

  

Program in Human Biology

Faculty

Emerita Professor
Helen T. Ghiradella, Ph.D.
University of California, Santa Barbara

Professors
Timothy B. Gage, Ph.D.
Pennsylvania State University
Lawrence M. Schell, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania

Associate Professor
Adam D. Gordon, Ph.D.
University of Texas at Austin

Assistant Professors
Louis Alvarado, Ph.D.
University of New Mexico       
Julia Jennings, Ph.D.
Pennsylvania State University

Visiting Assistant Professor
Mercedes Fabian, Ph.D.
University at Buffalo       



The Human Biology program is a combined major/minor designed for students interested in a liberal arts education with particular focus on the human organism. It provides a strong background in human evolution, structure, function and behavior. This program is especially suitable for those seeking careers that deal directly or indirectly with human health and welfare (e.g., medicine, allied health [physician assistant, occupational therapy, physical therapy, nursing, etc.], public health), forensics, administration, business, journalism, and teaching.

Students interested in research and/or teaching careers in biological anthropology are especially encouraged to major in Human Biology. Most graduate programs in Anthropology require undergraduate coursework in at least three of the four traditional subfields of anthropology (archaeology, cultural anthropology, biological anthropology), and some also require linguistics as the fourth subfield. It is advisable, therefore, for those intending to do graduate work in an anthropology department to take at least one course in each of these subfields. Students who plan on graduate work and professional careers in Biology are advised to major in Biological Sciences.

Degree Requirements for the Major in Human Biology

General Program B.S.: Combined major and minor sequence consisting of a minimum of 55 credits to be taken from:

(a) Required courses (42 credits minimum):
Basic Sciences:
A BIO 110 or 120 & 201; A BIO 111 or 121 & 202Z, A BIO 205 or 212;
A CHM 120, 121, 124, 125;
A MAT 108 or A PSY 210 or A SOC 221 or one semester of college mathematics exclusive of A MAT 100, 102, 104, or 105;
A PHY 105.

Fundamentals of Human Biology:
A ANT 110, 211, 316, 318, and one of A ANT 312 (= A BIO 318) or 319 or 416 or 441.

(b) Major electives (13 credits minimum):
A ANT 111, 119, 304, 309, 310, 311, 312 (= A BIO 318) or 319 or 416 or 441 if not used in (a) above, 314, 317, 365, 414, 415, 416, 418, 419, 450;
A BIO 117, 205 or 212 if not used in (a) above, 230, 308, 311, 314, 329, 330, 320 or 401, 402, 410, 411;
A CHM 220, 221, 222, 223;
A PSY 314, 385, 387;
H SPH 201, 231, 341.

A maximum of 3 credits may be selected from R SSW 290/390, A BIO 399/499 and/or A ANT 498/498, with prior approval for appropriate activities from the Director(s) of the Human Biology major. The one-credit writing intensive courses, A ANT 389Z and A BIO 389Z, taken in conjunction with a required or elective course in the major, may also yield credit toward the major.

  

Program in Journalism

Faculty

Professors
Thomas Bass, Ph.D. 
University of California, Santa Cruz
Nancy Roberts, Ph.D.
University of Minnesota

Associate Professor
Rosemary Armao, M.A. (Director)
Ohio State University       

Lecturers
Thomas Palmer, M.S.
Syracuse University
Laney Salisbury, M.S.
Columbia University

Adjunct Faculty
Steven Barnes, B.A.
Ithaca College
David Guistina, M.A.
University at Albany
Michael Hill, B.A.
SUNY Geneseo
Mike Huber, M.A.
University at Albany
Ian Pickus, M.A.
University at Albany
Barbara Lombardo, M.A.
Ohio State University
Mark Marchand, B.S.
University of Massachusetts
Holly McKenna, M.A.
University at Albany
James Odato, B.A.
University of Massachusetts
Shirley Perlman, B.A.
SUNY at Buffalo
Katherine Van Acker, B.S.
Montana State University



The Journalism Program offers courses in nonfiction writing, media analysis and production, and the history, societal, and global context of journalism. The Program also offers workshops that concentrate on student reporting, writing and editing, digital media publication, and photojournalism, as well as courses that address legal and ethical issues confronting journalists today

The Program’s courses and internships prepare students for work as journalists, freelance writers, editors, TV producers, television and radio journalists, Web journalists, magazine and book publishers, copy writers, and public advocates in media. The Journalism Program also provides excellent preparation for students who want to pursue careers in related fields, such as law, government, history, educational policy, and teaching, as well as graduate study.

While offering survey courses that review the history and development of journalism from its early days in print to its current digital formats, the Program also gives students hands-on experience with reporting and writing newspaper and magazine articles (both print and online) and producing other digital forms of journalism. The internship program encourages students to work at television and radio stations, newspapers and magazines, publishing houses, governmental agencies, non-governmental organizations, and public relations firms.

Degree Requirements for the Major in Journalism

General Program B.A.: a minimum of 36 credits in A JRL courses including:

Advising

The Journalism Program has established a solid reputation for giving students the individual attention required for curricular advising, placement in internships, and career planning. Graduates of the program have secured a wide variety of jobs in broadcasting and reporting or gone on to graduate study at Columbia University, New York University, Syracuse University, and other institutions. Journalism students work with the staff of the Communication/Journalism Advisement Office, 351 Social Science Building, to receive advisement and AVN numbers each semester. Also each undergraduate major in Journalism is assigned to a full-time faculty member in the Program for academic mentoring throughout the student’s career. In addition, faculty members in the Program are available to meet with students who are interested in learning about the program or thinking of majoring in Journalism.

Honors Program

Journalism majors who wish to graduate with Honors in Journalism should contact Professor Thomas Bass, the Journalism Program's Honors Director. To be admitted to the Journalism Honors Program, a student must: (a) be a declared Journalism major; (b) have completed 12 credits in A JRL courses; (c) have a minimum 3.25 overall GPA and a minimum 3.50 GPA in Journalism; (d) submit an application essay.

In addition, the student is required, as part of his/her courses for completing the Journalism major, to choose one course from the Contextual courses menu from the following: A JRL 340 Global Perspectives on the News; A JRL 330 History of Journalism in the United States; A JRL 420 Media in the Digital Age; or A JRL 480 Public Affairs Journalism. The student must earn at least an A- in the chosen course. Senior honors students will then complete A JRL 499 Senior Honors Project. The Honors sequence requires 39 credits.

  

Courses in Journalism

A JRL 100 Foundations of Journalism (3)
Introduction to contemporary journalism as a major institution in American democracy. This course will help students become more informed about media and introduce them to the major issues in journalism. Topics range from media history and the economic structure of the industry to broad questions about the impact of media on individuals and society in a fast-changing technological society. Also addressed will be ethical and legal issues related to media practices in news media. A student must earn a grade of C or better in this course in order to take A JRL 200Z.

T JRL 100 Foundations of Journalism and Media Studies Honors (3)
Specially designed for students in the Honors College, T JRL 100 is the Journalism Program's introductory course in Journalism and Media Studies. With a strong writing component, the course helps students become more informed about media. It teaches basic journalistic practices and introduces the major issues currently confronting journalism and media studies. Topics range from media history and the economics of the media industry to broad questions about the impact of media on individuals and society in the 21st century. T JRL 100 is the Honors College version of A JRL 100; only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): Honors College students only.

A JRL 200Z Introduction to Reporting and News Writing (3)
In this introductory workshop, students develop the skills of practicing reporters and news writers. They acquire the news judgment that allows them to identify what should be reported and written about, and they learn the fundamental forms of journalistic writing. Students familiarize themselves with journalistic sources and evaluating their reliability. They practice revision and learn about the Associated Press style, civics, and rudimentary budget analysis. Prerequisite(s): A JRL 100 with a grade of C or higher.

A JRL 201Z Reporting and News Writing II (3)
This course builds on the introductory A JRL 200Z course, moving students to more advanced news reporting by focusing on beat reporting, multimedia platforms, and advanced assignments such as: covering budgets, public hearings and community issues, and researching public records. At the end of this course, students will be expected to demonstrate strong competence in news judgment, reporting, writing simple and mid-level news stories, and meeting deadlines. They will also have a basic understanding of critical thinking for journalists and some familiarity with media ethics. Prerequisite(s): A JRL 200Z, or permission of instructor.

A JRL 225 (= A DOC 225) Media Law and Ethics (3)
This course examines strategies for making good ethical decisions in newsgathering and writing as well as the laws that pertain to daily journalism and public relations. The course covers the major ethical theories and philosophies and the major legal cases that journalists must know. Emphasis will be on actual cases and hypothetical situations encountered in daily journalism. The course pays special attention to some of the most common dilemmas - libel, free press/fair trial conflicts, anonymous sources, and publishing content that can harm people. Only one version of A JRL 225 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): restricted to Journalism, Documentary Studies and History majors and minors. Others may be admitted space permitting, and with permission from the instructor.

A JRL 230 Media and War in U.S. History (3)
This course explores the roles, functions, and responsibilities of the mass media in times of war from a historical perspective. It focuses primarily on the news media and may also give some attention to entertainment media. Questions raised include: what impact have reporters' struggle for access and the government's struggle for control of information had on reporting methods and ultimately, on the news product? What has been the relationship between media representations of war and public attitudes toward war? And, how may have popular media constructed/influenced the way Americans remember and memorialize war? Relevant periods may include the Revolutionary and Civil Wars; World Wars I and II; and Korean, Vietnam, and Iraq Wars.

T JRL 230Z The Mass Media and War in U.S. History (3)
T JRL 230Z is the Honors College version of A JRL 230Z; only one version may be taken for credit.

A JRL 281X (= A WSS 281X) Women and the Media (3)
This course will explore how intersections of race, gender, class, nationality, sexuality, age, and (dis)ability shape representations of women in mass media and popular culture. We will also learn to research and analyze various media sources, as well as engage in creative projects to examine such representations and challenge issues of sexual objectification and societal dominance. Recommended (as opposed to required) courses prior to or during enrollment: A WSS 101, A WSS 220, or A WSS/A AFS/A LCS 240. Only one version of A JRL 281 may be taken for credit.

A JRL 308Z (= A DOC 308Z) Narrative Journalism (3)
Students will explore a variety of journalistic styles, with emphasis on compelling narrative and description, combined with the skillful use of quotes and dialogue. The class features intensive critiques of students' work. A variety of formats will be studied: newspapers, magazines, non-fiction books, and online publications. Readings for the course include works by Janet Malcolm, Barbara Ehrenreich, Ellen Ullman, Mary Karr, Edward Abbey, Edmund Wilson, Michael Herr, and James Baldwin. Students submit weekly writing assignments and a final portfolio of edited work. Only one version of A JRL 308Z may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A JRL 200Z, or permission of instructor.

A JRL 324 (= A DOC 324) Introduction to Documentary Photography (3)
From Mathew Brady’s Civil War photographs, to the work of photographers of the U.S. Farm Security Administration in the 1930s, and through the stunning and emotive images of contemporary social, ethnographic, scientific, and war photographers, documentary photography has experienced a long and vigorous development. In this basic introductory hands-on workshop, students will examine the long heritage of documentary photography as well as the practical lessons to be learned from renowned practitioners. The course explores the use of still photographs to record various aspects of social, political, and cultural life and events. Students will develop their visual storytelling skills through a series of research and fieldwork hands-on projects involving the documentation of various aspects of contemporary life. Students should be familiar with the basics of digital camera operation. Only one version of A JRL 324 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): restricted to Documentary Studies Program and Journalism majors and minors. Others may be admitted space permitting, and with permission from the instructor.

A JRL 330 History of Journalism in the United States (3)
This course examines the development of journalism in the United States, emphasizing the role of the press as a social institution. Subjects covered include the function and purpose of the press, evolving definitions of news, changing interpretations of the First Amendment, and the ethical and legal dimensions of free speech. Also examined will be the social, economic, political, technological, and cultural forces that have shaped the practices of journalism today.

A JRL 340 Global Perspectives on the News (3)
This course provides a global perspective on news production and the distribution of media around the world. After studying the political and legal constraints under which international media operate, including the operating procedures of American journalists working as foreign correspondents, the course will explore topics including censorship, information warfare, Internet piracy, the blogosphere, and conflicts between national interests and the media technologies that are unconstrained by national borders. Readings include works by Marshall McLuhan, Umberto Eco, Benjamin Barber, Susan George, and others.

A JRL 355 Public Relations Writing (3)
Students are introduced to the history of public relations, tracing its modern development in the 20th century and current rise to political prominence. Topics to be discussed include branding, logos, packaging, and other corporate practices. Students will review the legal and ethical rules of governing PR. Only after exploring how the goals of PR may be antithetical to those of journalism, will students be asked to produce a variety of writing samples, including advocacy journalism, press releases, speeches, position papers, web content, and other forms of PR. Some of this work, simulating crisis management, will be produced on deadline. Prerequisite(s): A JRL 201Z or A JRL 270X, or permission of instructor.

A JRL 363 (= A DOC 363) Visual Culture (3)
The course explores the increasing predominance of visual media in contemporary life. It examines how traditional narrative forms of storytelling are being replaced by visual forms of storytelling in journalism, photojournalism, film, television, the internet, video games, anime, graphic novels, and advertising. Particular emphasis will be paid to the global flow of visual culture and the technologies that facilitate these cultural exchanges. Readings range from Marshall McLuhan and Laura Mulvey to contemporary writers on visual culture. Only one version of A JRL 363 may be taken for credit. May not be taken by students with credit for A JRL/T JRL 220.

A JRL 366/366Z Magazine Writing (3)
This course gives students experience in conceptualizing, researching, writing, rewriting, and submitting for publication different types of articles that are found in magazines, and the features section of newspapers, both print and online. Ethical issues and writer-editor relationships are also examined. Students write several articles of varying length and complete other assignments, such as writing query letters and analyzing magazine content. Prerequisite(s): A JRL 200Z and either A JRL 201Z or A JRL 270X; or permission of instructor.

A JRL 380 (= A DOC 380) Photojournalism (3)
Students develop the critical skills for evaluating and the technical skills for producing, editing, and publishing digital photographs in a variety of formats, including traditional newspapers, satellite transmissions from the field, and Internet websites. While developing their aesthetic and technical skills, students will critique each other’s photos in a workshop format. Only one version of A JRL 380 may be taken for credit.

A JRL 385/385Y Broadcast Journalism (3)
Students will report, write, produce, air, and record a variety of television and radio news stories with a degree of professionalism resembling what might be found in local newscasts, whether they be short reports or longer, feature-length stories. Working individually or in groups, students will use analog and digital video technologies and recording devices to produce their stories. Prerequisite(s): A JRL 200Z and either A JRL 201Z or A JRL 270X; or permission of instructor.

A JRL 390 Digital Media Workshop: Online Publishing (3)
This workshop course introduces students to the frontier of online journalism and audience building. Students develop proficiency with the range of online services and applications that journalists use today, including WordPress, Facebook, Twitter, Adobe Photoshop, and video-editing software. The field-based journalism projects include video and photography capture and editing. Students also learn search-engine optimization headline writing skills and online story editing. Prerequisite(s): A JRL 200Z, or permission of instructor.

A JRL 392 Digital Media Workshop: Desk-Top Publishing (3)
With an orientation to journalistic principles, this workshop course provides students with a cross-platform foundation in design, typography and color theory as it applies today in printed publications and mobile devices. Students learn workflow strategies in the editing and fusion of visual and written content for print and online. Projects include the creation of magazines, broadsheet or tabloid print designs and tablet visual design. Application training includes Adobe InDesign and Photoshop. Prerequisites(s): AJRL 200Z, or permission of instructor.

A JRL 410 Images of Journalism in Film (3)
This course explores the depiction of American journalism and journalists in a variety of fictional films and selected works of prose. Students study the history of filmed representations of journalists; they also study the images that journalists have presented of themselves and their profession. The course does not involve journalistic report and writing, but it does require close analysis of films, attentive reading, participation in class discussions, and a willingness to explore.

A JRL 420 Media in the Digital Age (3)
An examination of media and society in the digital age. The course explores the nature of media, their social role, and means of production. It surveys new technologies and their effect on effect on print, film, broadcast, web, and other media. Topics include recent developments in communications technology, news, social media, intellectual property, censorship, surveillance, and gender differences.

A JRL 442 (= A DOC 442 & A WSS 442) Transmedia Storytelling (3)
Students in this workshop learn how to use a variety of new media tools, including—but not restricted to—digital videos, interactive web pages, and animation software, to create a set of linked stories about a singular historical or newsworthy event. Additionally, students learn to search for, collect, and analyze primary sources—e.g. news stories, first-person accounts, government records, cultural artifacts, ephemera, found footage, etc.—stored in archives, libraries, museums, and online databases. Through the processes of research and reflection, students learn to understand the intersections and consequences of class, gender, race, and nationality. The workshop format enables students to participate fully as active learners and peer teachers. Only one version of A JRL 442 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing or permission of instructor.

A JRL 460Z Advanced Reporting and News Writing (3)
Students in this advanced workshop will work on investigative and explanatory news stories that are thoroughly researched and compellingly written. Students are expected to develop a sense of journalistic tenacity and appreciation for applied research. They will learn how to develop a story through multiple drafts and how to produce articles noteworthy for journalistic flair, emotional impact, and informative power. Prerequisite(s): A JRL 201Z or A JRL 270X or permission of instructor.

A JRL 468 (= A DOC 468) Literary Journalism (3)
This course invites students to read and analyze literary journalism, with attention to its historical context. Readings include works by Daniel Defoe, Charles Dickens, Samuel Clemens, Stephen Cane, Janet Flanner, Lillian Ross, Rebecca West, John Hersey, James Agee, Dorothy Day, Meridel LeSueur, Truman Capote, Joan Didion, Tracy Kidder, and others. While reflecting on the relations between journalism and literary fiction and nonfiction, students will complete bi-weekly assignments. Only one version of A JRL 468 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A JRL 201Z.

A JRL 475/475Z Topics in Journalism (3)
This course may be either an intensive skills-oriented workshop or a conceptual course on a topic in journalism that bears serious study. More than one section may be offered in a semester. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Prerequisite(s): A JRL 200Z or 270X.

A JRL 480/480Z Public Affairs Journalism (3)
The Capital District offers a unique laboratory for reporting on public affairs at all levels, from the local to the national. These include governmental affairs, but also judicial matters, relations between New York State and the State’s indigenous Indian tribes, and policy issues concerning medicine, technology, business, and education. Public affairs journalism is now part of a large debate about the lengths to which journalists should go in hosting community events and creating an informed citizenry. Along with numerous writing assignments, students will engage in wide reading of journalists who have staked out positions to this debate and operated effectively as reports or advocates in the public arena. Prerequisite(s): A JRL 200Z and either A JRL 201Z or A JRL 270X; or permission of instructor.

A JRL 487Z Investigative Reporting (3)
Intensive reading and analysis of the history, strategies, techniques, ethics and practical problems of the craft of investigative reporting. Emphasis will be on hands-on experience with documents, sources, state agencies and ethical dilemmas. The goal is to produce a substantial piece of original, in-depth reportage by semester's end. Prerequisite(s): A JRL 201Z or A JRL 270X; or permission of instructor.

A JRL 490Z Digital Publication (3)
This workshop is devoted to electronic publishing in a wide variety of contemporary contexts - from the Web, to blogs, to Webcasts, and others. Most often, the course will involve publishing at least one issue of a journalistic online publication, in addition to other assignments that require using other forms of contemporary electronic media. Students will be expected to exercise news judgment; report, write, and edit stories; work with digital imaging; utilize graphic design and layout principles; and work through a publishing process. Prerequisite(s): A JRL 201Z, and either A JRL 390 or A JRL 392; or permission of instructor.

A JRL 495 Internship in Journalism (1-6)
The course is limited to Journalism majors and minors. Internships in a variety of media are offered for variable credit. The internship requires that students work on-site in a professional media organization, under the direct supervision of a qualified supervisor. A faculty supervisor will also design an academic component for the internship, based on readings, daily journals, and the writing of papers that analyze and reflect on the work experience. The faculty supervisor will meet regularly with interns. May be repeated for up to a total of six credits. Prerequisite(s): internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher and an overall grade point average of 3.0 or higher in their coursework in Journalism. S/U graded.

A JRL 497 Independent Study in Journalism (1-3)
For variable credit (1-3), students in Journalism pursue an independent project under the supervision of a full time faculty member. A student might use this course to enhance a portfolio, gain expertise in journalistic practices, research a special topic, or complete work on a major assignment. An application to a faculty member is required. A written agreement outlining the goals and work to be completed during the independent study is also required. The course is limited to seniors with prior journalism experience, although they do not have to be a journalism major or minor.

A JRL 499 Senior Honors Project in Journalism (3)
Students will define, develop, research, and write or produce in electronic or visual form an individual project of serious merit. The project is intended to demonstrate the range of skills acquired during the student’s training in Journalism. The project should also demonstrate a nuanced understanding of the ethical and legal issues of the profession. Work on the project will be supervised by advanced arrangement with a faculty member. The decision on whether a student’s final project merits receiving Honors in Journalism will be made by the faculty of the Journalism Program.

  

Program in Judaic Studies

Faculty

Professors Emeriti
Judith R. Baskin. Ph.D.
Yale University     
Stanley J. Isser, Ph.D.
Columbia University

Associate Professor Emeritus
Daniel Grossberg, Ph.D.
New York University

Associate Professor
Nadieszda Kizenko, Ph.D. (Department Chair)
Columbia University

Affiliated Faculty
Robert J. Gluck, M.H.L., M.S.W., M.F.A.
Department of Music
Martha Rozett, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
Department of English
Edward L. Schwarzschild, Ph.D.
Department of English      
Sharona R. Wachs, M.A., M.L.S.
University Libraries    



The Department of History's Program in Judaic Studies offers courses at the elementary and advanced levels in Jewish history and civilization. The Program offers a minor in Judaic Studies and many courses in the program are cross-listed with other departments.

Careers
Judaic Studies is a broad-based liberal arts discipline leading to a variety of careers. Many students with a solid background of Judaic Studies courses pursue careers in law, medicine, journalism, business, social welfare, Jewish communal administration, or education, often after appropriate graduate training.

Special Programs or Opportunities
The State University system has arrangements with the University of Haifa, the Hebrew University, Ben-Gurion University, Tel Aviv University, and Bar-Ilan University for students who desire to spend a semester or an academic year studying in Israel; credits toward the minor in Judaic Studies will be awarded for suitable courses. This program is administered from the Albany campus and is available to students, regardless of major.

  

Courses in Judaic Studies

A JST 150 Jewish Civilization: From the Birth of the Israelites until the Present (3)
An orientation to the field of Jewish studies from the ancient period to the present via a thematic approach, such as through Jewish languages, cities, migrations, or religious denominations. Recommended preparation for other A JST courses.

A JST 151 (= A REL 151) Foundational Jewish Texts (3)
Examines a variety of canonical Jewish texts from ancient times until the present. Considers how each was a meaningful voice regarding the affairs of its own era and to what extent it remains significant in our own day. With each topic, students will read a variety of primary sources and related secondary sources. Only one of A JST 151 and A REL 151 may be taken for credit.

A JST 155 (= A REL 155) Judaism: Traditions and Practices (3)
Examines the development of Jewish traditions and practices from the Rabbinic period to the present. Addresses Jewish law and custom related to the cycle of Jewish holidays throughout the year, and life cycle events from cradle to grave. Differentiates among beliefs and practices of various Jewish denominations. For those not already familiar with this subject matter, recommended preparation for other A JST courses. Only one version of A JST 155 may be taken for credit.

A JST 221 (= A HIS 221) The American Jewish Experience (3)
A general overview of the American Jewish experience. Examines historical developments in such areas of American Jewish life as religious expression, political activity, education, demographics, socio-economics, and secular intellectual and cultural activity. Assesses the impact on American Jewry of immigration from Europe and elsewhere, and such pivotal events as World War I and II, the Holocaust, and the founding of the State of Israel. Addresses the relationship between diverse segments of American Jewry and between Jewish and non-Jewish Americans. Only one version of A JST 221 may be taken for credit.

A JST 225 (= A HIS 225) American Cinema and the Jews (3)
An examination of the history of Hollywood and the Jewish relationship to the American motion picture industry. Investigates a representative sample of films and movies and explores the impact of the fictionalized landscape of the Jewish mind on American culture and values. Only one version of A JST 225 may be taken for credit.

A JST 244 (= A HIS 244 & A HEB 244) Zionism, Palestine, and Israel in Historical Perspective (3)
A study of 19th century Jewish and European history resulting in the formation of Jewish nationalism. Covers the development of various Zionist ideologies and organizations as well as their challengers within and outside the Jewish community. Examines the history of settlement in Palestine, the founding of the state of Israel, and the country’s subsequent development. Only one version of A JST 244 may be taken for credit.

A JST 250 (= A HIS 250) The Holocaust in History (3)
Begins with an overview of European Jewish life on the eve of the attempt at its destruction, examines the cultural, social, and intellectual roots of Nazism, and discusses the efforts to isolate and marginalize those marked as “a-socials” in German society. Explores the radicalization of the Nazi program and investigates the variety of ways targeted groups responded to the crisis. Covers a number of survivor accounts and the memorialization and politicization of the Nazi Holocaust in the United States and Israel. Only one version of A JST 250 may be taken for credit.

A JST 251 (= A HIS 252) Early Israel and Biblical Civilization (3)
The history and culture of ancient Israel from its beginnings to the Persian Empire. A survey of the Hebrew Bible (in English) as the major source for the study of early Judaic religious and social forms in the context of the Near East. Only one of A JST 251, 341, and A HIS 252 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A JST 252 (= A REL 252) Jews, Hellenism, and Early Christianity (3)
History of the Jewish people from Alexander the Great to the decline of the ancient world. Topics include examination of cultural conflict in Judaea and the diaspora, confrontation with Greco-Roman Hellenism and early Christianity, sectarianism, and the beginnings of Rabbinic institutions. Only one version of A JST 252 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A JST 253 (= A HIS 253 & A REL 253) Medieval Jews among Muslims and Christians (3)
Explores the course of Jewish history from the development of Christianity until the Chmielnicki massacres of 1648. Investigates the experience of Jews between and within the major religious and cultural systems that dominated medieval Europe; Islam and Christianity. The course charts the history of Sephardic and Ashkenazic Jewry, noting the important social, religious, cultural, and political characteristics of each community, as well as their interaction with two great world civilizations. Only one version of A JST 253 may be taken for credit.

A JST 254 (= A HIS 254 & A REL 254) The Jews in the Modern World (3)
Beginning with the end of the late Middle Ages and the emergence of the Enlightenment, this class explores how Jewish communities responded to the demands of an ever-expanding modern world. Examines the ways in which Jews and Jewish communities sought to create modern expressions of Judaism and the response of rabbinic Judaism to these challenges. Explores the rise of Hasidism, the aims of “Enlightened” Jewry, nationalism, the creation of secular Jewish cultures, the World Wars, modern antisemitism and the Nazi Holocaust, and the emergence of new Jewish centers in the United States and Israel. Only one version of A JST 254 may be taken for credit.

A JST 256 (= A REL 256 & A HIS 266) World Jewry since the Holocaust (3)
Examines the historical, cultural, societal, and demographic changes in world Jewry since the Holocaust. Investigates the decline of European Jewish communities and the development of the United States and Israel as postwar centers of modern Jewish life. Only one version of A JST 256 may be taken for credit.

A JST 275 (= A HIS 275) Antisemitism: Historical Explorations & Contemporary Challenges (3)
Explores pre-modern forms of anti-Jewish hatred, the manifestation of antisemitism in the modern period, and several of the current debates on antisemitism. Explores the instrumentalization of antisemitic hatred through several case studies and provides students with the means to assess critically both current antisemitic attacks and contemporary debates about antisemitism. Only one of A HIS 275 and A JST 275 may be taken for credit.

A JST 299 (= A REL 299) Introductory Topics in Judaic Studies (1–3)
An elementary course in Jewish culture, history, philosophy, literature or the Bible that is devoted to a topic or theme, a particular work or works, or a particular author or authors. May be repeated up to 6 credits when content varies.

T JST 299 Introductory Topics in Judaic Studies (1–3)
T JST 299 is the Honors College version of A JST 299.

A JST 308 (= A HEB 308) Readings in Hebrew Literature (3)
Study of a selected period, genre, or author of Hebrew literature. The course is taught in translation (in English). May be repeated when content varies.

A JST 309 (= A HEB 309) 20th Century Hebrew Literature
A study of selected works of Hebrew literature from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. The works studied will deal with such themes as alienation, disaster, religious and secular worldviews, and the place of Israel. The course is taught in translation (in English). May be repeated when content varies.

A JST 331 (= A REL 331) Modern Jewish Thought (3)
A survey of the range of Jewish thought and philosophical movements from the mid-17th century to the present. Focuses on key Jewish thinkers, philosophers, and theologians, exploring questions of Jewish ethics, religion, relationships to God, and moral responsibility in a time of increased secularization. Only one version of A JST 331 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A JST 332 (= A MUS 332; formerly A JST 215 & A MUS 225) Music of the Jewish People (3)
A survey of significant features and trends emerging from the evolving history, musical literature, and aesthetics of Jewish musical expression. Issues to be addressed include musical implications of the multi-national, multi-ethnic nature of Jewish peoplehood; the complex interplay between Jewish identity and musical expression; the multi-faceted nature of the term Jewish, and the dynamic interaction between Jewish communities and surrounding host cultures, as diverse influences have been perpetually refracted through the lens of the Jewish experience. Course work will include listening, reading, and writing assignments, integrated within a lecture and discussion format. Only one version of A JST 332 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A JST 357 (= A HIS 368) West European Jewry in Modern Times (3)
A detailed examination of Jewish history in West and Central Europe that highlights the transformation and politicization of Jewish life in the modern era until World War II. Examines the denominalization of Judaism; the Jewish Enlightenment and its opponents; the campaigns for and against emancipation; the role of Jews in European culture, politics, and industry; and the rise of modern antisemitism.

A JST 358 East European Jewry in Modern Times (3)
A detailed examination of Jewish history and culture in Russia, the U.S.S.R., Poland, and the Baltic States in the period of East European Jewry’s encounter with and participation in the modern world. Explores the conflicts between Hasidism, traditional Rabbinic Judaism, and the Jewish Enlightenment. Investigates the complex legal, economic, political, and demographic status of Jewry under Russian imperial rule and its development in the period between the two World Wars. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A JST 360 (= A HIS 360) Bearing Witness: Holocaust Diaries and Memoirs (3)
A study in diaries, autobiographies, and memoirs of Jews written during and after the Nazi Holocaust. Considers the complex historical questions raised by such works, including: What can be learned about the Holocaust through autobiographical writing? To what extent were the authors aware of the scope of the attacks on European Jewry beyond their own immediate experience? What responses were available to Jews during this period? How did the authors make sense of their experiences? What are the merits and limits of autobiographical writing as a historical resource? How do accounts of the period change as authors' chronological proximity to the events increases? In what ways are memoirs of the Holocaust shaped by the events occurring at the time in which they written?

A JST 367 (= A ENG 367) The Jewish Literary Imagination (3)
Readings in literature by modern Jewish writers that addresses themes and issues of importance to modern Jewry. The course may offer either an intensive survey of a broad range of modern Jewish literature in one or more genres, or take a thematic, national, chronological, or generic approach to the subject matter. Only one version of A JST 367 may be taken for credit.

A JST 373 The Arab in Israeli Literature (3)
An examination of the image of the Arab in selected poetry, short stories, and novels of modern Israel. The course will address the evolving presence, perceptions, and significance of the Arab in the literature. Attention is given to the historical and cultural factors contributing to the distinct treatment of the Arab in various areas of modern Hebrew literature. Only one of A JST 273 and 373 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A JST 450 Judaic Studies Practicum (3)
Advanced Judaic Studies students receive undergraduate credit for assisting with 100 or 200 level Judaic Studies courses under the close supervision of the instructor. Students at this level lead small group discussions several times in the semester; offer one class presentation, which will also be written up as a paper and submitted to the instructor; and may assist in grading quizzes and examinations. Students meet regularly with the instructor, who helps students improve their knowledge of the topic and discusses pedagogical techniques. Course may be repeated once for credit with approval of department chair. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and department chair.

A JST 497 Independent Study in Judaic Studies (1–6)
Directed reading and conferences on selected topics in Judaic studies. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): permission of department chair.

  

Courses in Hebrew

A HEB 101 Elementary Hebrew I (4)
Introduction to the fundamentals of modern spoken and written Hebrew.

A HEB 102 Elementary Hebrew II (4)
Continuation of A HEB 101. Prerequisite(s): A HEB 101 or equivalent, or placement.

A HEB 201 Intermediate Hebrew I (3)
Readings, grammar, composition, and conversation. Prerequisite(s): A HEB 102 or equivalent, or placement.

A HEB 202 Intermediate Hebrew II (3)
Continuation of A HEB 201. Grammar, composition, and conversation. Prerequisite(s): A HEB 201 or equivalent, or placement.

A HEB 244 (= A JST 244 & A HIS 244) Zionism, Palestine, and Israel in Historical Perspective (3)
A study of 19th century Jewish and European history resulting in the formation of Jewish nationalism. Covers the development of various Zionist ideologies and organizations as well as their challengers within and outside the Jewish community. Examines the history of settlement in Palestine, the founding of the state of Israel, and the country’s subsequent development. Only one version of A HEB 244 may be taken for credit.

A HEB 297 Independent Study in Hebrew (3)
Directed readings and conferences on selected topics in Hebrew language and literature. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and department chair.

A HEB 307 Hebrew Composition and Conversation (3)
Intensive oral and written practice. Composition and conversation based on readings representing the development of the Hebrew language and literature. Prerequisite(s): A HEB 202 or equivalent. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A HEB 308 (= A JST 308) Readings in Hebrew Literature (3)
Study of a selected period, genre, or author of Hebrew literature. The course is taught in translation (in English). May be repeated when content varies. 

A HEB 309/309Y (= A JST 309) 20th Century Hebrew Literature (3)
A study of selected works of Hebrew literature from the beginning of the 20th century to the present. The works studied will deal with such themes as alienation, disaster, religious and secular worldviews, and the place of Israel. The course is taught in translation (in English).  May be repeated when content varies.

A HEB 450 Hebrew Practicum (4)
Advanced Hebrew students receive undergraduate credit for teaching experience in elementary Hebrew by working with sections of A HEB 101 or 102. The supervising instructor helps students improve their mastery of Hebrew and discusses pedagogical techniques. This course may be repeated once for credit with approval of the department chair. Prerequisite(s): A HEB 202 or equivalent, and permission of instructor.

A HEB 497 Independent Study in Hebrew (1–6)
Directed readings and conferences on selected topics in Hebrew language and literature. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and department chair.

  

Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures

Maurice Westmoreland, Ph.D.
Department Chair

The Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures includes the three programs French Studies, Hispanic and Italian Studies, and Slavic and Eurasian Studies. Each of these programs is fully described in the corresponding three sections of the bulletin. In addition, the department offers courses in Arabic, German, Hebrew, Latin, and Portuguese and minors in French, Hebrew, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish.

 

 

  

French Studies

Faculty

Associate Professors
Susan Blood, Ph.D.
Johns Hopkins University
Cynthia A. Fox, Ph.D.
Indiana University, Bloomington

Lecturer
Veronique Martin, Ph.D.
University at Albany

Professors Emeriti
Eloise A. Brière, Ph.D.
University of Toronto
Jean-François Brière, Ph.D.
York University
Robert W. Greene, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania
Martin Kanes, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania
Raymond J. Ortali, Ph.D.
University of Michigan
Herman P. Salomon, Ph.D.
New York University
Georges V. Santoni, Ph.D.
University of Colorado
Mary Beth Winn, Ph.D.
Yale University

Adjuncts (estimated): 6



French Studies offers a range of courses in language, literature, civilization, mass media, Francophone studies, and French cinema as well as in business French. The program combines innovative and traditional approaches leading to teaching, international trade, graduate work or other career objectives. A minor in French is available; many students also opt to combine advanced coursework in French with work in a related field to create their own interdisciplinary major.

Courses of general interest, given in English and requiring no knowledge of French, are also regularly scheduled.

Careers
Students of French Studies enter careers in teaching, government service, translating, editing, interpreting, library science, international business, Foreign Service, and computer-related technologies. Any field of work that requires a broad liberal education, linguistic skill and knowledge of French-speaking cultures will offer job opportunities. Combinations with particularly strong employment potential are French Studies and economics, political science and business.

Special Programs and Opportunities
The University maintains summer, semester and year-long exchange programs in France with the University of Montpellier, a program which provides students an opportunity to study French language at any level (no language prerequisite), literature and culture as well as business and economics in either French or English. An array of programs are available for study elsewhere in France, Quebec and other French-speaking parts of the world. The Center for International Education and Global Strategy’s Study Abroad Office provides students with guidance in choosing the right program; faculty are also happy to provide informal advisement on study abroad options.

Opportunities to use French and to exchange ideas outside of class are provided through Le Cercle français (the French Club) and La Pause café (an informal conversation group). For contact information and meeting times: http://www.albany.edu/llc/news&events_clubs_tables.shtml. We also offer lecture and film series and other activities.

The Paris Chamber of Commerce Exam: The French Studies Program trains students to take both the written and oral parts of an international exam offered by the Paris Chamber of Commerce and Industry (the Diplôme de français professional-niveau A2). Recipients of the diploma enhance their employment potential in international business and management.

Language Placement: How do I know what level French is for me?
Students wishing to enroll in French for the first time at the University at Albany should enroll in French 101 if they have never studied French before. Students should use the following guidelines in selecting the appropriate course. Please note that students taking a lower level course after having completed a course at a higher level will not receive graduation credit for that course.

Exceptions:

  1. Students may elect to enroll one level higher or lower than the level suggested by the above guidelines. Factors which could be taken into consideration in making this decision are: the length of time which has elapsed since last formal study of French; additional travel or home experience with the language; quality of previous program of study; grades earned (overall performance) in previous study. Note, however, that the Language Placement rules of the Undergraduate Bulletin state that A FRE 101 may not be taken for credit by students who have taken three years of high school French or passed the Regents examination within the last five years.
  2. Students who wish to be placed more than one level higher or lower than the placement suggested by these guidelines must have written permission from the Language Placement Advisor.
  3. Students who have completed A FRE 221 through the University in High School Program should enroll in A FRE 222; students who have completed A FRE 222 should enroll in A FRE 301.
  4. Students who have received Advanced Placement (AP) credit should see the Language Placement Advisor to discuss their program of study.
  5. Students whose experience with French has not been primarily through organized study in an American high school setting should consult with the Language Placement Advisor or the French Undergraduate Advisor for help in selecting an appropriate class.

Students are strongly encouraged to see the Language Placement Advisor if they feel they are in the wrong class or if they have any questions about placement. Decisions to change courses should be made no later than the second week of classes.

The Student-Initiated Interdisciplinary Major in French Studies*

Students wishing to go beyond the undergraduate minor in French Studies may propose their own Interdisciplinary Major by blending courses from the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures and other academic departments on campus. Many departments on campus offer courses relevant to France and the Francophone world, including (but not limited to) Africana Studies, Anthropology, Art, English, History, Latin American, Caribbean & U.S. Latino Studies, Linguistics, Music, Philosophy and Women’s Studies. See the guidelines for the Student-Initiated Interdisciplinary Major: www.albany.edu/undergraduateeducation/files/IDS_Major_App.docx.

The Interdisciplinary Major must consist of at least 36 but not more than 66 credits. If the major includes fewer than 54 credits, the student will need a separate minor to meet graduation requirements. If the major includes 54 or more credits, the student will not need to declare a separate minor.

At least half of the total credits in the Interdisciplinary Major must be at the 300 level or above. Up to 25% of the credits earned toward the Interdisciplinary Major may take the form of independent study courses.

The Interdisciplinary Major must have at least two faculty sponsors, one primary and one secondary, with the primary sponsor serving as the student’s major advisor. The two sponsors must be faculty members of academic rank (i.e. Assistant Professor, Associate Professor or Professor) and must come from two different academic departments offering courses included in the proposed major.

Formal application to initiate an Interdisciplinary Major must be made through the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education located in Lecture Center 30 (518-442-3950). In order to apply, a student must have already completed at least 30 general credits toward graduation. Proposals will be reviewed by the Interdisciplinary Studies Committee of the Undergraduate Academic Council. For further information and advising, please contact the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures (Humanities 235, phone 518-442-4100).

*Students who matriculated prior to Fall 2011 who are declared French majors, French Honors majors, and combined French B.A./M.A. majors should consult the previous Undergraduate Bulletin year appropriate to their date of matriculation as well as their DARS Degree Audits for their own graduation requirements. Previous Undergraduate Bulletins are available online at: www.albany.edu/undergraduate_bulletin/previous_bulletins.html.

Teacher Education Program
To obtain teacher certification students must combine French credits with an M.A. in Education, according to New York State Education Department regulations for teacher certification. Students interested in teaching as a profession should contact the Pathways Into Education (PIE) Center at 518-442-3529.

  

Hispanic and Italian Studies

Faculty

Professor
Lotfi Sayahi, Ph.D.
Universidad Complutense de Madrid

Associate Professors
Ilka Kressner, Ph.D.
University of Virginia
Olimpia Pelosi, Ph.D.
University of North Carolina
Maurice Westmoreland, Ph.D.
University of Illinois

Assistant Professors
Maria Alejandra Aguilar, Ph.D.
Washington University
Carmen Serrano, Ph.D.
University of California, Irvine
Megan Solon, Ph.D.
Indiana University

Lecturers
J. Leonardo Correa, M.A.
Universidad Nacional de Colombia
Luis Cuesta, Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles
Maria Keyes, M.A.
University at Albany
Elizabeth Lansing, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Dora Ramirez, Ph.D.
University at Albany

Adjuncts (estimated): 8
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 8



The Hispanic and Italian Studies program expects its students to become highly proficient in speaking, understanding, reading and writing the foreign language, as well as to develop a thorough knowledge of and an appreciation for literatures and cultures of the Spanish or Italian speaking world. Proficiency in language skills is regarded not only as an end in itself but also as a means of studying a foreign culture. A full program is offered leading to the B.A. in Spanish and there are opportunities for interdisciplinary studies in Italian. Students may also chose to minor in Spanish and/or Italian.

Careers

Spanish majors are employed in a wide variety of occupations, including teaching, state and federal service, law, U.S Foreign Service, media, communications, public relations, human resources, healthcare, airline, travel, hospitality and entertainment industries, finance and banking, in any business or organization working with Spanish-speaking countries or customers. Spanish majors with bilingual skills have an edge over their peers.

Combining knowledge of Italian culture and language with a variety of other majors helps build a stronger employment portfolio. Business corporations have many prospects for bi- or multi-lingual employees with Italian skills, from sales and production to HR, training, accounting, finance, banking, healthcare, science and engineering. Utilizing Italian and other foreign languages strengthens credentials in teaching and academic research. Hospitality, airline, tourism, and entertainment industries seek multilingual staff. Translating and interpreting skills are important to diplomatic service, business, military intelligence, nonprofit/humanitarian organizations and international law.

Special Programs and Opportunities

The Hispanic and Italian Studies program also participates in interdisciplinary studies in conjunction with programs in Latin American Studies, Linguistics, the School of Education, and the Departments of Art, History and Music.

A semester abroad program was initiated at the International Institute in Madrid, Spain in 1970. Study abroad programs also are available in Valencia, Spain; The Dominican Republic; and Costa Rica. For more information, see The Center for International Education and Global Strategy. Use of the foreign language and the exchange of ideas are fostered through language clubs, colloquia, lectures, films and other activities.

The Student-Initiated Interdisciplinary Major in Italian Studies*

Students wishing to go beyond basic language instruction in Italian may propose their own Interdisciplinary Major by blending courses from the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures and other academic departments on campus. Many departments on campus offer courses relevant to Italian Studies, including (but not limited to) Africana Studies, Anthropology, Art, English, History, Linguistics, Music, Philosophy and Women’s Studies. See the guidelines for the Student-Initiated Interdisciplinary Major: http://www.albany.edu/undergraduateeducation/files/IDS_Major_App.docx.

The Interdisciplinary Major must consist of at least 36 but not more than 66 credits. If the major includes fewer than 54 credits, the student will need a separate minor to meet graduation requirements. If the major includes 54 or more credits, the student will not need to declare a separate minor.

At least half of the total credits in the Interdisciplinary Major must be at the 300 level or above. Up to 25% of the credits earned toward the Interdisciplinary Major may take the form of independent study courses.

The Interdisciplinary Major must have at least two faculty sponsors, one primary and one secondary, with the primary sponsor serving as the student’s major advisor. The two sponsors must be faculty members of academic rank (i.e. Assistant Professor, Associate Professor or Professor) and must come from two different academic departments offering courses included in the proposed major.

Formal application to initiate an Interdisciplinary Major must be made through the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education located in Lecture Center 30 (442-3950). In order to apply, a student must have already completed at least 30 general credits toward graduation. Proposals will be reviewed by the Interdisciplinary Studies Committee of the Undergraduate Academic Council.

For further information and advising, please contact the Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures (Humanities 235, phone 442-4100).

*Students who matriculated prior to Fall 2011 who are declared Italian majors or Italian Honors majors, should consult the previous Undergraduate Bulletin year appropriate to their date of matriculation as well as their DARS Degree Audits for their own graduation requirements. Previous Undergraduate Bulletins are available online at: http://www.albany.edu/undergraduate_bulletin/previous_bulletins.html.

Degree Requirements for the Major in Spanish

General Program B.A.: Students majoring in Spanish must complete a minimum of 36 credits in Spanish while fulfilling one of two specializations: (1) Hispanic literatures and cultures, or (2) Spanish language, linguistics, teaching. These credits must be distributed as follows:

Core (15 credits): A SPN 201 (formerly A SPN 104), A SPN 205 or 206, A SPN 208 or 209 (formerly A SPN 301), A SPN 303 (formerly A SPN 496), and A SPN 310 (formerly A SPN 223). Advanced speakers of Spanish may replace 200-level core requirements with more advanced coursework.

Specialization (15 credits):

Hispanic Literatures and Cultures: 6 credits of 400-level Spanish language, linguistics, teaching coursework from A SPN 401-410, 442, 490-496; 6 credits of 400-level Hispanic literatures and cultures coursework from A SPN 414-482 (except 442); and 3 credit capstone A SPN 443.

or

Spanish Language, Linguistics, Teaching: 6 credits of 400-level Hispanic literatures and cultures coursework from A SPN 414-482 (except 442); 6 credits of 400 level Spanish language, linguistics, teaching coursework from A SPN 401-410, 442, 490-496; and a 3 credit capstone from A SPN 401 or 403.

Electives (6 credits): Spanish coursework at the 300 level or above. (A LIN 220 may replace one elective in the Spanish language, linguistics, teaching specialization.)

Honors Program in Spanish

The Honors Program in Spanish is designed to promote opportunities for advanced work to highly motivated, mature undergraduate majors and prepare them to do independent work. Students may apply for admission to the Honors Program no earlier than the beginning of the second semester of their sophomore year. To gain admission to the Program students must have formally declared a major in Spanish and have completed at least 12 credits toward their major. In addition, they must have an overall GPA of at least 3.25, and 3.50 in their major, both of which must be maintained in order to graduate with honors.

Students must complete the 36 credits required for the major as well as a 4 credit Honors Thesis (A SPN 499) to be done the semester in which they graduate. Students are required to take one additional course at the 400-500 level within the area of their specialization. This “additional” 400-500 level course does not increase the number of credits required for the major or for the Honors Program but only mandates that one of the student’s elective courses be at the most advanced level in the area of their specialization. The Honors Thesis should be a 25-40 page research project directed by a faculty member of the Spanish Program. Students interested in doing the Honors Program in Spanish should express that interest to their faculty mentor.

Combined B.A./M.A. Program in Spanish

The combined B.A./M.A. program in Spanish provides an opportunity for students of recognized academic ability and educational maturity to fulfill integrated requirements of undergraduate and master’s degree programs from the beginning of their junior year. A carefully designed program can permit a student to earn the B.A. and M.A. degrees within nine semesters.

The combined program requires a minimum of 138 credits, of which at least 30 must be graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.A., students must meet all University and college requirements, including the requirements of the undergraduate major described previously, the minor requirement, the minimum 90-credit liberal arts and sciences requirement, general education requirements and residency requirements. In qualifying for the M.A., students must meet all University and college requirements, including completion of a minimum of 30 graduate credits and course distribution requirements within their M.A. concentration, and successful completion of the M.A. exams. Up to 12 graduate credits may be applied simultaneously to both the B.A. and M.A. programs.

Students may apply for admission to the combined degree program in Spanish at the beginning of their junior year or after the successful completion of 56 credits. Students entering the University with advanced standing in Spanish may be admitted after satisfying the core requirements: A SPN 205 or 206, 208 or 209 (formerly 301), 310 (formerly 223), 303 (formerly 496), and one additional 300 level course. A cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or higher and three supportive letters of recommendation from faculty are required for consideration.

  

Slavic & Eurasian Studies

Faculty

Associate Professor
Timothy Sergay, Ph.D.
Yale University

Emeriti
Henryk Baran, Ph.D.
Harvard University
Charles P. Rougle, Ph.D.
University of Stockholm

Adjuncts (estimated): 1



Russian and other Slavic languages and literatures are studied both for their intellectual and cultural significance and as a means toward understanding the present and the past of the Russian Federation, the former Soviet Union, and Eastern Europe. A minor in Russian is available. Courses offered through the Slavic and Eurasian Studies program lay a firm foundation for developing advanced communication skills in Russian which will be of benefit in postgraduate study in diverse fields and various occupations.

Careers
The Russian minor is valuable intellectually, academically, culturally, and as an adjunct to various vocational profiles as well. University-level study of Russian will make a resume stand out for transnational businesses, law firms, travel firms, banks, media outlets, healthcare organizations, government agencies, and nongovernmental organizations that interact with large numbers of Russian speakers, or that are looking to make inroads into the Russian and post-Soviet markets. In addition to careers in secondary-school and university teaching, and the language services sector, students may find themselves dealing with commerce, democratization, cultural exchange and the development of civil society in Russia and other post-Soviet states, and in many other fields.

Courses in English Translation
To provide access to the riches of Russian literature and culture to all undergraduates, the Slavic and Eurasian Studies program offers a number of courses in English translation that deal with Russian literature, culture, and film. These courses assume no prior knowledge of the Russian language and are intended both for students studying the language and for students who are not. Students interested in these courses are advised to consult the program for current offerings and course descriptions.

Study in Russia
Opportunities to spend a semester in Russia are made possible through close cooperation between SUNY and Moscow State University (see below Advanced Study in Russia).

Language Placement
Experience indicates that students with one year of high school Russian will usually place in A RUS 101 or 102, with two years in A RUS 102, with three years in A RUS 102 or 201, and with four years in A RUS 201. Placement is contingent upon an active assessment of language skills made by the instructor in the course no later than the second class. Native speakers of Russian may not enroll in LLC's Russian-language courses, which are designed to introduce Russian to foreign speakers. "Heritage" speakers (children or grandchildren of Russian-speaking émigrés with clearly deficient mastery of Russian grammar and vocabulary) may enroll at the instructor's discretion at the appropriate level.

A student may not earn graduation credit for a course in a language sequence if it is a prerequisite to a course for which graduation credit has already been earned.

Students earning advanced placement credits from high school, and those earning credits in the University at Albany’s University in the High School Program, will be expected to register for the next higher course in the language sequence.

Transfer students are expected to register for the next higher course in the language sequence. Placement is contingent upon an active assessment of language skills made by the instructor in the course no later than the second class.

The Student Initiated Interdisciplinary Major in Russian*

Students wishing to go beyond the undergraduate minor in Russian may propose their own Student-Initiated Interdisciplinary Major by blending courses from the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures and other academic departments on campus. Several departments on campus offer courses relevant to Russia and Eastern Europe, including (but not limited to) Anthropology, Art, English, History, Linguistics, Music, Philosophy and Women’s Studies. See the guidelines for the Student-Initiated Interdisciplinary Major: http://www.albany.edu/undergraduateeducation/files/IDS_Major_App.docx.

The Interdisciplinary Major must consist of at least 36 but not more than 66 credits. If the major includes fewer than 54 credits, the student will need a separate minor to meet graduation requirements. If the major includes 54 or more credits, the student will not need to declare a separate minor.

At least half of the total credits in the Interdisciplinary Major must be at the 300 level or above. The most likely route to a successful Russian Student-Initiated Interdisciplinary Major will involve study abroad in Russia (see below). Twenty-five percent of the credits earned toward the Student-Initiated Interdisciplinary Major may take the form of independent study courses, but students should be aware that possibilities for offering such courses in the Russian program are quite limited.

The Interdisciplinary Major must have at least two faculty sponsors, one primary and one secondary, with the primary sponsor serving as the student’s major advisor. The two sponsors must be faculty members of academic rank (i.e., assistant professor, associate professor or professor) and must come from two different academic departments offering courses included in the proposed major.

Formal application to initiate an Interdisciplinary Major must be made through the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education located in Lecture Center 30 (442-3950). In order to apply, a student must have already completed at least 30 general credits toward graduation. Proposals will be reviewed by the Interdisciplinary Studies Committee of the Undergraduate Academic Council.

For further information and advising, please contact the Department of Languages, Literature, and Cultures (Humanities 235, phone 442-4100).

*Students who matriculated prior to Fall 2011 who are declared Russian majors and Russian Honors majors should consult the previous Undergraduate Bulletin year appropriate to their date of matriculation as well as their DARS Degree Audits for their own graduation requirements. Previous Undergraduate Bulletins are available online at: http://www.albany.edu/undergraduate_bulletin/previous_bulletins.html.

Advanced Study in Russia
Through cooperation with the State University of New York Office of International Education, Slavic and Eurasian Studies provides students with various opportunities to spend a semester studying in Russia. Students accepted for a program reside and study at Moscow State University and follow a curriculum comprised of advanced Russian language, Russian and Soviet literature and Russian culture.

Students with advanced language skills are encouraged to participate in the UAlbany exchange program with Moscow State University and enroll in courses in the Russian Area Studies Program at the Faculty of Foreign Languages and Area Studies. Besides instruction in Russian language, available courses taught entirely in Russian include Russian History, Russian Culture, Literature, and Religion, Russian Economics and Russian Economic Geography, Russian Society and Politics, Russian International Relations and Foreign Policy, Ethnology in Russia, and Russian Civilization. Adequate language proficiency is a requirement for this option, and application is subject to approval by the faculty of the Slavic and Eurasian Studies Program.

Students with only elementary Russian language skills are encouraged to consider additional programs offered through UAlbany’s exchange affiliation with Moscow State University in partnership with Knowledge Exchange Institute (KEI). These programs offer both language instruction and up to three Russian studies courses conducted in English. See https://ualbany.studioabroad.com/index.cfm?FuseAction=Programs.ViewProgram&Program_ID=10042.

  

Courses in Ancient Greek

A CLG 101 Elementary Greek I (4)
Introduction to Attic Greek Prose. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A CLG 102 Elementary Greek II (4)
Introduction to Attic Greek Prose. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A CLG 101 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A CLG 497 Independent Study (2–4)
Seniors may offer 2 to 4 credits of independent study in place of regular course work in Greek. Projects must be approved by the department chair. May be repeated once for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

  

Courses in Arabic

A ARA 101 Elementary Arabic I (3)
The objective of this course is the development of initial reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills in Modern Standard Arabic. Attention will be given to the mastering of the Arabic alphabet, pronunciation, basic grammatical structures, and initial vocabulary. Cultural elements from different Arabic speaking areas will also be introduced. Students are expected to attend regularly and participate in all class activities. Classes meet four times per week. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): for beginners, none; for students with some knowledge of Arabic, placement.

A ARA 102 Elementary Arabic II (3)
A continuation of A ARA 101. Additional Arabic grammatical structures and vocabulary items will be introduced to continue the development of the four communicative skills and cultural knowledge. The focus will be on syntax and morphology and the development of the ability to participate in different types of conversations. Modern Standard Arabic will be the language of instruction. Students are expected to attend regularly and participate in all class activities. Classes meet four times per week. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A ARA 101 or placement.

A ARA 201 Intermediate Arabic I (3)
The objective of this course is to continue the development of the communicative skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) in Modern Standard Arabic with strong emphasis on the cultural context. The course will improve the student's ability to process different types of material in Arabic and acquire additional grammatical structures and vocabulary. Modern Standard Arabic is the language of instruction. Students are expected to attend regularly and participate in all class activities. Classes meet four times per week. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A ARA 102 or placement.

A ARA 202 Intermediate Arabic II (3)
A continuation of A ARA 201 which furthers the development of communicative competence in Modern Standard Arabic. Students will continue to acquire skills that allow them to understand a wide range of material in Arabic including written texts and audiovisual material and become more proficient in expressing their opinions accurately in Modern Standard Arabic. At the end of the course, they will be able to understand and distinguish different linguistic patterns and cultural expressions. Modern Standard Arabic will be the language of instruction. Students are expected to attend regularly and participate in all class activities. Classes meet four times per week. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A ARA 201 or placement.

A ARA 301 Advanced Arabic I (3)
This course is a continuation of A ARA 202. Students will continue to develop the communicative skills (speaking, listening, writing and reading) in Modern Standard Arabic. Advanced conversation and composition tasks will be integrated at this level to develop in the students a superior level of proficiency. There is a continued focus on the understanding of authentic materials including literary and audiovisual production. Students will also be introduced to the linguistic diversity in the Arab countries and become familiar with the diglossic situation of Arabic. Modern Standard Arabic is the language of instruction. Prerequisite(s): A ARA 101, 102, 201, and 202 or by permission of instructor on the basis of a language interview or placement test. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ARA 302 Advanced Arabic II (3)
This course is a review of the more advanced elements of the Arabic grammar including complex sentence structure and types of verb patterns. Students will be exposed to a wide range of social, linguistic, and literary topics to widen their cultural background. Additional exposure to colloquial Arabic through DVD and MP3 files will prepare the students for experience with at least one of the dialects. Modern Standard Arabic is the language of instruction. Prerequisite(s): A ARA 101, 102, 201, 202, and 301 or by permission of instructor on the basis of a language interview or placement test. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ARA 397 Independent Study in Arabic (1-3)
Study by a student in Arabic language and linguistics or a related area of special interest. Work performed under direction of a professor chosen by the student on a topic approved by the program. May be repeated for credit with approval of the program. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

 

  

Courses in Dutch

A DCH 101 Elementary Dutch I (3)
Beginner's course with sociocultural approach. Emphasis on fundamental Dutch vocabulary, grammar, pronunciation and oral expression; graded readings; exercises in Dutch-English and English-Dutch translation. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A DCH 102 Elementary Dutch II (3)
Continuation of sociocultural approach of A DCH 101. Reading of selections from contemporary Dutch fiction to further develop the reading skill. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A DCH 101 or placement. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A DCH 201 Intermediate Dutch I (3)
Review of grammar and syntax, followed by literary readings in conjunction with a continuation of the sociocultural method. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A DCH 102 or placement. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A DCH 202 Intermediate Dutch II (3)
Continued literary readings in conjunction with a continued emphasis on the sociocultural method. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A DCH 201 or placement. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A DCH 308 Introduction to the Literature of the Netherlands (3)
The course surveys major movements in the literature of the Netherlands from 1850 to the present. We will read and study highlights of Dutch and Flemish literature and their social/cultural background. The language of instruction is English (as well as Dutch). Emphasis, however, will be on reading fiction and some poetry in Dutch. Though we may use translations (and movie-adaptations in English), reading proficiency in Dutch on an elementary level is necessary. Works may include Multatuli, Bordewijk, Poetry of the “Experimentelen”, Hermans, Reve, Wolkers and Mulisch. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A DCH 397 Independent Study Dutch (1-4)
Study by a student in an area of special interest not treated in courses currently offered. May be repeated once for credit with special departmental approval. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017. 

  

Courses in French

Courses in French Language

A FRE 101 Beginning French I (4)
For students with no previous study of French. This course emphasizes the development of practical communication skills through a variety of lively, interactive activities. By the end of the course, students should be able to talk about themselves, their immediate world, and their interests. The course also provides an introduction to the culture of France and other French speaking countries. According to University regulations, this course may not be taken for credit by students who have taken three years of high school French or passed the Regents examination within the past five years. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence.

A FRE 102 Beginning French II (4)
For students who have completed one semester of college French, such as A FRE 101, or one year of high school French. This course continues to emphasize the development of practical communication skills using a lively and interactive approach. Students expand their proficiency to be able to talk not only about themselves, but about the world. Students also increase their knowledge of French and francophone cultures. By the end of the course, students should have basic survival skills in French. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A FRE 101 or permission of instructor.

A FRE 221Y Intermediate French I (4)
For students who have completed one year of introductory college French (such as A FRE 101, 102) or two to three years of high school French (the complete Regents sequence). This course provides a substantial review of the basics while expanding students’ knowledge of vocabulary and structure, and allows them to express themselves in a more varied and meaningful way, both orally and in writing. As in the previous levels, students have plenty of opportunity for interaction in class. Culture is explored in greater depth than in preceding levels. Students read a variety of short texts during the semester. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A FRE 102 or permission of instructor.

A FRE 222Y Intermediate French II (4)
For students who have completed A FRE 221Y, three semesters of college French, or three to four years of high school French (one year beyond the Regents' sequence). Continuing with a functional and thematic approach to building proficiency and a lively, interactive approach to learning, this course builds on students’ previous knowledge to expand and refine their ability to express themselves, both orally and in writing. Culture continues to play a central role, as does reading. Students read a variety of short texts as well as a work chosen by the instructor. By the end of A FRE 222, students should be able to express themselves and read with reasonable fluency on a variety of topics. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A FRE 221Y or permission of instructor. 

Core Courses

A FRE 301 (formerly A FRE 240) Structural Review of French (3)
Provides a thorough review of French structure for communication with increased accuracy in both speaking and writing. Students will not only improve their control of French grammar, but will also learn how the grammar functions in specific spoken and written contexts. Prerequisite(s): A FRE 222 or equivalent.

A FRE 306 Comprehension & Pronunciation of French (3)
This course is designed to help students hear and understand French with greater ease and to speak French with greater accuracy. It combines an examination of how sounds are produced, how they are organized into a patterned system, and how they are different from English sounds, with practical exercises in sound discrimination, listening comprehension, and oral practice. Students increase their ability to communicate successfully with French speakers throughout the francophone world. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A FRE 340Z Introduction to Writing French (3)
Builds on the skills acquired in A FRE 301, concentrates on improving written expression through expansion of vocabulary and use of more complex and varied sentence structures. A variety of written texts will provide models for different kinds of writing, with an emphasis on description and narration. Intensive writing practice through formal compositions as well as weekly participation in electronic bulletin board discussions on topics of student’s choosing. Fulfills the General Education writing intensive requirement. Prerequisite(s): A FRE 301 or permission of instructor. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A FRE 341/341Z (formerly A FRE 241/241Z) Introduction to Global French Studies (3)
This course introduces students to the fields of linguistics, culture, and literature in France, the Caribbean, Quebec, and/or Africa. Includes units on fiction, film, music, and art. Students are taught research and analysis techniques that are required in all upper-level courses in the French Studies Program. Required for the French minor. Only one version A FRE 341 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A FRE 301 or permission of instructor.

A FRE 355 Contemporary French Society and Culture (3)
A course designed to give students a broad knowledge and understanding of French society today: value orientations, family and education, social and political institutions, leisure and work, and the media. Prerequisite(s): A FRE 341 or permission of instructor. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A FRE 360 Social and Cultural History of France (3)
Provides a broad knowledge and understanding of the political, social, intellectual, literary and artistic history of France from the Middle Ages to the present as well as the historical and conceptual framework required in more advanced courses in French Studies. Prerequisite(s): A FRE 341 or permission of instructor.

A FRE 461/461Z Classics of Literature in French (3)
An in-depth study of major literary works from France and the Francophone world. Interpretive techniques will be illustrated by selected critical essays. Only one version of A FRE 461 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A FRE 341 or permission of instructor. May not be offered 2016-2017.

Electives at the 200 Level

A FRE 270 Beginning French for Business (3)
A conversation course with emphasis on learning how business is conducted in French. Successful students will acquire greater fluency, mastery of business vocabulary, knowledge of fundamental work-related cultural differences, and familiarity with basic practices for doing business in France and other francophone countries. Extensive use of film and television. Meets General Education oral discourse requirements. Prerequisite(s): intermediate standing and permission of instructor.

A FRE 297 Independent Study in French (1-3)
Study in an area of special interest not treated in courses currently offered. Topic must be approved by the undergraduate adviser and directed by a member of the faculty. May be repeated once for credit with approval. May not be offered 2016-2017.

Electives at the 300 Level

A FRE 315 Introduction to French Cinema (3)
An introduction with detailed analyses to a dozen of the most well-known French classic films as contributions to the art of cinema and as reflections of French society at various historical moments. Only one of A FRE 238 and 315 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A FRE 341Z.

A FRE 350Y French Conversation (3)
Students will learn the strategies, vocabulary, and structures that will allow them to participate more fluently and confidently in a variety of spoken contexts, both formal and informal. Some of the conversational functions and strategies covered include reporting, giving advice, conducting interviews, expressing differences of opinion, expressing aesthetic judgments, and reading out loud. Students will have the opportunity to talk about current events, engage in debate, and talk about their personal interests. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A FRE 361/361Z Readings in French Literature (3)
Major works and selections will be studied in the context of the social and cultural structures of a particular period. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s) A FRE 341Z. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A FRE 365 Contemporary French Media (3)
A study of print and online media in French with an emphasis on content analysis and language practice. Prerequisite(s): A FRE 301 or placement. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A FRE 397 Independent Study in French (1–4)
Study in an area of special interest not treated in courses currently offered. Topic must be approved by the undergraduate adviser and directed by a member of the faculty. May be repeated once for credit with approval. Prerequisite(s): A FRE 341Z.

A FRE 399 Special Topics (3)
Intensive study of a topic not treated in regularly offered undergraduate courses. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): A FRE 301 or permission of instructor.

Electives at the 400 Level

A FRE 405 Research in French Society and Culture (3)
Aspects of contemporary French culture, French society, politics, economy, education, religion, mass media, the arts. Prerequisite(s): A FRE 340Z and 341Z. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A FRE 406 French Linguistics: Morphology and Syntax (3)
Survey of the structure of the French language in light of current linguistic theory. Prerequisite(s): A LIN 220 or permission of instructor. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A FRE 415 French Cinema and Society (3)
Analysis of selected commercial feature films by major contemporary French directors. Emphasis will be placed on the consideration of each film as a social and cultural document. Only one of A FRE 338 and 415 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A FRE 430 Translation (3)
This course will deal with both the theoretical and practical aspects of translation, with regular exercises in the translation (from French to English and from English to French) of a wide variety of texts (literary, scientific, journalistic, economic, poetic, etc.). Prerequisite(s): A FRE 340Z and 341Z. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A FRE 440Z Writing French with Style (3)
Intensive practice of written French through close analysis of grammar and stylistic study of selected works. Aims to strengthen and develop competency in different styles of writing: creative, argumentative, and analytical. Prerequisite(s): A FRE 340Z. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A FRE 455 Life and Letters (3)
Exploration of the historical, cultural, and literary aspects of a particular period or movement. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A FRE 470 French For Business (3)
Provides students with the tools needed in a French speaking business environment: specialized vocabulary, correspondence, business operations in France, the economy of France and the European Union. This course provides preparation for the examinations (on campus) leading to certification by the Paris Chamber of Commerce (Diplôme de Français des Affaires I and II). Prerequisite(s): A FRE 340Z or equivalent. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A FRE 481 Francophone Cultures (3)
An examination of non-European cultures in Africa and the Caribbean as well as French based cultures in North America. Gives a broad understanding of the political and social impact of French colonization and examines contemporary francophone life through the study of literary and other texts as well as film. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A FRE 497 Honor Thesis (4)
An independent honors thesis written under the supervision of an appropriate faculty member. Normally taken during final semester of senior year. Prerequisite(s): all other requirements for the Honors Program must be completed or in the course of completion during the semester the thesis is written. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A FRE 498 Face-to-Face (3)
Seminar devoted to the works of a visiting major figure in contemporary French thought, letters, film, or art. Taught by a regular faculty member in cooperation with the visiting author or artist. May be repeated for credit with permission of undergraduate adviser. Prerequisite(s): A FRE 340Z and 341Z or permission of the undergraduate advisor. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A FRE 499 Undergraduate Seminar (3)
Intensive study of an author, topic, or literary theme not treated in regularly offered undergraduate courses. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. May not be offered 2016-2017.

Courses Taught in English

A FRE 201 Perspectives on the French World (1–3)
Intensive study of a particular work or works, limited theme or topic, genre, or contemporary issue. Taught in English. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. May not be used to fulfill the requirements of the major in French.

A FRE 202 French Literature (3)
Reading and discussion of selected works of French literature in translation. Taught in English. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. May not be used to fulfill the requirements of the major in French. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A FRE 208 Haiti through Film and Literature (3)
An introduction to the history and culture of Haiti. Gives broad knowledge and understanding of the political, social, intellectual, literary, and artistic history of Haiti from 1492 to the present, particularly as it relates to the United States. Main tools of investigation: fiction, essays, film (documentary and fiction), and the arts. May be used to complete the French minor. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A FRE 218/218Y Contemporary France (3)
Analysis and comparison of French and American value orientations, family structures, educational, political, economic, and cultural institutions. Taught in English. Only one version of A FRE 218 may be taken for credit. May not be used to fulfill the requirements of the major in French. May not be offered 2016-2017.

T FRE 218 Contemporary France (3) 
T FRE 218 is the Honors College version of A FRE 218; only one version may be taken for credit. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A FRE 238 (= A ARH 238) Great Classics of French Cinema (3)
An introduction with detailed analyses to a dozen of the most well-known French classic films as contributions to the art of cinema and as reflections of French society at various historical moments. Taught in English. May not be used to fulfill the requirements of the major in French. Only one of A ARH/A FRE 238 and A FRE 315 can be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A FRE 281 French Canada Through Film and Literature (3)
Gives broad knowledge of the French speaking areas of Canada (mainly Quebec and Acadia) through an examination of the history of the French in North America as well as contemporary literature and cinema. May be taken to complete the French minor. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A FRE 338 French Cinema and Society (3)
Analysis of selected feature films of major contemporary French directors. Emphasis on each film as a social and cultural document. Taught in English. May not be used to fulfill the requirements of the major in French. Only one of A FRE 338 and 415 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing or permission of instructor. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A FRE 398 Face-to-Face (3)
Seminar devoted to the works of a visiting major figure in contemporary French thought, letters, film, or art. Taught by a regular faculty member in cooperation with the visiting author or artist. Taught in English. May be repeated for credit with permission of the program chair. May not be used to fulfill the requirements of the major in French. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing or permission of instructor. May not be offered 2016-2017.

A FRE 460 (= A ARH 450) Art and Society in Early Modern France (3)
Seminar examining selected topics in art and architecture produced in France from the 16th through 18th centuries. Special emphasis upon the cultural significance of art in an era that saw the rise and fall of monarchical power as well as dramatic changes in understanding of social hierarchy, gender, the natural world and philosophy. Taught in English. French majors will do readings and written work in French when possible. Only one version of A FRE 460 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A FRE 360.

  

Courses in German

A GER 101 Elementary German I (4)
Beginner's course for students with no previous German. Focus on communicative skills, speaking, reading, writing, and listening. Independent work and student participation are stressed. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence.

A GER 102 Elementary German II (4)
Continuation of A GER 101 with emphasis on basic language skills for communication and on cultural aspects. Independent work and student participation are stressed. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A GER 101 or placement.

A GER 201 Intermediate German I (3-4)
Continuation of A GER 102. Fundamentals of German for students with limited experience in German. Provides opportunity for review and expansion of the main features of the German language and German culture. Involves frequent and independent work. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A GER 102 or placement.

A GER 202 Intermediate German II (3-4)
Continuation of A GER 201. Completes the basic sequence of study of the essential features of the German language. Involves frequent and independent work. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A GER 201 or placement.

 

  

Courses in Italian

A ITA 100 Elementary Italian I (4)
Beginner's course. Fundamentals of language structure and sounds; emphasis on correct pronunciation and oral expression, graded readings. May not be taken for credit by students who have taken three years of high school Italian or passed the Regents examination within the past five years. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): for beginners, none; for students with high school Italian, placement.

A ITA 101 Elementary Italian II (4)
Continuation of A ITA 100. Fundamentals of language structure and sounds, emphasis on correct pronunciation and oral expression, and graded readings. . Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A ITA 100 or placement.

A ITA 103 Intermediate Italian I (4)
Modern Italian readings. Review of Italian grammar, composition and conversation. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A ITA 101 or placement.

A ITA 104 Intermediate Italian II (4)
Continuation of modern Italian readings, review of Italian grammar, composition and conversation. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A ITA 103 or placement.

A ITA 206 Intermediate Conversation and Oral Grammar (3)
Primary emphasis on speaking skills. May be taken simultaneously with A ITA 207. Prerequisite(s): A ITA 104.

A ITA 207 Intermediate Composition and Written Grammar (3)
Primary emphasis on writing skills. May be taken simultaneously with A ITA 206. Prerequisite(s): A ITA 104 or placement.

A ITA 213 The Italian-American Experience (3)
This course explores the historical and cultural background of the Italian immigrants in the United States along with the development of major themes in the Italian American life. Conducted in English.

A ITA 223 Introduction to Literary Methods (3)
Textual exposition of readings selected according to genre, with an introduction to literary terminology and writing. Prerequisite(s): A ITA 104. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ITA 301Z Advanced Conversation and Composition (3)
Intensive practice in speaking and writing in Italian. Prerequisite(s): A ITA 207.

A ITA 313 Throughout the Ages: Gender, Ideas, and Writing In Italy from 1100 to 1900 (3)
Selected readings from medieval poetry, including the Scuola Siciliana, the Dolce Stil Novo, Dante’s Divine Comedy, the production of medieval women writers, excerpts from Petrarch’s love and political poetry, and Boccaccio’s Decameron. An overview of the Renaissance, of the Baroque, the Enlightenment, the Romanticism, and the Modern Age literary developments, examined through their most relevant feminine and masculine voices, with particular emphasis on the school of women poets and novelists of the Italian Novecento. Prerequisite(s): A ITA 233 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ITA 315 Italian Civilization: From the Etruscans to Galileo (3)
An introduction to Italian culture from the Etruscans to the Renaissance, with emphasis on the contributions of Dante, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Machiavelli, Galileo, and the struggle between church and state. Offered in English with readings in Italian for majors. Prerequisite(s): for majors, A ITA 104; for nonmajors, none. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ITA 316 Contemporary Italy: From the Unification to the Present (3)
A study of the cultural manifestations of the sociopolitical changes in modern Italy: from the Risorgimento to the formation of one nation; the rise and fall of Fascism; social developments in contemporary Italy—political parties, trade unions, media, religion and education. Offered in English with readings in Italian for majors. Prerequisite(s): for majors, A ITA 104; for nonmajors, none. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ITA 318 Italian Cinema and Literature (3)
This course deals with a study of the work of Rossellini, Visconti, De Sica, Fellini, Antonioni, Benigni and others. It examines the way fiction and themes taken from Italian life have been rendered in cinematic form during the past 40+ years. Offered in English with readings in Italian for majors. Prerequisite(s): for majors, A ITA 104; for nonmajors, none.

A ITA 325 The Italian Short Story (3)
Representative Italian short stories with emphasis on specific characteristics of the genre. Prerequisite(s): A ITA 301. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ITA 350 Contemporary Italian Society (3)
This course will offer an overview of the Italian society of today through an analysis of its major cultural, economic, and socio-political issues. Among the topics examined will be the question of the language, the regional identify, the Italian political system, the economic development, the position of Italy in the European community and the function of the media. Emphasis will be placed on the analysis of the changes that have occurred in Italy during the last four decades. Audio-visual material, articles from newspapers and magazines, and excerpts of contemporary Italian literature will be used as ancillary material and will provide the basis for lectures and class discussions. Class is conducted in Italian. Prerequisite(s): A ITA 301Z or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ITA 397 Independent Study in Italian (2–4)
Study by a student in an area of special interest not treated in currently offered courses. Work performed under direction of a professor chosen by the student on a topic approved by the program. May be repeated once for credit with special departmental approval. Prerequisite(s): A ITA 313.

A ITA 441 Women, Men, Love, and Politics of the Italian Renaissance (3)
The course will focus on the themes of femininity and the ideas of love, politics, and society, filtered through the voices of some of the women writers of the Italian Renaissance, such as: Tullia D’Aragona, Gaspara Stampa, Vittoria Colonna, Chiara Matraini, Veronica Franco, Isabella DiMorra, as well as through the voices of their masculine counterparts (Sannazaro, Ficino, Ariosto, Bembo, Machiavelli, Tasso). Prerequisite(s): A ITA 313 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A ITA 444 Topics in Italian Language and Literature (2–3)
Selected works of Italian language or literature not covered by other undergraduate courses offered by the program. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Consult current schedule of classes for topic and prerequisite. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

  

Courses in Languages, Literatures and Cultures

A LLC 200 Special Topics (3)
Selected topics in literature or culture not covered by other undergraduate courses offered by the program. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Consult current schedule of classes for topic and prerequisite. Taught in English. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A LLC 275 European Cinema and Society (3)
This course, taught entirely in English, explores the symbiotic evolution of European cinema and society from the silent era through the present, focusing on representative films from France, Italy, Germany, Spain, and the Soviet Union/Russia. We will approach film not only as an art form whose stylistic and technological dimensions have shifted over the past century, but also as a collective representation that provides insight into social, political, and cultural issues. We will also investigate how cinema has shaped national identities and promoted both international competition and collaboration. In so doing, our study of film will naturally open onto a variety of other disciplines, such as history, psychology, sociology, political science, and gender studies. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A LLC 400 Special Topics (3)
Selected specialized, advanced topics in linguistics, literature, culture, or theory not covered by other undergraduate courses offered by the program. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Consult current schedule of classes for topic and prerequisite. Taught in English. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A LLC 440 Internship in Translation (3)
Employment in and study of theory and practice of professional translation. Practice and study of professional relationships and technology of translation, with a final report on the experience and a paper based on a list of readings selected in consultation with faculty. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. S/U graded. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

  

Courses in Latin

A CLL 101 Elementary Latin I (4)
Grammar, composition, conversation, and reading of Latin. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence.

A CLL 102 Elementary Latin II (4)
Continuation of A CLL 101; grammar, composition, conversation, and reading of Latin. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A CLL 101 or permission of instructor.

A CLL 201 Introduction to Latin Literature I (3)
Selected readings from prose authors, especially Cicero. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A CLL 102 or permission of instructor for students with two years of high school Latin. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A CLL 202 Introduction to Latin Literature II (3)
Continuation of A CLL 201; selected readings from prose authors, especially Cicero, and from Latin poetry. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A CLL 201 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A CLL 410 Latin Prose Authors (3)
Detailed study and criticism of one Latin prose author (historian, orator, novelist, etc.). May be repeated for credit with change in author. Prerequisite(s): A CLL 202 or equivalent. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A CLL 411 Latin Poetry (3)
Detailed study and criticism of one Latin epic, lyric or dramatic poet. May be repeated for credit with change in author. Prerequisite(s): A CLL 202 or equivalent. May be taken concurrently with A CLL 202 with instructor's permission. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A CLL 497 Independent Study (2–4)
Seniors may offer 2 to 4 credits of independent study in place of regular course work in Latin. Projects must be approved by the department chair. May be repeated once for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

 

  

Courses in Portuguese

A minor in Portuguese is available to students who complete 18 credits of course work with an A POR prefix.

The Portuguese Program offers instruction in the Portuguese language and in Portuguese and Brazilian literature and culture. By extending career opportunities to Brazil, Portugal and African countries where Portuguese is an official language, study in the Portuguese Program can be an important adjunct to academic preparation in Latin American studies, social sciences, natural sciences, business, and other fields.

Courses in Portuguese

A POR 100 Elementary Portuguese I (3)
Beginner's course. Fundamentals of language structure with emphasis on correct pronunciation and oral expression. Portuguese will be the language of instruction. May not be taken for credit by bilinguals or native speakers. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): for beginners, none; for others, placement.

A POR 101 Elementary Portuguese II (3)
Continuation of A POR 100. Fundamentals of language structure with emphasis on correct pronunciation and oral expression. Portuguese will be the language of instruction. May not be taken for credit by bilinguals or native speakers. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A POR 100 or placement. 

A POR 115 (= A LCS 115) Portuguese and Brazilian Culture and Society (3)
Survey of culture and society in the Portuguese-speaking world, including, Brazil, Portugal and Portuguese Africa. The development of typical customs and institutions, with special attention to folklore, music, painting and architecture, with visual and recorded materials. Conducted in English. Only one version of A POR 115 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A POR 150 Portuguese for Speakers of Spanish (3)
This course will introduce the speakers of Spanish to the Lusophone (Portuguese-speaking) world. Emphasis will be given to the development of the four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing), as well as the appreciation and awareness of Portuguese-speaking cultures. Prerequisite(s): coursework at or above A SPN 201 (previously A SPN 104) or equivalent, or Spanish heritage language background, or permission of instructor.

A POR 201 Intermediate Portuguese (3)
Continuation of A POR 101. Development of knowledge of grammar and vocabulary through directed conversation, reading and composition. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A POR 101 or placement. 

A POR 206 Conversation and Spoken Grammar (3)
Primary emphasis on spoken language, with training in comprehension and expression, and systematic practice in oral discourse, including dialogue, narrative and description. Prerequisite(s): A POR 101 or placement.

A POR 207 Composition and Written Grammar (3)
Primary emphasis on writing skills. Formal grammar of written language, with training in various types of composition. Prerequisite(s): A POR 101 or placement. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A POR 215 African-Brazilian Culture (3)
A study of social, political, and symbolic adaptations of people of African origin in Brazil through an examination of social institutions, customs, and other relevant aspects of culture, with special attention given to corresponding aspects of culture in the United States. Prerequisite(s): A POR 115 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A POR 301 Advanced Conversation and Composition (3)
Advanced study of oral and written expression in Portuguese through analysis and exercises in both grammar and style. Prerequisite(s): A POR 206 and 207, or placement. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A POR 311 Introduction to Portuguese Literature (3)
Survey of Portuguese literature from the Middle Ages to the present. Selected readings, lectures, discussions, and reports on collateral study. Prerequisite(s): A POR 207 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A POR 312 (= A LCS 312) Introduction to Brazilian Literature (3)
Survey of Brazilian literature from colonial period to the present. Selected readings, lectures, discussions, and reports on collateral study. Only one version of A POR 312 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A POR 207 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A POR 315 Introduction to Brazilian Popular Culture (3)
This course explores the diversity of Brazilian popular culture, focusing especially on Brazilian music, dance, sports, theater, films, popular literature, religion, visual arts, architecture, and festivities. It reflects on popular culture's social, economic, and political aspects and how they interweave with the various forms of popular culture's manifestations. Prerequisite(s): when taught in Portuguese, three semesters of Portuguese or permission of instructor; no prerequisite when taught in English. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A POR 318 (= A LCS 318) Introduction to Brazilian Cinema (3)
Survey of Brazilian cinema, emphasizing the social and cultural dimensions of selected major films, including some which represent the “new cinema” movement. Course includes viewings, discussions, readings, and written work. Only one version of A POR 318 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A POR 397 Independent Study in Portuguese (2–3)
Study in an area of special interest not treated in courses currently offered. May be repeated once for credit with program approval. Prerequisite(s): permission of department. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A POR 402 Studies in Portuguese Linguistics (3)
Survey of selected area of Portuguese linguistics, such as phonetics and phonology, syntax, dialectology or history of the language. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): A POR 301 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A POR 411 Studies in Literature (3)
Texts from selected genres of literature in Portuguese. Topics may deal with poetry, drama or narrative of Portugal, Brazil, or other Portuguese-speaking countries. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): A POR 311 & A POR 312 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

  

Courses in Russian

Courses in Russian Language

A RUS 101 Elementary Russian I (3)
A communicative introduction to Russian for beginners, designed to develop basic skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing while mastering the grammatical structures and concepts on which those skills depend. Content focuses on practical survival and social functioning in today's Russian-speaking world as well as aspects of Russian culture, society, and history. Native speakers of Russian may not take this course. Students with only limited Russian gained from growing up in families where Russian was spoken may be allowed to enroll in this course with permission of the instructor. Transfer students who have had one year of Russian-language study are advised to enroll in A RUS 201. Students who have been granted University in the High School credit for second-year Russian may not enroll in A RUS 101, 102, 201, or 202 for credit. Students who have had two or more years of college-level Russian-language study are advised to consider SUNY study-abroad options for more advanced Russian study. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence.

A RUS 102 Elementary Russian II (3)
Continuation of A RUS 101. Native speakers of Russian may not take this course. Students with only limited Russian gained from growing up in families where Russian was spoken may be allowed to enroll in this course with permission of the instructor. Transfer students who have had one year of Russian-language study are advised to enroll in A RUS 201. Students who have been granted University in the High School credit for second-year Russian may not enroll in A RUS 101, 102, 201, or 202 for credit. Students who have had two or more years of college-level Russian-language study are advised to consider SUNY study-abroad options for more advanced Russian study. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A RUS 101 or equivalent or permission of the instructor.

A RUS 201 Intermediate Russian I (3-5)
Continuation of A RUS 102. Also offered in the University in High School Program. Students solidify their mastery of the Russian case system and begin mastering verbal aspect. Native speakers of Russian may not take this course. Students with only limited Russian gained from growing up in families where Russian was spoken may be allowed to enroll in this course with permission of the instructor. Transfer students who have had one year of Russian-language study are advised to enroll in A RUS 201. Students who have been granted University in the High School credit for second-year Russian may not enroll in A RUS 101, 102, 201, or 202 for credit. Students who have had two or more years of college-level Russian-language study are advised to consider SUNY study-abroad options for more advanced Russian study. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A RUS 102 or permission of the director of the Russian minor program.

A RUS 202 Intermediate Russian II (3-5)
Continuation of A RUS 201. Also offered in the University in High School Program. Students solidify their mastery of the Russian case system and begin mastering verbal aspect. Native speakers of Russian may not take this course. Students with only limited Russian gained from growing up in families where Russian was spoken may be allowed to enroll in this course with permission of the instructor. Transfer students who have had one year of Russian-language study are advised to enroll in A RUS 201. Students who have been granted University in the High School credit for second-year Russian may not enroll in A RUS 101, 102, 201, or 202 for credit. Students who have had two or more years of college-level Russian-language study are advised to consider SUNY study-abroad options for more advanced Russian study. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A RUS 201 or permission of the director of the Russian minor program.

A RUS 397 Independent Study (1–6)
Directed reading and conferences on selected topics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor and program director.

Literature and Culture Courses in English Translation

A RUS 161/161Z Russian Civilization (3)
The cultural and ideological development of Russia from the inheritance of the Byzantine Empire through the 1917 Russian Revolution. Includes various aspects of history, political systems, economy and culture and the arts. Conducted in English. Only one version of A RUS 161 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A RUS 162/162Z Contemporary Russia (3)
Introduction to the society and culture of contemporary Russia, focusing in part on the continuities and differences between the Soviet and post-Soviet periods. Topics to be studied include: the linguistic and cultural revolution of the 1990s, individual adaptation to a new economic environment, official and unofficial attempts to “construct” a new Russia. Conducted in English. Only one version of A RUS 162 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A RUS 251 Masterpieces of 19th Century Russian Literature (3)
Survey of the development of Russian literature, particularly prose fiction, from the age of Pushkin to about 1900. Readings will be chosen from short stories and novels by the following writers: Pushkin, Gogol, Lermontov, Turgenev, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Chekhov. Conducted in English. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A RUS 252 Masterpieces of 20th Century Russian Literature (3)
Survey of the development of Russian literature, particularly prose fiction, from the turn of the century to the death of Stalin (1953). Readings will be chosen from poems, short stories and novels by the following writers: Chekhov, Gorky, Olesha, Bulgakov, Babel, Pasternak, Zamyatin, Sholokhov, and others. Conducted in English.

A RUS 253 Late Soviet-Period Russian Literature (3)
Survey of Soviet literature from the death of Stalin (1953) to the present. Readings taken primarily from prose fiction by such writers as Solzhenitsyn, Trifonov, Aksyonov, Shukshin, Bitov, and Erofeyev. Discussion of how the changing political situation affected writers and literature. Conducted in English. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A RUS 280 Soviet and Russian Cinema (3)
Main trends in the development of Russian and Soviet cinema, from the silents of the early 20th century to the period of glasnost and the post-Soviet era. Introduction to the theories of Eisenstein, Vertov, Kuleshov, and others. Social and political issues explored through famous classic and contemporary films. Films are subtitled in English. Conducted in English.

  

Courses in Spanish

Courses in Spanish Language

A SPN 100 Elementary Spanish I (4)
This is a beginner’s course using the natural method that will emphasize the acquisition of grammatical structures and vocabulary through an active process of student participation; it will focus on listening comprehension, correct pronunciation, and cultural knowledge. Spanish will be the language of instruction. Students are expected to attend regularly and participate in all class activities. May not be taken for credit by bilinguals or native speakers, or by students who have taken three years of high school Spanish or passed the Regents examination within the past five years. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): for beginners, none; for students with high school Spanish, placement.

A SPN 101 Elementary Spanish II (4)
A continuation of A SPN 100 which focuses on the active development of listening and reading comprehension, cultural knowledge, and speaking and writing skills. Cultural topics include: Types and Stereotypes, the Human Community, and Views on Death. Students are expected to attend regularly and participate in all class activities. Spanish will be the language of instruction. Students will be assigned to view videos outside of class. May not be taken for credit by bilinguals or native speakers. Language courses must be taken in sequence. A student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 100 or placement.

A SPN 105 Spanish for Bilinguals I (3)
Emphasizes the development of all four communicative skills (writing, reading, speaking, and listening), with special attention given to specific areas of language such as vocabulary building, grammar, and orthography. This course is for students who speak Spanish at home, but who have little or no formal training in the language. Prerequisite(s): placement.

A SPN 200 (formerly A SPN 103) Intermediate Spanish I (3-4)
A SPN 200 (formerly A SPN 103) is a continuation of A SPN 101 and the active development of student communication skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and the study of Hispanic culture. Course includes short compositions and students are expected to participate in all class activities. Spanish is the language of instruction. May not be taken for credit by native or heritage speakers of Spanish. Language courses at the 100 and 200-level must be taken in sequence; a student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Only one of A SPN 200 and A SPN 103 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 101 or placement.

A SPN 201 (formerly A SPN 104) Intermediate Spanish II (3-4)
A SPN 201 (formerly A SPN 104) is a continuation of A SPN 200, intermediate-level Spanish, with a special emphasis on student short compositions, student development of reading skills, and active participation in class discussions. Spanish is the language of instruction. May not be taken for credit by native or heritage speakers of Spanish. Language courses at the 100 and 200-level must be taken in sequence; a student may not earn graduation credit for a lower-level course taken concurrently with a higher-level course or after receiving credit for a higher-level course in the sequence. Only one of A SPN 201 and A SPN 104 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 200 (formerly A SPN 103) or placement.

A SPN 205 Spanish for Bilinguals II (3)
Emphasizes the development of skills in writing, reading, and oral communication, including the use of anglicisms and interference of English, code-switching, and reading comprehension. Students will make oral presentations, write short compositions, and practice reading through the study of U.S. Hispanic culture. Prerequisite(s): placement.

A SPN 206 Intermediate Conversation and Oral Grammar (3)
Primary emphasis on the active skill of speaking. Cannot be taken by bilinguals or native speakers. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 104 or A SPN 201, or placement.

A SPN 208 (formerly A SPN 301/301Z) Spanish Composition and Conversation for non-Heritage Speakers of Spanish (3)
Formerly A SPN 301. Intensive study of the Spanish language with frequent short compositions, oral presentations, and video projects. Also includes some short readings and analysis and discussion of literary texts. This course is only for non-heritage speakers of Spanish; students with a heritage speaker background should enroll in A SPN 209. Only one of A SPN 208, A SPN 209, and A SPN 301 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 206 or permission of instructor.

A SPN 209 Spanish Composition and Conversation for Heritage Speakers of Spanish (3)
Intensive study of the Spanish language with frequent short compositions and oral presentations. Also includes some short readings and class discussions of topics of special interest to heritage speakers of Spanish. This course is only for heritage speakers of Spanish, intended to meet their specific language needs; non-heritage speakers should enroll in A SPN 208. Only one of A SPN 208, A SPN 209, and A SPN 301 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 205 or permission of instructor.

A SPN 297 Supplemental Language Study (1)
A course to help students improve their Spanish reading and/or writing ability, taken in conjunction with a course of Hispanic literature in translation, or a course in another discipline which has a relation to Hispanic literature or culture. Course work may include readings and short compositions in Spanish. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 302 Advanced Spanish Grammar (3)
This course will offer an advanced grammar review of Spanish, contrasting its structures with those of English. Attention will be given to both morphological paradigms and syntactic patterns. Reviewing and discussing exercises and compositions will comprise a significant portion of the course work. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 205 or 206, or placement.

A SPN 303 (formerly A SPN 496) Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3)
A SPN 303 (formerly A SPN 496) is a general introduction to Spanish linguistics. Students will be introduced to the different areas of linguistic specialization (general linguistics, phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax, language change, and language variation) in order to prepare them for a more specialized study of these areas. Only one of A SPN 303 and A SPN 496 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 208 or A SPN 209 or A SPN 301 or permission of instructor.

A SPN 310 (formerly A SPN 223) Introduction to Literary Methods (3)
Formerly A SPN 223, this is a beginning literature course where students are introduced to the study of literature in a foreign language. Works will be chosen by genre, with emphasis placed on the issues and assumptions underlying literary study, as well as the practical aspects of literary analysis. Only one of A SPN 310 and A SPN 223 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 208 or A SPN 209 or A SPN 301 or permission of instructor.

A SPN 311 Hispanic Literature through the Golden Age (3)
An introduction to the literature of Spain and Latin America: the Medieval tradition, from the epic to the Celestina; the innovations of the Renaissance and Baroque poetry (Garcilaso, San Juan, Terrazas, Balbuena, Góngora, Quevedo, Sor Juana); the birth of the modern novel (the Lazarillo, Cervantes), the Comedia (Lope, Alarcón, Calderón). Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 310 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 312 Representative Spanish Authors (3)
Survey of Spanish literature from the beginning of the 18th century to the Generation of ‘98. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 310 or permission of instructor.

A SPN 314 The Rise and Fall of the Spanish Empire (3)
From the encounter of cultures during the expansion of Fernando and Isabel to the intolerance of Philip II and his successors: saints and sinners (mysticism and the picaresque); noble peasants and ignoble aristocrats (Spanish drama); El Greco and Velázquez; and apocalyptic visions (Quevedo’s Dreams). Prerequisite(s): for majors, A SPN 223 or A SPN 310 or permission of instructor; for nonmajors, none. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 315 Conflict and Progress in Modern Spain (3)
A study of the social and political struggles of the Spanish people through their literary and artistic manifestations, from the beginnings of the 18th century to the present. Prerequisite(s): for majors, A SPN 223 or A SPN 310 or permission of instructor; for nonmajors, none. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 316 (= A LCS 316) Representative Spanish-American Authors (3)
A survey of literary movements in Spanish America from independence to World War II. Only one version of A SPN 316 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 310 or permission of instructor.

A SPN 317 (= A LCS 317) Latin-American Civilization (3)
Study of Spanish-American cultures and institutions from the beginnings of the 20th century. Only one version of A SPN 317 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 310 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 318 (= A LCS 314) Topics in Hispanic Film (3)
A study of Hispanic film as a medium that offers a unique amalgam of diverse musical, pictorial, and literary art forms within a sociopolitical context. The course will focus on such specific topics as peasant movements, human rights, images of women, race, and ethnicity. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Consult current schedule of classes for topic. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 310 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 319 20th Century Spanish Literature (3)
A study of selected works of Spanish literature from the Generation of ‘98 to the present. Works studied will deal with philosophical and social movements such as Existentialism, Tremendismo, the Spanish Civil War, the struggle between the individual and society. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 310 or permission of instructor.

A SPN 320 (= A LCS 319) 20th Century Spanish American Literature (3)
A study of selected works of Spanish American literature from World War II to the present. Works studied will deal with topics of special interest such as the continuing debate with regard to civilization and barbarism, dictatorship and revolution, social justice, and the search for identity. Only one version of A SPN 320 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 310 permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 322 (= A LCS 302) Los Latinos en Estados Unidos (3)
Examination of major U.S. Latino groups (Mexican-American, Cuban, Puerto Rican, Dominican) with special emphasis on 20th century literary works. Students will study demographic, socio-economic, historical, and cultural aspects of these groups in the context of their interaction with mainstream society. Course will be given in Spanish. Only one version of A SPN 322 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 310 or permission of instructor.

A SPN 323 Textual Analysis (3)
Students will continue the study of literature in a foreign language through an advanced, in-depth analysis of selected works of Hispanic literature. They will further develop practical skills of literary criticism to be applied to different types of literature. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 310 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 325 The Hispanic Short Story (3)
Representative Spanish and Spanish-American short stories with emphasis on specific characteristics of the genre. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 310 or permission of instructor.

A SPN 326 (= A LCS 326) Spanish-American Poetry and Theatre (3)
Representative Spanish-American plays and selected works in Spanish-American poetry, with emphasis on specific characteristics of the genres. Only one version of A SPN 326 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 310 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 333 Hispanic Literature in Translation (3)
Hispanic literature in translation studied with a view to understanding its contributions to world literatures. Sample topics: Don Quijote, medieval masterpieces, images of women, Unamuno, Machado, Borges. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Consult schedule for topic. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing.

A SPN 344 Women in Hispanic Literature (3)
Images of women in diverse works in Hispanic literature. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 310 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 347 Resistance and Revolution in Latin American Literature and Art (3)
This course will examine the various literary and artistic works (fiction, photography, film/media) that have focused on promoting and representing resistance and revolution in Latin America. In addition to analyzing specific literary and artistic works in relation to the topic, the course will contextualize the works in the socioeconomic, political, and cultural currents that produced them. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 310 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 397 Independent Study in Spanish (1–4)
Study by a student in an area of special interest not treated in courses currently offered. Work performed under direction of a professor chosen by the student on a topic approved by the program. May be repeated once for credit with special approval of the program. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 311 and A SPN 312.

A SPN 401 Spanish Phonetics and Phonology (3)
This is an advanced course in Spanish phonology. Course topics include: articulatory phonetics, phonetic transcription, allophonic distribution, dialect variation, and differences between English and Spanish sound systems. Some lab work is required. Prerequisite(s): this is a capstone course and requires senior Spanish major with Spanish Language, Linguistics, Teaching concentration and one 400 level Spanish linguistics course.

A SPN 402 Spanish Linguistics: Morphology and Syntax (3)
Survey of the structure of the Spanish language in the light of current linguistic theory. Emphasizes morphology and syntax. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 303 or A SPN 496 or permission of instructor.

A SPN 403 Spanish for Teachers (3)
Study of Spanish grammar with the needs of the beginning teacher in mind. Emphasizes those aspects of grammar that cause most difficulty to English speaking students. May be offered as a quarter course. Prerequisite(s): this is a capstone course and requires senior Spanish major with Spanish Language, Linguistics, Teaching concentration and one 400 level Spanish linguistics course.

A SPN 404 Advanced Oral Communication (3)
Training in public speaking through participation in talks for special occasions, debates, panel discussions, extemporaneous speaking, and other forms of public address. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 303 or A SPN 496 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 405 Evolution of the Spanish Language (3)
Historical phonology and morphology: from Vulgar Latin to medieval and modern Spanish. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 303 or A SPN 496 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 406 Applied Translation (3)
Written translation from and into Spanish. Text selections from professional journals and government publications. Use of radio broadcasts and taped speeches. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 303 or A SPN 496 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 407 Business and Legal Spanish (3)
The application of language skills to meet professional career requirements through the development of a specialized vocabulary and written exercises. Reading and analysis of contemporary texts from business journals and reports in the fields of business, law and economics. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 303 or A SPN 496 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 408 Spanish Second Language Acquisition (3)
This course presents a panoramic view of the major questions, research methods, and findings in the study of the acquisition of Spanish as a second, additional, or foreign language. The first part of the course explores fundamental concepts in the field of second language acquisition -- such as interlanguage, language transfer, language universals, error analysis, and stages of development -- and traces the development of the field from early behaviorist theories to contemporary approaches to learner language. The second part of the course delves into contemporary research on the acquisition of Spanish. Students will examine and analyze samples of learner language using tools typically employed in the field and will explore structures from all levels of grammar that present challenges to Spanish language learners. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 303 (formerly A SPN 496) or permission of instructor.

A SPN 409 Spanish for Community Engagement (3)
This course examines Spanish with a focus on its presence, use, and application within the community. Course topics will include language attitudes, bilingualism, dialect variation, Spanish in the US, and Spanish for specific purposes. Additionally, the course will explore the availability of resources in Spanish in communities. Coursework will be coupled with a significant service component that will provide students the opportunity to apply what they are learning to language use in the community. Service projects and sites will be determined on the basis of students' interest, scheduling considerations, and the needs of the community. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 208, A SPN 209, or A SPN 301 or permission of instructor.

A SPN 410Z Creative Writing (3)
Creative writing in Spanish. Students may choose to write in one or several genres. Prerequisite(s): two courses between A SPN 310-350 (excluding A SPN 333) or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 414 (= A LCS 414) Literature of the Hispanic Caribbean (3)
Study of selected major writers of Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico of the 19th and 20th centuries. Special consideration of literature as a reflection of situations and problems peculiar to the Hispanic Caribbean. Conducted in Spanish. Only one version of A SPN 414 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): two courses between A SPN 310-350 (excluding A SPN 333) or permission of instructor.

A SPN 417 Youth Cultures in Latin America (3)
This course will examine contemporary youth cultures in Latin America as reflected in diverse forms of art analyzed and discussed using of a variety of critical approaches. Examples taken from film, literature, music, and electronic media. Prerequisite(s): two courses between A SPN 310-350 (excluding A SPN 333) or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 418 Hispanic Cinema and Literature (3)
A study of literary techniques in cinema and cinematic techniques in literature as a way of exploring narrative structure in representative Hispanic works. Prerequisite(s): two courses between A SPN 310-350 (excluding A SPN 333) or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 442 Topics in the Spanish Language (3)
Selected topics in Spanish language not covered by other undergraduate courses offered by the program. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Consult current schedule of classes for topic. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 303 or A SPN 496 or permission of instructor.

A SPN 443 Topics in Hispanic Literature (3)
Selected topics in Hispanic literature not covered by other undergraduate courses offered by the program. May be repeated for credit when content varies. Consult current schedule of classes for topic. Prerequisite(s): this is a capstone course and requires senior Spanish major with Hispanic Literatures and Cultures concentration and one 400 level Spanish literature course.

A SPN 445 Satire in Hispanic Literature (3)
Representative satirical writers in Spanish and Spanish-American literature from Quevedo to the present, including such writers as Fernandez de Lizardi, Larra, Mesonero Romanos, Valle-Inclan, Francisco Umbral, or other appropriate authors selected by the instructor. Prerequisite(s): two courses between A SPN 310-350 (excluding A SPN 333) or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 446 (= A AFS 446) Literature and Human Rights (3)
A study of selected works of Spanish and Spanish-American literature that deal with the subject of human rights throughout history. Topics to be studies may include such things as social protest, censored texts, women’s writing, the literature of exile, minority portrayals, and slavery. Only one version of A SPN 446 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): two courses between A SPN 310-350 (excluding A SPN 333) or permission of instructor.

A SPN 449 Myths and Archetypes (3)
A study of mythical and/or archetypal themes in selected works of Spanish or Spanish-American literature. Typical themes may include the hero or the anti-hero, Don Juan, the Christ figure, the epic journey, the lost paradise, and the eternal return. Prerequisite(s): two courses between A SPN 310-350 (excluding A SPN 333) or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 453 Cultural Foundations of Spanish Literature: Golden Age (3)
Civilization of Spain during the 16th and 17th centuries. Its institutions and ideologies will be considered with emphasis on their relationship to literature. Prerequisite(s): two courses between A SPN 310-350 (excluding A SPN 333) or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 454 Cultural Foundations of Spanish Literature (3)
Civilization of Spain in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. Social, economic, religious, and political institutions will be considered through literature. Prerequisite(s): two courses between A SPN 310-350 (excluding A SPN 333) or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 462 The Fantastic and Otherworldly in Latin American Literature (3)
This course will examine the literary supernatural in twentieth-century Latin American narratives: the Fantastic, Magical Realism, the Gothic, and lo real maravilloso. Prerequisite(s): two courses between A SPN 310-350 (excluding A SPN 333) or permission of instructor.

A SPN 481 The Generation of ’98 (3)
The important writers of the Generation of ’98 will be studied, with emphasis on the way they express their ideas in essays, novels and poetry. Those writers will include Unamuno, Machado, Baroja, Valle-Inclan, Azorín, Ortega y Gasset. Prerequisite(s): two courses between A SPN 310-350 (excluding A SPN 333) or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 482 Cervantes (3)
The life and major works of Miguel de Cervantes de Saavedra. Prerequisite(s): two courses between A SPN 310-350 (excluding A SPN 333) or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 490 Romance Linguistics (3)
A study of the general linguistic traits and differences between the major romance languages, with particular attention given to both the historical factors and different linguistic processes which produced current language divisions. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 303 or A SPN 496 or permission of instructor.

A SPN 492 Introduction to Spanish Dialectology (3)
This course will describe the linguistic traits of European Spanish and the division of Spain into different dialects. It will study linguistic concepts and the methodologies associated with spatial dialect studies, and consider competing factors which explain Spain’s current dialect configurations. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 303 or A SPN 496 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 493 Introduction to Latin American Dialectology (3)
The principal linguistic traits of Spanish in the Americas, and the classification of American Spanish into individual dialects. The influence of African and indigenous peoples on American Spanish, standard and non-standard varieties, and historical and geographical factors which contribute to the dialect differences. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 303 or A SPN 496 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 494 Spanish Sociolinguistics (3)
The purpose of this course is to introduce the students to the scientific study of the complex relationship between language and society in the different parts of the Spanish Speaking World. It examines the wide range of linguistic variations and the corresponding methods of their study both in monolingual and bilingual speech communities. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 303 or A SPN 496 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 495 Bilingualism and U.S. Spanish (3)
This course offers a deep study of bilingualism and its implications for the individual and the society (identity, family, minorities, and education). The focus will be on the acquisition and development of communicative skills by bilingual speakers in the United States. Special attention will be paid to the intersection of bilingualism with other linguistic phenomena including borrowing, code-switching, diglossia, multilingualism, language shift, and language maintenance. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 303 or A SPN 496 or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A SPN 499 Honors Thesis (4)
An independent honors thesis written under the supervision of an appropriate faculty member and evaluated by the Honors Committee. Prerequisite(s): completion of all other requirements for the Honors Program.

  

Department of Latin American, Caribbean & U.S. Latino Studies

Faculty        

Distinguished Professor Emerita
Edna Acosta-Belén, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow and O'Leary Professor)
Columbia University

Professors Emeriti
Christine Bose, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
Johns Hopkins University
Colbert I. Nepaulsingh, Ph.D.
University of Toronto

Distinguished Professor
Daniel C. Levy, Ph.D.
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Professors
Jeanette Altarriba, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University
Ray Bromley, Ph.D.
Cambridge University
Pedro Cabán, Ph.D. (Department Chair)
Columbia University       

Associate Professors
José Cruz, Ph.D.
City University of New York      
Walter Little, Ph.D.
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign      
Blanca Ramos, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Barbara Sutton, Ph.D.
University of Oregon
Gilbert Valverde, Ph.D.
University of Chicago

Assistant Professors
Ruth Felder, Ph.D.
York University
Gabriel Hetland, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley
Johana Londoño, Ph.D.
New York University

Visiting Assistant Professor
Harry Franqui-Rivera, Ph.D.
University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Full-Time Lecturer
Christine Preble, Ph.D. (Undergraduate Program Director)
University at Albany

Library Bibliographer for LACS
Jesús Alonso Regalado, MA.
University of Pittsburgh

Adjuncts (estimated): 1
Teaching Assistants (estimated): 5



The Department of Latin American, Caribbean, & U.S. Latino Studies has a cross-disciplinary faculty prepared to train undergraduates for research, service, and applied careers dealing with the U.S. Latino communities and with the Caribbean and Latin American regions.

The interdisciplinary major in Latin American, Caribbean, & U.S. Latino Studies is designed to prepare students for professional and research careers; domestic service with federal and state governmental agencies; careers in the United States foreign service; careers with business and educational organizations, public and private foundations, and other private or public agencies engaged in developing, improving, and promoting trade and the social, political, and economic life of the peoples of Latin America; editing and journalism; and paramedical and paralegal careers.

This major requires interdisciplinary course work with Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Latino content. Undergraduate students in the department are also provided with opportunities for community-oriented research, community service, and study abroad. LACS majors who study abroad to any country in Latin America or the Caribbean have the opportunity for their overseas credits to count toward graduation requirements in LACS.

The department also offers two minor sequences in either Latin American and Caribbean Studies or U.S. Latino Studies.

Courses focusing on cultures, peoples, and history of Latin America, the Caribbean, and U.S. Latina/os are also offered in the Departments of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, History, Geography and Planning, Anthropology, Sociology, Africana Studies, Education, Economics, Political Science, and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies.

Careers
An undergraduate degree in LACS provides students with the flexibility to pursue a wide variety of business, education, and government occupations, as well as for graduate or professional study in specific disciplinary interests in the social sciences, the humanities, or professional areas. Moreover, LACS majors can easily combine their culture and language interests and skills with a commitment to issues of diversity, civil and human rights, and social justice. Many students with a LACS degree pursue careers in law, journalism, marketing, business, social welfare, higher education administration, government, or education. LACS students have also have pursued the Fulbright English Teaching Assistant program, Peace Corps, and AmeriCorps. Faculty are available to consult with students about their career interests throughout their time in the department.

Degree Requirements for the Major in Latin American, Caribbean, & U.S. Latino Studies

General Program B.A.: A minimum of 36 credits, 18 of which must be at or above the 300 level, as follows:
Required core courses (9 credits): A LCS 100, A LCS 300, and one of the following capstone seminars: A LCS 411, A LCS 412, or A LCS 413.
Electives (27 credits): A total of 27 additional credits in Latin American, Caribbean & U.S. Latino Studies with A LCS prefix courses or any courses cross-listed with A LCS from other departments. The Undergraduate Director will assist students with an individually designed and cohesive curriculum comprised of these electives.       

Honors Program

The Department of Latin American, Caribbean, & U.S. Latino Studies Honors Program is a 36-credit undergraduate career distinction that consists of at least 12 credits of coursework designed to enhance and intensify the undergraduate experience.

To be admitted into the LACS Honors Program, each student must meet the following requirements: the student must be a LACS major who has already completed at least 12 credits of coursework; the student must have an overall GPA of at least 3.25; the student must have a GPA of 3.50 in the major; both the overall and major GPAs must be maintained until graduation in order to graduate with honors.

Students admitted to the Honors Program are required to complete a minimum of 36 credits in LACS courses, fulfilling all the “Requirements for the Major” listed above. Within the 36 credits, the student in the LACS Honors Program completes a junior or senior level independent honors project (ALCS 497, “Independent Study”) under the direction of the LACS Honors Committee, which is selected by the Chair, in consultation with a Faculty Director, chosen by the student.

In addition to maintaining an overall GPA of at least 3.25 and a 3.50 in the major each student enrolled in the LACS Honors Program will need the following 12-credits that are designed to enhance and intensify the undergraduate experience: A LCS 300 (3 credits) that includes an extra assignment linked to the project the student is completing for A LCS 497; A LCS 411, 412, or 413 (3 credits) that includes an extra assignment linked to the project the student is completing for A LCS 497; A LCS 497 (6 credits) which is the LACS Honors Project (e.g. research paper, etc.) that is designed in consultation with the LACS Honors Committee and Faculty Director.

  

Courses in Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Latino Studies

A LCS 100/100Z Culture and Power in the Americas (3)
Survey of the diverse pre-Columbian and New World societies and cultures of Spanish and Portuguese America from the pre-conquest period to the present. Broadly interdisciplinary introduction to the historical development of Latin American society, culture, politics, and economics with a special emphasis on elements such as race, gender, and class. Only one version of A LCS 100 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): any course in Latin American Studies and/or Women's Studies and/or History.

A LCS 102 (= A HIS 170) Introduction to Caribbean History (3)
An introduction to the history of culture contact in the Caribbean from the pre-Columbian Arawaks and Caribs, through the infusion of European and African cultures, to the emergence of the leadership of the United States in 1898. Special emphasis on the social and economic development of the plantation system, the intercontinental trade system, slavery, and the struggle for abolition and self-determination. Only one version of A LCS 102 may be taken for credit.

A LCS 103/103W/103Y/103Z Introduction to Afro-Brazilian Culture (3)
An introduction to the processes of formation and transformation of Afro-Brazilian culture and its connections to racial identities, Brazilian national identity, and the black Atlantic world. Only one version of A LCS 103 may be taken for credit.

A LCS 115 (= A POR 115) Portuguese and Brazilian Culture and Society (3)
Survey of culture and society in the Portuguese-speaking world, including Brazil, Portugal, and Portuguese Africa. Includes the development of typical customs and institutions with special attention to folklore, music, painting, and architecture. Utilizes visual and recorded materials. Conducted in English. Only one version of A LCS 115 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A LCS 150/150Z (= A ANT 146/146Z) Puerto Rico: People, History, and Culture (3)
Survey of the Puerto Rican people, history, and culture on the island from the pre-Hispanic era to the present. Special emphasis on the change of sovereignty in 1898, the national question, migration, race, class, and culture. Only one version of A LCS 150 may be taken for credit.

A LCS 201/201Z Latino USA (3)
This course is an intensive examination of Latino American society. Major Latino groups (e.g., Puerto Ricans, Mexican-Americans, Cubans, Dominicans, Central Americans, and Colombians) will be studied with emphasis on interaction between these groups and mainstream society, culture and value change in contact situations, and efforts to deal with prejudice and discrimination. The course draws from texts in anthropology, sociology, history, and cultural studies, all of which are augmented with various films.

A LCS 203/203W/203Y/203Z Afro-Latin America (3)
Analysis of blackness in Latin America with a focus on the representations of peoples of African descent in national identities and discourses. The course examines some of the "myths of foundation" of Latin American nations (e.g. The "cosmic race" in Mexico, "racial democracy" in Brazil, etc.), and how these myths bring together ideas of nation, gender, race, blackness, whiteness, and mestizaje (racial and cultural mixture).

A LCS 216/216Z (= A MUS 216/216Z) Music and Society in Latin America: Past and Present (3)
This course will deal with two basic issues: the evolution of musical thought throughout Latin America from pre-Hispanic times to the present, and the relationship between musical manifestations and the prevailing social order in which those activities took place. Only one version of A LCS 216 may be taken for credit.

T LCS 216 (= T MUS 216) Music and Society in Latin America: Past and Present (3)
T LCS 216 is the Honors College version of A LCS 216; only one may be taken for credit.

A LCS 225/225W/225Y/225Z (= A SOC 225/225W/225Y/225Z) Global Migration and Transnationalism (3)
The course is an introduction to global migratory patterns in the contemporary period. The course covers: basic concepts and approaches to migration studies; global and regional migratory patterns and major forces shaping them with a specific focus on the twentieth century; and how individuals and families mobilize during the processes of international migration. Geographically, the course covers several areas of the world. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.    

A LCS 229 Special Topics in Latin American and Caribbean Studies (3)
The specific topic will be selected by the instructor and will vary from semester to semester as indicated by course subtitle. May be repeated for up to six credits when content varies.

A LCS 231 Special Topics in Latino Studies (3)
The specific topic will be selected by the instructor and will vary from semester to semester as indicated by course subtitle. May be repeated for up to six credits when content varies.

A LCS 233 (= A ANT 233) Aztecs, Incas, and Mayas (3)
Introductory survey of the archaeology and ethnohistory of the three best-known indigenous civilizations of the New World. Each is presented in terms of pre-historic background and evolution, social organization, politics and economics, religion and art. Consideration is given to the Spanish conquest of these groups and to their modern legacies. Only one version of A LCS 233 may be taken for credit.

T LCS 233 (= T ANT 233) Aztecs, Incas, and Mayas (3)
T LCS 233 is the Honors College version of A LCS 233; only one may be taken for credit.

A LCS 240/240V/240X/240Z (= A AFS 240/240V/240X/240Z & A WSS 240/240V/240X/240Z) Classism, Racism, and Sexism: Issues (3)
Analyzes the connections between and among classism, racism and sexism, their mutually reinforcing nature, and the tensions arising from their interrelations. Particular attention will be given to the ideological and personal aspects of these phenomena, as well as to their institutional guises in American society. Only one version of A LCS 240 may be taken for credit.

A LCS 250/250Z (= A GOG 250/250Z) Geography of Latin America (3)
An introduction to the geographical diversity of Latin America, reviewing the Continent’s physical features, natural resources, societies, economies, and politics, and relating them to its history and cultural traditions. Particular attention will be given to rural and urban living conditions, social and regional inequalities, population distribution, internal and international migration, and socioeconomic development issues. Only one version of A LCS 250 may be taken for credit.

A LCS 255 Race and the American Empire (3)

This course will explore the relationship between racism and the formation of the American empire from approximately 1776 through the end of the Progressive Era. By the early 20th century the United States emerged as a world power after a relentless process of continental and overseas territorial expansion. The young nation employed an ideology of racial superiority and predestination to justify its expropriation of the land and natural resources of other peoples and nations, to capture a continuous supply of labor, and to acquire new export. Theories of Manifest Destiny, white man's burden, social Darwinism, and religious doctrines were some of the narratives central to an ideology of racial supremacy in service of empire. Only one version of A LCS 255 may be taken for credit.

T LCS 255 (= T POS 255) Race and the American Empire (3)
T LCS 255 is the Honors College version of A LCS 255; only one may be taken for credit.

A LCS 268 (= A ANT 268) Ethnology of Pre-Columbian Art (3)
Survey of pre-Hispanic Mesoamerican arts and architecture for the reconstruction of pre-Columbian culture, history, religion, symbolism, and ritual. Stresses interrelationships of New World cultures, art styles, and worldview, and on ethnological techniques for iconographic interpretations. Only one version of A LCS 268 may be taken for credit.

A LCS 269 (= A AFS 269 & A ANT 269) The Caribbean: Peoples, History, and Culture (3)
This course introduces students to significant aspects of Anglophone Caribbean culture and history in the context of this region of the globe, the wider Caribbean, functioning as the crossroads of the world. Colonial conquest forced and forged the intersection of Europe, Asia, and Africa in the Caribbean so that while it is not large in terms of geographical area or total population, it resonates with global significance as a crucible of cultural hybridity and as a nurturing space of modernity. Only one version may be taken for credit.

A LCS 282 (= A SOC 282) Race and Ethnicity (3)
Study of religion, race, and nationality conflicts in American society. Reactions of minority to majority; changing patterns of minority relationships; efforts to deal with prejudice and discrimination. Only one version of A LCS 282 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.

A LCS 283 Latinization of U.S. Cities (3)
This course examines the historical and contemporary Latino transformation of American cities. We begin with early 20th century Latino migrations to N.Y.C. and L.A., move onto the rise of barrio politics in the 1960s and 70s, recent urban transnational ties in a late 20th century global era, and end with the exponential rise and geographic expansion of Latino populations in various urban and suburban cities across the U.S. A study of these shifts in the Latinization of cities is of particular relevance today as professionals in creative, policy, and academic fields grapple with the fast-growing U.S. Latina/o population. Because of the multi-faceted and urgent nature of this ethnic specific urban process, this course understands that the verb "Latinizing" is enacted by multiple actors with various political and economic interests, and considers the resulting Latinized urban process to be an always contested and evolving intersection of culture, class, gender, sexuality, and race. The course draws from texts in anthropology, sociology, history, cultural studies, and geography, all of which are augmented with various films. By reading multi-disciplinary texts that cover various cities and Latino national groups across the United States, students in this course will gain a rich theoretical and analytical background on the pressing issues and main individuals and communities that have shaped and continue to shape Latina/o urban America.

T LCS 288 Race, Ethnicity, and the Contemporary U.S. City (3)
This course examines the historical and contemporary ethnic and racial transformation of American cities. We begin with early 20th century Latino, Asian, and Black migrations to inner cities, move onto the rise of ethnic urban politics in the 1960s and 70s, new urban transnational ties in a late 20th century global era, and end with the exponential rise and geographic expansion of ethnic and racial minority populations in various urban and suburban cities across the US. A study of the shifts in cities is of particular relevance today as professionals in creative, policy, and academic fields grapple with an increasingly multicultural US city. The course draws from texts in anthropology, sociology, history, cultural studies, and geography, all of which are augmented with various films. By reading multi-disciplinary texts that cover various cities and ethnic and racial groups across the United States, students in this course will gain a rich theoretical and analytical background on the pressing issues and main individuals and communities that have shaped and continue to shape multicultural urban America. Open to Honors College students only.

A LCS 289 (= A SOC 289) Special Topics in Ethnicity (1–3)
This course is an intensive examination of the culture and lifestyle of a single ethnic group within American society. The specific ethnic group varies from term to term and is indicated by the course subtitle; e.g., Asian American Communities. A SOC 289 can be repeated, but the total credits earned may not exceed 6 credits under different subtitles. Departmental permission required for more than 6 credits. Prerequisite(s): A SOC 115.       

A LCS 290 Special Topics: Perspectives in Latin America and the Caribbean (1-3)
This course will broadly examine under various topics, the social, economic, political, and cultural issues that affect contemporary life Latin American and Caribbean. Maybe repeated for a total of six credits. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor.

A LCS 300 Introduction to Theories and Research Methods in Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Latino Studies (3)
This is a team-taught course designed to introduce students to some of the disciplines within, as well as fields of study that bridge the Social Sciences and Humanities. Guest lecturers with different disciplinary and interdisciplinary trainings will explain the origin, development, and some of the major theories and methods of their respective discipline or field of study. The experts will also discuss the processes of institutionalization of these disciplines and transdisciplines as academic programs in U.S., Latin American, and Caribbean universities, and how they claim to add new knowledge to university curricula. Students will be exposed to the different theories, methods, and epistemologies of both traditional disciplines (e.g. Sociology, Anthropology, Geography, etc.) as well as inter or transdisciplinary fields of study (e.g. Latin America Studies, Latino Studies, Women Studies, Africana Studies, and Judaic Studies, etc.). Students will build Information Literacy skills, learn the difference between quantitative and qualitative research, and study how to write empirical research reports. Offered fall semester only.

A LCS 302 (= A SPN 322) Latinos(as) en Estados Unidos (3)
Examination of major U.S. Latino groups (Mexican-American, Cuban, Puerto Rican, Dominican) with special emphasis on 20th century literary works. Students will study demographic, socio-economic, historical, and cultural aspects of these groups in the context of their interaction with mainstream society. Course will be given in Spanish. Only one version of A LCS 302 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 301 or permission of instructor.

A LCS 312 (= A POR 312) Introduction to Brazilian Literature (3)
Survey of Brazilian literature from the colonial period to the present. Selected readings, discussions, and reports on collateral study. Only one version of A LCS 312 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A POR 207 or permission of instructor.

A LCS 314 (= A SPN 318) Topics in Hispanic Film (3)
A study of Hispanic film as a medium that offers a unique amalgam of diverse musical, pictorial, and literary art forms within a sociopolitical context. The course will focus on such specific topics as peasant movements, human rights, images of women, race, and ethnicity. Only one of version A LCS 314 may be taken for credit in any semester. May be repeated once for credit when content varies. Consult current schedule of classes for topic. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 310 or permission of instructor.

A LCS 315 Film in Contemporary Latin America (3)
Study of culture and society in Latin America as revealed through film. Emphasis on the use of film, especially in the “new cinema” movements, as an instrument for social and political change. History and current trends of cinema in selected countries. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A LCS 316 (= A SPN 316) Representative Spanish-American Authors (3)
Survey of literary movements in Spanish America from independence to World War II. Only one version of A LCS 316 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 310 or permission of instructor.

A LCS 317 (= A SPN 317) Latin American Civilization (3)
Study of Spanish-American cultures and institutions from the beginnings of the 20th century. Only one version of A LCS 317 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 310 or permission of instructor.

A LCS 318 (= A POR 318) Introduction to Brazilian Cinema (3)
Survey of Brazilian cinema, emphasizing the social and cultural dimensions of selected major films, including some which represent the “new cinema” movement. Course includes viewings, discussions, readings, and written work. Only one version of A LCS 318 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A LCS 319 (= A SPN 320) 20th Century Spanish American Literature (3)
A study of selected works of Spanish American literature from World War II to the present. Works studied will deal with topics of special interest such as the continuing debate with regard to civilization and barbarism, dictatorship and revolution, social justice, and the search for identity. Only one version of A LCS 319 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 310 or permission of instructor.

A LCS 321Y (= A EAS 321Y & A GOG 321Y) Exploring the Multicultural City (3)
This course will explore the human dimensions and implications of ethnic diversity in the United States, focusing on New York City. The course utilizes a variety of methods to introduce students to the multicultural city, beginning in the classroom but ending with fieldwork in a specific New York neighborhood. Only one version of A LCS 321Y may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): one of A GOG 102, 125, 160, 220, or 240.

A LCS 326 (= A SPN 326) Spanish-American Poetry and Theatre (3)
Representative Spanish-American plays and selected works in Spanish-American poetry, with emphasis on specific characteristics of the genres. Only one version of A LCS 326 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A SPN 223 or A SPN 310 or permission of instructor.

A LCS 329 Special Topics in Puerto Rican Studies (3)
Intensive interdisciplinary examination of a specific aspect on contemporary Puerto Rican Studies. The topic varies from term to term and is indicated every term by the subtitle: e.g. 19th century Agrarian Society or the Political Status Debate or the Migrant Experience. May be repeated for up to 6 credits under different subtitles. Departmental permission required for more than 6 credits. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A LCS 330 Special Topics in Latin American and Caribbean Studies (3)
The specific topic will be selected by the instructor and will vary from semester to semester as indicated by course subtitle. May be repeated for up to six credits under different subtitles.

A LCS 331 Special Topics in Latino Studies (3)
The specific topic will be selected by the instructor and will vary from semester to semester as indicated by course subtitle. May be repeated for up to six credits under different subtitles.

A LCS 341/341Z (= A ANT 341/341Z) Ethnology of Mesoamerica (3)
Survey of the cultures and history of the native peoples of Mexico and Central America. Beginning with the documents created by and about the native peoples around the time of the Spanish invasion, the course follows the experiences of these societies through the colonial period and up to the present. Only one version of A LCS 341 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ANT 100 or 108.

A LCS 348 Social Change in Latin America (3)
Changing class structure, ethnic composition, and culture of contemporary Latin American nations.

A LCS 349 (= R POS 349) Urban Politics in Latin America (3)
This course examines from a theoretical and historical perspective the context and character of politics and political participation in major Latin American urban cities.

A LCS 354 (= A GOG 354) Environment & Development (3)
A survey of international development issues, focusing on the impact of economic growth, population growth, and increased consumption of natural resources on global and local environments. This course focuses primarily on the poorer countries of the world, and particularly on tropical environments. It discusses issues of deforestation, desertification, and increased vulnerability to man-made and natural hazards. Prerequisite(s): A GOG 101 or 102, or permission of instructor.

A LCS 357 (= R POS 357) Latin American & Caribbean Politics (3)
The course will examine the current process and societies in the hemisphere. Emphasis will be on Latin America and the Caribbean with implications of globalization for all workers and societies of the Americas. Prerequisite(s): A LCS 100 or permission of instructor.

A LCS 359 Globalization in the Americas (3)
The aim of this course is to sharpen every student's ability to evaluate the impact of "globalization" on the societies of the Americas. It relies on concepts from political economy, while mainstreams (or "neoclassical") economics narrowly focuses on prices and markets (supply and demand), political economy examines the broad processes through which power relations existing in society (and conflicts over them) shape economic outcomes. It uses concepts from political economy to examine two specific groups — wage-workers and indigenous peoples — and provides in-depth case studies for examining the multi-dimensional impact of globalization on their livelihoods.      

A LCS 360 Political Economy of the Caribbean (3)
An intensive evaluation of political and economic forces as they have shaped the Caribbean region during the 20th century to the present, particularly the period since World War II. Special attention given to social conflicts and political movements, population growth and migration, urbanization, problems of industry and agriculture, economic planning, education, and superpower confrontations. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A LCS 361 (= A ECO 361) Development of the Latin American Economy (3)
Economic change in Latin American societies. Comparative study of the growth of various Latin American countries emphasizing the variables associated with development: population, technology, capital formation, output, resources, and income distribution. Only one version of A LCS 361 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A ECO 110 and 111.

A LCS 369 (= A HIS 369/369Z) Mexico, Central America, and the West Indies since 1810 (3)
The circum-Caribbean lands and islands in the 19th and 20th centuries; independence; independent nations and colonies; foreign intrusions and interventions; social and economic change; revolutions; comparative Caribbean studies. Only one version of A LCS 369 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in history.

A LCS 371/371Z (= A HIS 371/371Z) South America Since 1810 (3)
The political, economic, social, and cultural evolution of the South American nations from the winning of independence to the present, with emphasis on Argentina, Brazil, and Chile. Among topics studied will be dictatorship, democratic government, economic change, modern revolution, and social trends. Only one version of A LCS 371 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or 3 credits in history.

A LCS 373/373Z (= A HIS 373/373Z) History of Modern Mexico (3-4)
An in-depth survey of Mexico since Independence, this course emphasizes agrarian change and peasant rebellion; foreign intervention and U.S.-Mexican relations; indigenous and mestizo identities; gender and culture; political stability and economic development; authoritarianism, democratization, and globalization; and Latinos in the U.S. Writing intensive sections: Only one version of A LCS 373 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): 3 credits of A HIS or A LCS course work, or junior or senior standing.

A LCS 374 International Migration and Transnationalism (3)
This course discusses basic concepts and theories related to the study of migration and transnationalism. It discusses, among others issues, the following: Why do people move internationally following certain patterns? Why and how do they develop transnational relations? How do migration and transnationalism relate to economic, cultural, political and social processes, and social agency? How do they relate to some gender, class, and ethnic factors? What are some of the global, regional, national, and individual implications of migration and transnationalism? What are the implications for households and enterprises? May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A LCS 375 (= R POS 324) Latino Politics in the United States (3)
This course reviews Mexican, Puerto Rican, and Cuban participation, perspectives and issues on American politics. Each Latino sub-group will be analyzed and comparisons will be made between Latino sub-groups and between Latinos and other groups. The following questions will be examined: What is the context of Latino politics? What characterizes Latino political behavior? What is the place of Latinos in the U.S. political system? What are the political perspectives and values? What issues form the basis of their political mobilization and incorporation? What are their political prospects? We will be concerned with relevant historical, interpretive, and theoretical issues raised by the Latino political experience, with an emphasis on electoral representation, issues of gender, race and ethnicity, education, affirmative action, and radical politics. Only one version of A LCS 375 may be taken for credit.

A LCS 402 Latinos and Health Issues (3)
This course provides an overview of a broad range of issues related to the health status of Latinos in the United States such as the influence of culture, class, and gender on health care, access to health services, patterns of chronic disease, mental health concerns, family and child health. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A LCS 403 Special Topics in Latin American Studies (3)
The specific topic will be selected by the instructor and will vary from semester to semester as indicated by course subtitle. May be repeated for up to 6 credits under different subtitles. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A LCS 405 Special Topics in Caribbean Studies (3)
An intensive examination of social, economic, political, and cultural issues which affect contemporary Caribbean life and society. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A LCS 408 Latinos and American Political Change (3)
This course examines the impact of changes in the U.S. political institutions on Latino participation and inclusion in the policy process. Particular emphasis will be placed on studying Latino political engagement through collective action and mobilization outside the established political party system. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A LCS 410 Tourism, Culture, and Identities (3)
An in-depth interdisciplinary examination of tourism in relation to culture and its impact on the identities of both hosts and guests. Some of the questions to be explored include the role of tourism in the formation of regional, national, and transnational identities, how tourism reflects global inequities, and the impact it has on local Latin American communities. This course is open only to juniors and seniors. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A LCS 411 Seminar on Latin America (3)
As the world's borders become ever more permeable to the influxes of capital, media, and technology, identity boundaries seem to become increasingly sealed. Despite the phenomena of global impact that have emphasized the commonality of our fragile human condition (e.g. global warming, financial meltdowns, food crises, etc.), identity markers are constantly brought to the fore as reminders of our dissimilarities. Place of birth, language proficiency, attachment to the land, conformity to gender expectations, and even elements that lie on the surface of the body such as skin tone and hair texture have all been used to demarcate who can or cannot belong to identity groups. The main purpose of this course is to understand that are cultural identities, why and how they come about, and what their political consequences are. More specifically, it will discuss contemporary Latin American identities. It will analyze crucial aspects of identity construction, such as sameness, difference, belonging, boundaries, contrasts, and oppositions; the meanings of space and place and the significance of roots for the construction of identities; the importance of diaspora and the challenge it poses to nationalist attachments; the essentialist reactions to the supposed threats to identity exemplified by the rise of anti-immigrant racism and western fundamentalisms; and the centrality of language, media and consumption for the contemporary construction of identities. Adopting theories of identities produced in the fields of anthropology, cultural studies and postcolonial studies, and employing the poststructuralist concepts of subjectivity, positionality, agency, discourse, and representation, the course will prepare students to analyze the construction of identities related to "race," ethnicity, gender, class, nation, and immigration in a context of increasing globalization. Considering that theory should not be understood as "the truth" but a site of contested knowledge, the bibliography will encompass a variety of approaches to, and case studies of identities. Prerequisite(s) A LCS 300.

A LCS 412 Seminar on the Caribbean (3)
Analysis of the colonial establishment of European power and ascendancy in the Caribbean and Latin America, and the numerous and varied forms of resistance to colonialism in the hemisphere. Employing critical strategies associated with the field of post-colonial studies, the course revolves around literature (novels) that provide us with fertile ground for a cultural critique or power and resistance. These novels will be read against the background of the hemisphere's history and cultural legacy of colonialism and anti-colonial resistance in an attempt to better understand the cultural modalities of power and resistance in the Caribbean and Latin America. Prerequisite(s): A LCS 300.

A LCS 413 Seminar on U.S. Latino Studies (3)
This course is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of dominant approaches to the study of Latinos in the United States. Scholars have employed a variety of theoretical constructs and methodological approaches to explore a wide range of issues of particular significance for Latinos and Latinas. Latino social science research broadly falls into a set of readily defined categories, but shares a distinctive concern with reinterpreting standard narratives that reinforce structures of white privilege. Much of Latino-directed research aims to develop alternative conceptualizations and interpretations of the Latino experience in order to enhance the capacity of Latinos to purposefully engage U.S. society. Prerequisite(s): A LCS 300.

A LCS 414 (= A SPN 414) Literature of the Hispanic Caribbean (3)
Study of selected major writers of Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico of the 19th and 20th centuries. Special consideration of literature as a reflection of situations and problems peculiar to the Hispanic Caribbean. Conducted in Spanish. Only one version of A LCS 414 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): two courses between A SPN 310-350 (excluding A SPN 333) or permission of instructor.

A LCS 415 Los Latinos en EE.UU.: Historia, Cultura, y Literatura (3)
A study of the historical, cultural, and socioeconomic development of U.S. Latino groups. Emphasis on the experiences of Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Dominicans, and Mexicans. Particular attention will be given to how gender, race, ethnicity, and class shape the U.S. Latino experience. Prerequisite(s): knowledge of Spanish at the 300 level or above is required.

A LCS 430Z (=A WSS 430Z) Environmental Justice: Racism, Classism, Sexism (3)
In Environmental Justice: Racism, Classism, and Sexism, we will explore how racism, classism, and sexism impact current environmental “events,” including environmental policy-making, public health outcomes, and the rhetoric and politics of environmentalism. Surveying the development of environmental awareness among the public philosophies behind such awarenesses, and resulting shifts in policy, we will focus on the growth of the environmental justice movement, and will consider how various groups have addressed environmental degradation and injustice. Also under consideration will be a set of related issues: how globalization has impacted these events, the feminist critique of science and its impact, relationships between grass-roots activism (for example, native American activists and other Environmental Justice groups) and between these groups and more scholarly approaches, and contributions by artists, labor-rights groups, religious leaders, animal rights activists, and deep ecologists. Prerequisite(s): Students, at whatever level, are welcome. The requirements will differ for graduate and undergraduate students. For example, graduate students will be reading more theoretical articles, and will be responsible for explaining these to the undergraduate students. In addition, graduate students will be required to submit a final research paper that is much longer (12-20 pages) than that required for undergraduate students.

A LCS 450 Legislative Internship (3-6)
Internships involving off-campus participation in the NYS Legislature, with collateral academic study. Contingent on the approval of a faculty member of the Department of Latin American and Caribbean Studies willing to supervise the study and evaluate on-site reports of the student's progress. Students must apply two weeks prior to the start of the academic term, and are subject to an interview and selection process. Internships are open only to qualified juniors and seniors who have an overall grade point average of 2.50 or higher. Prerequisite(s): Open to students of any major. Bilingual and multicultural skills will prove particularly useful since students will be working with legislative members of the NYS Assembly Puerto Rican/Hispanic Task Force. S/U graded.

A LCS 451 (= A HIS 451 & A WSS 451) Gender & Class in Latin American Development (3)
The study of the historical interplay of cultural, ideological, and structural factors affecting women’s lives during the course of Latin America’s experience with modernization and industrialization during the 19th and 20th centuries. Topics covered may include: household work, paid work, migration, growth of female-headed households, women’s political participation, and women’s participation in social movements. Only one version of A LCS 451 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): any course in LACS and/or Women’s Studies and/or History.

A LCS 465 (= R POS 447) Latino/as and Inequality in America (3)
This course is about the political engagement of Latinas and Latinos and the political and economic forces that historically have impeded their full incorporation in U.S. society. Only one version of A LCS 465 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): open to seniors and graduate students.

A LCS 472 (= A ANT 472) Social Movements in Latin America (3)
This class takes an anthropological perspective to discuss contemporary Latin American social movements. It considers why the intensification of social movements throughout the region may follow some traditional forms of resistance and mobilization, but also why it is a response to neoliberal globalization. These new movements seek to define a novel relation to the political realm. Unlike traditional guerrilla movements or electoral expressions of the left, they are not fundamentally organized to seize state power. Yet they have contributed to destabilizing, even, ousting governments. Social movement formation and resistance to neoliberalism are explored. Social movements, such as the indigenous mobilizations in Ecuador, mobilizations against water privatizations and gas pipeline investments in Bolivia, the Zapatista movement in Mexico, landless rural workers in Brazil, Afro-Colombians resisting investors, and the urban worker strikes in Argentina, are covered. Only one version may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): one course in anthropology, sociology, political science or geography.

A LCS 475 Caribbean Migration (3)
The focus of the course is post-World War II migration between the Caribbean and the United States—in particular migration from Cuba, the West Indies, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico. The material is interdisciplinary in nature, though highlighting approaches from the fields of economics, sociology, political science, and history. The major topics include: (1) Migration theory; (2) U.S. migration policy—its impact on receiving and sending populations; (3) a socio-historical background to post-war Caribbean Migration; and (4) specific migrations from Cuba, the West Indies, the Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A LCS 491 (= A ANT 481) Research Projects (3–6)
Introduction to basic research skills required to answer questions on human behavior, with special emphasis on cross-cultural interaction. Specific research projects provide students with the basic research methods, including data collection, processing, and analysis. Only one version of A LCS 491 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): junior or senior standing, or permission of instructor.

A LCS 497 Independent Study (3-6)
Independent study in an area of special interest to the student under the supervision of the sponsoring faculty member. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. Prerequisite(s): permission of instructor and department chair.

  

Program in Linguistics and Cognitive Science

Faculty

Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus
Ernest A. Scatton, Ph.D.
Harvard University

Professors Emeriti
Francine W. Frank, Ph.D. (Collins Fellow)
University of Illinois
Robert Meyers, Ph.D.
State University of New York at Buffalo
Robert Sanders, Ph.D.
University of Iowa
Silke Van Ness, Ph.D.
University at Albany
Rose-Marie Weber, Ph.D.
Cornell University

Distinguished Professor
Frank Vellutino, Ph.D.
Catholic University of America

Professors
Jeanette Altarriba, Ph.D.
Vanderbilt University
Brad Armour-Garb, Ph.D.
City University of New York
Lee Bickmore, Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles
James Collins, Ph.D. 
University of California, Berkeley
Laurie Feldman, Ph.D.
University of Connecticut
John Justeson, Ph.D.
Stanford University
Istvan Kecskes, Ph.D.
Kossuth University, Hungary
Carla Meskill, Ph.D.
Boston University
James Neely, Ph.D.
Yale University
Lotfi Sayahi, Ph.D.
Universidad Complutense Madrid
W. Trammell Neill, Ph.D.
University of Oregon

Associate Professors
George Berg, Ph.D.
Northwestern University
Andrew Byon, Ph.D.
University of Hawaii
Cynthia Fox, Ph.D.
Indiana University
Ronald A. McClamrock, Ph.D.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Maurice Westmoreland, Ph.D.
University of Illinois

Assistant Professor Emeritus
George Hastings, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania

Assistant Professors
Lauren E. Clemens, Ph.D.
Harvard University
Megan Solon, Ph.D.
Indiana University



The linguistics major is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the nature of human language and the principles and methods of contemporary linguistic theories. The major offers a liberal education that combines the approaches of the humanities, the social sciences and the sciences. It also provides appropriate preparation for those interested in pursuing graduate work in linguistics or related disciplines. The Program in Linguistics and Cognitive Science and the Department of Educational Theory and Practice offer a combined B.A./M.S. program leading to a bachelor’s degree in linguistics and a master’s in teaching English to speakers of other languages.

Careers
Linguistics majors compete favorably with those from other humanities and social science disciplines for entry-level positions in public relations, commerce, publishing and other fields requiring analytical, communication and research skills. Career opportunities for graduates also include computer programming, computer software development, editing, technical writing and dictionary-making.

Students planning to undertake professional study in such fields as law, public administration, public policy, speech pathology and education (including TESOL) will find that course work in linguistics provides valuable preparation in analytical skills as well as an understanding of the social implications of language and attitudes toward language. For suggested sequences of courses appropriate to specific areas of advanced study or careers, consult the undergraduate adviser.

Special Programs or Opportunities
The possibility of studying a foreign language not regularly taught at the University is provided by A LIN 289, Directed Study in Foreign Languages. This course is open to any undergraduate student in the University. For current offerings, consult the undergraduate adviser.

The program also sponsors minors in Linguistics and Cognitive Science (See Approved Minors section of this bulletin for details).

Degree Requirements for the Major in Linguistics

General Program B.A.: 36 credits in the major field of study, including: A LIN 220, 321, 322, 421 or 422, 429; one year of a foreign language (or A LIN 423, Linguistic Structures)*, as advised; additional credits, as advised, including a minimum of 3 credits at the 300 level or above; these are to be chosen from courses offered by the Program in Linguistics and Cognitive Science and from approved courses in other departments.

*This language should be of radically different structure from the foreign language chosen for the language proficiency requirement (see below). Non-Indo-European languages are usually advised. Credits earned in A LIN 289 may be counted toward the 36 credit requirement only if used to fulfill this one year language requirement.

Other Degree Requirements
Language Requirement: Majors are required to demonstrate competence in a foreign language equivalent to two years of study of skill courses in a foreign language at the college level. This requirement may be satisfied by course work or the passing of the appropriate examination. Credits earned for the proficiency requirement are additional to the 36 credit requirement described above.

Courses in other departments approved for the linguistics major. (Some of these courses may have prerequisites within the departments offering them.) Consult the undergraduate advisor of the Linguistics and Cognitive Science Program for modifications in this list:
A ANT 424; A CLC 125; A COM 373, 465; I CSI 101, 201, 310; A ENG 311; A FRE 306, 406, 450; A PHI 210, 301*, 332, 415, 432; A POR 402; A PSY 301*, 365, 381; A SPN 401, 402, 405; one of the following: A MAT 108, A PSY 210, or A SOC 221.
*Only one of A LIN 301, A PHI 301, and A PSY 301 can be taken for credit.

Honors Program

Students who have completed 12 or more credits of A LIN courses may apply to the program by letter to the director of the Program in Linguistics and Cognitive Science. The requirements are as follows:

  1. The major GPA must be at least 3.50, and the overall GPA must be at least 3.25.
  2. Students are required to take 39 credits. In addition to satisfying all the linguistics major requirements, the 39 credits must include 12 credits of 400 level A LIN courses. Of these 12 credits, seven must come from A LIN 429, Field Methods in Anthropological Linguistics (4 credits) and A LIN 423, Language Structures (3 credits), which constitute a seven credit sequence involving original research projects. Three credits must come from A LIN 495 Honors Thesis (described below). The remaining credits can come from any 400 level A LIN course.
  3. Students must take A LIN 495 Honors Thesis in which they write a major research paper. The paper can be based on new research or can be a major revision of a paper written for a previous A LIN class or independent study. This course should be taken during the final semester of the student’s senior year, under the supervision of an appropriate member of the A LIN faculty. All students in A LIN 495 will make an oral presentation of their research before submitting the final written version.

Combined B.A./M.S. Program

The combined B.A./M.S. program in linguistics and teaching English to speakers of other languages provides an opportunity for students of recognized academic ability and educational maturity to fulfill integrated requirements of undergraduate and master’s degree programs from the beginning of their junior year. A carefully designed program can permit a student to earn the B.A. and M.S. degrees within nine semesters.

The combined program requires a minimum of 143 credits, of which at least 35 must be graduate credits. In qualifying for the B.A., students must meet all University and college requirements, including the requirements of the undergraduate major described previously, the minor requirement, the minimum 90 credit liberal arts and sciences requirement, general education requirements and residency requirements. In qualifying for the M.S., students must meet all University and college requirements as outlined in the Graduate Bulletin including completion of a minimum of 35 graduate credits and any other conditions such as a research seminar, thesis, comprehensive examination, professional experience and residency requirements. Up to 12 graduate credits may be applied simultaneously to both the B.A. and M.S. programs.

Students may apply for admission to the combined degree program at the beginning of their junior year or after the successful completion of 56 credits. A cumulative grade point average of 3.20 or higher and three supportive letters of recommendation from faculty are required for consideration. Students will be admitted to the combined program upon the recommendation of faculties of the Program in Linguistics and Cognitive Science and the Department of Educational Theory and Practice set up to administer the combined degree program.

  

Courses in Linguistics and Cognitive Science

A LIN 100 Understanding Language (3)
General introduction to all aspects of the nature and use of language. Language acquisition, language loss, language change, language in society. Films and television documentaries augmented by readings and written exercises.

A LIN 200 (= A ENG 200) Structure of English Words (3)
Introduction to the structure of English words, including the most common Greek and Latin base forms, and the way in which related words are derived. Students may expect to achieve a significant enrichment in their own vocabulary, while learning about the etymology, semantic change and rules of English word formation.

A LIN 216 (= A ENG 216) Traditional Grammar and Usage (3)
Thorough coverage of traditional grammar and usage with an introduction to the principles of structural and transformational grammar. Brief exploration into recent advances in linguistic thought. Practice in stylistic analysis using such grammatical elements as syntax, voice, subordination and sentence structure.

A LIN 220 (= A ANT 220 & A ENG 217) Introduction to Linguistics (3)
Introduction to the study of language, including examination of the characteristics and structural principles of natural language. After exploring the basic characteristics of sound, word formation and sentence structure, these principles are applied to such topics as: language variation, language change, psycholinguistics, pragmatics, and animal communication. Only one version of A LIN 220 may be taken for credit.

A LIN 289 Directed Study in Foreign Language (4)
Study of a foreign language not regularly taught at the University; independent work with the guidance of a faculty member using recordings and other material; meetings with native speakers when possible. A limited number of languages may be offered in any one year. May be repeated for a different language or for more advanced study in the same language. Prerequisite(s): permission of undergraduate adviser.

A LIN 301 (= A PHI 301 & A PSY 301) Introduction to Cognitive Science (3)
Cognitive science investigates the nature of the human mind and cuts across several disciplines (e.g., psychology, computer science, philosophy, linguistics). This course examines the approaches these disciplines use to promote our understanding of various mental phenomena (e.g., perceiving, reasoning, production and comprehension of language, memory.) Only one version of A LIN 301 may be taken for credit. May not be offered in 2016-2017.

A LIN 321 (= A ANT 321) Introduction to Syntax (3)
The human ability to produce and understand an infinite number of different sentences is one of the most remarkable capabilities we have. The study of the structure of sentences is called syntax, and this course is an introduction to syntactic theory. The particular approach we will be pursuing is called generative grammar, the approach to syntax pioneered by linguists such as Noam Chomsky. Chomsky argues that all humans are born with an unconscious knowledge of Universal Grammar, the basis on which the grammars of all languages are built. Through a detailed examination of English sentence structure, we will investigate the connections between English syntax and Universal Grammar. Only one version of A LIN 321 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A LIN 220 or permission of instructor.

A LIN 322 (= A ANT 322) Introduction to Phonology (3)
Introduction to the description and analysis of human speech sounds and their organization. Introduction to articulatory phonetics and the International Phonetic Alphabet followed by examination and generative phonological analysis of data from English and a wide range of other languages. Only one version of A LIN 322 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A LIN 220 or permission of instructor.

A LIN 325 (= A ANT 325) Sociolinguistics (3)
Introduction to the study of language as a social phenomenon. Includes basic sociolinguistic concepts, interactional sociolinguistics, social dialects, black English, diglossia, bilingualism and bilingual education. Only one version of A LIN 325 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A LIN 220 or permission of instructor.

A LIN 326Z Writing, Reading, and Language (3)
This course will explore patterns of language in effective writing and draw on linguistic approaches—such as corpus grammars, systemic functional linguistics, and cognitive linguistics—that seem useful in reading, writing, teaching, and editing. We will look at traditional grammar and weigh its strengths and weaknesses. We will consider what knowledge about language is most helpful in mastering writing conventions, in understanding effective rhetorical choice, in critical reading, and in meeting the demands of technical texts and academic registers. We will look closely at the relationship between language and genre. In writing projects, students will explore their own language worlds and literacy goals, write reflectively about issues that come up in class, and have an opportunity, in a larger research project, to follow their own interests.

A LIN 421Z (= A ANT 421Z) Advanced Syntax (3)
This course continues the investigation of the relationship between the grammars of particular languages and Universal Grammar. We will examine the syntax of several languages from around the world asking ourselves the following questions: a.) How do the principles that organize the grammars of other languages around the world compare to English? b.) What grammatical properties are true for all languages? We will discuss the answers to these questions in the light of generative grammar. Only one version of A LIN 421Z may be taken for credit. The former A LIN 421 & A ANT 421 do not yield writing intensive credit. Prerequisite(s): A LIN 321 with grade of C or higher.

A LIN 422 (= A ANT 422) Advanced Phonology (3)
Advanced studies in generative phonological theory, with a focus on the analysis of prosodic phenomena such as stress, tone, and accent. Discussion of recent theoretical trends in phonology. Only one version of A LIN 422 may be taken for credit. Prerequisite(s): A LIN 322 with grade of C or higher.

A LIN 423 (= A ANT 423) Linguistic Structures (3)
Investigation of the structure of a selected language, language family, or language area; may be repeated for credit when content varies. Prerequisite(s): A LIN 321 or 322 or permission of instructor.

A LIN 425 (= A ANT 425) Comparative and Historical Linguistics (3)
Language development and change. Language classification, linguistic reconstruction. Prerequisite(s): A LIN 322.

A LIN 429 Field Methods in Anthropological Linguistics (4)
An introduction to the techniques of collecting and analyzing primary linguistic data from native speakers, taught through intensive examination of a selected language; may be repeated for credit with change in language. Prerequisite(s): A LIN 321 or 322 or permission of instructor.

A LIN 495 Honors Thesis (3)
Students in the honors program should enroll in A LIN 495 during one semester of their senior year. Students will write a major paper under the supervision of a faculty member in the Program in Linguistics and Cognitive Science, and deliver an oral presentation of their research. Prerequisite(s): admission to the honors program in Linguistics.

A LIN 497 Independent Study in Linguistics (1–6)
Independent reading or research on a selected topic in linguistics, under the direction of a faculty member. Normally taken for 3 credits, but if the nature of the project warrants it, as many as 6 credits may be earned in one term; may be taken a second time, with approval, for a maximum total of 12 credits. Prerequisite(s): a 300 level course from the list of courses approved for the linguistics major; permission of instructor and director of linguistics program.

A LIN 499 Seminar on Topics in Linguistics (3)
Seminar on selected topics in linguistic theory and methodology, chosen on the basis of current interest