Academic Grievances

  

Academic Retention Standards

  

Final Examination

  

Repeating Courses

  

Credit Load

  

Full-Time, Part-Time Definition

  

Policies to Deregister Students

  

Course Enrollment

  

Attendance and Timely Compliance with Course Requirements

  

Class Standing

  

School of College Enrollment

  

Undergraduate Academic Regulations

As one of the Councils of the University Senate, the Undergraduate Academic Council recommends policy concerning undergraduate academic programs and regulations. To assist in academic governance, individual schools and colleges have collateral committees that can recommend academic policy to this council. It is the responsibility of each undergraduate student to be knowledgeable concerning pertinent academic policy. The University encourages students to accept the widest responsibility for their academic programs. For clarification and interpretation of the regulations contained in this section, students should contact the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, Lecture Center 30.

Policy Exceptions

In rare cases and for extraordinary reasons, exceptions to University, college, school, and department academic regulations may be granted to individual students. A student who wishes an exception to an existing regulation should, in the case of a college, school or department regulation, consult with the head of the unit in question for the approved procedure for submitting an appeal. For exceptions to University regulations, students should contact the Committee on Academic Standing through the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education in Lecture Center 30.


Standards of Academic Integrity

Note:  The policies and procedures in the following section on Standards of Academic Integrity are effective beginning Fall 2013 by action of the University Senate.

As a community of scholars, the University at Albany has a special responsibility to integrity and truth. By testing, analyzing, and scrutinizing ideas and assumptions, scholarly inquiry produces the timely and valuable bodies of knowledge that guide and inform important and significant decisions, policies, and choices. Our duty to be honest, methodical and careful in the attribution of data and ideas to their sources establishes the foundations of our work. Misrepresenting or falsifying scholarship undermines the essential trust on which our community depends. Every member of the community, including both faculty and students, shares an interest in maintaining academic integrity.

 

When the entire University community upholds the principles of academic integrity, it creates an environment where students value their education and embrace experiences of discovery and intellectual growth. In this environment, grades and degrees are awarded and applauded as the recognition of years of learning, achievement, discipline, and hard work. Maintaining the highest standards of academic integrity insures the value and reputation of our degree programs; these standards represent an ethical obligation for faculty intrinsic to their role as educators, as well as a pledge of honor on the part of students. If a violation of academic integrity occurs, faculty, deans, and students all share in the responsibility to report it.

 

Violations of trust harm everyone. The academic community needs to trust that its members do not misrepresent their data, take credit for another's ideas or labor, misrepresent or interfere with the work of other scholars, or present previous work as if it were new. Acts of academic dishonesty undermine the value and credibility of the institution as a whole, and may distract others from important scholarship or divert resources away from critical research. In particular, students who plagiarize or falsify their work not only fail to adhere to the principles of scholarly inquiry and fail their peers by taking undeserved credit or reward, but they also fail to demonstrate their learning.  

 

These guidelines define a shared context of values to help both students and faculty to make individual and institutional decisions about academic integrity. Every student has the responsibility to become familiar with the standards of academic integrity at the University. Faculty members must specify in their syllabi information about academic integrity, and may refer students to this policy for more information. Nonetheless, student claims of ignorance, unintentional error, or personal or academic pressures cannot be excuses for violation of academic integrity. Students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with the standards and behaving accordingly, and UAlbany faculty are responsible for teaching, modeling and upholding them. Anything less undermines the worth and value of our intellectual work, and the reputation and credibility of the University at Albany degree.

Resources for Students

The University Libraries offer important resources for students seeking additional orientation to academic integrity.

Practicing Academic Integrity Sitelibrary.albany.edu/infolit/integrity. This site provides access to concise and engaging educational resources that will help students navigate through the complexities surrounding information use and creation in today’s digital environment. Acknowledging the work of others through citation (and its flip side, plagiarism), copyright, the ethics of sharing information in different formats, and the importance of contributing one’s own voice to academic conversations are all highlighted.

Citation Tools: the University Libraries offers a wide variety of citation tools which may be found at libguides.library.albany.edu/citationgenerators. These resources include citation generators and more extensive citation management tools, such as Zotero, Citation generators are websites or mobile apps that automatically format citations and bibliographies. Users select a type of source to be cited, such as a book, enter the book title, and the citation generator retrieves the required data and creates the citation data. Citation generators are useful for undergraduates who need to create bibliographies when writing papers, but it is important to check the resulting citations for errors. Citation management software programs allow students to create and organize a personal library of references and articles, format citations for a bibliography in various citation styles, and sometimes share and collaborate with others. Also available is CitationFox, an extensive resource developed by UAlbany librarians that provides citation guidance and examples for both the MLA and APA style.

Students should consult syllabi, their instructors, and in relevant circumstances their advisors for information about specific policies on academic integrity in courses or other academic exercises such as comprehensive/qualifying examinations, theses, and dissertations.

Graduate students may access additional information on Academic Integrity, Conduct, and Research Regulations via www.albany.edu/graduate/index.php.

Examples of Academic Dishonesty

The following is a list of acts considered to be academically dishonest and therefore unacceptable. Committing such acts is a breach of integrity and is subject to penalty. No such list can, of course, describe all possible types or degrees of academic dishonesty. Therefore this list should be viewed as a set of examples, rather than as an exhaustive list. Individual faculty members, Deans of Schools and Colleges as appropriate, and Community Standards will continue to judge each breach according to its particular context.

Plagiarism: Presenting as one's own work the work of another person (for example, the words, ideas, information, data, evidence, organizing principles, or style of presentation of someone else). Some examples of plagiarism include copying, paraphrasing, or summarizing without acknowledgment, submission of another student's work as one's own, the purchase/use of prepared research or completed papers or projects, and the unacknowledged use of research sources gathered by someone else. Failure to indicate accurately the extent and precise nature of one's reliance on other sources is also a form of plagiarism. Students are responsible for understanding legitimate use of sources, the appropriate ways of acknowledging academic, scholarly, or creative indebtedness.

Examples of plagiarism include: failure to acknowledge the source(s) of even a few phrases, sentences, or paragraphs; failure to acknowledge a quotation or paraphrase of paragraph-length sections of a paper; failure to acknowledge the source(s) of a major idea or the source(s) for an ordering principle; failure to acknowledge the source (quoted, paraphrased, or summarized) of major sections or passages in the paper or project; the unacknowledged use of several major ideas or extensive reliance on another person's data, evidence, or critical method; submitting as one's own work, work borrowed, stolen, or purchased from someone else.

Cheating on Examinations: Giving or receiving unauthorized help before, during, or after an examination. Examples of unauthorized help include collaboration of any sort during an examination (unless specifically approved by the instructor); collaboration before an examination (when such collaboration is specifically forbidden by the instructor); the use of notes, books, or other aids during an examination (unless permitted by the instructor); arranging for another person to take an examination in one's place; looking upon someone else's examination during the examination period; intentionally allowing another student to look upon one's exam; unauthorized discussion of exam questions during the examination period; and the passing of any examination information to students who have not yet taken the examination. There can be no conversation while an examination is in progress unless specifically authorized by the instructor.

Multiple Submission: Submitting substantial portions of the same work for credit more than once without receiving the prior explicit consent of the instructor to whom the material is being submitted the second or subsequent time.

Forgery: Imitating another person's signature on academic or other official documents, including class material.

Sabotage: Willfully destroying, damaging, or stealing of another's work or working materials (including lab experiments, computer programs, term papers, digital files, or projects).

Unauthorized Collaboration: Collaborating on projects, papers, or other academic exercises when this is forbidden by the instructor(s). The default faculty assumption is that work submitted for credit is entirely one's own. At the same time, standards on appropriate and inappropriate collaboration as well as the need for collaboration vary across courses and disciplines. Therefore, students who want to confer or collaborate with one another on work receiving academic credit should seek the instructor's permission to collaborate.

Falsification: Misrepresenting material or fabricating information in an academic exercise or assignment (for example, the false or misleading citation of sources, the falsification of experimental or computer data, etc.).

Bribery: Offering or giving any article of value or service to an instructor in an attempt to receive a grade or other benefits not legitimately earned or not available to other students in the class.

Theft, Damage, or Misuse of Library or IT Resources: Removing uncharged library materials from the library, defacing or damaging library materials, intentionally displacing or hoarding materials within the library for one's unauthorized private use, or other abuse of reserve-book privileges. Any violation of the University’s Responsible Use of Information Technology policy. This includes, but is not limited to, unauthorized use of the University's or another person's computer accounts, codes, passwords, or facilities; damaging computer equipment or interfering with the operation of the computing system of the University.

Penalties and Procedures for Violations of Academic Integrity

The course instructor is responsible for determining when a student has violated academic integrity in a course. Students engaging in other academic activities such as qualifying or comprehensive examinations, theses, dissertations must also adhere to the standards of academic integrity outlined in this policy. In these cases, academic advisors and department, college, or school officials responsible for a student's program of study are charged with determining if a student has violated academic integrity.

When a faculty member determines that a student has violated academic integrity, he or she will inform the student and impose an appropriate sanction. Faculty members must respond in a manner most appropriate to the particular infraction and the circumstances of the case in question, according to his or her best judgment. Penalties for violations of academic integrity may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. Warning without further penalty, or with a requirement that an assignment be redone without a breach of academic integrity and resubmitted
  2. Lowering of an assignment/exam grade 
  3. Assigning a failing grade on a paper containing plagiarized material 
  4. Assigning a failing grade on any examination in which cheating occurred
  5. Lowering a course grade
  6. Giving a failing grade in a course or other academic exercise 

In addition, faculty members encountering a violation of academic integrity in their courses are required to complete and file the Violation of Academic Integrity Report. The report should indicate the sanction imposed and a brief description of the incident. Faculty filing a VAIR will submit copies both to the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education or Graduate Education, as appropriate, and to the student. 

If a faculty member informs the student that he or she will receive a failing grade for the course as a whole or for a component of the course as a result of academic dishonesty, the student receiving such a penalty will not be permitted to withdraw from the course, or to change the grading basis of the course from A-E to S/U.

Students who feel they have been erroneously penalized for an academic integrity infraction, or who think that a penalty is inappropriate, may make use of the grievance procedures, beginning with the Department and the College/School where the course was offered. Each College/School of the University has procedures for students who seek to dispute grades assigned or penalties imposed for academic infractions. Copies of the procedures are maintained in the College/School Deans' Offices or on their respective websites. 

If a student is cleared of wrongdoing through the grievance process, the student will not be subject to any penalties and the Violation of Academic Integrity Report associated with the case will be destroyed.

A violation confirmed by admission on the part of the student, by the student's acceptance of the charges and penalties outlined in the Violation of Academic Integrity Report, or through the grievance process will result in the enforcement of the penalty determined by the faculty member reporting the incident.

Under either of the following two conditions, a violation may be forwarded to Community Standards for further adjudication and, potentially, further sanction:

In these circumstances, the faculty member or College/School Dean may request that the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education or Graduate Education, as appropriate, forward the case to Community Standards.

However, the following circumstance will automatically result in the case being forwarded to Community Standards for adjudication:

If a case is referred to Community Standards, that office will act in accordance with its standard procedures to determine the final disposition of the case, which may include revoking a student's scholarship or fellowship, or teaching or research assistantship, as well as or in addition to disciplinary probation, suspension, or expulsion. If a hearing is held and a student is found "not in violation," no punitive action may be taken against the student and the Violation of Academic Integrity Report associated with the incident will be destroyed.

A copy of the Violation of Academic Integrity Report associated with any incident in which the student is not cleared of wrongdoing (through the grievance process or by Community Standards) will be retained in the Offices of Undergraduate Education or Graduate Education, as appropriate. The Offices of Undergraduate Education or Graduate Education will maintain a copy of such reports for periods  in accordance with SUNY student record retention policies: three years beyond the academic year in which the violation occurred, in the case of minor code violations (a single offense resulting in a sanction or sanctions short of a failing grade in the course), and seven years beyond the academic year in which the violation occurred, in the case of major code violations (a failing grade in the course, or any offense referred to and confirmed by Community Standards). A student's record of violations of academic integrity may be communicated to graduate or professional schools or employers who request such information about applicants who have attended the University at Albany.

The Director of Libraries or Chief Information Officer, upon a finding of theft, damage, misuse of facilities or resources, or a violation of University policies, will forward all such cases to Community Standards for review and disposition, which can include suspension or expulsion from the University. The Director of Libraries or Chief Information Officer may, in individual cases, limit access to the Libraries or IT resources pending action by Community Standards. In all other cases of academic dishonesty by students, which come to the attention of any staff, faculty member, or student, it is expected that the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education or Graduate Education, as appropriate, will be consulted about such infractions. In addition, University Police may elect to pursue the breaches, consistent with their policies.

Community Standards was established by the governing bodies of the University at Albany and is administratively the responsibility of the Vice President for Student Affairs. Any questions about the procedures of Community Standards may be secured by inquiry to that office.


Procedures for Resolving Academic Grievances

Students who seek to challenge an academic grade or evaluation of their work in a course or seminar, or in research or another educational activity may request a review of the evaluation by filing an academic grievance.

The Graduate Academic Council (GAC) and the Undergraduate Academic Council (UAC), through the work of their respective Committees on Admission and Academic Standing (CAAS) are responsible for insuring that approved procedures exist within the schools, colleges, departments (if applicable) and programs of the University for students to file academic grievances. Copies of established grievance procedures shall be filed by each academic unit with the Offices of the Vice Provost and Dean of Graduate Education and the Vice Provost and Dean for Undergraduate Education and available to students at each school/college dean’s office.

It is expected that the grounds upon which an academic grievance may be based should be clearly identified. Such grounds may include variance from University grading standards/policies, grade calculation inconsistencies with that announced in published course syllabi, procedural abnormalities, or other factors that are alleged to have denied the student a fair evaluation. It is not expected that grievances will propose that the professional obligation of faculty to fairly evaluate academic material within their field of expertise will be supplanted by alternate means without procedural cause.

A student who seeks to dispute a grade or evaluation must initially pursue the matter directly with the faculty member involved. If not satisfactorily resolved directly with the faculty member, a written grievance may be filed with the program/department, or directly with school/college for units that are not departmentalized.

Should the grievance not be satisfactorily resolved at this initial level of review, students may pursue further consideration of the grievance at the next organizational level until such time as the grievance is considered at the University level by the GAC or UAC CAAS, as appropriate. Action on an academic grievance by the appropriate CAAS, upon acceptance by the GAC or UAC, as appropriate, is final and not subject to further formal review within the University. Only at this final level of grievance determination by the CAAS may a grade or other such evaluation be changed against the will of the faculty member(s) involved. In such rare cases, the Chair of the GAC or UAC, or its respective CAAS, as appropriate, may consult at his/her discretion with departmental faculty and/or appropriate scholars to determine an appropriate grade and authorize its recording by the Registrar.

In reviewing an academic grievance, the CAAS will consider the formal written petition from the student and corresponding written response/comment from the faculty, along with all records of consideration of the matter at prior levels of review. Although rare, the CAAS reserves the right to conduct a hearing with all parties present or it may decide to meet with each party separately. The nature and number of the representatives attending any such meeting will be at the discretion of the CAAS. These procedures adopted are those which the University believes will provide all parties involved the opportunity to present complete and factual information as necessary for the CAAS to render a fair decision.      


Syllabus Requirement

The instructor of every section of an undergraduate class at the University at Albany shall provide each student in the section a printed or web-published copy of the syllabus for that section distributed during the first week of the class (preferably on the first regularly scheduled day the section meets). This syllabus must contain at least the information defined below. Each instructor retains the right to modify the syllabus and give notice in class of any modifications in a timely fashion. Students are responsible to apprise themselves of such notices.

Minimum Contents of a Class Syllabus:

The course syllabus may also include such additional information as the instructor deems appropriate or necessary.

*Academic integrity: “Every student has the responsibility to become familiar with the standards of academic integrity at the University. Faculty members must specify in their syllabi information about academic integrity, and may refer students to this policy for more information. Nonetheless, student claims of ignorance, unintentional error, or personal or academic pressures cannot be excuses for violation of academic integrity. Students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with the standards and behaving accordingly, and UAlbany faculty are responsible for teaching, modeling and upholding them. Anything less undermines the worth and value of our intellectual work, and the reputation and credibility of the University at Albany degree.” (University’s Standards of Academic Integrity Policy, Fall 2013)


Policy for Freedom of Expression

The University reaffirms its commitment to the principle that the widest possible scope for freedom of expression is the foundation of an institution dedicated to vigorous inquiry, robust debate, and the continuous search for a proper balance between freedom and order. The University seeks to foster an environment in which persons who are on its campus legitimately may express their views as widely and as passionately as possible; at the same time, the University pledges to provide the greatest protection available for controversial, unpopular, dissident, or minority opinions. The University believes that censorship is always suspect, that intimidation is always repugnant, and that attempts to discourage constitutionally protected expression may be antithetical to the University’s essential missions: to discover new knowledge and to educate.

All persons on University-controlled premises are bound by the Rules and Regulations for Maintenance of Public Order, which deal in part with freedom of expression (adopted by the Board of Trustees of the of the State University of New York June 18,1969; amended 1969,1980). Members of the University community should familiarize themselves with those rules and regulations. In addition, University faculty are protected by and bound by Article XI, Title 1, Sec. I of the Policies of the Board of Trustees (adopted January 1987), entitled “Academic Freedom.”

University officials or other members of the University community in a position to review posters, publications, speakers, performances, or any other form of expression may establish legitimate time, place, and manner regulations for the maintenance of an orderly educational environment; however, they may not prohibit expression for any reason related to the content of the expression, except as permitted in those narrow areas of expression devoid of federal or state constitutional protection.

Speakers invited to campus by University groups or individuals, and other speakers who may be legitimately present on campus, will be given the utmost protection to communicate their messages without disruptive harassment or interference. Opponents to those speakers enjoy the same protections for expressing their dissent.

All members of the University community share the duty to support, protect, and extend the commitment to the principle of freedom of expression, and to discuss this commitment with groups or individuals who seek to take part in University life. While all persons may seek to peacefully discourage speech that may be unnecessarily offensive to particular individuals or groups, speech that may be antithetical to the University’s values, those persons must support the legal right of free speech.


School or College Enrollment

Most students are advised in the Advisement Services Center during their freshman year. When students have been accepted to a major, they are enrolled in the school or college offering study in the desired major field. These are the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Computing and Information, the Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy; and the Schools of Business, Criminal Justice, Social Welfare and Public Health. In line with policy developed by the Committee on Academic Standing, a particular department, school or college within the University may permit a student to enroll as a major who has not completed a minimum of 24 graduation credits. Upon approval of the Committee on Academic Standing of the Undergraduate Academic Council additional conditions of initial and continued enrollment as a major may be required by individual departments, schools, or colleges.


Class Standing

Students are classified by the Registrar’s Office on the basis of graduation credits, as follows:

Freshmen Fewer than 24 credits
Sophomore 24-55 credits
Junior 56-87 credits
Senior 88 or more credits

 


Attendance and Timely Compliance with Course Requirements

Students are expected to attend all classes and all examinations and to complete all course requirements on time. Faculty have the prerogative of developing an attendance policy whereby attendance and/or participation is part of the grade. As noted in the following section, “Syllabus Requirement,” instructors are obliged to announce and interpret all course requirements, including specific attendance policies, to their classes at the beginning of the term; an instructor may modify this or other requirements in the syllabus but “must give notice in class of any modification” and must do so “in a timely fashion.” This policy also applies to courses that are less than a standard semester in length. In courses that are less than a standard semester in length, the appropriateness of the duration of the excused absence will be determined on a prorated basis consistent with the length of the course in question.

Students will not be excused from a class or an examination or completion of an assignment by the stated deadline except for emergencies, required appointments or other comparable situations. Students who miss a class period, a final or other examination, or other obligations for a course (fieldwork, required attendance at a concert, etc.) must notify the instructor or the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education of the reason for their absence and must do so in a timely fashion.

The Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education will only provide letters to instructors asking that students with compelling reasons be granted consideration in completing their work when students have missed an exam or assignment deadline or when the absence exceeds one calendar week. Faculty are expected to use their best judgment when students have appropriate documentation for legitimate absences and not rely on the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education for substantiation when it is not necessary.

If the student foresees a time conflict in advance that will prevent attendance at a class or examination or completion of an assignment, the student is expected to bring this to the attention of the instructor or the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education as soon as the conflict is noted. In the case of an unforeseen event, the student is expected to notify the instructor or the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education within one week of the requested period of absence.

This timeliness is important since if the reason cited by the student is not considered a sufficient excuse, the student will need to know this as soon as possible. Even if the reason warrants granting the excuse, a student’s delay in contacting the instructor or the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education may make it more difficult for the University to assist the student with acceptable options for making up the work that was missed.

Although University officials will consider each student’s request on its own merits and not attempt to define ahead of time the validity of all the possible reasons a student might give for missing a class or an examination, there are three types of reasons for which excuses will generally be granted: (a) illness, tragedy, or other personal emergency; (b) foreseeable time conflicts resulting from required appointments; and (c) religious observance. It shall be the student’s responsibility to provide sufficient documentation to support any request. (In this context, it should be noted that fraudulent excuses are considered violations of academic integrity and are grounds for academic or disciplinary penalties.)

a. Illness, Tragedy and Emergencies: If the cause is documented hospitalization or other significant medical reason, a tragic or traumatic experience, or other personal emergency, the student should contact his or her professor or the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education (LC 30) as soon as the student is able to do so. In general, students are expected to provide appropriate documentation. In cases where absences exceed one calendar week, the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education will review the documentation and, if appropriate, notify the instructor(s) involved of this fact and of the date(s) for which the student has been excused. An instructor in this case may not penalize the student academically for the absence and is expected to provide reasonable assistance to the student concerning instruction and assignments that were missed. If an examination was missed, the instructor must administer a make-up examination or offer an alternative mutually agreeable to the instructor and the student. Any conflicts between student and faculty in accepting the alternative may be presented for resolution to the Chair of the department in which the course is offered.

Written notes from the University Health Center will only be provided to students in instances where absence due to documentable illness exceeds one calendar week in duration. There will be no provision for notes in instances where an illness-related absence is one calendar week or less in duration, except in cases where the student has missed an exam or significant course deadline due to their absence. In these situations the UAlbany Health center Medical Excuse policy will be strictly adhered to. In cases where the student has an illness-related absence extending beyond two calendar weeks in duration, the absence must be reviewed and approved by the University Health Center, then brought to the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education. The Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education will not accept requests for absence notes submitted more than one calendar week after the requested period of absence.

b. Compelling Time Conflicts: If the cause of the absence is a major academic conference at which the student has a significant participation, a field trip in another course, or some other compelling time conflict, the student must notify the professor involved as soon as possible, providing verification of the conflict. When a student clearly would have been able to notify the instructor well in advance of the conflict, the student is required to do so. If an excuse is granted, the instructor is expected to provide, if at all possible, an alternative by which the student will not be penalized as a result of the conflict. Any conflicts between student and faculty in accepting the alternative may be presented for resolution to the Chair of the department in which the course is offered. The Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education will not accept requests for absence notes submitted more than one calendar week after the requested period of absence.

c. Athletic Events: If the cause of the absence is a varsity athletic contest, i.e., a University-sponsored team competition (excluding practice sessions and intra-squad games), the student should provide the instructor with a note from the Office of Student Athlete Support Services (Department of Athletics and Recreation) listing all scheduled competitions by the last day to add a course. If a student-athlete has provided this documentation in a timely manner, the instructor may not penalize the student academically for these absences and is expected to provide reasonable assistance to the student concerning instruction and assignments that were missed. It is the responsibility of the student to notify instructors of changes to such schedules prior to the date of the event; such changes will be supported with appropriate documentation from the Office of Student Athlete Support Services. If an examination was missed, the instructor must administer a make-up examination or offer an alternative mutually agreeable to the instructor and the student. Any conflicts between student and faculty in accepting the alternative may be presented for resolution to the Chair of the department in which the course is offered.

d. Religious Observance: Absences for religious observance are covered by Section 224-a. of the Education Law: “Students unable because of religious beliefs to register or attend classes on certain days.”

  1. No person shall be expelled from or be refused admission as a student to an institution of higher education for the reason that he or she is unable, because of his or her religious beliefs, to register or attend classes or to participate in any examination, study, or work requirement on a particular day or days.
  2. Any student in an institution of higher education who is unable, because of his or her religious beliefs, to attend classes on a particular day or days shall, because of such absence on the particular day or days, be excused from any examination or any study or work requirements.
  3. It shall be the responsibility of the faculty and of the administrative officials of each institution of higher education to make available to each student who is absent from school, because of his religious beliefs, an equivalent opportunity to register for classes or make up any examination, study, or work requirements which he or she may have missed because of such absence on any particular day or days. No fees of any kind shall be charged by the institution for making available to the said student such equivalent opportunity.
  4. If registration, classes, examinations, study, or work requirements are held on Friday after four o’clock post meridian or on Saturday, similar or makeup classes, examinations, study or work requirements or opportunity to register shall be made available on other days, where it is possible and practicable to do so. No special fees shall be charged for these classes, examinations, study or work requirements or registration held on other days.
  5. In effectuating the provisions of this section, it shall be the duty of the faculty and of the administrative officials of each institution of higher education to exercise the fullest measure of good faith. No adverse or prejudicial effects shall result to any student because of his availing himself of the provisions of this section.
  6. Any student who is aggrieved by the alleged failure of any faculty or administrative official to comply in good faith with the provisions of this section shall be entitled to maintain an action or proceeding in the supreme court of the county in which such institution of higher education is located for the enforcement of his rights under this section.
    6-a. It shall be the responsibility of the administrative officials of each institution of higher education to give written notice to students of their rights under this section, informing them that each student who is absent from school, because of his or her religious beliefs, must be given an equivalent opportunity to register for classes or make up any examination, study or work requirements which he or she may have missed because of such absence on any particular day or days. No fees of any kind shall be charged by the institution for making available to such student such equivalent opportunity.
  7. As used in this section, the term “institution of higher education” shall mean any institution of higher education, recognized and approved by the Regents of the University of the State of New York, which provides a course of study leading to the granting of a post-secondary degree or diploma. Such term shall not include any institution which is operated, supervised or controlled by a church or by a religious or denominational organization whose educational programs are principally designed for the purpose of training ministers or other religious functionaries or for the purpose of propagating religious doctrines. As used in this section, the term “religious belief” shall mean beliefs associated with any corporation organized and operated exclusively for religious purposes, which is not disqualified for tax exemption under section 501 of the United States Code.
    As amended by Laws of 1992, chapter 278


 

Course Enrollment              

Students ordinarily enroll in courses at the level appropriate to their class.

Individual departments have the authority to require a C or S grade in courses that are prerequisite for advanced courses in that area.

Senior Enrollment in 100-Level Courses: Students with senior status (credits completed plus credits in progress equal to or exceeding 88) shall be allowed into courses at the 100 level only during the Program Adjustment period as defined by the University Calendar. This restriction does not apply to Music Performance courses and any summer session courses. Other exceptions may be granted by the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education (Lecture Center 30).

Graduate Courses for Undergraduate Credit: A senior with a superior academic record may register for a 500-level course for undergraduate credit with the approval of the major department chair and the course instructor. In exceptional circumstances, seniors may be authorized to register for 600-level graduate courses provided they have completed most of the upper division undergraduate and other courses essential to their major and require a graduate course to strengthen it. To qualify for such enrollment the senior must have a superior record, particularly in his or her major field. To register for a 600-level course, students must have the approval of their adviser and obtain the written consent of their department chair and the instructor offering the course. The department chair should arrange for copies of these consents to be distributed to the persons involved and to be filed in the student’s official folder.

Graduate Courses for Graduate Credit: Seniors of high academic standing in the University may receive graduate credit for graduate courses taken in excess of undergraduate requirements in the last semester of their senior year provided not more than 6 credits are needed to complete the student’s undergraduate program. Consent of the Dean of Graduate Education is required and must be obtained in advance of registration to receive such credit. Seniors who are permitted to take courses for graduate credit in their last semester also must make formal application for admission to a graduate program and be accepted as a graduate student before registering for study in the final semester.

Auditing Courses

Informal Audit: This category of audit permits any student or resident of the state to visit any course (except those listed here). The informal auditor visits courses without tuition, fees, examinations, grading, or credit; and no record is maintained. The instructor determines the level of participation of the informal auditor. A student matriculated at Albany confers with the instructor of the course and requests consent to visit the course. An individual not matriculated at this University must first contact the Office of General Studies and then obtain consent of the individual instructor of the course. NOTE: Informal Audit is not allowed during Summer Sessions.

Formal Audit: This category of audit allows any student to formally audit any course (except those listed here). The formal auditor pays regular tuition and fees, and the course is entered on the transcript of the student with the grade of N (noncredit) or W (withdrawn) according to 6., as follows.

Exceptions: Generally, the following types of courses cannot be formally audited: practica, internships, research and independent study courses, field courses, clinical courses, workshops, and foreign study programs. Students who feel they have an extraordinary need to audit these courses must prepare a written rationale and submit it to the chair of the department in which the course is offered. Formal audit of graduate-level courses is restricted as outlined in 3. below. If a course is filled and has auditors in it, a student wishing to take the course for credit may displace the auditor.

Formal Audit Policies

1) The student must register for the courses during the program adjustment period

2) Students must pay the regular tuition and fees based on their academic status. Fees and tuition will be based on the student’s total load, including courses formally audited. Credits taken by formal audit will not count toward full-time status for the purposes of academic retention.

3) Registration for the formally audited course must be approved by the student’s academic adviser (for nonmatriculated students, either the Office of General Studies or the Office of Admissions) and the course instructor. A senior with a superior academic record may formally audit a 500-level course with the approval of the academic adviser, the major department chair, and the course instructor. In exceptional circumstances, a senior may be authorized to formally audit a 600-level graduate course provided the student has completed most of the upper-division undergraduate and other courses essential to the major field. To formally audit a 600-level course, students must have the approval of their adviser and obtain the written consent of their department chair and the instructor offering the course. The department chair will arrange for copies of these consents to be distributed to the persons involved and to be filed in the student’s official folder.

4) A student may not change from credit to audit or from audit to credit after the last day to add a course.

5) The formal audit option is limited to a maximum of two courses per term for each student.

6) An individual who formally audits a course must participate in appropriate ways as determined by the instructor. It will be the responsibility of the student to ascertain from the instructor the degree of participation required. The course will appear at the end of the term on the transcript of the student with a grade of N (noncredit). A formal auditor may withdraw from a course not later than one week after the mid-semester date as stated in the academic calendar and be assigned a W. A student failing to participate satisfactorily will be withdrawn and assigned a W.

7) Although not recommended, formally audited undergraduate courses may be taken for graduation credit at a later date. Formally audited graduate courses may not be taken again for graduate credit.

Adding Courses  

All students must drop and add courses on the Web via www.albany.edu/myualbany.

From the first class day through the sixth class day of the semester, enter MyUAlbany on the Web and enter the class number of the course. If the course is closed or restricted, a Permission Number from the instructor is also necessary. From the seventh class day through the tenth class day of the semester, a Permission Number from the instructor is required for all adds. Enter MyUAlbany on the Web, enter the class number and the Permission Number for the course.

Subject to the approval of the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, after the tenth class day of the semester, a Course Permission Number from the instructor must be obtained before the Program Adjustment can be accepted by the Registrar’s Office. After the tenth class day of the semester, all late adds must be done in person at the Registrar’s Office, Campus Center-B52. A fee will be charged for this Program Adjustment.

In the event permission to late add a course after the tenth day of class is denied, a student may appeal that decision for any reason to the Committee on Academic Standing of the Undergraduate Academic Council. A “class day” is here defined to be any day from Monday through Friday in which classes are in session. The above methods of adding a course apply to quarter (“8 week”) courses and summer session coursework on a prorated basis, determined by the length of the course in question.

Dropping Courses

All students must drop and add courses on the Web via www.albany.edu/myualbany.

From the first class day through the tenth class day of the semester, enter MyUAlbany on the Web and enter the class number of the course. During this time, a dropped course will be removed from the student’s record. A “class day” is defined as in “Adding Courses” above.

After the tenth class day through the “last day to drop a course” (as specified in the Academic Calendar), a student may drop a course by entering MyUAlbany on the Web and entering the class number of the course. During this time, a dropped course will remain on the student’s record and an indicator of W will be entered in the grade column. The W will be entered regardless of whether the student has ever attended a class.

If a faculty member announces a failing grade in the course as a possible result of academic dishonesty, the student receiving such a penalty will not be permitted to withdraw from the course unless the grievance or judicial system rules in favor of the student.

A student still enrolled in a class after the “last day to drop” is expected to fulfill the course requirements. The grade recorded for the course shall be determined on this basis. A student who registers for a course but never attends or ceases attendance before the tenth class day, as reported by the instructor, yet does not officially drop the course shall have an indicator of Z listed in the grade column on his/her record. The above methods of dropping a course apply to quarter (“8 week”) courses and summer session course work on a prorated basis, determined by the length of the course in question.

Exceptions to this policy may be granted by the Committee on Academic Standing of the Undergraduate Academic Council.

Note: Students receiving financial assistance through state awards should refer to Academic Criteria for State Awards in the Financial Aid and Estimated Costs sections of this bulletin before withdrawing from courses.


Policies to Deregister Students

Failure to Attend Class

Beginning on the seventh class day, instructors may deregister students who fail to attend class, explain absence, or officially drop within the first six days of classes of a term unless prior arrangements have been made by the student with the instructor. The policy to deregister students is limited to the add period at the beginning of the semester. For courses that meet only once each week, including laboratory courses, the instructor may deregister students who do not attend the first scheduled class.

The above policy also applies to half-semester (“8 week”) courses on a prorated basis, depending on the length of the course in question. A “class day” is defined as in “Adding a Course” above. This policy does not apply to Summer or Winter session courses.

WARNING: Not all faculty exercise this prerogative. The fact that a student didn’t attend doesn’t guarantee that the professor dropped the student from the course. Students must take the responsibility for dropping a course on the Web via www.albany.edu/myualbany if they wish to avoid an E or U in that course.

Lack of Prerequisite(s)

Students may be deregistered who lack the prerequisite(s) of the course at any time within the term or quarter the course is being taught. The Registrar will assign students who have been deregistered after the program adjustment period a grade of W for the course.


Transfer of Credit after Matriculation

Transfer equivalencies for institutions and courses previously approved for transfer credit are available online from the University at Albany's Transfer Equivalency Databank on the Registrar’s Web page, http://www.albany.edu/registrar/transfer-credits.php. Courses not included in the databank may still be awarded transfer credit but require a course description or syllabus be attached to the transfer credit permission form. Post-matriculation transfer courses may not meet some requirements for the major, minor, and/or liberal arts credit requirements. Also, they cannot meet residency requirements. Students are strongly advised to consult with their advisors and/or the department in question about transfer credits prior to taking courses at other institutions.


Full-Time, Part-Time Defined

A student registered for a minimum of 12 credits within the semester is classified as a full-time student. Students registered for fewer than 12 credits are classified as part-time students for the semester.


Credit Load

A normal semester load is 15 credits. Registration for at least 12 credits is required for a student to be considered full-time. For loads of no more than 19 credits, the number of credits for which a student registers in a semester is an individual matter, determined by the student with the advice of that student's academic advisor. Except as provided, below, for undergraduates studying abroad, no undergraduate may register for more than 19 credits without prior permission obtained from the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education. Students must present compelling academic justification and have the approval of their academic adviser or major department for a request to exceed 19 credits to be considered by the Office of the Vice Provost.

Undergraduates studying abroad who plan to take more than 19 SUNY credits must apply for permission no later than 4 weeks after the start of classes overseas. Credits earned for pre-session courses which, when added to the regular semester’s course load, bring the total semester’s enrollment to over 19, do not need such permission.


Repeating Courses

Courses that can be repeated for graduation credit are so indicated within the course descriptions contained in this bulletin.

The following shall apply to students who enroll more than one time in a course that cannot be repeated for credit:

  1. Appropriate registrations in the course, as of the last day to add a course in a term as specified in the academic calendar, shall be listed on the student’s Academic Record; all A–E grades for such courses will be computed in the average.
  2. The total graduation credit applicable toward the student’s degree shall only be the credit for which that course has been assigned; i.e., graduation credit for the course can only be counted once.

Repeating Courses to Meet Program Admission Requirements

For the purposes of calculating admissions requirements into restricted majors or programs, once a student has received the grade of B- or higher in a course, no future grade in that course or its equivalent will be used in determining the student’s average for admission to that major or program.

An “equivalent” course, for purposes of this policy, is any course for which the student cannot receive credit by virtue of his or her having satisfactorily completed the original course.


Final Examinations

General Policy: In many courses, final examinations are an integral part of the learning and evaluative process. Some courses, by virtue of the structure, material, or style of presentation, do not require a final examination. The following policy in no way requires an instructor to administer a final examination.

Final examinations in semester-long undergraduate courses in the University are to be given only during the scheduled final examination period in accordance with the official schedule of examinations as published by the Registrar’s Office. The term “final examination” as used here shall be defined as any examination of more than one-half hour’s duration that is given in the terminal phase of a course. As defined, “final examinations” may be either comprehensive, covering the majority of the content of a course, or limited to only a portion of the content of a course.

No examinations of more than one-half hour’s duration are to be given during the last five regularly scheduled class days of a semester. Instructors seeking any exceptions to the above policy must submit a written request through their respective department chair to their college dean, or directly to their dean in those schools with no departmental structure. If the dean approves the exceptions, the instructor must notify the class of the new scheduled final examination date at least three weeks before the last regularly scheduled class day of the semester. At the end of each semester, each college and school dean must submit to the Vice President for Academic Affairs a summary of all exceptions granted to the final examination policy.

The above regulations notwithstanding, the instructor in any course should always retain the freedom to reschedule a final examination for an individual student should such a student present a case of unquestionable hardship in his or her scheduled examinations. Such rescheduling should, however, be done in the final examination period if at all possible.

Reading Day: A day reserved for preparation for final exams. It is scheduled after all the regular class lectures and before final exams. As a rule, Reading Day should not be used as a make-up day and activities should not be scheduled that conflict with students' ability to study for final exams.

Three Finals on One Day: If a student has three examinations in one day as a result of a departmental exam or of the official rescheduling of an examination after the initial final examination schedule has been published, then that student has the right to be given a makeup examination for the departmental or rescheduled examination. The request for such an exam must be made to the instructor in the appropriate course no later than two weeks before the last day of classes of the given semester. If possible, the makeup examination should be given within the final examination period.

Retention of Exams: Each instructor shall retain the final examination papers in his/her courses for one semester so those students wishing to see their papers may do so. This regulation does not apply in those instances in which the instructor chooses to return the papers to the students at the end of the course.


Grading

The undergraduate grading system for the University will include the following grades: A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, E.

The normative grading pattern is A–E. However, students may receive S/U grades in two circumstances:

For students matriculated in the fall 2010 or thereafter, the student is limited to receiving optional grades only twice in their undergraduate academic career. Only courses below the 300 level may be S/U opted. These two courses of S/U may be in addition to all S/U grades received in department or school-designated S/U graded sections of courses. See also “Grading Option Deadline,” below.

A–E grades are defined as follows: A–Excellent, B–Good, C–Fair, D–Poor, and E–Failure. The grade of E is a failing grade and cannot be used to fulfill graduation requirements.

The grade of S is defined as equivalent to the grade of C or higher and is acceptable to fulfill graduation requirements. The grade of U (C- or lower) is unsatisfactory and is not acceptable to fulfill graduation requirements.

Transfer D Grades

1) Students cannot transfer in any grades of D

2) However, except for the University’s writing requirements, for which a grade of C or higher or S is required, transfer work graded D in a course that applies to one or more of the University’s General Education requirements may be applied toward fulfilling the requirements, even if the student receives no graduation credit for the course.

Other Grades and Indicators

Additionally, the following grades and indicators may be assigned:

I: Incomplete. No graduation credit. A temporary grade requested by the student and assigned by the instructor ONLY when the student has nearly completed the course requirements but because of circumstances beyond the student’s control the work is not completed. The incomplete should only be assigned on the basis of an agreement between the instructor and the student specifying the work to be completed and establishing a general timeline in which the work will be completed. Incompletes may NOT be resolved by auditing or registering again for a subsequent offering of the course. The date for the completion of the work may not be longer than one month before the end of the semester following that in which the incomplete is received. Once the work is completed, the instructor assigns the appropriate academic grade.

The instructor may extend an incomplete for a maximum of one semester beyond the original deadline providing that the student has made contact with the instructor to request the extension. Additional extensions are NOT permitted.

Any grade of I existing after the stated deadline shall be automatically changed to E or U according to whether or not the student is enrolled for A–E or S/U grading. Except for extenuating circumstances approved by the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, these converted grades may not be later changed.

(NOTE: Students receiving financial assistance through state awards should refer to Academic Criteria for State Awards in the expenses and financial aid section of this bulletin before requesting grades of I.)

N: Noncredit.

W: An indicator assigned by the appropriate administrative officer indicating a student withdrew from the University, withdrew from an entire course load for a summer session, or dropped a course after the last day to add. For information and completeness, the W is placed on the permanent academic record. The W is not used in any computation of quality point or cumulative average totals.

Z: An indicator assigned by the appropriate administrative officer indicating a student enrolled in a course, never attended or failed to attend after the last day to add, and took no official action to drop the course. For information and completeness, the Z is placed on the permanent academic record. The Z is not used in any computation of quality point or cumulative average totals.

Grade Changes

An instructor may not permit students in an undergraduate course to submit additional work or to be reexamined for the purpose of improving their grades after the course has been completed. Also, The Registrar’s Office may not enter a change of grade without the approval of the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, except, of course, for changes of I to a final grade.

A grade of A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, E, S, or U may not be changed to a grade of I. On a case-by-case basis and for good cause, the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education continues to have the power to allow grade changes for reasons deemed legitimate.

Grading Option Deadline

Students may change their option (A–E or S/U) for courses not departmentally designated for S/U grading until 15 class days after the midterm point. Changes in grading selections cannot be authorized beyond the date specified. The grading option may be changed by filing the appropriate form with The Registrar’s Office by the date specified in the academic calendar. When discussing with an instructor their progress in a course, students should inform the instructor if they are taking the course S/U.

Academic Average

The grades of A, A- B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, and E shall be the only grades used to determine an average. Grades shall be weighted as follows: A = 4.00, A- = 3.70, B+ =3.30, B = 3.00 B- = 2.70, C+ = 2.30, C = 2.00, C- = 1.70, D+ = 1.30, D = 1.00, D- = 0.70, and E = 0.00. The student’s academic average is the result of the following calculation:

  1. The number of credits for courses receiving A–E grades is totaled
  2. Each grade’s weight is multiplied by the number of credits for the course receiving that grade
  3. The results of these multiplications are totaled to yield a weighted total.
  4. The weighted total is divided by the total number of credits receiving A–E grades to yield an academic average.

Student Academic Record

A student’s official progress records are maintained by the Registrar’s Office. Grades for the semester are available to the student via MyUAlbany following the posting of grades by the Registrar.


Academic Retention Standards

Since the University requires that students have a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 and an average of 2.00 in the major and the minor in order to earn a bachelor’s degree, the grade point average is an important indicator of the ability to achieve a bachelor’s degree. Thus, the following policies are in effect for students whose performance indicates that they are in danger of failing to meet the conditions necessary to earn a degree.

Academic Warning

A student whose semester grade point average falls below a 2.00 (but is a 1.0 or above) will receive an Academic Warning from the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education. This action will not subject the student to any further penalty but is intended to remind the student of the University’s policies as well as to inform the student of the resources available to ensure good progress in achieving an undergraduate degree.

Academic Probation

1) A student whose cumulative grade point average falls below a 2.00 will be placed on Academic Probation for the following semester. A student placed on academic probation will be notified by the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, and will be advised of the resources available to assist students in improving their academic standing.

2) Students on Academic Probation will be expected to improve their academic performance immediately. They must raise the cumulative GPA to at least 2.00 to be removed from academic probation. Students who fail to meet this condition will be placed on Terminal Probation in the following semester.

Terminal Probation

1) A student will be placed on Terminal Probation for the following semester if either of the following occurs:

the student’s semester GPA is below 1.00, or

the student has a cumulative GPA below 2.00 for a second semester

2) Students on Terminal Probation for a semester are in danger of academic dismissal at the end of that semester. Therefore, as a condition of continuing their enrollment at Albany, they must complete an “Academic Improvement Plan” (AIP) to improve their academic performance in consultation with their academic adviser, and must file this plan with the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education by the date designated on the AIP. (Failure to file this form could result in a hold on the student's record.)

3) If the student achieves a semester GPA and cumulative GPA of at least 2.00, the student will be removed from Terminal Probation.

4) If the student’s semester GPA is at least a 2.00 but the cumulative GPA remains below 2.00, the student will remain on Terminal Probation and must continue to meet the conditions described in section 2) above. The student must raise the cumulative GPA to at least 2.00 to be removed from Terminal Probation.

5) If the student earns a semester GPA below a 2.00 while on Terminal Probation, the student will be dismissed.

Academic Dismissal

Academic dismissal will occur only if a student has been on Terminal Probation and fails to earn a semester GPA of at least 2.00. The student’s record will have the notation “Academic Dismissal.” Students who have been academically dismissed have the right to seek reinstatement to the University by submitting a written petition to the Committee on Academic Standing through the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, Lecture Center 30.

Academic Dismissal Policy: Educational Opportunities Program Students

Students enrolled at the University through the Educational Opportunities Program will be granted an additional semester on Academic Probation before they are subject to Terminal Probation, even if their cumulative GPA is below a 2.00.

Good Academic Standing

The term “in good academic standing” (satisfactory academic standing) means that a student is making satisfactory progress toward a degree and is eligible or has been allowed to register and take academic course work at this campus for the current term. Students placed on “Academic Probation” or “Terminal Academic Probation” are considered to be in good academic standing since they are making satisfactory progress toward a degree and are still authorized to continue studying toward their degrees. Academic Probation only serves as an academic warning that a student is in danger of not meeting minimum academic retention standards and being terminated from the University. Only those students who are officially terminated from the University are considered not to be in good academic standing.

(The above definition should not be confused with the academic standing criteria for eligibility for New York State financial awards as detailed in the Financial Aid section of this publication.)


Leave for Approved Study

1) Students may apply for permission to pursue a Leave for Approved Study with the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, Lecture Center 30, 518-442-3950. That office shall ascertain that the student has been informed of University residency requirements, including major, minor and senior residency minima. Students interested in pursuing an approved leave for a given semester, must submit an application and other necessary paperwork prior to the mid-term point of the proceeding semester of departure. Completion of the semester prior to the commencement of the leave is required.

2) Study must be in an approved program at another college or university.

3) A leave for approved study is granted for only one semester and can be granted for a maximum of two semesters. A request for a leave implies an intent to return to the University in the next successive semester after completion of the leave.

4) Adviser approval is necessary for the leave to be approved. If the student was admitted through the EOP program, approval of the EOP director is necessary.

5) A student may pursue part-time or full-time course work during the leave.

6) A student who has satisfied the previous conditions and whose University at Albany cumulative average, as well as the GPA in the major and minor, is at least 2.00 at the time the proposed leave would begin will be granted a Leave for Approved Study.

7) A student who has satisfied the previous conditions and whose University at Albany cumulative average is less than 2.00 at the time the proposed leave would begin has the right to seek prior approval for a Leave for Approved Study by written petition to the Committee on Academic Standing.

8) Disciplinary dismissed or academically dismissed students are not eligible for leaves for approved study.


Degrees in Absentia

Formerly matriculated undergraduates who have almost completed their degree and cannot return here to finish remaining requirements may apply for permission to finish their degree in absentia.

Their cumulative University at Albany grade point average, as well as their GPA in the major and minor, must be at least a 2.00. In addition, a petition for a waiver of residence requirement(s) and departmental support may be necessary.

Disciplinary dismissed or academically dismissed students are not eligible for a degree in absentia.

An application and other necessary forms for this process are available upon request by calling 518-422-3950 or writing the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, Lecture Center 30.

  

Requirements for Bachelor's Degree

The University awards the degree of Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) to those matriculated students who have completed an approved sequence of courses and study totaling a minimum of 120 credits and who, by vote of the faculty, are certified as having fulfilled all degree requirements. Matriculated students may fulfill their degree requirements while classified as either full-time or part-time students for individual academic semesters. The following B.A. and B.S. degree requirements must be fulfilled by all students matriculating in 2016-2017.

Bachelor of Arts Requirements

  1. A minimum of 120 credits
  2. At least 90 credits in the liberal arts and sciences
  3. The completion of the General Education Program [The specific general education requirements are determined by the student’s matriculation date and basis of admission to the University—see the General Education section of this bulletin.]
  4. 30–36 credits in a major that has been registered with the education department of the state of New York
  5. The completion of a minor consisting of 18–24 graduation credits which must include a minimum of 9 graduation credits in coursework requiring one or more prerequisite courses or courses at or above the 300 level. The minor requirements may be combined with the major requirements but the total may not exceed 60 graduation credits

Bachelor of Science Requirements

  1. A minimum of 120 credits 
  2. At least 60 credits in the liberal arts and sciences
  3. The completion of the General Education Program [The specific general education requirements are determined by the student’s matriculation date and basis of admission to the University—see the General Education section of this bulletin.] 
  4. 30–42 credits in a major that has been registered with the education department of the state of New York
  5. The completion of a minor consisting of 18–24 graduation credits which must include a minimum of 9 graduation credits in coursework requiring one or more prerequisite courses or courses at or above the 300 level. The minor requirements may be combined with the major requirement but the total may not exceed 66 graduation credits

Grade Point Average Required for Degree

To be eligible for graduation from the University, matriculated students must have achieved a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00 in all course grades earned at the University.

Grade Point Average in the Major

Students must achieve a minimum grade point average of at least 2.00 in all University at Albany course work used to fulfill requirements in the major, combined major/minor, or departmental major.

Grade Point Average in the Minor

Students must achieve a minimum grade point average of at least 2.00 in all University at Albany course work used to fulfill requirements in the minor(s).

Residence Requirements

The University requires degree candidates to earn a minimum of 30 of their last 60 graduation credits in courses at the Albany campus. Degree candidates who complete two approved study abroad semesters during their junior or senior year must earn a minimum of 30 of their last 69 credits in courses at the Albany campus. An “approved” study abroad program is any program from which the University accepts credits.

Major and Minor Residence Credits

Major Residence

For the B.A. and B.S. degrees, a minimum of 18 graduation credits, including 12 credits at or above the 300 level, must be completed in the major on the Albany campus, or through a State University of New York sponsored Study Abroad Program sponsored by a university center or four-year liberal arts college. Study abroad coursework completed at SUNY Community, Agriculture, or Technology Colleges may not generally be used to satisfy this requirement.

Minor Residence

For the B.A. and B.S. degrees, a minimum of 6 graduation credits of advanced courses (courses at or above the 300 level or courses which require a prerequisite) must be completed in the minor on the Albany campus, or through a State University of New York sponsored study abroad program sponsored by a university center or four-year liberal arts college. Study abroad coursework completed at SUNY Community, Agriculture, or Technology Colleges may not generally be used to satisfy this requirement.

Combined Major/Minor Residence

For the B.A. and B.S. degrees, a minimum of 24 graduation credits, including 12 credits at or above the 300 level, must be completed in a combined major and minor program on the Albany campus, or through a State University of New York sponsored study abroad program sponsored by a university center or four-year liberal arts college. Study abroad coursework completed at SUNY Community, Agriculture, or Technology Colleges may not generally be used to satisfy this requirement.

Graduation Application

Degrees are awarded at the conclusion of the fall, spring, and summer terms. The student must file a degree application online via MyUAlbany in accordance with the date specified in the official University academic calendar for the term in which all degree requirements will be completed. All incomplete grades and grades not reported must be resolved before the degree can be awarded. If reasonable attempts to contact the instructor fail, the student with an incomplete or “blank” (not reported) grade may appeal to the Committee on Academic Standing or, if that body is unable to meet to resolve the issue in timely fashion, to the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education.

A degree review will be conducted at the end of each term for those students who have properly applied for graduation. The Registrar’s Office will notify the student if the degree is not awarded because the degree requirements have not been met. If the student has completed all requirements for the degree, a confirming email will be sent to the student via the University email address.

Waiver of Requirements

In rare and exceptional cases, a waiver of the requirements listed in this section may be granted to an individual student. Petitions for waiver of major or minor requirements should be addressed to the academic unit offering the major or minor. Petitions for waiver of any other requirements in this section should be addressed to the Committee on Academic Standing of the Undergraduate Academic Council and submitted to the Office of Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, LC 30.

Classification of Courses, Credits

To graduate from the University at Albany, a student must have at least 120 graduation credits, fulfill the requirements of the major(s)/minor(s) chosen by the student, complete all General Education requirements that apply to the student, and fulfill the University, major and minor residence requirements. For a Bachelor of Arts degree, a minimum of 90 credits in courses designated "liberal arts and sciences" must be completed; for a Bachelor of Science degree, a minimum of 60 credits in courses designated "liberal arts and sciences" must be completed. Courses may be classified as “liberal arts and sciences” or as “non-liberal arts and sciences” or as a course carrying no credit applicable to graduation.

Liberal Arts and Sciences Courses: University at Albany undergraduate courses classified as "liberal arts and sciences" have a content, either formal or systematic, that provides the student with an appreciation for and knowledge of the arts and written and spoken expression, humanities, world cultures and language, biological and physical sciences, social and behavioral sciences, mathematics and statistics, computing and information literacy, history, philosophy, or religion, or interdisciplinary studies involving one or more of these areas or otherwise contributing to the student’s understanding of the social or physical environment. The University definition of “liberal arts and sciences” also extends to the skill, technique and methods courses, performance and practicum courses, internships, and service learning that serve to enhance a student’s abilities and appreciation for study in these areas. In accordance with this definition, the majority of undergraduate courses taught at the University at Albany (as well as comparable courses transferred from another institution or offered in an Albany graduate program) are considered “liberal arts and sciences.”

Non-Liberal Arts and Sciences Courses: Each UAlbany college and school offering undergraduate courses determines whether its courses are “liberal arts and sciences” or “non-liberal arts and sciences” and submits to the Curriculum and Honors Committee of the Undergraduate Academic Council a rationale for excluding one or more of its courses from its “default” classification. By request of a department or program to the Committee, a course’s classification may later be changed. A department or program may also modify the classification of one of its courses or a transferred course in its discipline for an individual student upon petition to the department or program. The “default” classification for each college and school and the list of courses that are exceptions to the college’s or school’s default classification shall be printed in the Undergraduate Bulletin. In addition to the “non-liberal arts and sciences” courses mentioned, the following three categories of courses are also classified as “non-liberal arts and sciences” courses.

ROTC Courses: Students may apply toward their undergraduate degree requirements up to a maximum of twelve credits for ROTC courses completed successfully at the University at Albany and/or from other accredited institutions. All ROTC credit is designated "non-liberal arts and sciences."

Physical Education Courses: Although the University no longer offers physical education courses for credit, students may apply toward their degree a maximum of six credits of physical education activity credits. These and credit for courses in coaching, recreational studies, etc., will ordinarily be designated "non-liberal arts and sciences" credits.

Applied Elective Courses: The term “Applied Elective” designates a transfer course of a relatively non-theoretical and predominantly “skill” or “application” nature only tangentially connected to the objectives or study of the liberal arts and sciences. Such courses typically are intended to prepare a student for a specific vocational pursuit rather than for future academic, graduate or professional study or practice. Students may apply toward their undergraduate degree requirements up to a maximum of twelve credits from transferred "applied elective" courses. (Cf. "Types of Transfer Credit" section below.)

Courses Yielding No Graduation Credit: The following types of courses do not carry credit applicable toward graduation at the University at Albany:

  1. Developmental courses offered by the Educational Opportunities Program or their transfer equivalents
  2. Written and oral language skills courses offered by the Intensive English Language Program or their transfer equivalents
  3. Mathematics courses at or below the level of the New York State “Course B” Regents Examination in Mathematics (algebra and geometry, trigonometry, probability and statistics). However, in some cases such courses may fulfill the "Mathematics and Statistics" requirement in the General Education Program  
  4. Introduction to typing/keyboarding or shorthand, driver education, or other courses of an elementary manual skill nature with little or no theoretical content
  5. Some religious studies courses: “Religious studies courses transfer if they are not doctrinal, confessional, or sectarian in nature. Religious studies courses from public institutions transfer without special review; religious studies courses from all other institutions will be evaluated by the appropriate departmental faculty." (Quoted material was adopted from the University of Minnesota’s policy on transfer credit and is used with their permission.)  
  6. Courses from institutions or programs determined by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions as not acceptable as a source for transfer credit to the University

Types of Transfer Credit

Equivalent Transfer Courses: A department, school or program may designate a course taken elsewhere as equivalent to one of its courses. It is considered "liberal arts and sciences" if the Albany equivalent is so considered; it is considered “non-liberal arts and sciences” if the Albany equivalent is so considered.

Departmental Electives: A department, school or program may designate a course taken elsewhere as "departmental elective credit." For example, an English course may be designated A ENG 000 (an English course not applicable to the major or minor in English), A ENG 010 (a lower division English course) or A ENG 030 (an upper division English course). Unless expressly stated otherwise in the Undergraduate Bulletin, such credit is considered "liberal arts and sciences" credit if that is the Albany college's or school’s default classification; it is considered "non-liberal arts and sciences" credit if that is the Albany college's or school’s default classification.

Applied Electives: A department, school or program may decide whether a transfer course that is in its discipline should be designated as an “applied elective.” Courses that are not represented by comparable study in the University at Albany’s colleges and schools are generally designated “applied electives” (engineering, architecture, agricultural sciences, pharmacy, legal assistant, etc.). However, courses that appear roughly comparable to arts and sciences offerings (engineering courses comparable to physics, architecture comparable to art history or drawing, etc.) may be designated as "liberal arts and sciences" or may have their designation changed to "liberal arts and sciences" based on a student's appeal. A student may receive a maximum of 12 credits for transferred applied electives.

Limits on Transfer Credits

The following limits and restrictions apply whether or not these credits are taken pre-matriculation or post-matriculation.

Maximum Limit on Transfer Credit: Since Albany requires at least 30 credits to be completed at the University, the most transfer credit that can be applied toward graduation is 90 credits. (Since some SUNY and other technical and community colleges now award baccalaureate degrees, the University no longer distinguishes between "two-year" and baccalaureate-granting institutions in determining the maximum credits that may be transferred.)

Non-Liberal Arts and Sciences Courses: Bachelor of Arts degree programs require a minimum of 90 credits in "liberal arts and sciences." Therefore, for students pursuing the B.A. degree the most credit from "non-liberal arts and sciences" courses that can apply to the degree is 30 credits. Bachelor of Science degree programs require a minimum of 60 credits in "liberal arts and sciences." Therefore, for students pursuing the B.S. degree the most credit from "non-liberal arts and sciences" courses that can apply to the degree is 60 credits.

Of a student's transfer credits in courses that are designated "non-liberal arts and sciences," no more than 6 credits may be in physical education activity courses, no more than 12 credits may be in ROTC courses, and no more than 12 credits may be in courses equated to "applied electives."

Although credits successfully completed at other institutions after the student has matriculated will appear on the student's record, the limits and restrictions mentioned above will determine whether or not the student is able to apply all of those credits toward the minimum 120 credits needed for graduation.

Graduation Credits

A student must earn a minimum of 120 acceptable graduation credits to be eligible for graduation from the University. Acceptable graduation credit is as follows:

  1. Credit accepted by transfer
  2. Credit earned through approved proficiency examinations. Such credit may be awarded on the basis of a student’s performance on such external examinations as CLEP, RCE, AP, USAFI, etc., or an examination established for this purpose by a University at Albany department, school or program. Proficiency examination credit shall be clearly distinguished as such on a student’s academic record, and shall have no bearing on a student’s academic average. Proficiency examination credits shall not count within a semester load, hence shall not be counted when determining whether a student is full-time or part-time, and shall not be applied to University, major or minor residence requirements or semester retention standards. Any academic unit at the University may award proficiency credit by examination provided it does so openly and applies standards consistently to all students seeking credit. In no case may award of credit be contingent upon auditing a course (formally or informally), private tutelage (paid or otherwise), or participation in University or extracurricular activities or productions; however, the payment of a modest fee may be charged for administering the examination
  3. Credit completed with the grades of A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D- or S. An academic unit may award credit with an A–E or S/U grade only in a University at Albany course for which the student was formally registered in a fall or spring semester or summer or winter session in accordance with established registration and program adjustment procedures and deadlines
  4. No credit graded D from another institution will transfer

Major and Minor Credits

A University at Albany grade of D- is minimally acceptable for graduation credit in the major and minor. Note, however, that a 2.00 average within each major and minor is a requirement for graduation.

Students cannot transfer in any grades of D.

  

Programs of Study and Course Designations

Information concerning specific programs of study may be found by referring to the sections in this bulletin headed College of Arts and Science, School of Business, School of Criminal Justice, School of Education, College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nanoscale Science and Engineering Program, Nelson A. Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy, School of Public Health, School of Social Welfare, and Undergraduate Study Opportunities.

Unit of Academic Credit

Generally, one credit represents the equivalent of one hour of lecture or recitation or at least two hours of laboratory work each week for one semester or the equivalent in honors study. The number following each course title; e.g., (3), indicates the credits offered for that course.

Significance of Course Number

Each course offered by the University is assigned a designation and a number according to a plan that is outlined here. The specific course designation and number appears in the bulletin directly in front of the course title. Each course designation consists of three separate units: (1) the school designation; (2) the subject or departmental designation; and (3) the course number.

The school or college offering a course is identified by a single letter as noted here.

A College of Arts and Sciences
B School of Business
C College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity
D former Division of Physical Education, Athletics, and Recreation
E School of Education
G International Studies
H School of Public Health
I College of Engineering and Applied Sciences
N Nanoscale Science and Engineering Program
O Educational Opportunities Program
R School of Criminal Justice,
Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy, and
School of Social Welfare
T Honors College Course
U University-Wide Offerings
X Regional Cross-Registration


The subject or departmental designation consists of three letters representing an abbreviation for the subject or the department offering the course.

Students ordinarily enroll in courses at the level appropriate to their class. The course number is a three-digit number assigned to the course by the academic unit offering the course.

The first digit reflects the level at which the course is taught. The level designations are as follows:

000-099 Noncredit courses [Exception: transfer courses having no counterpart at the University are often evaluated as the generic A HIS 010, A ENG 030, etc., meaning 100-level History elective, 300-level English elective, and so on.]

100-299 Lower-division courses, with 200-299 primarily for sophomores. Courses designed to present a large body of information without expecting a mastery of detail (e.g., survey courses in history or literature) or to present general theoretical or methodological approaches (e.g., foundation courses in the social, natural and physical sciences) or to teach skills or techniques at an introductory level (e.g., general physical education) are considered to be lower division. Lower-division courses may be expected to include elementary and may include intermediate levels of subject matter competency but not advanced levels.

300-499 Upper-division courses, with 400-499 primarily for seniors. Courses offered primarily for those who are in the third and fourth years of their university education. The content should go beyond the introductory or survey level and, in the judgment of the faculty, will require prior academic achievement and experience.

500-599 First-year graduate courses (open to seniors with appropriate background and consent of major department chairs and the course instructors).

600-699 First-year graduate courses (open to superior seniors with the approval of their advisers and the written consent of their department chairs and the course instructors).

700+ Advanced graduate courses ordinarily beyond the master’s degree and open only to graduate students.

Letter Suffixes for General Education Courses

The General Education Program employs the suffixes T, U, V, W, X, Y, and Z to identify communication and reasoning competencies.

The Meaning of Undergraduate Course Suffixes

Suffixes may be used to designate courses designed to meet competencies within the major in oral discourse, information literacy, and advanced writing. Students should note that the General Education Lookup page indicates only whether a course has been approved to be offered in certain categories. When the suffix is attached to the course offering in the Schedule of Classes, the General Education content of the course is included in that specific course offering.

For students who matriculated prior to Fall 2013 and are required to take an Information Literacy course: a section will fulfill the Information Literacy requirement if the course number ends in the suffix T, U, V, or X.

For students who matriculated prior to Fall 2013 and are required to take a Writing Intensive course: a section will fulfill the Writing Intensive requirement if the course number ends in the suffix T, V, W, or Z. U UNI 110 and A ENG 110 will also meet the requirement.

T = Writing Intensive + Information Literacy + Oral Discourse
U = Information Literacy + Oral Discourse
V = Writing Intensive + Information Literacy
W = Writing Intensive + Oral Discourse
X = Information Literacy
Y = Oral Discourse
Z = Writing Intensive


Whether a course also meets one of the other General Education requirements can be determined from the updated online lists for each category available at “General Education Lookup:” http://www.albany.edu/gened/search/search.shtml.

On MyUAlbany, the “Search Class Schedules” capability also allows students to search for courses in a term that fulfill one or more of the General Education categories. This same search capability exists from the University’s homepage: http://www.albany.edu/registrar/schedule_of_classes.html to find courses that meet one or more General Education requirements.

Additional information about the University at Albany’s courses, programs, policies and regulations can be found at the websites of the various departments, schools and offices mentioned in this bulletin, accessible from the University at Albany’s home page: http://www.albany.edu.

Equivalent Courses

If a course is cross-listed (considered equivalent) with a course from another department or school, the equivalent course is listed in parentheses after the course number with an equals sign. Therefore, if a course fulfills a requirement for a major, minor, or general education category, all courses cross-listed with that course shall be considered to fulfill the same requirement.

Students who have received graduation credit for a cross-listed course may not also receive graduation credit for the equivalent courses(s) listed in parentheses.

If a course has had its number changed within the past four years, the prior number is listed in parentheses after the current course number. Unless expressly allowed to do so in the course description, students who have received graduation credit for a course under a previous course number may not also receive graduation credit for the same course under a new course number.

Repeatable Courses

If a course may be repeated for graduation credit, this will be indicated in the course description. Sometimes the repeatability is restricted and this is also indicated in the course description: "may be repeated once for credit," "may be repeated if topic varies," etc.

If the description does not indicate the course can be repeated for credit, then a student who takes and passes the same course more than once will only receive graduation credit for that course once.

  

Liberal Arts and Sciences Courses

The following undergraduate courses offered by the specified school or college during 2016-2017 are considered liberal arts and sciences courses for the purposes of degree requirements for the B.A. and B.S. degrees.

(A) College of Arts and Sciences: 
all courses except A EAJ 423, A ECO 495, A HEB 450, A MUS 315, A THR 315
(B) School of Business: 
B BUS 250, B LAW 200, B LAW 220, B MGT 341, B MGT 430, B MGT 481, B MKT 351, B ITM 215
(C) College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity: 
C EHC 101, 210, 242, 310, 343, 344, 345, 410.
(D) Division of Physical Education, Athletics, and Recreation: 
no courses
(E) School of Education: 
E APS 301, E APS 400, E APS 470; E CPY 360; E CPY 462; all E EST courses; E SPE 369, E SPE 460; E SPY 360; E TAP 403
(H) School of Public Health:
H HPM 310, H HPM 381; all H SPH courses
(I) College of Engineering and Applied Sciences:  
all I CSI courses; I INF 100, I INF 201, I INF 301, I INF 499, I IST 457, I IST 473; I CEN courses TBDT.
(R) School of Criminal Justice
all courses
(R) Nelson A. Rockefeller College of Public Affairs & Policy: 
all R PAD courses except R PAD 110, R PAD 111, R PAD 210, R PAD 211, R PAD 380, R PAD 381, R PAD 480, R PAD 481; all R POS courses
(R) School of Social Welfare: 
R SSW 200, R SSW 210, R SSW 220, R SSW 301, R SSW 322, R SSW 408, R SSW 409, R SSW 450, R SSW 499
(T) Honors College Courses:
all courses
(U) University-wide Courses: 
all U FSP courses, all U UNI courses, all U UNL courses
  

Majors

The chart below lists all University at Albany majors and whether the major leads to a B.A. or B.S. degree and whether there is an Honors Program option.

The chart that follows lists combined baccalaureate and master’s programs that are designed to assist students in accelerating completion of two degrees. Policies regarding enrollment in BAMA programs can be found in the section on Joint Degrees and Combined Bachelor's-Master's Programs.

 

UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS HEGIS
Code
B.A.
Degree
B.S.
Degree
Honors
Program
College of Arts & Sciences
Actuarial & Mathematical Sciences 1799   X X
Africana Studies 2211 X   X
Anthropology 2202 X   X
Art 1002 X   X
Art History 1003 X   X
Atmospheric Science 1913   X X
Biology 0401 X X X
Chemistry 1905 X X X
Chinese Studies 1107 X   X
East Asian Studies 0302 X   X
Economics 2204 X X X
English 1501 X   X
Geography 2206 X   X
History 2205 X   X
Human Biology 0401   X  
Interdisciplinary Majors with Concentrations
   Biochemistry & Molecular Biology 4901   X X
   Documentary Studies 4901 X   X
   Environmental Science 4901   X  X
   Globalization Studies 4901 X    
   Medieval & Renaissance Studies 4901 X   X
   Religious Studies 4901 X    
Japanese Studies 1108 X   X
Journalism 0602 X   X
Latin American, Caribbean, & U.S. Latino Studies 0308 X   X
Linguistics 1505 X   X
Mathematics 1701 X X X
Music 1005 X    
Philosophy 1509 X   X
Physics 1902   X X
Psychology 2001 X   X
Rhetoric & Communication 1506 X   X
Sociology 2208 X   X
Spanish 1105 X   X
Theatre 1107  X   X
Urban Studies and Planning      2214 X    
Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies 4903 X   X
School of Business
Accounting 0502   X  
Business Administration 0506   X  
Digital Forensics 0799   X  
Interdisciplinary Major with Concentration
   Financial Market Regulation 4901   X  
School of Criminal Justice
Criminal Justice 2209 X X
School of Education
Human Development 0822 X
College of Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity
Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity 2102 X X
College of Engineering and Applied Sciences
Computer Engineering 0999 X
Computer Science 0701 X X X
Computer Science and Applied Mathematics 0701 X X
Informatics 0799 X
Nanoscale Science and Engineering Program
Nanoscale Engineering 0915   X X
Nanoscale Science 0915   X X
Rockefeller College of Public Affairs and Policy
Political Science 2207 X   X
Public Policy and Management 2102 X   X
School of Public Health
Interdisciplinary Majors with Concentrations
   Bio-instrumentation 4901   X  
   Public Health 4901   X  
School of Social Welfare
Social Welfare 2104   X  
University-wide
Interdisciplinary Studies 4901 X X  

Combined Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Programs

Majors HEGIS Codes Degrees
Atmospheric Science/Atmospheric Science 1913/1913 B.S./M.S.
Biology/Biology 0401/0401 B.S./M.S.
Chemistry/Chemistry 1905/1905 B.S./M.S.
Computer Science/Computer Science 0701/0701 B.S./M.S.
Computer Science & Applied Mathematics/Mathematics 0701/1701 B.S./M.A
Criminal Justice/Criminal Justice 2209/2209 B.A./M.A.
Economics/Economics 2204/2204 B.S./M.A.
Economics/Public Administration 2204/2102 B.S./M.P.A.
English/English 1501/1501 B.A./M.A.
English/Liberal Studies 1501/4901 B.A./M.A.
Geography/Geography 2206/2206 B.A./M.A.
History/History 2205/2205 B.A./M.A.
Linguistics/Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages 1505/1508 B.A./M.S.
Mathematics/Mathematics 1701/1701 B.A./M.A.
Mathematics/Mathematics 1701/1701 B.S./M.A.
Philosophy/Philosophy 1509/1509 B.A./M.A.
Physics/Physics 1902/1902 B.S./M.S.
Political Science/Political Science 2207/2207 B.A./M.A.
Political Science/Public Administration 2207/2102 B.A./M.P.A.
Public Policy and Management/Public Administration 2102/2102 B.A./M.P.A.
Psychology/Mental Health Counseling 2001/2104 B.A./M.S.
Rhetoric & Communication/Rhetoric & Communication 1506/1506 B.A./M.A.
Sociology/Public Administration 2208/2102 B.A./M.P.A.
Sociology/Sociology 2208/2208 B.A./M.A.
Spanish/Spanish 1105/1105 B.A./M.A.
Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies/Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies 4903/4903 B.A./M.A.
Any undergraduate B.A. major (except Art History, East Asian Studies, Japanese Studies, Journalism)/Information Science *1/0702 B.A./M.S.I.S
Any undergraduate B.S. major (except Accounting, Bio-instrumentation, Digital Forensics, Human Development, Informatics)/Information Science *1/0702 B.S./M.S.I.S.
*1 HEGIS code depends on undergraduate major.

Regulations Concerning Majors

The University offers majors in the General Program through the schools and colleges indicated here. In addition, there currently exist unique departmental program majors in art and music that complement the regular University major options in both of these areas.

Most majors are available with an honors program option and several majors have combined bachelor’s/master’s degree programs. Approved faculty-initiated interdisciplinary majors are also included in the University’s curricular offerings. In addition, students may design their own interdisciplinary major in accordance with procedures established by the Interdisciplinary Studies Committee of the Undergraduate Academic Council.

Declaration of Major

Freshmen are generally admitted to the University and not to a particular department, college, or school. Students may declare their intended major when they have earned 24 graduation credits. For most majors, students need only complete a minimum of 24 graduation credits to declare a major in the school or college offering their major. Other majors, however, are restricted in the sense that students must be granted formal departmental of school approval or satisfy stated admissions criteria before being officially classified as that major. Students interested in declaring or changing their majors should inquire about the specifics at the Advisement Services Center, LI 36. Students are advised to declare a major by the time they have completed 56 credits. Failure to do so may jeopardize timely graduation and may have serious consequences for financial aid recipients. For further information regarding academic requirements for financial aid recipients, please visit http://www.albany.edu/financialaid/requirements.shtml. Student athletes must follow NCAA regulations concerning declaration of major.

Restricted Majors

Currently, admission to the following majors is restricted to those who meet admission criteria or who are selected as a result of an application process.

  • Accounting
  • Art (Departmental)
  • Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Interdisciplinary Major)
  • Bio-instrumentation (Interdisciplinary Major) 
  • Business Administration
  • Criminal Justice
  • Digital Forensics
  • Economics
  • Financial Market Regulation (Interdisciplinary Major)
  • Human Development 
  • Mathematics
  • Music (Departmental)
  • Nanoscale Engineering
  • Nanoscale Science
  • Psychology
  • Public Health (Interdisciplinary Major)
  • Rhetoric and Communication
  • Social Welfare
  • Sociology 

Selection to these restricted majors will differ depending on the degree of competition generated by other applicants and/or the completion of specific course requirements. For further details on the specific requirements and selection processes for each of these majors, please refer to the appropriate department or school description in this bulletin.

Multiple Majors

Students may elect more than one major, designating which is to be considered the “first major,” the “second major,” etc. The first major listed shall be from the department from which the student elects to receive advisement. The faculty of the school or college that offers the first major shall recommend the student for the appropriate degree. For example, a student completing the three majors biology, history, and philosophy would receive a B.S. degree if the first major were biology or a B.A. degree if the first major were history or philosophy. The first major must be established prior to the conferral date of the degree.

For each major, students must complete the major requirements as outlined in this bulletin. However, for a student with two or more majors, a specific course that is applicable to more than one of the majors may be applied toward each of the majors to which it is applicable. For example, a student with majors in accounting and economics may “double count” calculus and some economics courses, applying the credits toward both majors; if the student also had a third major in computer science, the calculus course A MAT 112 would “triple count,” applying to all three majors.

The above ability to apply a course to multiple majors is limited to the extent that all students must complete a minimum of 48 non-overlapping credits between majors and/or minors. Thus, a student with two 36 credit majors may apply up to 12 credits of coursework to each major (provided the coursework is approved to fulfill requirements in both programs). For example, a student with majors in criminal justice and sociology may apply A SOC 220 and A SOC 221 to both majors and up to 6 additional credits of coursework if they are courses that have been approved to apply to both majors.

   

Academic departments which offer more than one major can choose to develop a policy to prohibit students from declaring multiple majors within their programs. Any such policy proposal must be submitted to UAC for review and approval.

The Student-Initiated Interdisciplinary Major

In addition to existing majors offered by the University’s departments, schools and programs, a “Student-Initiated Interdisciplinary Major” option is available through the Undergraduate Academic Council’s Interdisciplinary Studies Committee. This option is designed to allow highly motivated students to meet special educational goals not available from the many existing majors at the University.

In the development of an interdisciplinary major the student and prospective faculty sponsors are asked to insure its intellectual merit by considering the following questions: Will the proposed major make it possible to undertake future disciplined inquiry such as that which is found in graduate or professional study? Will the plan promote mastery of the methodological tools relevant to the subject matter? Are there sufficient bodies of scholarly literature to allow for in-depth study in the major’s disciplines? Will the plan allow for gaining significant knowledge to read and evaluate professional and scholarly literature in the major’s disciplines?

The following information will assist in the formulation of a major.

Non-Duplication of Existing Majors: The proposed major must involve coursework in at least two different departments or schools. Moreover, the proposal must not duplicate or nearly duplicate opportunities available to University at Albany students through existing major programs.

Coherence: The proposed major must consist of a coherent, integrated program of studies. As with any other major, there must be some relationship between courses to be undertaken as well as sufficient depth of study in the area under consideration. It would also be helpful to know if models exist on other campuses for the proposed major. This information will assist the student in constructing a program of studies and the citation of an existing program will support the application for such a major.

Credits: The proposed major must consist of at least 36 but not more than 66 credits. If the major includes fewer than 54 credits, the student will be applying for a major only and will need a separate minor to meet minimum graduation requirements. If the major includes 54 or more credits, the student will be applying for a combined major and minor program and, therefore, no separate minor will be needed.

Upper Division Course Work: At least half of the credits in the proposed major must be at the 300 level or above.

Independent Study: The proposed major may include a maximum of 25% of independent study coursework.

B.A. or B.S. Degree: The coursework in the interdisciplinary major will normally dictate the type of bachelor’s degree to be earned by the student.

Faculty Sponsorship: The proposal must have a primary and a secondary faculty sponsor. The primary sponsor must also agree to serve as the student’s major advisor for the proposed program. The two sponsors must be members of the teaching faculty and must come from two different academic units (departments or schools) offering courses included in the major.

Student who believe they might like to construct their own major should begin plans as soon as possible, but the application for the major cannot be filed until the student has completed at least 30 graduation credits.

Once a student has tentatively decided on the theme for the proposed study, the Undergraduate Bulletin should be reviewed to verify that no existing major encompasses that theme. The Bulletin and the Schedule of Classes should also be used to identify possible courses which might be included in the proposed major and, based on the courses they teach, possible faculty who might be willing to serve as sponsors for the major.

Before deciding on all the details of the proposed major, the student should speak with several faculty for the following reasons: (a) to determine the likelihood of finding two faculty sponsors for the program; (b) to solicit suggestions on how to further refine, limit, or expand the chosen theme; (c) to solicit further suggestions of individual courses or sequences of courses which might be included in the major; and (d) to determine whether or not the student’s goals in creating the major are likely to be met by the combination of courses chosen.

Further information and application procedures and forms may be obtained by contacting the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, LC 30 (518-442-3950).

  

Minors

Regulations Concerning Minors

Minors Defined, Titles

A minor consists of 18–24 graduation credits which must include a minimum of 9 graduation credits of “advanced coursework” (defined as coursework requiring at least one prerequisite course and/or courses at or above the 300 level).

No student may use a minor title that is the same as the title of the student’s major.

Only the following are acceptable minor titles to appear on the academic record:

Students Required to Complete a Minor

A student is required to complete a minor if the student has only one major and that major is neither an approved “combined major and minor” nor an approved “departmental major.”

If the student with a single, non-combined, non-departmental major has only one minor, the same course may not be used to fulfill the requirements of both the major and the discrete minor, i.e., no “double counting” between the major and minor is allowed.

Students not Required to Complete a Minor

A student with two or more majors or a major that is either an approved “combined major and minor” or an approved “departmental major” is not required to have a discrete minor, but the student may elect to have one or more minors listed on the academic record.

If the student does elect one or more minors, the same course may be “double counted” toward the major (or even more than one of the majors) and toward the minor.

Similarly, if the student in a “combined major and minor program” elects one or more minors, the same course may be “double counted” toward the “minor” requirements of the combined major and toward one of the minors. Naturally, students in a combined major and minor program who complete one or more discrete minors nevertheless must complete all requirements in the combined major program.

Multiple Minors

Students may declare two or more minors. For a student with two or more minors, a specific course that is applicable to more than one of the minors may be applied toward each of the minors to which it is applicable.  No more than three courses can be utilized by multiple minors. Additionally, courses may be applied to one of the minors and to one (or more) of the applicable majors.

Restricted Minors

Currently, admission to the following minors is restricted, as outlined in the minors’ requirements:

Broadcast Meteorology

Educational Studies

Financial Market Regulation

Minors

Listed here are the minor titles that have been approved by the Undergraduate Academic Council. Action of the Council also mandates that the following may not be used as a minor title: social welfare.

Africana Studies: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level) including one course from among the following: A AFS 142, 219, 286, 287, and 490.

Anthropology: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level). Students are required to take two of the following core courses: A ANT 100, 104, 108, 110, or A ANT/A LIN 220.

Art: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level and/or in courses requiring at least one prerequisite course) from coursework with an A ART prefix. Six (6) of the required 18 credits may be from courses with an A ARH prefix or from other courses that have been approved for the major in art history.

Art History: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level and/or in courses requiring at least one prerequisite course) including A ARH 170 and 171, and 6 additional credits from coursework with an A ARH prefix. The remaining 6 credits may be selected from: any course with an A ARH prefix; A ANT 233, 334, 433; A CAS 240; A ANT/A CLA 490; A EAC 280, A HIS 303Z.

Atmospheric Science: A minimum of 20 graduation credits from coursework with an A ATM prefix, including A ATM 209, 210, 211; and at least 6 credits from all 300 level and higher A ATM courses; A ATM 490, 497, 499 are excluded. Appropriate prerequisite courses in mathematics and physics are necessary to complete the required minor courses.

Bioethics: A minimum of 18 graduation credits including an introductory course (A PHI 114 or 115 or 212); an introductory course in biology (A BIO 102, 110, 120 or A BIO 209; biology majors may substitute an advanced biology course for this requirement); Moral Problems in Medicine (A PHI 338); 3 credits at 300-level or higher in ethical and/or political theory (A PHI 320, 321, 326, 425, 474 or R POS 301, 302, 306, 307, 308, 310); and 6 credits from advanced related courses.

Advanced related courses include: A ANT 312, 360, 361, 364, 365, 418, 450; A BIO 205, 212, 214, 311, 318, 329; A ECO 381; A GOG 310; A PHI 355, A PHI 417; A PSY 329, 385, 387; A SOC 359; H SPH 342; R CRJ 405; R POS 328; U UNI 310.

Advanced related graduate courses include: A ANT 511, 517, 518; A BIO 511, 519; A ECO 509, 511, 512; A PHI 505, 506, 517; H EPI 501, 502; H HPM 501, 511; R POS/RPUB 502. Students may use other courses to fulfill the related courses requirement at the discretion of the director of the program.

Biology: A minimum of 18 graduation credits, including A BIO 110 or 120; A BIO 111 or 121; A BIO 212Y. Additional credits are selected from biology courses that yield biology credit toward the biology major.

Broadcast Meteorology: A minimum of 21 credits as follows: A ATM 200, A COM 100, 203, 265, A JRL 100, 200Z, and A ATM 490 (preferably taken as a TV internship) or A JRL 385 or A THR 343. Open only to ATM B.S. students.

Business: A minimum of 18 graduation credits as follows: B ACC 211; B ITM 215; A MAT 108 or A ECO 320; and any three of the following courses: B ACC 222, B FIN 300, B LAW 321, B MGT 341, B MKT 310, and B ITM 330.

Students majoring in criminal justice, economics, linguistics, mathematics, psychology, public affairs or sociology who complete a statistics course in the major may substitute either B LAW 200 or 220 for the statistics requirement in the business minor.

Students majoring in rhetoric and communication who complete A MAT 108 or B ITM 215 in their major may substitute either B LAW 200 or 220 in the Business minor. When both the statistics and computer requirements are involved, either B LAW 200 or 220 may substitute for statistics in the business minor and an additional 300 level course listed as a course that can be taken in the minor may substitute for computer applications in the major.

Students majoring in any major where A MAT 108 is used in their major, may substitute either B LAW 200 or 220 in the business minor.

Chemistry: A minimum of 23 or 24 graduation credits as follows: A CHM 120 (or 130 or T CHM 130) and A CHM 121 (or 131 or T CHM131), 124, 125, 220, 221, 222, 223, 226 and 227 or 344, 250 and 251.

Chinese Studies: A minimum of 21 graduation credits of which 15 must be A EAC 102, 201, and 202. The remaining 6 credits may be earned from any A EAC or A EAS course except A EAC 101 and A EAS 220.

Cognitive Science: A minimum of 18 graduation credits, (9 credits or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level and/or in courses requiring a prerequisite) to include: 3 courses from: I CEN/I CSI 201, A LIN 301, 321, A PHI 416, A PSY 365; and 3 courses from the following list: I CEN/I CSI 201, I CEN/I CSI 210, I CEN/I CSI 213, I CSI 101, 409; A LIN 301, 321, 322, 421, 422; A PHI 210, 332, 415, 416, 418, 422, 432; A PSY 210, 211, 365, 381, 382.

Communication: A minimum of 18 graduation credits from coursework with an A COM prefix including A COM 100, A COM 265, and 9 or more credits in coursework at or above the 300 level.

Computer Science: A minimum of 18-19 credits of which at least 12-13 must have an I CSI prefix. I CSI/I CEN 201 or a transfer equivalent (3-4 credits) must be included except if course is applied to another major or minor. I CSI/I CEN 213 and another 3 credits with an I CSI prefix and number 300 or above must be included. The remaining 6 credits can be in I CSI courses or in the Departmentally approved list of courses that cover details of either substantive applications of computing to other disciplines (such as B ITM 215), the internal operation of computer technologies (such as I CEN/A PHY 353 or I CEN/A PHY 454), or advanced and related theory (such as A MAT 326, 372, or A PHI 432). Consult the Department of Computer Science or the Undergraduate Advisors for the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences for further information and advisement.

I CSI/I CEN 201 and I CSI/I CEN 213 are intensive courses that emphasize computer programming. They are the introductions to Computer Science that comprise the first two courses for CS majors. Suitable student choices of minor courses enable the Computer Science minor to be used either to help prepare for master's level computer science graduate study or to provide basic understanding plus breadth in the use and applications of computing technology.

Creative Writing: A minimum of 18 credits to include A ENG 102Z and A ENG 302W or 302Z; 3 additional credits with the A ENG prefix at the 200 level or higher; 3 credits from A ENG 350, A ENG 402Z, or A ENG 450; 6 credits from A ENG 300-499 (excluding A ENG 390). Students may major in English and minor in Creative Writing, but no courses may count towards both degrees.

Criminal Justice Studies: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 credits or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level and/or in courses requiring a prerequisite) in coursework from among the following: any R CRJ or T CRJ courses; A SOC 203, 283, 380.

Documentary Studies: A minimum of 18 credits, which must include A DOC 251 (3 credits); a "Theory & History" course from the list outlined under the major (3 credits); two core "Skills" courses from the list outlined under the major (6 credits); A DOC 450 (4 credits); one elective (2-3 credits) from the “Electives” list outlined under the major.

Economics: A minimum of 18 graduation credits in coursework with an A ECO prefix as follows: A ECO 110, 111, and 12 additional credits at or above the 300 level.

Educational Studies: Students are required to complete a minimum of 18 credits of coursework offered by the School of Education. This includes a minimum of 12 credits at or above the 300 level. At least 3 credits of E EDU/E PSY 390 (Community Service) or the E CPY Middle Earth Sequence are required. No more than 6 credits may be fulfilled through E EDU/E PSY 390. To declare this minor, students must apply to the School of Education through the Pathways Into Education Center and effective Fall 2009, must have at least sophomore status at UAlbany with a UAlbany cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better.

Electronics: A minimum of 20 graduation credits as follows: A PHY 140 or 141, 145, 150 or 151, 155, 240 or 241, 415, 416, and A PHY/I CEN 353.

Emergency Preparedness, Homeland Security and Cybersecurity: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level) including:       
Core: 12 credits from C EHC/R PAD 101; C EHC/R PAD 344; R POS/R PAD 343; C EHC 242 or B FOR 201 or B FOR 204 or I CSI 124X. NOTE: Only one of B FOR 204 and I CSI 124X may be taken for credit toward the minor.
Electives: a minimum of 6 credits from A ATM 100, A ATM 103, A ATM 107, A ATM 200, A ENV/A GEO 105, A GOG 290, A GOG 484, A USP 201, A USP 315Z, A USP/A GOG 430/430Z, A USP 456/A GOG 496, A USP 474, A USP 475, B FOR 100, B FOR 201, B FOR 202, B FOR 203, B FOR 204, B FOR 300, B FOR 410, B FOR 412, H SPH 201, H SPH 231, T SPH/T POS/R PAD 272, H SPH 321, H SPH/H EHS 323, H SPH 341, I CSI 124X, I INF 202, I INF 306, R CRJ 201, R CRJ 202, R CRJ/A SOC 203, R CRJ 281, R CRJ 351, R CRJ 353/R POS 363, R CRJ 401, R CRJ 417, R CRJ 418, R POS/R PAD 140, T POS 260, T POS 261Y, R POS/R PAD 316, R POS 320, R POS/R PAD 321, R POS 336, R POS 360 and any coursework with a CEHC prefix or cross-listing prefix.      

English: A minimum of 18 graduation credits from A ENG coursework, including A ENG 205Z and 9 or more credits at or above the 300 level (excluding AENG390).

Film Studies: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level and/or in courses requiring at least one prerequisite course) including A ARH 260 and 15 credits from the following: A ARH 261, 263, 264, 267, 269, 361, 362, 363, 367, 368, 460, 461 (A WSS 461), 462, 491; A COM 378*, 386; A DOC 335 (A HIS 335), A DOC 390* (A HIS 390*); A EAS 140; A ENG 243*, 355, 419*; A FRE 208, 238 (A ARH 238), 281, 315, 415; A ITA 318; A JST 225 (A HIS 225); A LCS 315; A POR 318 (A LCS 318); A RUS 280; A SPN 318 (A LCS 314), 418; A THR 230; A WSS 280, A WSS 281* (A JRL 281*). (*When topic focuses on film.)

Financial Market Regulation: A minimum of 21 graduation credits including B ACC 211, B FIN/R PAD 236, B FIN 300, 333, 375, B FIN/R PAD 435, and either I CSI 105 or I CSI/I CEN 201. Appropriate substitutes are also acceptable with the approval of the Academic Program Advisor. Students wishing to declare the minor in Financial Market Regulation must have an overall grade point average at the University of at least 3.25 and completed the required lower-division (100-200 level) classes with at least a 3.0 average; these classes (B ACC 211; B FIN/R PAD 236; and I CSI 105 or I CSI/I CEN 201) must be taken on a graded (not S/U) basis. For additional details and information on applying for admission into the minor, see the Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies with a faculty-initiated concentration in Financial Market Regulation under the School of Business.

French: A minimum of 18 graduation credits from coursework with an A FRE prefix above A FRE 101 including A FRE 341Z. No more than 3 credits of courses conducted in English may be used to satisfy the requirements of the minor. Students interested in declaring a French Studies minor are encouraged to meet with the coordinator of advisement for French Studies.

Geography: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level and/or in courses requiring at least one prerequisite course) from coursework with an A GOG prefix.

Globalization Studies: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level) including A GLO 103, A GOG/A GLO/A USP 225, and four additional courses, drawn from: A GLO 303/R POS 309, A GLO 402 or A GLO 403, and all courses listed in the Global Perspectives and Regional Foci categories approved for the major in Globalization Studies.

Hebrew: A minimum of 18 graduation credits in coursework with an A HEB prefix above the 102 level. Students who begin with A HEB 101 and/or 102 must complete 15 graduation credits above the 102 level. No more than 4 credits of A HEB 450 may be applied to the minor.

History: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level) in coursework with an A HIS prefix including no more than 12 credits from any one of the geographic areas of concentration listed in the Undergraduate Bulletin. A student may, on petition to the Director of Undergraduate Studies in the history department, count toward the minor one relevant course of no more than 4 credits taken in a department other than history.

Informatics: A minimum of 18 graduation credits including I INF 100; I INF 201; I INF 202; any one course from among I INF 108, I CSI 101, 105, I CSI/I CEN 201; and any two courses with prerequisites from one of the Informatics cognate options, as follows:

General: any two courses from among I CSI 203, 204, 205, 300, 410, I INF 203, 303 or 423, 304 or 424, 362, 403, 404, 470, 496. I IST 402, 433. This option is open to students with any major EXCEPT the B.S. in Informatics.

Art: any two courses from among A ART 244, 280 (or A ARH 283), 281 (or A ARH 268), 344, and 348. This option is only open to students with an Art major.

Communication: any two courses from among A COM 369, 375, 430Z, and 465. This option is only open to students with a Communication major.

Computer Science: any two courses between I CSI 300 and I CSI 479 or between I INF 400 and I INF 496, excluding I INF 460 through I INF 469. This option is only open to students with a Computer Science major.

Criminal Justice: any two courses from among I INF 306, R CRJ 393, R CRJ 399 (GIS only), R CRJ 418, R CRJ 592 (only available to BA/MA students), A GOG 496, one of B FOR 201 or B FOR 202. This option is only open to students with a Criminal Justice Major.

Economics: any two courses from among A ECO 401, 427, 466, 480/580, A MAT 363, 369, A SOC 370, B ITM 322, 330. This option is only open to students with an Economics major.

Geography: any two courses from among A GOG 406, 414, 484 and 485. This option is only open to students with a Geography major.

Journalism: any two courses from among A JRL 330, A JRL 363, A JRL 420, A DOC 442 (or A WSS 442), A JRL 460Z, A JRL 487Z. This option is only open to students with a Journalism major.

Physics: A PHY 451 (or I CSI 451 or I INF 451) and either A PHY/I CEN 353 or A PHY 415. This option is only open to students with a Physics major.

Sociology: any two courses from among A SOC 270, A SOC 370, and selected sections of A SOC 420W/420Z, A SOC 475W/475Z, A SOC 481W/481Z as determined by department. This option is only open to students with a Sociology major.

Women's Studies: A WSS 342X and 442 (or A DOC 442). This option is only open to students with a Women’s Studies major.

International Studies: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level and/or in courses requiring at least one prerequisite course) following one of the tracks below.

International Development Studies Track: NOTE: No more than 9 credits with the same prefix or cross-listed prefix may be used in this track.
Required Core: A GLO 103, A GOG/A GLO 447
Electives, a minimum of 4 courses from the following list, at least 2 of which must be at the 300 level or above: A AFS/A GOG 270, A AFS/A HIS 286, A AFS/A HIS 287, A AFS 311, A AFS 322, A AFS/A HIS 386, A BIO 311/A GOG 310/U UNI 310, A ECO 330, A ECO 360, A ECO/A EAS 362, A GLO/A GOG/A USP 225, A GLO/A GOG/A USP 266, A GLO/A GOG 366, A GLO 410, A GLO 411, A GOG/A LCS 250, A GOG 344, A GOG/A LCS 354, A HIS 144, A HIS 158, A HIS/A EAS 177, A HIS 371, A HIS 373, A HIS/A LCS/A WSS 451, A LCS 203, A LCS 359, A LCS/A ECO 361, A LCS 374, A LCS 410, A PHI 355, A SOC 225/A LCS 225, A SOC 320, A WSS 308, A WSS 361, A WSS 412, A WSS/A LCS 430, H SPH 321, R POS/A LCS 349, R POS 351, R POS 353, R POS 355, R POS/A LCS 357, R POS 361, R POS 362, R POS 366/R PAD 364, R POS 367, R POS/A EAC 373, R POS 375, R POS 377, R POS 386, R POS/R PAD 395, R POS 474.

Social and Cultural Area Studies Track:
This Track is designed to enable a student who studies abroad on an approved SUNY Program, to combine 6-12 Study Abroad credits (prefix GINS) with 6-12 other credits, so as to focus on the cultures and language(s) of one foreign country or world region. The program of study for the track must be approved by the Office of the Vice Provost for International Education and it should not duplicate the content or purpose of any existing minor or major at UAlbany. The courses taken at UAlbany should include at least two of the following, which provide an introduction to the study of culture, linguistics and society suitable to enhancing the understanding of a study abroad experience: A ANT 108, A ANT 220/A ENG 217/A LIN 220, A ANT/A LIN 321, A ANT/A LIN 322, A ANT/A LIN 325, A ANT 340, A ANT 390, A ANT 480, A SOC/A LCS 225, A LCS 410, A WSS/A AFS/A LCS 240, A WSS 308. The selection of courses for the track may also include foreign language or foreign area studies courses pertinent to the country or world region under study.

Italian: A minimum of 18 graduation credits from coursework with an A ITA prefix above A ITA 100, including A ITA 206, 207, 301Z.

Japanese Studies: A minimum of 21 graduation credits of which 15 must be A EAJ 102, 201, and 202. The remaining 6 credits may be earned from any A EAJ or A EAS course except A EAJ 101 and A EAS 220.

Journalism: A minimum of 18 graduation credits including A JRL 100, A JRL 200Z, A JRL 201Z, and 9 credits of electives from 300-level and 400-level courses. Only 3 credits of A JRL 495 (Internship) may apply to the minor.

Judaic Studies: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level) from coursework in the Judaic Studies Program or other relevant departments. No more than 4 credits from among A HEB 450 or A JST 450 or 490 may be applied to the minor.

Korean Studies: A minimum of 21 graduation credits of which 15 must be A EAK 102, 201, and 202. The remaining 6 credits may be earned from any A EAK or A EAS course except A EAK 101 and A EAS 220.

Latin American and Caribbean Studies: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level) to include: A LCS 100; A LCS 150, 201 or 302; A LCS 102 or 269; and 9 additional credits in coursework with an A LCS prefix.

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer Studies: A minimum of 18 graduation credits to include A WSS 202, A WSS 240, A SOC 362/A WSS 363; and 9 credits from the following, of which 6 credits should be at the 300-level or higher: A WSS 101, A ENG 240, A WSS/A SOC 262, A WSS/R POS 333, A WSS/R POS 346, A WSS/A ENG 362, A WSS 401, A WSS 412, A WSS/A ENG 416, A WSS 497, and (with approval of Minor Director) A WSS 397 or A WSS 492.

Library and Information Science: A minimum of 18 graduation credits including I CSI 105; I INF 201; I IST 523; I IST 601; I IST 602, and one additional I IST course at the 500 level or above. The minor is open only to students in the combined Bachelor's/Master's program in the Department of Information Science.

Linguistics: A minimum of 18 graduation credits, including A LIN 220, A LIN 321 or 322 and 6 additional credits in courses with an A LIN prefix. (A LIN 289 may not be used to satisfy the requirements for the minor.) The remaining credits may be selected from courses with an A LIN prefix or from the following courses which are approved electives within the linguistics major: A ANT 424; A CLC 125; A COM 373, 465; one of I CSI 101, I CSI/I CEN 201 or I CSI/I CEN 213; A ENG 311; A FRE 306, 406, 450, A PHI 210, 332, 415, 432; A POR 402, A PSY 365, 381; A SPN 401, 402, 405; one of A PSY 210, A MAT 108 or A SOC 221.

Mathematics: A minimum of 18 graduation credits in courses with an A MAT prefix numbered 108 or higher. These credits must include a minimum of 12 credits at or above the 200 level.

Medical Anthropology: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level and/or in courses requiring at least one prerequisite course) as follows: A ANT 108 and 211; at least 3 credits from the series A ANT 340, 361, 364, 365, 381, 450; at least 3 credits from the series A ANT 119, 311, 319, 414, 415, 418, 441; the remaining 6 credits may be taken from any of the preceding courses as well as from the following additional courses: A BIO 117, 209, 308, A SOC 359.

Medieval and Renaissance Studies: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level and/or in courses requiring at least one prerequisite course) including 3 credits from History courses, 3 credits from Literature and Philosophy courses, 3 credits from Art and Music courses. The remaining 9 credits are to be selected from any of the approved courses listed below.

Core Courses: A ARH 331, 342; A ENG 330, 331, 332; A HIS 235, 336, 337, 338, 339, 346; A PHI 311.

Art and Music Elective Courses: A ARH 230, 303, 332, 442, 499 (approval required); A MUS 230, 287 (approval required).

History Elective Courses: A HIS 336, 337, 391 (approval required), 463.

Literatures and Cultures Courses: A ENG 341, 342, 346 (replaces 344 and 345), 348, other English topics courses, as appropriate (approval required); A FRE 202 (approval required), 455 (approval required; taught in French); A ITA 315, 441; A SPN 311, A SPN 482.

Philosophy Courses: A PHI 311, 312.

Global Perspectives: A EAC 471, A EAS 478.

Music: A minimum of 19 graduation credits to include A MUS 100; A MUS 231; A MUS 110 or A MUS 245; 3 electives with an A MUS prefix at the 300-level or above or courses having at least one prerequisite, not to include lessons or ensembles; and one semester of ensemble chosen from 180, 182, 184, 185, 186, 187, 287 or 289.

Neuroscience: A minimum of 21 graduation credits to include 18 credits from A PSY 101, 214, A BIO 120, 121, 341, A BIO/A PSY 490; and 3 credits from A PSY 314, 387, 388, A BIO 441.

Organizational Studies: A minimum of 18 graduation credits selected from the following courses: A COM 369, A ECO 370, A PSY 341, 450, A SOC 342, 357, 450Z, 494, R PAD 302, R PAD 303, R PAD/R POS 329. A student may petition the director of the minor program to take a course not listed. Note: each of these courses has prerequisites.

Philosophy: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level and/or in courses requiring at least one prerequisite course) from coursework with an A PHI prefix, including at least two of the following: A PHI 110 or 111, 210, 212, 310, 312.

Physics: A minimum of 18 graduation credits as follows: A PHY 140 or 141, 150 or 151, 240 or 241, and 250; and at least two courses with an A PHY prefix at the 300 level or above.

Political Science: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level and/or in courses requiring at least one prerequisite course) from coursework with an R POS prefix, including R POS 101.

Portuguese: A minimum of 18 graduation credits from coursework with an A POR prefix.

Psychology: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level and/or in courses requiring at least one prerequisite course) from coursework with an A PSY prefix, including A PSY 101 or 102.

Public Health: A minimum of 18 graduation credits as follows: 12 credits from the following core courses: H SPH 201; H SPH 321, H SPH 341 and H SPH 342; one course chosen from the following: A PHI 115, H SPH 202, H SPH/H HPM 310; and one course chosen from the following: H SPH 231, A ANT 418.

Public Policy: A minimum of 18 credits including A ECO 110, R PAD 140, R PAD 302, R PAD 316, R POS 101, and one 300-level electives in Public Administration and Policy. Students whose major requires A ECO 110 or R POS 101 must substitute an additional elective in Public Administration and Policy. Students who have taken a different 300-level course in statistics may waive R PAD 316, but must then take an additional 300-level elective in Public Administration and Policy. 

Religious Studies: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level and/or in courses requiring at least one prerequisite course) including A PHI 214 and one of the following methodological courses: A ANT 363, A PHI 322. Of the remaining credits, 6 credits must be chosen from core courses, the remainder from either core or supplementary courses or, with the approval of the director of the program, other course offerings. No more than 9 credits from any one department may be included in the minimum 18 credits required for the minor.

Core Courses: A REL 100, 299, 397, 499; A AFS 341; A ANT 363; A HIS 235, 324; A JST 150; A PHI 322, 412. In addition, special topics courses (e.g., A ENG 378, A PHI 340, A PSY 450) may be included when the given topic directly concerns religious studies.

Supplementary courses: A ARH 303; A ARH/A CLA 207; A HIS 339, 381, 425, 463; A JST 251, 252, 253; A RUS 251.      

Rhetoric and Communication: See Communication

Russian: A minimum of 18 graduation credits in courses with A RUS prefix as advised with at least 9 credits in coursework at the 300 level or above and/or in courses requiring at least one prerequisite course. Courses with direct relevance to Russian studies completed in Study Abroad programs and in History, Political Science, and other Arts and Sciences departments may be approved by the director of the Russian minor.

Russian and Eastern European Studies: A minimum of 18 graduation credits from among the following with no more than 6 credits from any one prefix: A HIS 352, 353, 354, 355; A RUS 161, 162, 251, 252, 253; R POS 354, 356, 452Z.

Sociology: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level) from coursework with an A SOC prefix, including A SOC 115.

Spanish: A minimum of 18 graduation credits from coursework with an A SPN prefix above A SPN 200, including A SPN 303 (formerly A SPN 496), A SPN 310 (formerly A SPN 223), and one A SPN 300 level elective.

Statistics: A minimum of 18 graduation credits in courses with an A MAT prefix numbered 105 or above, including either (1) A MAT 362, 363, and 369 or (2) A MAT 367, 467, and 468. NOTE: This minor is not open to students with a major in Mathematics.

Sustainability: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level), including at least 3 credits in each of 3 categories:
(i) Natural/Physical Sciences: A ATM 304, A BIO 102, A BIO 120, A BIO 222, A BIO 311, A BIO 327, A BIO 427, A ENV 105, A ENV 450, A GOG/A ENV/A GEO 201.
(ii) Social Sciences/Humanities: A ANT 334, A ANT 414, A ECO 110, A GLO 103, A GOG 344, A GOG 350, A HIS 276, A HIS 277, A HIS 317, A HIS 329, A HIS 407, A WSS 430Z.
(iii) Planning: A ECO 385, A GOG/A USP 125, A GOG/A USP 220, A GOG/A USP 225, A GOG/A USP 430, A PHI 474, A USP 201, A USP 432.

Theatre: A minimum of 18 graduation credits from coursework with an A THR prefix, 9 or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level. Internship credits (A THR 390 and 490) may not be used to satisfy minor requirements. Students are urged to seek departmental advisement in planning their minors and in selecting courses. General suggestions for planning a minor follow:

Students interested in theatrical production - performance/design/technology/management - are encouraged to choose from A THR 120, 135, 240, 314, 340, and 370; those with a particular interest in literature, history and theory should consider A THR 457; and for all minors, A THR 121 and 300 are recommended.

Urban Studies and Planning: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level) as follows: A USP/A GOG 125, A USP/A GOG 220 or A USP 201, and A USP/A GOG/A GLO 225; and 3 courses from A ANT 334, 372; A ECO 341, 356; A GOG/A EAS/A LCS 321, A GOG/A USP 324, 330, 480, A GOG 496/A USP 456; A HIS 303, 317, 318; A USP 315, 320, 425, 426, 430, 432, 436, 437, 443, 449, 451, 452, 474, 475, 476, 485, 490, 497; A SOC 373, 473; R POS/R PAD 321, R POS 323, R POS 424.

U.S. Latino Studies: A minimum of 18 required credits in LCS courses. At least 9 of these credits should be at the 300 level or above. 9 credits to include the following courses: A LCS 100, 201, and 269; 9 additional credits from the following courses: A LCS 318, 357, 359, 374, 402, 415, and 475, or any other appropriate LCS courses as advised.

Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies: A minimum of 18 graduation credits (9 or more of which must be in coursework at or above the 300 level), including A WSS 100 or A WSS 101 or A WSS 240. In addition to A WSS prefix courses, any course cross-listed with A WSS (from Africana Studies, Anthropology, Art, Classics, East Asian Studies, English, Judaic Studies, Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Latino Studies, Music, Philosophy, Political Science, or Sociology) will count towards the requirement, as will A HIS 256 and A HIS 293. Special Topics courses in other departments that focus on women’s issues are also acceptable with the approval of the Chair of the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department or when offered as A WSS 299, 399, or 498.

  

General Education Program

The University at Albany's General Education Program has made a multi-year transition to new requirements. The General Education Program requirements effective with this 2016-2017 Undergraduate Bulletin apply to all students matriculating in Fall 2016. This includes students mastering General Education Academic Competencies of Advanced Writing, Oral Discourse, Information Literacy, and Critical Thinking through the completion of their declared majors. Continuing students who matriculated prior to Fall 2016 follow similar but modified requirements.

For complete details on the General Education Program, see the General Education website: http://www.albany.edu/generaleducation.


The General Education Program at the University at Albany proposes a set of knowledge areas, perspectives, and competencies considered by the University to be central to the intellectual development of every undergraduate.

The General Education Program is intended to provide students with a foundation that prepares them for continued work within their chosen major and minor fields, and gives them the intellectual habits that will enable them to become lifelong learners. Courses within the program are designed not only to enhance students’ knowledge, but to provide them as well with new ways of thinking and with the ability to engage in critical analysis and creative activity.

The characteristics of and the rationale and goals for the specific requirements of the General Education Program are discussed in greater detail below.

Characteristics of General Education Courses

The General Education Program as a whole has the following characteristics. Different courses within the Program emphasize different characteristics.

General education offers explicit understandings of the procedures and practices of disciplines and interdisciplinary fields.

General education provides multiple perspectives on the subject matter, reflecting the intellectual and cultural diversity within and beyond the University.

General education emphasizes active learning in an engaged environment that enables students to become producers as well as consumers of knowledge.

General education promotes critical thinking about the assumptions, goals, and methods of various fields of academic study, and the interpretive, analytic, and evaluative competencies central to intellectual development.


Requirements of the program for students matriculating Fall 2014 and thereafter:

    1) A minimum of 30 credits of coursework in the following areas:

Math and Statistics 1 course
Writing and Critical Inquiry* 1 course
Arts** 1 course
Humanities** 1 course
Natural Sciences 1 course
Social Sciences 1 course
U.S. History 1 course
International Perspectives 1 course
Foreign Languages 1 course
Challenges for the 21st Century 1 course

*Writing and Critical Inquiry course must be completed with a grade of C or better or S.
** No single course can be used to satisfy BOTH the Humanities and the Arts requirement.

    2) Academic Competencies of Advanced Writing, Oral Discourse, Information Literacy, and Critical Thinking through completion of a major.

Course Selection

While the majority of General Education courses are at the 100 and 200 level, the General Education Program at the University at Albany can extend throughout the four years of undergraduate study. Indeed, certain requirements may be more appropriately completed during the junior and senior years. Students who are required to take Writing and Critical Inquiry are expected to do so within the first two semesters of study.

Students may not use the same course to fulfill both the Arts and the Humanities categories. Otherwise, if a course fulfills more than one category, students may use the course to fulfill all of those categories. Although such “double counting” may reduce the number of courses needed to fulfill General Education, to graduate from the University, each student must have satisfactorily completed a minimum of thirty (30) graduation credits in courses designated as General Education requirements. If a course fulfilling a General Education category also meets a major or minor requirement, there is no prohibition against counting the course toward General Education and the major or minor.

Overview of the General Education Categories

The General Education Program is designed to provide students with a set of skills essential both for academic success and for becoming effective citizens in the 21st century. Among these skills, Writing and Critical Thinking as well as Mathematics and Statistics are considered to be important foundations for other areas of students’ academic success.

The humanities and arts, natural sciences, and social sciences are commonly considered to be the core of a liberal arts education. Courses in these categories are designed to familiarize students with the objectives, assumptions, subject matters, methods, and boundaries of knowledge organized in terms of academic disciplines. The requirements seek to introduce students to a broad range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives and areas of knowledge.

Equally central to a liberal arts education is an understanding of history—the recognition that the world we inhabit today had its origins in and has been shaped by the events of the past, and that to understand our current situation we must try as best we can to understand the past. Of similar importance is an understanding of the origins, development and significance of human cultures, and the recognition of cultural distinctiveness and multiplicity. Courses in the categories of U.S. History and International Perspectives are designed to increase students’ understanding of the history of this nation (U.S.), of its cultural diversity, of histories and cultures that have played a major role in the development of the U.S., and of cultures and histories beyond those of the U.S. Courses in the Challenges for the 21st Century category address the historical roots and contemporary manifestations of challenges that lie ahead as students move into the world beyond the University at Albany.

The Foreign Language requirement is also designed to enhance students' global awareness and to expand their knowledge of different cultures.

Definition of General Education Categories

Mathematics and Statistics: Approved courses introduce students to or extend their knowledge of precalculus, calculus, discrete mathematics, probability, statistics and/or data analysis. Courses may be offered in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics and in other departments that have expertise in quantitative reasoning and data analysis and that offer appropriate courses, particularly in statistics or discrete structures.

A student who has achieved a score of 85 or above on the Regents “Math B” Exam (former “Mathematics Course III” Exam) or on a recognized standardized examination indicating readiness to enter precalculus will be considered to have fulfilled this requirement.

Writing and Critical Inquiry: The Writing and Critical Inquiry (WCI) Program introduces students to intellectual inquiry at the university with a focus on academic writing. Students must complete U UNI 110 (or approved equivalent A ENG 110) with a grade of C or better or S by the end of their second semester at the University at Albany. The seminar is devoted to rigorous practice in writing as a discipline itself and as an essential form of inquiry in postsecondary education. It reflects the importance of writing as a vehicle for learning and a means of expression. It also emphasizes the essential role of writing in students’ lives as citizens, workers, and productive members of their communities.

Based on established principles of rhetorical theory, Writing and Critical Inquiry provides students opportunities for sustained practice in writing so that students gain a deeper understanding of writing as a mode of inquiry and develop their ability to negotiate varied writing and reading tasks in different academic and non-academic contexts. Through rigorous assignments that emphasize analysis and argument, students learn to engage in writing as an integral part of critical inquiry in college-level study, become familiar with the conventions of academic discourse, and sharpen their skills as researchers, while improving their command of the mechanics of prose composition. WCI also helps students develop competence in the uses of digital technologies as an essential 21st century skill for inquiry and communication. For additional information, visit: http://www.albany.edu/wci.

Students will also meet advanced writing requirements as established by the department or program within which they are enrolled as a major.

The Arts: Approved courses provide instruction in or about a medium of creative expression. Courses may focus on the physical practice and techniques of the medium, on its critical and theoretical interpretation, on its historical development, or on a combination of these approaches. Courses explicate the methods used to study and critique the medium as a vital element of personal or cultural expression and exchange.

Approved courses generally fall into one of five categories:

  1. introductions to the disciplines
  2. introductions to subfields in the disciplines
  3. courses on the physical practice of a medium (studio art, creative writing, music composition or performance, dance, and theatre acting, directing or stagecraft)
  4. instructional courses on the skills and methods required and their critical evaluation
  5. courses focused upon performance

Humanities: Approved courses are concerned with defining and disputing that which is understood to be quintessentially "human:" studying language, texts, thought, and culture; their definition, interpretation, and historical development; and their reflection of human values, beliefs, and traditions. Courses in a variety of disciplines explicate the underlying assumptions, methods of study, practices, theories, and disputes appropriate to those disciplines.

Approved courses generally fall into one of three categories:

  1. introductions to basic materials and methods in the disciplines
  2. introductions to subfields or groupings of materials in the disciplines
  3. literature and culture courses taught in a foreign language higher than the third- semester level

Natural Sciences: Approved courses show how understandings of natural phenomena are obtained using the scientific method, including data collection, hypothesis development, employment of mathematical analysis, and critical evaluation of evidence. Courses provide an overview of major principles and concepts underpinning a discipline's current base of knowledge and discuss major topics at the current frontiers of disciplinary knowledge. Courses show how answers to fundamental questions in science can change the world in which we live and often explore how social issues can influence scientific research. Opportunities for scientific inquiry within laboratory and/or field settings may be provided.

Approved courses generally fall into one of three categories:

  1. introductions to scientific disciplines, designed for majors, non-majors, or both
  2. introductions to disciplinary subfields, designed for majors, non-majors, or both
  3. courses open to majors and non-majors on broad topics that are addressed by one or more scientific disciplines and which may focus on the application of science to practical issues

Social Sciences: Approved courses provide theory and instruction on the role of institutions, groups and individuals in society. The focus of these courses is on the interaction of social, economic, political, geographic, linguistic, religious, and/or cultural factors, with emphasis on the ways humans understand the complex nature of their existence. Courses include discussion of skills and practices used by the social sciences: data collection, hypothesis development, employment of mathematical analysis, and critical evaluation of evidence. Opportunities to experience social science methods in the field may be provided.

Approved courses generally fall into one of three categories:

  1. introductions to the various disciplines of the social sciences
  2. introductions to disciplinary subfields, designed for majors, non-majors, or both
  3. courses open to majors and non-majors on broad topics that are addressed by one or more social scientific disciplines

U.S. History: Approved courses focus on specific narratives or themes in the historical unfolding of the United States, including political, economic, social, cultural and/or intellectual dimensions. All courses will feature an explicitly historical organization; deal with topics of national, as opposed to regional or local, import; and consider a topic of sufficient specificity for the course to be coherent, but over a period long enough to ensure that the historical dynamic is clearly visible. Students should acquire knowledge of substance and methods for comprehending the narratives or themes presented.

Certain of these courses will balance topical focus and chronological breadth. A student who has achieved a score of 85 or above on the Regents Examination in “United States History and Government” will be considered to have fulfilled the chronological breadth criterion. Therefore, such a student has the choice of fulfilling the requirement by completing a course chosen from the basic list (Part 1 U.S. History) available to all students or from a list of more specialized courses (Part 2 U.S. History). All other students must complete a Part 1 U.S. History course. The more specialized courses cover to some extent knowledge of common institutions in American society and how they have affected different groups, provide an understanding of America's evolving relationship with the rest of the world, and deal substantially with issues of American history.

International Perspectives: Approved courses and study abroad programs develop students’ understanding of the history, cultures and/or traditions of any region, nation, or society beyond the United States. Students must fulfill this requirement in one of two ways:

  1. participating in a study abroad program that earns University at Albany academic credit
  2. taking a course that meets the learning objectives (this includes courses taught in a foreign language beyond the elementary level that addresses histories, institutions, economies, societies, and cultures beyond those of the United States)

Foreign Language: One course of at least 3 credits in a language other than English. This requirement is also considered satisfied for students who have

Challenges for the 21st Century: This category is specific to UAlbany. Since it is a “local” requirement, even students who have completed all their general education courses at another SUNY college/university, or have completed their A.A. or A.S. at another SUNY campus, must complete 3 credits in this local UAlbany category.

Approved courses in the category of Challenges for the 21st Century address a variety of issues focusing on challenges and opportunities in such areas as cultural diversity and pluralism, science and technology, social interaction, ethics, global citizenship, and others, and may include interdisciplinary approaches. Courses in this category will be expected to address the historical roots and contemporary manifestations of challenges that lie ahead as students move into the world beyond the University at Albany.

Transfer Course Policies

Transfer students who have earned an Associate of Arts (A.A.) or an Associate of Science (A.S.) degree from a SUNY state-operated campus or SUNY community college shall be considered to have completed all SUNY-wide General Education requirements at UAlbany. The "Challenges for the 21st Century" requirement will not be waived by an A.A. or A.S. degree.

In accordance with the Trustees’ policies, if a student from a SUNY state-operated campus or SUNY community college has fulfilled, as determined by the policies of the other SUNY campus, one or more of the Trustees-mandated general educational categories, the University at Albany will also consider the student to have fulfilled that category or those categories. This is true even if 1) Albany requires more credits or courses for the given category; 2) the requirement is fulfilled by a course whose Albany equivalent does not fulfill the same requirement; 3) the student received a non-transferable but minimally passing grade in the course; 4) due to limits on total transferable credits, the student is unable to include that course among those transferred to Albany; 5) the student was waived from the requirement based on high school achievement or other standards different from those employed by Albany; or 6) the student was covered by a blanket waiver of the requirement by the SUNY Provost because the other SUNY campus was not yet able to implement the given requirement.

The same principle of reciprocity should apply to students who transfer from non-SUNY schools. If a course approved for transfer from a non-SUNY school is deemed to be equivalent to a University at Albany course that meets a general education requirement, the student shall be considered to have fulfilled the Albany general education category represented by that course. This is true even if 1) Albany requires more credits or courses for the given category; 2) the student receives a non-transferable but minimally passing grade in the course; or 3) due to limits on total transferable credits, the student is unable to include that course among those transferred to Albany.

Students may present credit for courses the University deems equivalent to these requirements, but for the transfer course to fulfill the Writing and Critical Inquiry requirement it must be completed with a grade of C or better, or a grade of S. Transferable English composition classes taught through university in the high school programs or in advanced placement courses will not satisfy the Writing and Critical Inquiry requirement.

Students who feel they have not been appropriately accorded General Education equivalence for any given course or courses are encouraged to consult with their academic advisor. If the academic advisor determines that the student has not been awarded appropriate equivalency, the student or the advisor may then appeal the decision through established procedures. Students who believe their transfer work or academic circumstances may justify a waiver or substitution for part of the general education requirements may appeal to the General Education Committee through the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education (LC 30). For information on appealing how transfer work has been applied to the General Education requirements, see "Transfer Credit Appeals" at http://www.albany.edu/transfer_students.

Transfer Credit D Grades: Except for the University’s Writing and Critical Inquiry requirements, for which a grade equivalent to C or higher is required, either pre- or postmatriculation transfer work graded D+, D or D- in a course that applies to one or more of the University’s General Education requirements may be applied toward fulfilling the requirements, even if the student receives no graduation credit for the course.

Administration of the Program

The Office of the Vice Provost and Dean for Undergraduate Education is responsible for the administration of the program, including interpretation of legislation, assessing the number of seats required and communicating that information to Deans, evaluation of courses, faculty development and program assessment. The Office of the Vice Provost and Dean for Undergraduate Education shall also have the explicit authority to grant waivers and make appropriate substitutions for individual students, and to decertify courses that do not meet the program’s standards. The Vice Provost shall have sufficient material and human resources to meet these responsibilities.

The General Education Committee is a subcommittee of the Undergraduate Academic Council (UAC). This Committee is responsible for the administration of the General Education Program. Its composition is determined by the University Senate.

Course proposals originate in departments or programs, pass through college and school curriculum committees where appropriate, and are reviewed by the General Education Committee. It is the responsibility of the Vice Provost and Dean for Undergraduate Education and of the General Education Committee to ensure that course proposals meet the values and criteria of the General Education Program. Proposals for new and revised general education courses must be approved by the General Education Committee and the Undergraduate Academic Council of the University Senate.

The General Education Committee will review approved courses on a regular cycle of three years. At the end of the review process, the committee will continue the course for another three-year cycle, suggest revisions necessary for its continuance, or designate the course to be discontinued as a general education course, effective at the end of the spring term of the next academic year. Any decision to discontinue a course must provide sufficient opportunity for appeal and revision.

The General Education Advisory Board is advisory to the General Education Committee of the UAC. Its purpose is to ensure that the principles and practices of the General Education program are well understood by all stakeholders, and that all concerned parties understand that General Education courses are an integral part of undergraduate work. In this context, the Board is responsible for soliciting student input on an ongoing basis about desirable General Education courses, and work with deans and department chairs to find support for faculty to design and teach such courses. In addition, the General Education Advisory Board will work with major departments and the General Education Assessment Committee to develop a structure or process by which departments will verify how students acquire competencies in critical thinking, oral and written communication, and information literacy within the framework of majors. The General Education Advisory Board’s members are approved by a majority vote of the Undergraduate Academic Council.

General Education Courses

The most up-to-date information on courses approved for General Education categories can be found on the General Education website’s “General Education Lookup” page: www.albany.edu/generaleducation/course_lookup.php.

On MyUAlbany, the “Search Class Schedules” capability also allows students to search for courses in a term that fulfill one or more of these General Education categories. This same search capability exists from the University’s homepage to find courses that meet one or more of the General Education requirements: www.albany.edu/registrar/schedule_of_classes.html.

Course suffixes T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z:
Suffixes may be used to designate courses designed to meet competencies within the major in oral discourse, information literacy, and advanced writing. Students should note that the General Education Look-up page indicates only whether a course has been approved to be offered in certain categories. When the suffix is attached to the course offering in the Schedule of Classes, the General Education content of the course is included in that specific course offering.

For students who matriculated prior to Fall 2013 and are required to take an Information Literacy course: a section will fulfill the Information Literacy requirement if the course number ends in the suffix T, U, V, or X.

For students who matriculated prior to Fall 2013 and are required to take a Writing Intensive course: a section will fulfill the Writing Intensive requirement if the course number ends in the suffix  T, V, W, or Z. U UNI 110 and A ENG 110 will also meet the requirement.

  

Honors, Awards, and Prizes

Departmental/Major Honors Programs

In an effort to provide challenging and alternative curricular options to its best undergraduates, the University encourages its academic departments and programs to offer high quality honors programs. The main focus of the honors degree is the honors project, which is conceived as an original piece of written research or a creative project submitted in the senior year. Currently, honors programs exist in the following majors: actuarial & mathematical sciences, Africana studies, anthropology, art, art history, atmospheric science, biology, biochemistry and molecular biology (interdisciplinary), chemistry, Chinese studies, computer science (both B.S. programs), criminal justice, documentary studies (interdisciplinary), East Asian studies, economics, English, environmental science (interdisciplinary), geography,  history, Japanese studies, journalism, Latin American studies, linguistics, mathematics, Medieval and Renaissance studies (interdisciplinary), philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, public policy, rhetoric and communication, sociology, Spanish, and women’s, gender and sexuality studies. Descriptions of these programs may be found under the academic unit offering the program.

Degree with Honors

University-wide Latin honors are conferred at graduation. A student will be graduated:

Latin Honors Residence Criteria: For graduation with honors, students must have completed a minimum of 56 credits in courses for which they registered at this University, including a minimum of 40 University at Albany credits graded on the A-E basis.

Grade Changes after Graduation Affecting Honors: Students who have received a change of grade following graduation may appeal for graduation with honors through the Registrar's Office.

Dean’s List

A full-time student shall be placed on the Dean’s List of Distinguished Students for a particular semester if the following conditions are met:

Within the award semester, matriculated students must have completed at UAlbany a minimum of 12 graduation credits in courses graded A–E, with no grade lower than a C, and with no incomplete (I) grades.

Once an incomplete grade has been changed to a grade not lower than a C, the student may file an appeal for inclusion on the Dean's List with the Committee on Academic Standing of the Undergraduate Academic Council. For a student’s first matriculated semester at the University, the student's semester average must be 3.25 or higher; for all other students, the semester average must be 3.50 or higher.

Dean’s Commendation for Part-Time Students

A part-time student shall receive the Dean’s Commendation for Part-Time Students for a particular semester if the following conditions are met:

Within the award semester, matriculated students must have completed at UAlbany a minimum of 6 graduation credits in courses graded A–E, with no grade lower than a C, and with no incomplete (I) grades.

Once an incomplete grade has been changed to a grade not lower than a C, the student may file an appeal for inclusion on the Dean's Commendation for Part-Time Students with the Committee on Academic Standing of the Undergraduate Academic Council. For a student’s first matriculated semester at the University, the student's semester average must be 3.25 or higher; for all other students, the semester average must be 3.50 or higher.

Chancellor’s Award for Student Excellence

Undergraduate and graduate students are nominated for this distinction by each college and university in the State University of New York system. The award is presented by the Chancellor to students who have demonstrated outstanding academic achievement and have received national or international recognition for their efforts. Recipients of this high honor have typically distinguished themselves in their academic work and in a variety of other domains including athletics, service, publication, conference presentation, or artistic performance.

Presidential Undergraduate Award for Research

The Presidential Undergraduate Award for Research was established to encourage undergraduate research and scholarship and to recognize the high quality of work being conducted by undergraduate students at the University at Albany. Juniors and seniors who demonstrate outstanding scholastic ability, and who are enrolled full-time are eligible for the award. Applicants must submit a paper or project in their major field of study, which originated in an upper-level course or independent study under the direction of a UAlbany faculty member. The project or paper must be initiated and completed within a timeframe (usually from May of one year to May of the following year). For full information, please refer to http://www.albany.edu/research/32480.php

Presidential Honors Society

The Presidential Honors Society is unique to the University at Albany. The PHS has a strong service focus and seeks to "create a true honor society through service to the campus and community that brings prestige to the University, the individual, the organization and its members."

President's Award for Leadership

These honors recognize and reward undergraduate/graduate students and organizations that have made significant contributions to enhance the quality of life at the University at Albany. Recipients will have demonstrated a variety of accomplishments including extraordinary leadership, service, academic achievement, and involvement with the University community.

National Honoraries and Honor Societies

Chi Alpha Epsilon

Chi Alpha Epsilon is the official honor society of the Educational Opportunities Program (EOP), C-Step, and Project Excel.

National Society of Collegiate Scholars

Membership is offered to first and second year college students with outstanding academic achievement. NSCS offers students access to scholarships, community service, career resources and leadership opportunities. NSCS also provides students with a network of other members and alumni on their campus and across the country. NSCS invites students who have achieved a cumulative 3.4 GPA in their first or second year class on their campus to join as lifetime members.

Omicron Delta Kappa 

Omicron Delta Kappa, the National Leadership Honor Society, organizes students, staff, and faculty who, while excelling in their academic and professional work, have contributed in special ways to the University at Albany. The society recognizes leaders in the areas of scholarship, athletics, college and community service, social and religious activities, campus government, journalism, speech and the mass media, and the creative and performing arts.

Phi Beta Kappa

Students compiling a distinguished academic record at the University at Albany, State University of New York may be elected members of the venerable (founded 1776) honorary society, Phi Beta Kappa, in their senior year, or, if they do exceptionally well, in their junior year. To be considered for election, students must have the following:

Consideration will be given to courses of a liberal nature, even though they may be offered outside the College of Arts and Sciences. Students pursuing a double major with courses combined from such fields as business, social welfare, or other professional schools may be considered for election in their senior year, if their course work includes at least 90 credits in the liberal arts and sciences.

The breadth of a student’s program is important, as shown by the number and variety of courses taken outside the major. Students are expected to have completed at least a minimum of courses in natural science (6 credits); mathematics (3 credits; courses in statistics or with a CSI prefix qualify); social and behavioral sciences (6 credits); humanities and fine arts (6 credits); foreign language (6 credits, or at least 3 credits above the introductory course; courses offered in English by foreign language programs do NOT qualify, nor does Regents equivalency). Credits earned through AP, University in the High School program coursework, or examinations can satisfy the requirements. Students must achieve a minimum GPA of 3.60, including grades for transfer credit.

Requirements for election to Phi Beta Kappa are determined by the local chapter in accordance with the national guidelines.

Every student is considered automatically, so there is no nomination process. The final choices are decided on by the full membership of the University at Albany, State University of New York Chapter, Alpha Alpha of New York.

More information on Phi Beta Kappa is available on their University at Albany chapter website, available at http://libguides.library.albany.edu/pbk.

Tau Sigma

Tau Sigma is a national honors society specifically for transfer students.

Field Specific Honor Societies

Membership in national and international honors societies is available to qualified students within certain disciplines. Interested students should contact the appropriate dean or department chair for further information. Listed below are some of the societies active at UAlbany.

Beta Alpha Psi is an international honors society for accounting.

Kappa Delta Pi is an international honors society for education.

Lambda Alpha is a national honors society for anthropology.

Lambda Pi Eta is a national honors society for communication studies.

Pi Sigma Alpha is a national honors society for political science.

Psi Chi is a national honors society for psychology.

Sigma Tau Delta is a national honors society for English.

  

Joint Degree and Bachelor-Master Programs

Joint Degree Programs

3+3 Program with Albany Law School of Union University *

This program offers a six-year bachelor’s and law degree program. A limited number of freshmen are selected for this program based primarily on high school record and SAT scores. Students who are selected for this program and maintain the required GPA and LSAT standards are guaranteed a seat in the first-year class at Albany Law after completing three years on this campus. The bachelor’s degree is conferred upon successful completion of the first year of study at Albany Law School. Students are admitted to this program either prior to beginning their freshman year or at the end of their freshman year. Further information regarding criteria for admission and program requirements can be obtained from the Pre-Law Advisor, Advisement Services Center, LI 36, (518) 442-3960.

Early Assurance of Admission to Albany Medical College *

The Early Assurance Program is a cooperative program developed between the University at Albany and the Albany Medical College. This program provides an opportunity to submit an early application for admission to Albany Medical College. Applicants must have completed three semesters of coursework at the University at Albany; receive the Pre-Health Committee Evaluation and approval during the spring semester of the sophomore year; and complete a full two years of undergraduate study in order to apply to Albany Medical College at the end of the sophomore year. Students in this program must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.50 and achieve grades no lower than a B in each prerequisite science course.

Students selected for admission will matriculate at Albany Medical College after completion of their undergraduate degree and four years of study at the University at Albany. Students pursuing this program should contact the Pre-Health Advisor during their freshman year. For details regarding criteria for admission and program requirements, contact the Advisement Services Center, LI 36, (518) 442-3960.

Joint Seven-Year Biology/Optometry Program *

The Joint Biology/Optometry Program is a cooperative program developed between the University at Albany and SUNY State College of Optometry. In this program, students complete three years at the University at Albany and then attend the SUNY State College of Optometry for four years. Credits from the first year at SUNY State College of Optometry will transfer back to the University at Albany for completion of the B.S. degree in Biology. After completion of the fourth year at SUNY State College of Optometry, students may earn the O.D. degree in Optometry. Students apply for this program in the spring semester of their sophomore year. Any students pursuing this program should see the Pre-Health Advisor during their freshman year. Further information may be obtained by contacting the Advisement Services Center, LI 36, (518) 442-3960.

Occupational Therapy and Physical Therapy Programs/Collaborative Agreement between University at Albany and Sage Graduate School

This Collaborative Agreement allows University at Albany graduates to transition into health professions programs at Sage Graduate School. This Collaborative Agreement provides for guaranteed acceptance into the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree program and preferred admission to the Occupational Therapy Master's degree program. Any students pursuing this program should contact the Pre-Health Advisor for additional details. Further information may be obtained by contacting the Advisement Services Center, LI 36, (518) 442-3960.

* NOTE: For the joint degree programs marked with an asterisk (*) the following policies apply:

  1. Only students with an admissions status of “FRESHMAN” (not transfer students) are eligible to participate. Students following joint degree programs shall be held to the same requirements that apply to students completing their entire degree on campus. This means that students need to complete 30 of their last 69 credits on this campus (residency requirement).
  2. All Albany requirements need to be completed by the time the bachelor’s degree will be awarded. Therefore, students pursuing these degree programs can continue to take courses, on campus or off, that apply to the requirements they need to complete at Albany (in compliance with residency and transfer limit policies). For example, in the summers following the student’s third and fourth years, the student can return to Albany to take additional coursework. Additionally, requirements at Albany might be satisfied by particular coursework at the partnering institution.


Combined Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Programs

Combined Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Programs: Undergraduate students of recognized academic ability and educational maturity have the opportunity of fulfilling integrated requirements of bachelor’s and master’s degree programs within a rationally designed and effective framework at the beginning of their junior year. Combined programs require a minimum of 138 credits and up to 12 graduate credits may be applied simultaneously to the requirements for the baccalaureate. For a chart of available Bachelor's/Master's Degree Programs, go to http://www.albany.edu/undergraduate_bulletin/majors.html.

Students may be admitted to these combined programs at the beginning of their junior year, or after the successful completion of 56 credits. A grade point average of 3.20 or higher and three supportive letters of recommendation from faculty are required.

Clarification to Students in Combined Bachelor's/Master's Programs

“Students are considered undergraduates until they have accumulated 120 credits, satisfied all degree requirements and been awarded the baccalaureate degree."

However, although students who have failed to satisfy “all degree requirements” will not be granted the baccalaureate degree until all undergraduate requirements are met, please be aware that for determining such matters as whether students pay undergraduate or graduate tuition, the following policy applies:

"Although admitted to an integrated degree program, a student will be considered as an undergraduate student for purposes of tuition billing, financial aid, and enrollment identification until qualified to receive the bachelor's degree or until enrolled in the 13th credit of graduate coursework. Once a student is qualified to receive the bachelor's degree or enrolls in the 13th credit of graduate coursework, the student will be considered a graduate student for tuition billing, financial aid and enrollment identification, and will be eligible for graduate assistantships, fellowships, and loans.

"Students' progress through the combined program will be reviewed in the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education to ensure timely completion of the undergraduate degree. Academic advisors of bachelor's-master's programs and students themselves should also attend to course enrollment choices that lead to timely completion of undergraduate requirements." (Accepted by University Senate, March 9, 2009, revised by the Undergraduate Academic Council, November, 2015.)

Students interested in further information regarding the combined programs should contact the appropriate program’s department chair.

Combined Bachelor's/Master's in Information Science

Any undergraduate B.A. Major (except Art History, East Asian Studies, Japanese Studies, Journalism)/Department of Information Studies: Major/Master's of Science in Information Science (General Program: B.A./M.S.I.S.)

Any undergraduate B.S. Major (except Accounting, Bio-instrumentation, Digital Forensics, Informatics)/Department of Information Studies: Major/Master's of Science in Information Science (General Program: B.S./M.S.I.S.)

Combined Bachelor’s in Political Science/Master’s in Public Administration and Policy

Department of Public Administration and Policy: Political Science /Public Administration (General Program: B.A./M.P.A.)

Combined Bachelor’s/Master’s in Public Administration and Policy

Department of Public Administration and Policy: Public Policy/Public Administration (General Program: B.A./M.P.A.)

Combined Bachelor's in Psychology/Master's in Mental Health Counseling

Department of Psychology/Division of Counseling Psychology: Psychology/Mental Health Counseling (General Program: B.A./M.S.)

 

  

Withdrawal and Readmission

Withdrawing from the University

Matriculated undergraduate students may voluntarily withdraw from the University up to and including the last day of classes in a semester as indicated by the academic calendar.

The date of withdrawal is generally defined as the date the form is received by the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education (LC 30). For students seeking to withdraw due to medical/ psychological reasons, the date of withdrawal will be set by the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, in consultation with Counseling and Psychological Services or Student Health Services, as appropriate.

Drops will be done for each currently registered course reflecting the withdrawal date. After the last day of classes, the appropriate academic grade will be assigned by the instructor for each registered course, regardless of class attendance. Academic retention standards will be applied.

Withdrawals from the University due to medical/psychological reasons must be recommended by Student Health Services or Counseling and Psychological Services upon review of documentation supplied by a licensed health care practitioner or treatment facility. In order for action to be taken on an application for readmission submitted by a student who withdrew for medical/psychological reasons, clearance must be granted by Student Health Services or Counseling and Psychological Services.

NOTE: Summer and winter sessions are not subject to withdrawal policies that apply to fall and spring semesters. For summer and winter sessions, course drop deadlines will apply as indicated by the academic calendar.

Policies Concerning Withdrawal from the University

The following are the withdrawal policies and procedures currently in effect for matriculated undergraduates:

  1. Matriculated students withdrawing from an entire semester’s course load must complete a Withdrawal Form, submitted to the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education.
  2. Students who voluntarily leave the University will be withdrawn effective with the date they initiate their withdrawal.
  3. Students eligible for return who fail to register for courses during a semester will be administratively withdrawn from the University. Such action will require submission of a readmission application should students wish to return at a future time.
  4. Students who drop all their courses for the semester will be administratively withdrawn from the University.
  5. Students who withdraw or drop all their courses and are administratively withdrawn will lose access to services and privileges available to enrolled students.
  6. Students who withdraw or drop all their courses and are administratively withdrawn will have any registration for an upcoming semester cancelled and must reapply to be eligible to return.
  7. Students with a cumulative grade point average of less than 2.00 who are withdrawn from the University are not eligible for readmission for the following semester. Should students wish to petition for readmission for the next term, petitions must be submitted to the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education by published deadlines.
  8. Grade assignment will be based on the following: If the withdrawal occurs by the last date to drop without receiving Ws, no grade will be recorded. If the withdrawal occurs after that date, a grade of W will be assigned for each course through the last day of classes for the semester. After the last day of classes, the appropriate academic grade will be assigned by the instructor for each registered course, regardless of class attendance. Academic retention standards will be applied.
  9. Retroactive withdrawal/drop dates normally will not be granted. Requests for exceptions should be submitted to the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education (LC30) and will be considered by the Committee on Academic Standing.
  10. A student who registers and receives grades of Z for all coursework for the semester will incur full financial liability.
  11. Withdrawals from the University due to medical reasons, active U.S. military duty and disciplinary suspensions or disciplinary dismissals must be administered by the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education (LC 30).
  12. A withdrawal does not supersede a disciplinary suspension or dismissal.

Questions regarding financial obligations or refunds as a result of leaving the University should be directed to the Student Financial Center www.albany.edu/studentservices/ or by calling 518-442-3202. Students living in residence halls who find it necessary to leave the University must contact the Department of Residential Life www.albany.edu/housing/index.shtml, or call 518-442-5875.


Return/Readmission Procedure

Students who were academically dismissed or whose University at Albany cumulative grade point average is less than a 2.00 must petition the Committee on Academic Standing as part of the readmission process. Applications for readmission as well as petition forms are available online via www.albany.edu/undergraduateeducation/readmission/php.

The appropriate subcommittee of the Committee on Admissions and Academic Standing will make a recommendation concerning the readmission of any student who was dismissed for academic reasons and/or whose cumulative grade point average at the University is less than 2.00. The admitting officer of the University may find it necessary to deny readmission to a student for whom there has been a positive recommendation, but the admitting officer of the University shall not readmit any student contrary to the recommendation of the subcommittee of the Committee on Admissions and Academic Standing.

Readmission is based upon the student’s prior academic record as well as recommendations from other involved offices.

Returning students who left on academic probation, terminal probation, or who were on special conditions at the time of withdrawal will return to the University under the same academic probationary conditions, unless the Committee on Academic Standing sets new conditions upon the student’s return. 

Students who resume study within a six semester period of time will meet degree requirements indicated in the Undergraduate Bulletin in effect for their initial matriculation. Students with a cumulative total of more than six semesters of absence, whether or not those semesters are consecutive, meet degree requirements indicated in the Undergraduate Bulletin for the semester in which the student was readmitted.

Students with previous holds or obligations to the University should take measures to clear these obligations as soon as possible.

Returning students who have not been dismissed and who left the University with a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or better must return to the same major being pursued at the time of withdrawal, unless a change of major is initiated. However, upon readmission they may opt to change their major.

Formerly matriculated undergraduates who have not yet completed a Baccalaureate degree may only return to the University as matriculated undergraduates. Any requests for exception to this policy will be considered by the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education.