Graduate Academic Council

2004 – 2005

 

DRAFT

 

Minutes of the Council meeting of April 6, 2005

Approved by the Council on

 

In attendance:                       F. Bolton (staff), H. Meyer, J. Bartow (staff), L.-A. McNutt (Chair), M. Pryse, M. Casserly, M. Jerison, M. Rodriguez, S. Friedman, S. Shahedipour, S. Maloney

 

Guests (item 8 only):                S. Messner, R. Geer & M. Range

 

Unable to attend:                                 B. Joseph, D. Byrd & O. Ongiti

 

1.        Minutes of the GAC meeting of 3/10/05 were presented and approved unanimously without amendment.

 

2.        Dean’s Report – M. Pryse

 

·         Presidential Fellows – This year’s program has had very positive results.  Acceptances remain pending for two individuals.  Prof. Jerison inquired as to total numbers.  Dean Pryse indicated that for 2005-06 we expect to have 8-10 continuing fellows and 4-5 new fellows.  An inquiry about rankings feedback to nominating programs resulted in Dean Pryse indicating she will consult with Dr. Hedberg about how this has been handled in the past, with an intent to maintain good practices.

 

·         A survey to graduate program directors has been distributed regarding matters of graduate academic program governance, communication and student services.  Dean Pryse provided Council members with a copy of the survey.  Response results will be compiled and should serve as a discussion matter in the fall.

 

·         Dean Pryse has received comments about implementation of the Ombuds bill recently approved by the Senate.  She would like to discuss such implementation issues with the Council at the next meeting.

 

 

3.        Chair’s Report – L.-A. McNutt

 

·         Professor McNutt reported that the President is encouraging faculty and staff to participate in Fountain Day activities on Sunday, April 17, 2005, so as to help the University improve its image.  Council members are asked to consider participating and to encourage colleagues, grad students and families to attend as well.

 

4.        Committee on Admission & Academic Standing – S. Shahedipour

 

Professor Shahedipour summarized the background leading to a recommendation regarding petition GACCAAS0405-01 (appended to the end of these minutes).  After a period of discussion on the case, the Council voted 9-0-0 to accept the committee report and in doing so accept the recommendation to deny the former student’s petition for reinstatement.

 

5.        Committee on Educational Policy & Procedures

 

The written committee report (appended to the end of these minutes) stood for discussion without particular introduction.  Prof. McNutt identified one glitch with the IRB approval route, that being for graduate students in the School of Public Health who engage in research in NYS Dept. of Health projects that are subject to an equivalent IRB process.  The Council voted (9-0-0) to accept the Committee’s report and recommendation for policy change, contingent upon additional language being inserted by Prof. McNutt, upon consultation with the Dean, that will attend to this Public Health alternate human subject research approval process.

 

6.        Committee on Curriculum & Instruction

 

Florie Bolton reviewed the 5 curriculum action items recommended in the written committee report (appended to the end of these minutes).  After a very brief discussion, the Council voted (9-0-0) to accept the report of the Committee and in doing so approve the five curriculum proposals contained therein.

 

7.        Task Force on Academic Dishonesty and Plagiarism

 

Dean Pryse introduced this topic, as she and Undergraduate Dean Sure Faerman have recommended the creation of this Task Force to the Provost and agreed to co-chair it.  In light of the “academics first” focus of our new President and technological/internet advances available to students and faculty, there appears to be a need to update University efforts to address these important issues.  The Task Force will be charged to study the issues and make policy recommendations.  A volunteer from GAC willing to serve is sought.  It was noted that although a GAC Policy Committee member might be appropriate, any GAC member should consider volunteering.  Dean Pryse asked that members think about such over the next week.

 

8.        Governance

 

The Council received visitors Bob Geer, Michael Range and Steve Messner, representatives from the joint ad-hoc committee addressing governance linkages between the University Senate, its Councils and the College of NanoScale Science & Engineering.  Professor Messner provided a brief history of the reasons behind the efforts and results to date.  The current efforts regarding a focus on graduate curricular matters bring them to consult with the GAC.  Jon Bartow described current practices regarding curricular and course approval matters.  Council members expressed various thoughts and the visitors took stock of the comments through this informal consultative process.  They will circulate proposed/draft policy change language back to the GAC when available.

 

9.        Electronic Theses and Dissertations

 

A discussion began on the topic and draft proposal, but time was quickly passing and the matter was tabled for consideration at the next meeting (4/13/05 at 8:30am in UAB320).

 

END OF GAC 4/6/05 MINUTES

 

To:          Graduate Academic Council

 

From:      Shadi Shahedipour, Chair

                GAC Committee on Admissions & Academic Standing (CAAS)

 

Date:       February 22, 2005

 

Subj:       Report and Recommendations

 

The CAAS met on October 27, 2004, November 17, 2004 and February 15, 2005 to consider petition GACCAAS0405-01.  Attendance was as follows:

 

10/27/04 -   A. Boehm, D. Peterson, K. Trent, J. Bartow (staff), L. Scoville, R. Henderson and R. Irving

11/17/04 -   A. Boehm, J. Bartow (staff), L. Scoville, R. Henderson, R. Irving, S. Shahedipour (Chair) and S. Maloney

2/15/05 -     A. Boehm, D. Peterson, C. Wagner, J. Bartow (staff), L. Scoville and S. Shahedipour (Chair)

 

Action on petition GACCAAS0405-01 is recommended to the GAC by 4-0-1 vote of the Committee at its meeting on 2/15/05.

 

 

To:          Graduate Academic Council

 

From:      Donald Byrd, Chair

                GAC Committee on Educational Policy & Procedures (CEP&P)

 

Date:       March 30, 2005

 

Subj:       Report and Recommendations

 

The CEP&P met on February 17, 2005.  In attendance were D. Byrd (Chair), J. Bartow (staff), M. Jerison, A. Pomerantz & M. Casserly

 

 

Proposals regarding recommended changes in graduate policy pertaining to masters level transfer credit and  full-time residency in C.A.S. programs were reported to the Council in a report dated 2/17/05.  One additional policy proposal pertaining to oversight of graduate student thesis and dissertation research was discussed at this meeting and subsequently by Committee members via email.  This proposal has now been endorsed by the Committee and is recommended to the Council for approval.  This proposal is attached.

 

Draft

Senate Bill No. 0405 - XX 

 

 

UNIVERSITY SENATE

 

UNIVERSITY AT ALBANY

STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK

 

 

Introduced by:              Graduate Academic Council

 

Date:                            April 6, 2005

 

PROPOSAL TO AMEND UNIVERSITY POLICIES PERTAINING TO THE OVERSIGHT OF GRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCH LEADING TO THESES AND DISSERTATIONS

 

 

IT IS HEREBY PROPOSED THAT THE FOLLOWING BE ADOPTED:

 

1.                  That the University Senate approves the attached proposal attending to the oversight of graduate student research leading to the preparation of theses or dissertations as detailed in specific policies pertaining to (1) masters theses and (2) admission to doctoral candidacy, as approved by the Graduate Academic Council

 

2.                  That this proposal be forwarded to the President for approval.

 


PROPOSAL TO AMEND UNIVERSITY POLICIES PERTAINING TO THE OVERSIGHT OF GRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCH LEADING TO THESES AND DISSERTATIONS

 

Rationale

 

Consistent with federal and state regulations, the University at Albany has mandatory advance review procedures for proposed research that will involve human subjects/participants.  The policies and procedures pertaining to this review are applicable to faculty and student investigators alike.  In order to assure for maximum adherence with such policies, the head of the University’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), with support from the Vice President for Research, has suggested that graduate studies regulations be amended to document that investigators acknowledge responsibility for such research protocol approval.  The Graduate Academic Council accepts this recommendation and has examined existing policies at key threshold points in masters and doctoral programs.  Proposed policy changes, as specified below, are the result of this review toward this end.  Other minor editorial changes are included to update the existing policies.

 

GENERAL REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE SUBMISSION OF A MASTER'S THESIS

 

A thesis is the culmination of a program of advanced study leading to a master's degree and, as such, must attest to the attainment of a basic understanding of scholarly investigation and reporting in an academic or professional field.

 

Responsibility for the evaluation and acceptance of a thesis rests with the major department.

 

Regulations governing the preparation and submission of a master's thesis follow. Further information, Ddetailed procedures, and the Subject Approval fForms required preliminary to registration for work on a thesis or in a research course requiring the writing of a thesis are available in the Office of Graduate Admissions, AD 112Studies, . Theseand should be obtained by the students (and advisors) at the beginning of the planning for the research and writing of a thesis.

 

Permission to undertake a thesis is at the direction of the student's major department. except in programs in which a thesis is required;

 

Masters thesis research involving human subject must be approved in advance by the University’s Institutional Review Board (IRB), as demonstrated by an IRB approval protocol number, or written acknowledgment by the student and advisor that human subjects research must be approved in advance by the IRB and that engaging such research without IRB approval would constitute misconduct

 

 

After the subject and scope of the research have been determined, students formally apply to their advisor for approval of the project. The student submits the three copies of a form (above)Application for Approval of Subject of Thesis for the Master’s Degree for this purpose to the advisor and upon her/his approval to Office of Graduate Studies for final approval.;

 

Unless there is some reason to suggest a reconsideration, the Office of Graduate Studies files one copy of the approval in the student's folder and returns two copies to the advisor, one copy for the advisor's file and one to be returned to the student along with the set of directions;

 

Students include the research course or master's thesis course in their registered program for the session. Students in the sciences register for appropriate research courses (e.g., Atm 699, Bio 699, Chm 699T). Students in other fields register their thesis effort and credits under a standard, departmental listing such as Fre 699, Tch 699, His 699, Cll 699. The student registers in the research 'course' or thesis 'course' for an appropriate number of credits for the session in question. If the work is to be spread out over two or more sessions, the student reregisters for the same course in each of the following sessions;

 

The student should be guided by the directions to students for format, style, paper, margins, and general procedures in writing and submitting the thesis. Directions for the preparation of a thesis are obtained from the Office of Graduate Studies;

 

The student submits unbound two final copies of the thesis and two final copies of an abstract to the advisor. The copies of the thesis submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies must be in one of the following physical modes:

A typed printed original without errors or corrections, on 100 percent non-recycled cotton or rag bond paper, and the a first printed copy, without errors or corrections, on 25 percent non-recycled cotton or rag bond paper;
or

A copy of an original on 100 percent cotton or rag bond paper, and a copy of an original on 25 percent cotton or rag bond paper;

 

The department chair notifies the student and the Dean of Graduate Studies as to the official evaluation of the thesis;

 

Upon final acceptance of a thesis, the student makes a prepayment of charges (currently $21.00) to the University Library to cover the costs of binding and gives the receipt to the department chair.

 

Students may request permission of their department and of the Dean of Graduate Studies to arrange for publication of their thesis. In such cases the publication must state on the title page, or in the foreword, or in a footnote in the case of publication in a journal, that the publication has been presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a master's degree at the University at Albany;

 

The department chair or dean of the college or school transmits the thesis to the Dean of Graduate Studies with a) the statement of acceptance signed by the readers, and b) a receipt from the student for the prepayment of binding charges;

 

Unless copies of the thesis are unacceptable to the Dean of Graduate Studies (in which case the dean notifies the student and the department), the dean authorizes the Registrar to assign the appropriate grade and credits to the student's record. Subsequently the dean transmits the thesis to the University Library for binding, distribution, and filing (ordinarily after the degree has been conferred);

 

Theses which have been approved should be transmitted to the Dean of Graduate Studies by May 1 for degrees to be conferred in May, by December 1 for degrees to be conferred in December, and by August 1 for degrees to be conferred in August.

 

Admission to Candidacy

 

Admission to doctoral candidacy means that, in the judgment of the faculty, the doctoral student has an adequate knowledge of the field and the specialty, knows how to use the academic resources, has potential to do original research, and presumably will complete the dissertation. The qualifying procedures include the following:

 

passing all the requisite departmental/program comprehensive /qualifying exam(s)

 

satisfying the University residentcy study requirements

 

achieving a satisfactory academic record: at least a B (3.0) average in all resident graduate courses applicable to the degree

 

satisfying the research tool requirements

 

certification that dissertation research involving human subjects has been approved by the University’s Institutional Review Board (IRB) as demonstrated by an IRB approval protocol number, or certification by the student and advisor that human subjects research must be approved in advance by the IRB and that engaging such research without IRB approval would constitute misconduct

 

satisfying all any other program specific candidacy requirements. established for the degree program

 

 

 

Admission to candidacy is not automatic, and a graduate student becomes a candidate for a doctoral degree only with the approval of the Dean of Graduate Studies, acting on recommendations of both on behalf of  the Graduate Academic Council, acting upon the recommendation of the program faculty and/or the dean of the school or college directing the program.

 

Students in doctoral programs must should be admitted to candidacy at least one session (exclusive of a summer session) before the acceptance of their dissertation and the completion of all requirements of the degree.

 

 

 

To:                    Graduate Academic Council

 

From:                    Florence Bolton on behalf of Monica Rodriguez, Chair

                    GAC Committee on Curriculum & Instruction (CC&I)

 

Date:           March 28, 2005

 

Subject:      Report and Recommendations

 

 

The CC&I met on March 28, 2005.  In attendance were:  S. Friedman, B. Keough, D. Parker, G. Pogarsky, and F. Bolton (staff).  F. Henderson, H. Meyer, M. Rodriguez (Chair), and J. Bartow (staff) were unable to attend.

 

Eight items of business were considered.  Five of those items are detailed below and are recommended for GAC approval.

 

1.              College of Arts and Sciences Department of Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Latino Studies  - Request for a curriculum change to the Ph.D. program

 

The Department of Latin American, Caribbean and U.S. Latino Studies asked that their focus area sequence require a Directed Readings course, Lcs 781.  The focus area would be reduced from 9 credits for students with a LACS M.A. to 6 credits and from 12 credits for students without a LACS M.A. to 9 credits.  As this would ensure that the required reading for the doctoral dissertation would be systematically accomplished under the direction of the dissertation director, the Committee members voted 4-0-0 in favor of the change.

 

2.              School of Education Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology – Request for a revision to the M.S. in Special Education (Inclusion and Special Education) program

 

The Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology set forth three changes to their existing Inclusion and Special Education program.  The first change dealt with the need of students to fulfill a mandated Pedagogy and Content Core with English Language Arts courses.  Presently students take two required courses - ERdg 625 and ERdg 638.  Under the proposed revision students would be allowed to choose two courses from a listing of four – ERdg 625, ERdg 638, ERdg 504 and ERdg 615.  The second change allowed students to choose three courses from a listing of special education courses – ESpe 650, ESpe 653, ESpe 654, ESpe 669, ESpe 673, EPsy 761 or an approved special education elective – rather than having to take the three specified required courses – ESpe 650, ESpe 653 and EPsy 761.  Likewise, the third change allowed students a choice of one educational psychology course from the following list – EPsy 502, EPsy 540, EPsy 610 or other approved EPsy course – rather than having to take EPsy 502 as presently required.

 

The changes grant students more options while still including the presently required courses within those options.  These changes enable students who took a similar course at the undergraduate level to select different English Language Arts, special education and educational psychology courses at the graduate level.  The CC&I members voted 4-0-0 to move this proposal forward to GAC for approval.

 

3.              School of Education Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology – Request for a revision to the M.S. in Special Education (Inclusion) program

 

This request for a revision to the existing Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology’s existing Inclusion program was very similar to the revision described in business item 2.  The first change dealt with the need of students to fulfill a mandated Pedagogy and Content Core with English Language Arts courses.  Presently students take two required courses - ERdg 625 and ERdg 638.  Under the proposed revision students would be allowed to choose two courses from a listing of four – ERdg 625, ERdg 638, ERdg 504 and ERdg 615.  The second change also allowed students to choose two courses from a listing of special education courses – ESpe 650, ESpe 653, ESpe 654, ESpe 669, ESpe 673, or an approved special education elective – rather than having to take the two specified required courses – ESpe 650 and ESpe 653.  Likewise, the third change allowed students a choice of one educational psychology course from the following list – EPsy 502, EPsy 540, EPsy 610 or other approved EPsy course – rather than having to take EPsy 502 as presently required.

 

Similar to business item #2 the changes grant students more options while still including the presently required courses within those options.  These changes enable students who took a similar course at the undergraduate level to select different English Language Arts, special education and educational psychology courses at the graduate level.  The CC&I members voted 4-0-0 to move this proposal forward to GAC for approval.

 

4.              School of Education Department of Reading – Request for revision to the M.S. in Early Childhood/Childhood (Literacy) program

 

In an effort to include more teacher preparation time on mathematics and in response to a recommendation of the SUNY System Task Force on Mathematics Education, the Department of Reading proposed to split ERdg 618, Mathematics and Science in Elementary Classrooms, into two separate courses – one to target math instruction, ETap 612, and one to target science instruction, ETap 614.  Within the Early Childhood program ERdg 618 and ERdg 504, Literature for Reading, are to remain as alternative required options for ETap 612 and 614.  Within the Childhood program ERdg 618 and ERdg 638, Media Literacy, are to remain as alternative required options.  This will allow students who have taken a math/science course at another institution to transfer in that course and will give the department scheduling flexibility for faculty.  Both the current Early Childhood and Childhood program requirements provide a choice of ERdg 610, Literacy in Society or EPhl 601, Philosophy of Education, in fulfillment of an elective.  The revised programs will now require ERdg 610.  EPhl 601 is to remain available as an “elective as advised”.  The need to take ETap 512 or EPsy521 as a requirement in the Childhood program is now to become a elective choice of one of the following ERdg 638, ERdg 677, EPsy 521, EPsy 540 or course as advised.

 

These revisions to require different courses in mathematics and science instruction and to adjust elective options appear to be excellent responses to ongoing assessments to evaluate and improve the program.  The Committee concurred 4-0-0 to approve this proposal and forward it to the GAC.

 

5.              School of Education Department of Reading – Request for revision to the M.S. in Literacy program

 

The M.S. in Literacy leads to the M.S. degree needed for professional teacher certification in three different tracks:  Literacy Specialist (B-6), Literacy Specialist 5-12 or Literacy Specialist (B-12).  In order that students are better prepared in literacy areas the Department of Reading proposed that the following electives become required core courses for the various tracks:

 

For the B-6 track:  ERdg 655, Emergent Literacy, and ERdg 615, Teaching Writing, B-6, are now to be required.

For the 5-12 track:  ERdg 506, Adolescent Literature and ERdg 616, Teaching Writing, 5-12, are now to be required.

For the B-12 track:  ERdg 655, Emergent Literacy, is now to be required.  Students are then required to choose one of the following literature courses, Erdg 504, Literature for Reading Programs, or ERdg 506, Young Adult Literature.  They are also required to choose a writing course, ERdg 615, Teaching Writing, B-6, or ERdg 616, Teaching Writing, 5-12.

 

The requirement change for the B-12 is the most significant of those above as it increases the required credits in the B-12 track from 33 to 36.  Apparently, most universities do not offer a B-12 track and one of the universities known to do so, the University at Buffalo, offers this option for 36 credits.  Therefore, the increased credit requirement for the B-12 program seems reasonable.

 

Another revision proposed was to remove the current 9 credit concentration and replace it with 9 elective credits.  Rather than repeating similar coursework taken as undergraduates, students would now have more flexibility. .  All these revisions are stated to be in compliance with the State University of New York’s New Vision in Teacher Education and the Teacher Education Accreditation Council regulations.  The Committee agreed 4-0-0 to move this proposal forward to the GAC for its approval.

 

 

The other three items of business were revisions proposed by the School of Education for the following programs:

 

M.S. in Special Education (Internship Certification)                            Department of Educational Counseling and Psychology

M.S. in Special Education and Literacy (I)                            Department of Educational Counseling and Psychology

M.S. in Special Education and Literacy (II)                            Department of Educational Counseling and Psychology

 

These proposals remain under review and will be reported to the GAC at a future meeting.